Page 1

The United Kingdom Science Park Association magazine | Issue 5 | Summer 2018

BREAKTHROUGH | The United Kingdom Science Park Association magazine | Issue 5 | Summer 2018

22. PROCESS SCALE-UP

39. ADVANCED MATERIALS

43. PROFESSOR SIR ANDRE GEIM ON UNKNOWN UNKNOWNS

ukspa.org.uk

The butterfly effect How the microscopic affects the macroscopic


innovationbham.com/serendip-smart-city-incubator

Innovation is no longer an option, it’s a necessity.

ACCESS to

INNOVATION

Dive into a community of innovators and entrepreneurs at the region’s largest campus for digital tech businesses. Innovation can be challenging, we can help you have the right conversations with the right people. We’ll connect you with our start-up/scale-up community, provide a flexible space to work for your colleagues, introduce you to other innovators in the region and invite you to numerous innovation-focused events.

For more information, contact: access@innovationbham.com


The Rotronic Universal Monitoring System – RMS

Monitoring environmental conditions in any industry requires a fully integrated continuous monitoring system. The modular Rotronic Monitoring System – RMS is the perfect solution. It provides installation flexibility and full data availability, anywhere, and on a variety of devices. Rotronic can meet all your requirements, incorporating multiple sensors for parameters on a secure network. We can service the entire system. www.rotronic.co.uk/rms ROTRONIC Instruments (UK) Ltd, Crompton Fields, Crawley, West Sussex RH10 9EE T: 01293 571000, instruments@rotronic.co.uk

A PST Brand (www.processsensing.com)


Regional Winner of LABC Building Excellence Award 2018

Collaborate to Innovate Come and join our community... you’ll be in good company Our collaborative environment and unique combination of laboratory, workshop & office space, provides companies in the aerospace, automotive, construction technologies and life sciences sectors the ideal location to grow their business

5 workshops approx 100m² FabLab access and support Shared laboratory facilities Office spaces starting from 20m² 14 laboratories (inc. short term hire) On-site business support services Superfast broadband / VoIP telephony Access to world leading areas of research For more information or a tour of these exciting facilities contact :

joinus@sciencetechcentre.co.uk 01902 824100 www.sciencetechcentre.co.uk


WELCOME

Promoting Access to Innovation

W

UKSPA Chairman Dr David Hardman MBE discusses how by creating networks we can help orchestrate translation landscapes on which businesses can flourish…

e held our June Members’ meeting at the Lincoln Science and Innovation Park. Participants explored the challenges and opportunities we face as a consequence of the current trends and future direction of science and innovation. Discussions centred around how we play into regional economic development as we sit at the heart of clusters. Clusters that are based on excellence and unique circumstances brought about by the diverse set of stakeholders we each engage with. The format of the meeting was significantly more discursive than has been the case previously and the level of engagement and enthusiasm was high. I hope we can continue such levels of interaction at future meetings to help drive thought leadership across and beyond the science park movement. Using it as a means of engagement with local, regional and national Government to promote our case for continuity and growth.

UKSPA

The United Kingdom Science Park Association, Chesterford Research Park, Little Chesterford, Essex CB10 1XL T: 01799 532050 E: info@ukspa.org.uk W: ukspa.org.uk l Editor Sarah.Lawton@ukspa.org.uk

E X T E R N A L I N F LU E N C E S

The dynamic nature of what we do and how we respond as our places are subjected to external influences was apparent. From supporting ideation to promoting and accelerating concepts into company structures. We grow them through our incubators and on into community-driven accommodation. By creating networks we orchestrate translation landscapes on which businesses can flourish more easily than they could elsewhere. There was a feeling that we need to focus more on growth, not just start-up; including engaging our local mediumsized entities to promote their innovation-led growth. A discussion on the life sciences equity funding environment highlighted a concern that those outside the ‘Golden Triangle’ found it tougher to access equity growth capital; with 86% of UK venture capital invested into the greater south east, and 58% of that in London.

OPEN BOX MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS l Director Stuart.Walters@ob-mc.co.uk l Director Sam.Skiller@ob-mc.co.uk l Production Manager Mark.Lamsdale@ob-mc.co.uk l Production Matt.Hood@ob-mc.co.uk l Advertising Sales Frances.Murphy@ob-mc.co.uk l Advertising Sales Penny.Michaela@ob-mc.co.uk

R E A D O N L I N E AT: U K S PA . O R G . U K / B R E A K T H R O U G H

The need for our translation landscapes in catalysing the entry of new products and services into the market place is never more apparent than when looking at the cutting edge of science and technology. It is suggested that quantum technologies underpin tomorrow’s ‘Information Age’ heralding a further increase in the pace of delivery of new innovative products, new ways of interacting with our world and with each other. This pace of development is another external influence on how we, as science park managers, have to drive kinetic, diverse places to meet the needs of the businesses that take these innovations to the market place. How we must act as networked nucleating points for the aggregation of multiple technologies, talent and finance. ■

All comments and feedback should be forwarded to the UKSPA team: info@ukspa.org.uk

Breakthrough is published on behalf of UKSPA by Open Box Media & Communications, Regent Court, 68 Caroline Street, Jewellery Quarter, B’ham B3 1UG. T: 0121 200 7820. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the consent of UKSPA.

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 5


10 LINCOLN CONFERENCE News from UKSPA’s latest Members’ event 12 UKSPA IN CAMBRIDGE Looking forward to UKSPA’s upcoming Members’ event 20 YOUR SAY UK manufacturing experts speak their minds on policy priorities

Impact

16

SCIENCE FOUNDATION IRELAND An interview with Director General, Professor Mark Ferguson on how to build networks with Irish sites of innovation

43

Innovation

Advocacy

CONTENTS

UNKNOWN UNKNOWNS An interview on blue sky graphene research with Sir Professor Andre Geim from the National Graphene Institute in Manchester

69

WEARABLE GAZELLES The UK’s top ten wearable start-ups and scale-ups by investment capital according to data supplied by Beauhurst

6 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | S U M M E R 2 0 18

39 ADVANCED MATERIALS How to source UK suppliers of nanomaterials and technolgies 48 FEELING THE FORCE How Nanoscale vertically orientated probes improve atomic force microscopy 50 A QUANTUM LEAP Dr Peter Thompson, CEO of the National Physical Laboratory, explains how quantum technologies can transform the energy sector

72 SFI AMBER An introduction to Science Foundation Ireland’s Advanced Materials and Bio-Engineering Research centre 74 PERSONALISED NANOMEDICINE How nanomedicine will revolutionise personalised healthcare, from prediction and diagnosis to treatment and monitoring


Welcome to Breakthrough, your UK Science Park Association magazine

PROCESS SCALE-UP Five steps to best practice production scale-up, an overview by Dr Gilda Gasparini for Lucideon

60 MEMBER NEWS A collection of updates from UKSPA Members 63 CHANCE ENCOUNTERS The joint developers behind Cambridge Biomedical Campus explain how collaboration helps inspire innovation and scientific breakthroughs

32 NON-ANIMAL NANOSAFETY Physiologically Anchored Tools for Realistic nanOmateriaL hazard aSsessment (PATROLS)

53

Growth

56 NEW MEMBERS An introduction to new UKSPA Members and Business Affiliates

29 SFI CONFIRM An introduction to Science Foundation Ireland’s smart manufacturing research centre

PRODUCT-SERVICE SYSTEMS Professor Andy Neely and Dr Jingchen Hou, University of Cambridge, look at how manufacturers can succeed in the servitisation journey

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF… Chris Pape describes a working day from the perspective of Portfolio Manager at the Baltic Quarter

76 MINIATURISATION Trends in manufacturing skills, methods, products and consumer demand 78 BIO REPORT Dave Russell-Graham reports from the Biotechnology Innovation Organisation (BIO) International Convention

Trends

82

Support

22

26 PARTICLE SIZE Particle size distributions from sub-nanometer to millimetres

80 DIGITAL MATURITY How Science Parks could benefit from free digital marketing

R E A D O N L I N E AT: U K S PA . O R G . U K / B R E A K T H R O U G H

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 7


The GOLD Standard in Small Molecule Screening Libraries and Building Blocks for Drug Discovery and Chemical Biology

SCREENING COMPOUNDS

ChemBridge® is a global provider of chemistry products and services. We offer over 1 million screening compounds, 14,000 building blocks, and high-end, research-intensive, chemistry services as well as our Hit2Lead.com on-line chemical store.

BUILDING BLOCKS • Over 1 million in-stock compounds available • Diversity sets offering broad chemical space and pharmacophore coverage • Targeted libraries for kinase, ion channel, nuclear receptor and GPCR research • More than 1,000 citations in peer-reviewed journals

DIVERSet® LIBRARY HIGHLIGHTS • Now available in two versions providing access to 100,000 structurally and pharmacophorically diverse compounds • DIVERSet-EXP and DIVERSet-CL: 50,000 non-overlapping compounds in each set • Available as pre-plated sets of solutions in DMSO in 96-well and 384-well format • Discounts for academic and not-for-profit organizations

Reg Richardson ChemBridge Corporation Tel: +44 (0)1386 765519 Fax: +44 (0)1386 423336 reg@chembridge.com www.chembridge.com

• Over 14,000 in-stock reagents available • Designed for hit-to-lead, lead optimization and medicinal chemistry programs • RUSH delivery available for most products from our San Diego stock in 1g and 5g amounts • Purity of 95% or higher by NMR and LC-MS

ONLINE CHEMICAL STORE

• Instant price and availability and online search and ordering via Hit2Lead.com • Access to San Diego RUSH stock of screening compounds and building blocks • Order by purchase order or by credit card • Easy to use chemical structure search


UKSPA VISION & MISSION

Increasing member connectivity

Jim Duvall is Executive Director of the UK Science Park Association (UKSPA); the authoratitive body on the planning, development and creation of science parks and other innovation locations

R

ecent government announcements continue to emphasise that cooperation on science and innovation is an essential element of the future UK–EU relationship. This is an area where UKSPA could usefully deliver significant impact through fostering increased connectivity between our members on both sides of the Irish Sea and borders. This is something that we will be looking at over future months.

IRISH CONNECTIONS

We certainly intend to strengthen our relationships with the Irish science and innovation sector and later in this issue, Mark Ferguson, DG of the Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) and Chief Scientific Adviser to the Irish Government looks at SFI-supported partnership and collaboration activities. Our Swansea conference in January featured the collaboration that is taking place between Ireland and Wales as part of the CALIN; Celtic Advanced Life Science Innovation Network. As well as creating new life science products, processes and services to improve healthcare, the network creates linkages with supply chains spanning Ireland and Wales.

The scheme delivers access to a network of universities, health-boards and multinational business firms, and opportunities to get involved with collaborative R&D projects that include UKSPA members; Nova UCD (Dublin), our new members NUI Galway (see page 56), alongside universities associated with UKSPA Members in Wales; Bangor, Cardiff and Swansea. BUCANIER was also launched at the UKSPA conference in Swansea and this programme seeks to increase innovation capacity within SMEs and social enterprises by collaborating with Higher Education institutions and other public bodies to improve the innovation dividend through increased productivity across the Ireland Wales Programme area. BUCANIER intends to increase the number of cross-border collaborative research, development and innovation clusters and networks between research institutions and SMEs.

U K S PA I N I T I AT I V E S

Feedback from the University of Lincoln Science and Innovation Park conference in June has been gratifying.

Many participants commented on the relevance and depth of the topics covered as well as the informative and enjoyable nature of the interactive discussion sessions. This will be continued at our future events. Another initiative announced at the Lincoln conference is a more collaborative approach to working with our Business Affiliates. The first of these is the delivery of external support for the UKSPA Annual Survey which is currently underway and will provide UKSPA with the evidence of activity that is essential to deliver enhanced promotion and advocacy for our members. I am grateful to both Bidwells and Creative Places for their support and advice in the survey which will be delivered by an Independent Researcher. We also recently announced that we will be working with our new Digital Partners, JISC, and I am sure that this partnership will deliver huge value to the work of the Association and to JISC. â–

Please do not hesitate to contact me: info@ukspa.org.uk

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 9


Advocacy

The world according to UKSPA and its Members

UKSPA Lincoln Conference A summary of events from the latest UKSPA member meeting

O

n 7-8 June, UKSPA members and supporters congregated in partnership with Lincoln Science and Innovation Park (LSIP) at the Isaac Newton Building on the inner-city campus of Lincoln University. The conference was the 30th UKSPA event managed by Jim Duvall, although only his second as Executive Director, and has been hailed as an immense success with the new panel sessions encouraging a much higher level of audience participation and a greater focus on practical innovation management practices throughout the programme.

A W E LC O M E T O L I N C O L N

The conference was opened by UKSPA Chairman, David Hardman who then introduced Ursula Lidbetter, Co-Chair LSIP and Chief Executive of the Lincolnshire Co-operative, who welcomed all participants to the University of Lincoln and gave a keynote presentation. This was

10 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | S U M M E R 2 0 18

followed by an overview of the LSIP from Director, Tom Blount.

SECTOR CHALLENGES & O P P O RT U N I T I E S

The initial keynote talks were followed by the first of the panel sessions which considered the current trends and the future direction of the science and innovation sector. Panellists included Tom Blount, LSIP, who presented R&D investment data to illustrate his thoughts around science parks as economic developers. Jo Williett, MD of Oxford Innovation, then discussed impact and ownership from the innovation centre perspective. These presentations were followed by questions and an animated discussion between audience members and the panellists. Following the break, this session continued with Glenn Crocker, CEO, BioCity, presenting his thoughts on the BioTech and Life Science sector

challenges and opportunities beyond the Golden Triangle. The view from the North was then covered by Martino Picardo, Former CEO, Stevenage BioScience Catalyst, and newly appointed Chairman of Discovery Park’s newly formed Board of Directors. These presentations highlighted the small distances between science parks in the UK from a global perspective but also noted that there remains a challenge to access equity growth capital if located outside the London-Oxford-Cambridge triangle.

M E A S U R I N G I M PA C T

The afternoon of day one included a parallel session where Dr Jonathan Bone, NESTA, outlined results from the current BEIS sponsored research in which NESTA is looking at measuring the impact of UK Incubator and Accelerator Programmes. Emma Thorn, Centre Director, SETSquared Bristol and Toni Harrison, Oxford Innovation, then considered how they


HAILED AS AN IMMENSE SUCCESS W I T H T HE NE W PA NE L S E S S I O N S ENCOUR AGING A MUCH HIGHER L E V E L O F A U D I E N C E P A R T I C I P AT I O N

measure the impact of their activities. How their organisations carry this out, what results show and how this research is used to refine and promote their services.

G R E E N T R A N S P O RT

A second parallel session looked at transport challenges for tenants with Dave Hockton, MIRA Technology Park, outlining the complexity of the artificial intelligence required for unbounded autonomy with between 50 and 100 microprocessors in a typical modern vehicle and 100 million lines of code in complex vehicles. Tim Edwards, HORIBA MIRA, then laid out the most relevant future transport challenges and opportunities from an UKSPA perspective, citing privacy and security, liability and insurance, connectivity provision, mapping, automated valet parking and campus transport systems. John Hacker, Director, TPS Transport Consultants, introduced travel planning for developers, universities and park management, aimed at minimising the use of cars by maximising sustainable travel alternatives; a strategy offering a wide range of business benefits.

C O M PA N Y G R O W T H

Lewis Stringer, Senior Relationship Manager, British Business Bank and Jessica Boot-Marshall, Business Development Officer (Innovate UK), University of Lincoln, delivered the third day one parallel session looking at supporting innovation companies, improving tenant and member company growth through the Midlands Engine Investment Fund (MEIF), supported by the European Regional Development Fund, and how Lincoln University helps SMEs grow, develop and progress by stimulating innovative activity.

PERSPECTIVES ON INVESTMENT

Day two of the conference opened with Ruth Carver, Director, Greater Lincolnshire LEP, providing an informative overview around the emerging policy position of HMG Funding post Brexit followed by a second panel session which took a broad look at UKSPA member perspectives on investment. Jonathan Burroughs, CEO, Creative Places, chaired the panel session and

delivered an overview of current investment trends focusing on open innovation and its impact on property demand and the importance of well informed decision making supported by risk mitigation strategies when planning investments. David Gillham, Director, Thames Valley Science Park at the University of Reading, then presented a university perspective, noting additional challenges resulting from conflicts between capital and academic investment. Steijn Ribbens, Kadans Science, Holland, provided an international investor perspective that looked at establishing ecosystems through networking and investments around shared services, coaching, incubation and venture capital across campuses. Roz Bird, Commercial Director of Silverstone Park, MEPC Limited, gave some specific guidance around people, place and pace that led to her own experience of successful commercial investment before David Hardman, representing Innovation Birmingham, rounded the session up with a city perspective - noting that while cities create economic potential, individuals can become buried in city infrastructure and must be supported through connectivity to drive innovation and achieve economic growth. The audience then questioned the panel and delivered complimentary and opposing opinion with one audience member clearly stating how useful this particular discussion had been.

CONNECTIVITY AND R & D S PA C E S

Sponsor supported parallel sessions in the afternoon covered connectivity and collaboration from Jisc and Bridge Fibre, and considerations around refreshing R&D space from Willmott Dixon and Wright Hassall.

R E A D O N L I N E AT: U K S PA . O R G . U K / B R E A K T H R O U G H

From Jisc; Jon Tucker, Chair, and Christian Evans, Customer Director, outlined Jisc’s commercial collaboration with Bridge Fibre, represented by Bob Cushing. The first venture of its kind for Jisc, the connectivity collaboration will help JANET users avoid the need for scientific support staff to provide network support to commercial customers. In the second parallel session, Adrian Gainer, Consultant, Willmott Dixon, presented original research exploring the needs, expectations and aspirations of users at the early planning stages of refurbishing an innovation workplace. This was followed by a presentation from Michael Goldfinch and Vicky Harrison, Wright Hassall, that discussed legal issues around refurbishment, including the Minimum Energy Efficiency Standards and the grant of leases of ‘substandard’ property.

WHERE NEXT?

The conference was concluded with a round up from David Hardman and a summary of current UKSPA activities from Jim Duvall, UKSPA Executive Director who also thanked all our speakers and sponsors. Day one was topped off by a dinner hosted in the Cathedral Room of the Hilton Hotel, overlooking the architectural splendour sitting atop the heights of Lincoln city and sponsored by UKSPA data partners; Jisc. Other sponsors included: Greater Lincolnshire Local Enterprise Partnership, Willmott Dixon, Wright Hassall, Sharp Ahead, ThirdSpace, and of course, the University of Lincoln. ■

Presentations can be found on the UKSPA website: http://www.ukspa.org. uk/events/ukspa-lincolnlsip-june-2018

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 11


ADVOCACY

Showcasing Cambridge UKSPA members will next gather on 11-12 October at Cambridge Science Park. First opened in 1970, the Cambridge team will invite delegates to investigate how the Park has developed since then OUR HOSTS

The Cambridge Science Park was established to embrace the concept that would change the hi-tech sector in Cambridge, the UK and beyond. Trinity College owns the freehold of the Science Park, which comprises 150 acres, almost two million square feet of high technology and laboratory buildings. It’s home to 6,500 people at over 100 companies, ranging from exciting start-ups to some of the world's leading technology businesses. More recently, Trinity College and Tus Park, the science park development body of Tsinghua University, have agreed a £200 million joint venture that will catalyse a new phase of renewal and investment in Cambridge Science Park.

35th Anniversary Conference Save the date: Join UKSPA and S-Lab in Birmingham on 1-3 April 2019 2019 will see the 35th Anniversary of UKSPA and the activities will include a joint conference with S-Lab on Science, Innovation and Collaboration at the University of Birmingham Conference Centre. Although the initial programme will not be ready until late July, the conference will consider future trends for science and innovation locations with sessions on industry partnerships, BREXIT and collaboration; skills and talent and developments in automotive, digital, life science and creative sectors.

S C I E N C E , I N N O VAT I O N A N D C O L L A B O R AT I O N 2 0 1 9

Jointly organised by S-Lab and UKSPA, Science, Innovation and Collaboration 2019 will take place on Tuesday 2 and Wednesday 3 April 2019. An optional experience day on Monday 1 April for

12 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | S U M M E R 2 0 18

The Biohub will complement the new Bradfield Centre, which opened in July 2017, enabling synergies between entrepreneurs in different sectors and new applications of technologies such as artificial intelligence, virtual reality, imaging and machine learning in healthcare. The Bradfield Centre will be the location for some of the conference sessions and is a collaboration between Trinity College and the Department for Business Enterprise and Industrial Strategy that aims to foster growth and collaboration in the Cambridgeshire region’s ever-expanding technology cluster.

The Bradfield Centre at Cambridge Science Park

issues, operational updates, as well as networking opportunities. In addition to the conference plenary and parallel sessions, which will take place in the Bradfield Centre and Trinity Centre overlooking one of the Park’s three main lakes, the intention is also to offer smaller group discussions to continue the more interactive approach that was a feature of the recent Lincoln Science and innovation Park conference. ■

C O L L A B O R AT I O N S H O W C A S E

The Conference is supported by Bidwells and will showcase collaborations between UKSPA member locations in the Cambridge Region, UKSPA research findings from the 2018 Annual Survey, discussion and debate on current

UKSPA members and other delegates is also under consideration. The event will have at least 60 conference sessions with around 40 exhibition stands, and an anticipated 300-400 delegates. Case studies will focus on content relevant to the design, financing, knowledge transfer, management, operation and strategies for science research, incubation and innovation facilities. There will also be conference streams on the design and fit-out of new and refurbished innovation, research and teaching facilities to foster cross-disciplinary and academia/industry communication, collaboration and interaction in university, science park and commercial/ public sector research environments. The Gala Awards Dinner will celebrate the achievements of UKSPA and S-Lab Award Winners to inspire thinking and enhance networking.

ACCESSIBLE FOR ALL

The conference venue has been chosen to be accessible for those travelling from all parts of the UK and Europe.

The full conference programme and booking information can be found on the UKSPA website: www.ukspa.org.uk Interested in sponsorship opportunities? Contact: louise.tilbrook@ukspa.org.uk

The University of Birmingham has its own (University) Railway Station which is just a few minutes from Birmingham New Street Station. A new 172- bed campus hotel is nearing completion close to the University’s existing conference facilities off Edgbaston Park Road; creating provision for 220 beds overall. Delegates staying there will be within walking distance of the Conference Centre which is the superbly appointed Bramall Centre and the Exhibition/Networking space in the historic Great Hall. Do save the dates and look out for more information on the UKSPA website and through our social media and digital newsletters. ■


Invitation Ireland UKSPA reaches across international borders

The Chairman and Executive Director cordially invite

Y O U R I R I S H S I T E O F I N N O VAT I O N to become an UKSPA member Ever since UKSPA was established in 1985, our Articles of Association have included the explicit reference that the Association should be comprised of innovation locations “in the UK and Republic of Ireland�. UKSPA invites Irish science parks, research centres, incubators and sites of innovation to join our Association to strengthen cross-sector, cross-border networking and collaboration opportunities. With influence, a well-established events calendar, and access to sector experts, UKSPA is in a prime position to offer increased support and profile to the Irish Innovation sector. We do hope that you can join us.

RSVP for more information to: info@ukspa.org.uk

R E A D O N L I N E AT: U K S PA . O R G . U K / B R E A K T H R O U G H

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 13


ADVERTORIAL

Experience Lab Developments

W

ith many new products to see and plenty of illuminating talks to learn from, there are many reasons to visit the UK’s only lab-dedicated exhibition showcase! Lab Innovations, returns to the NEC, Birmingham, on 31 October & 1 November 2018. Free-to-attend and supported by some of the UK’s top scientific institutions, Lab Innovations is the nation’s largest gathering of laboratory suppliers and professionals, growing year on year, with almost a third more attendees in 2017. As well as an exhibition of products and services, visitors can also benefit from CPD accredited learning and business opportunities, with 98% recommending Lab Innovations as a “must attend” event.

L AT E S T L A B P R O D U C T S AND SERVICES

Covering a broad spectrum of industries, including the life sciences, pharmaceuticals, petrochemicals, materials science, food and drink, visitors can see the very latest product innovations and services from companies including: Perkin Elmer, SLS, VWR, Eppendorf, Shimadzu, Thermo Fisher Scientific and many more.

14 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | S U M M E R 2 0 18

FA S C I N AT I N G S C I E N T I F I C LECTURES

Attendees will also be able to learn more about applications and hot topics in science, and earn CPD points. The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) will again be hosting a captivating and free lecture series in its dedicated theatre, focusing on the environment and wearable technology for healthcare. In addition, UK magazine Laboratory News will be organising lectures on science in practice in the “Insights and Innovations” theatre sponsored by Perkin Elmer. With over 35 hours of seminars and conferences on a broad range of the latest industry topics, everyone will have the opportunity to attend at least some of these talks.

NEW FOR 2018

This year, an area dedicated to the “Sustainable Laboratory” will highlight environmentally-friendly products and

examples of sustainable initiatives in the lab. Other new features include a ‘Cleanroom Pavilion’ - focusing on cleanroom technology – and the ‘Lab News Village’ - dedicated to new exhibitors not seen at previous shows. There will also be a pavilion for SLS, the UK’s largest independent supplier of laboratory equipment, chemicals and consumables.

IDEAL FOR NEW IDEAS!

Bethany McNamara, Lab Analyst at Sainsbury’s, commented on her successful visit to last year’s Lab Innovations: “Being from a small lab, our needs are quite niche and specific, so it was great that there was such a vast array of things to see and so many new technologies. It’s given us some great ideas...” ■

Register for free now to attend Lab Innovations, and for more information, visit: www.lab-innovations.com


Upcoming events Please send your event listing to: sarah.lawton@ukspa.org.uk

The Complete Service For your Pre Used Lab Equipment. • • • •

Buy Quality Instruments at a fraction of the New Cost Convert your Unused Lab equipment into Cash New Project? We can help source your Instruments Lab Clearance Service

www.akribis.co.uk 01565 734875 enquiries.aks@akribis.co.uk

35TH IASP WORLD CONFERENCE

Towards sustainable cities and communities: fostering innovation ecosystems Dates of the event: 2-5 September 2018 Organiser: IASP Venue: Abbasi Hotel City: Isfahan Country: Iran URL: www.iasp2018isfahan.com

U K S PA C A M B R I D G E LewVac is a UK based manufacturer and supplier of vacuum components to scientific research and manufacturing facilities worldwide. For product information and pricing, please visit our website to view our on-line catalogue or contact our technical sales team directly. We look forward to hearing from you.

www.lewvac.co.uk

LewVac, Unit F2, Ote Hall Farm, Janes Lane, Burgess Hill, RH15 0SR Tel : +44 (0)1444 233372 - Fax : +44 (0)1444 233392 - Email : sales@lewvac.co.uk

The next member meeting will be supported by Bidwells property consultancy firm and letting agent Dates of the event: 11-12 October 2018 Organiser: UKSPA Venue: Cambridge Science Park City: Cambridge Country: United Kingdom URL: ukspa.org.uk/events

DRUG DISCOVERY 2018

Cutting-edge advances in the application of laboratory technology to understand disease biology and to identify novel chemical and biological candidate drugs Dates of the event: 9-10 October 2018 Organiser: ELRIG Venue: Excel Arena City: London Country: United Kingdom URL: www.elrig.org

L A B I N N O V AT I O N S 2 0 1 8

The UK’s authoritative publication promoting the creation and growth of technology based companies

The UK’s only trade exhibition dedicated to the laboratory industry Dates of the event: 31 October -1 November 2018 Organiser: Easyfairs Venue: National Exhibition Centre City: Birmingham Country: United Kingdom URL: www.easyfairs.com/lab-innovations-2018

PH ARM ACEUTICAL FLOW CYTOMETRY & IMAGING 2018

Read online now: UKSPA.ORG.UK/ BREAKTHROUGH

R E A D O N L I N E AT: U K S PA . O R G . U K / B R E A K T H R O U G H

Flow cytometry and imaging from single cell to the patient Dates of the event: 14-15 November 2018 Organiser: ELRIG Venue: GlaxoSmithKline City: Stevenage Country: United Kingdom URL: www.elrig.org

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 15


ADVOCACY

Science Foundation Ireland Building networks with Irish sites of innovation

S

cience Foundation Ireland is the largest competitive funder of scientific research in Ireland and, as Director General, Professor Mark Ferguson is responsible for overseeing and driving both the strategy and its implementation.

HOW DOES SOUTHERN IRELAND E N C O U R A G E C O L L A B O R AT I O N A C R O S S S I T E S O F I N N O VAT I O N ? “We place a strong emphasis on excellence and impact creating positive beneficial impacts for Ireland’s economy, society, national and international reputation. I am focused on building partnerships with industry, charities and other funding agencies to drive economic, social and cultural development. In 2012, Science Foundation Ireland established the first seven SFI Research Centres of scale. These collaborations between academia and industry, brought together the best researchers in Universities, Institutes of Technology and companies

Professor Mark Ferguson DIRECTOR GENERAL OF SCIENCE FOUNDATION IRELAND AND CHIEF SCIENTIFIC ADVISER TO THE GOVERNMENT OF IRELAND

Professor Mark W.J. Ferguson commenced as Director General of Science Foundation Ireland in January 2012 and as Chief Scientific Adviser to the Government of Ireland in October 2012. Prof Ferguson is a founding member of the Small Advanced Economies Initiative, Chair of the eHealth Ireland Committee, a member of EU High Level Expert Group on H2020 Impact and has been involved in a number of ip41nternational reviews of R&D systems, including Hungary and Canada

16 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | S U M M E R 2 0 18


S C I E N C E F O U N D AT I O N I R E L A N D I S A L W AY S W O R K I N G T O S T R E N G T H E N A L L O U R B I L AT E R A L R E L AT I O N S H I P S W I T H T H E U K across Ireland to work on large scale strategic research programmes. Today, there are 17 SFI Research Centres throughout the country, specialising in diverse areas of research and innovation that are strategically relevant to Ireland. They act as magnets to attract and retain foreign direct investment as well as founding and growing Irish companies, with over 300 industry partners representing cumulative company commitments of over €228 million and Science Foundation Ireland commitments of €428 million. Outstanding researchers are attracted to Ireland to work within SFI Research Centres which are constantly benchmarked and generally ranked within the global top five in their field.”

WH AT IS SFI’S APPROACH TO FUNDING AND ENGAGEMENT?

“In Ireland, partnerships are a key part of our strategy: partnerships between government departments, agencies and universities, with industry, charities and international funders. We want to attract research leaders, emerging future leaders and early-career researchers in key areas of national importance. We want to train and support the next generation of researchers to the highest international standards. We want to further increase our standing in relevant international rankings – funding and producing excellent scientific research with potential impacts on both the economy and society.”

IS SFI’S APPROACH DIFFERENT TO THE UK’S?

“As a small island country with a population of 4-5 million people, Ireland cannot engage in all fields of science well. Small countries like Ireland are not scaled-down versions of large countries like the UK. We focus on our unique advantages such as the high density of major multinational companies as in: pharmaceuticals, medical devices, software, and strong indigenous industries, agriculture, agri-tech, food, app development, academic strengths e.g. big data analytics, photonics, foetal and perinatal health, applied geosciences, internet of things, immunology, materials, Nanotechnology, microbiome and smart manufacturing. As a small, forward looking, English speaking, technologically-advanced country firmly committed to European Union, with a strong international focus, and a young population, Ireland possesses numerous advantages; a hugely collaborative research community, flexibility, speed of execution, and meaningful partnerships with industry and international funding agencies.”

WHERE DOES SOUTHERN IRELAND SIT WITHIN THE G LO B A L I N N O VAT I O N S E C T O R ?

“We have ambition to compete globally where we have key strengths, for example – in citations per head of the population – Ireland is 1st in the world for Immunology and 1st for Animal and Dairy, 2nd for Nanotechnology and Agricultural sciences and 4th for molecular biology and genetics. We are the 10th most innovative country in the world and last year reported collaborations with over 60 countries. Ireland has climbed from 20th – in 2012 – to 11th in the world for global citations. The establishment of the SFI Research Centres has facilitated growth in industry investment from roughly €8 million a year in 2012 to over €300 million in 2018. The National Development Plan for Ireland has committed €500 million in a new disruptive technologies fund. Science Foundation

R E A D O N L I N E AT: U K S PA . O R G . U K / B R E A K T H R O U G H

Ireland will develop new programmes to fund disruptive research and innovation with a new Challenge-based Funding Programme rolling out later this year. Innovation 2020, the national strategy for science and innovation, has a doubling of the science budget (one third government, two thirds private sector) over the next few years – approximately €3 billion additional funding. Science Foundation Ireland’s challenge is to make this agreed government policy reality.”

HOW CAN UKSPA MEMBERS BUILD PARTNERSHIPS WITH SFI? “SFI is always working to strengthen all our bilateral relationships with the UK. We are currently exploring plans with UK universities to appoint joint-professorships to outstanding researchers co-locating between Ireland and the UK and we hope to partner the SFI Research Centres with equivalent research centres/groups in the UK as we have done with the NSF Engineering Research Centres in the US. We would like to explore a jointly funded Research Centre, particularly between Northern and Southern Ireland. The SFI Spokes Programme is further mechanism for engagement by which new industrial and academic partners can link into the existing SFI Research Centres. SFI Researchers and Research Centres are always interested in collaborative opportunities with any relevant international company or research organisation. Contact info@sfi.ie Science Foundation Ireland also funds an industry fellowship programme, for any researcher employed on a SFI programme in Ireland to spend up to one year working on a collaborative research programme in a company anywhere in the world.” ■

For more information, please visit www.sfi.ie/funding/funding-calls/ sfi-industry-fellowship-programme

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 17


PURELAB® Chorus: Flexible, Modular, Versatile

Visit us at Lab Innovations at the NEC Birmingham, 31st October - 1st November 01628 879631 sales.watertech@veolia.com www.veoliawatertechnologies.co.uk

WATER TECHNOLOGIES


News from Westminster Policy priorities for UK manufacturing investment, competitiveness and innovation

O

n 21 June, the Westminster Forum hosted a meeting to discuss policy priorities for UK Manufacturing. The morning session was chaired by Lord Cavendish of Furness, Member, All-Party Parliamentary Manufacturing Group who introduced the keynote speaker, Chris White, Director, Institute for Industrial Strategy, King’s College London. Quoting the Manufacturer, White stated that the UK is currently the world’s eighth largest industrial nation, and if this trend continues we will break into the top five by 2021, but we can’t lose momentum.

© Kursat Unsal / Shutterstock

S T R AT E G Y D E L AY S

According to White, UK manufacturing has lost 600,000 jobs in the past decade and has suffered the largest monthly fall in five years of output. Business warns that Brexit is delaying the Industrial Strategy which should help address this current decline. Increased collaboration and cooperation across sectors might boost the Industrial Strategy into becoming a tangible thing through development of core strategies, skills, and communications.

White highlighted the need to get the Industrial Strategy Council off the ground. It is fundamental to how the government is measured, monitored, and recommendations are made as to how it is delivering on the Strategy.

M A N U FA C T U R I N G D R I V E S OTHER SECTORS

Requiring ever shorter design, preproduction, and production lead times, manufacturing seeks greater efficiencies through robotics and automation and so drives other sectors. Manufacturing faces ethical, sustainability and skills challenges face on. The introduction of technology, as well as the environment, the atmosphere of an economy that works for everyone, and an Industrial Strategy which is very much based on place, are all good signals that the culture between politics and the industrial manufacturing world is going to change. Kieron Salter, Managing Director, KW Special Projects believes that while it can be difficult for SMEs to navigate the industrial landscape, innovations across the four grand challenges of AI, clean

R E A D O N L I N E AT: U K S PA . O R G . U K / B R E A K T H R O U G H

growth, ageing society and future mobility, will come from SMEs and startups that can take risks but do need the support of corporates and OEMs to get to market.

RULES OF ORIGIN

Lesley Batchelor, Director General, Institute of Export and International Trade explained that we’re moving into a world of complexity around trade so we’re going to have to start recording a lot more information. As soon as we leave the EU we are going to go from 60 million import/ export transactions with the rest of the world, to around about 300 million transactions. Each transaction will cost a lot more than predicted by Mr Thompson of HMRC, due to rules of origin. Compliant exports need to clearly specify where goods are manufactured, and imported raw materials can confuse this issue. Eight trading blocs means eight different sets of rules of origin to comply to. We need international traders who understand these intricacies and relief for new exporters to cover the heavy upfront costs. We need to implement tax relief to encourage business to buy and source from the UK. ■

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 19


ADVOCACY

Your Say... Experts from academia and industry deliver comment on UK manufacturing policy priorities *

“Whatever your feelings about Brexit, the process has dented the reason to invest and build a business in the UK. We need to create another reason to invest here and we are saying it’s because the UK is a credible place to be an eco innovator.” Angela Francis, Chief Economist, Green Alliance

“As far as trade is concerned, we had an £11.6 billion trade gap last year - that means we are importing much, much more than we export. We do genuinely need manufacturing. We need it desperately. In the UK, manufacturing makes up 11% of GVA, 44% of total UK exports, 70% of business R&D, and directly employs 2.6 million people. We need it because services need something to service. So, we all should work together on this.” Lesley Batchelor, Director General, Institute of Export and International Trade

“The key to productivity improvements is going to be innovation and new technology and that’s going to be developed by SMEs.” Kieron Salter, Managing Director, KW Special Projects, Board Member of Silverstone Technology Cluster

2 0 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | S U M M E R 2 0 18

“Manufacturing is a driver for other sectors; increasing efficiencies, designing processes, providing skills, and creating the exports.” Chris White, Director, Institute for Industrial Strategy, King’s College London


HAVE YOUR SAY Tweet your opinions @UKSPA

“Manufacturing remains, even on its current statistic, an important part of what we do, but actually it’s probably at least 5 or 8% more important than we think it really is because of all the services it outsources.” Lord Fox, Liberal Democrat Lords Spokesperson, Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

“I think in terms of Government support, we need some strong nudging taxation incentives, to really help those SMEs down the supply chain to start investing more in new technology.” Martin Walder, Vice President, Industry, Schneider Electric and Chairman, Engineering and Machinery Alliance

“We are at a critical juncture for UK manufacturing. An array of recent developments, from political and macroeconomic events to the increasing pace of extraordinary technology developments, point to volatile and disruptive times ahead. It is time for a rethink. A focus on openness to foreign investment, access to talent, engagement with new markets, positive regulatory and legal environment, and a coherent Industrial Strategy will drive the UK to new levels of competitiveness.” Stephen Cooper, Partner and Head of Industrial Manufacturing, KPMG

“The rapidly changing perspective on the acceptability of single use plastics is a really good example of how attitudes and expectations can change quickly with potentially catastrophic consequences for businesses that are in exposed sectors and failed to foresee the consequences of change.” Ross Taylor, Industry Director, Manufacturing, Transport and Logistics, Barclays

*Unless otherwise stated, quotations are based on the transcript from the 21 June 2018 Westminster Forum, ‘Policy priorities for UK manufacturing - investment, competitiveness and innovation’ and may not have been approved by the speakers

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 2 1


Support

On and off site services for your business

Process scale-up Five steps to best practice production scale-up

A

n overview of the scale-up process highlighting possible drawbacks and best practice, extracted from ‘The Whys & Whats of Scale-Up’ white paper written by Dr Gilda Gasparini for Lucideon, an international materials development and commercialisation organisation. The original white paper can be downloaded from www.lucideon.com/ healthcare/insight-hub/white-papers

FROM FEASIBLE TO SUSTAINABLE Scale-up requires an extremely wide range of skills and needs scientists, engineers, regulatory managers and business managers to work together to develop and deliver a plan which meets technical and commercial targets. Every product on the market has made the

2 2 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | S U M M E R 2 0 18

Dr Gilda Gasparini CHARTERED CHEMICAL ENGINEER AND CONSULTANT, LUCIDEON

Gilda’s role includes process scale-up and process development of Lucideon’s iCRT platform technology

journey from concept to commercialisation. For each completed product, there are many that may slip through the net during the process. One of the key stumbling blocks is the move from feasibility study to sustainable production via a demonstration plant (otherwise known as a pilot plant). Scale-up activities usually become relevant once the concept has been proven at the lab scale. The required production scale and cost are based on the target market size and desired share. Depending on the industry, the production throughput can vary from a few kilograms to thousands of tons per day with the latter demanding considerable investment. Scale-up studies mitigate the risks involved by considering all the aspects of a


T H E W H Y S A N D W H AT S

A successful scale-up project drives a proven concept from the lab to a commercially relevant demonstration. It requires teamwork, a range of technical expertise, good project management and commercial awareness to deliver within time and resource limits. A scale-up study is fundamental to de-risk the industrial uptake and it should be implicated from the very beginning of concept development to avoid going down unfeasible paths and to focus all efforts for maximum profitability The important questions to address are: 1. What equipment do I need? 2. What is the footprint required to make hundreds of square metres of this panel or thousands of tablets? 3. How much does it cost to build and to run? To get to this point there are some very critical issues to deal with first, such as reproducibility, safety, and satisfying regulatory requirements.

STEP 1: PROCESS DESIGN

The process design stage investigates the design space, robustness, and reproducibility of a process against set target performances. It also ensures that the path chosen is the most efficient and effective, defining critical steps and removing those that are

STEP 2: SAFETY REVIEW

Laboratory settings can handle solvent and waste disposal relatively easily at limited expense. Once the process is defined and the target production scale identified, it is necessary to verify that the health and safety implications remain manageable. Evaporating large quantities of flammable solvent, the production and management of dangerous byproducts, and quantity and nature of other waste can be logistically difficult to handle and very costly. The first port of call should be prevention by modifying the process so that hazardous reagents, products or waste are not produced or are produced at low levels. If this is not possible, mitigation should be sought, authorities should be involved at early

R E A D O N L I N E AT: U K S PA . O R G . U K / B R E A K T H R O U G H

Installation and commisioning

Budget and procurement

Regulatory

Technology transfer

unnecessary. This work is usually conducted in the lab and uses tools such as Design of Experiment to gather information-rich data with limited resources. Typical outputs include a recipe, critical quality parameters, intrinsic noise and operability range. It is essential to spend considerable time and effort on the first step as the cost of Steps from concept to failure increases demonstration exponentially throughout the lifespan of a product. When comparing the cost (including brand impact) of a longer-term product recall from supermarket shelves to the cost of additional early tests to verify the stability of a certain ingredient, it is evident that the effort put into each stage of the process is valuable.

Process design

commercial process, forecasting potential pitfalls and making sure that overall fullscale production is profitable. The starting point is a process that delivers technically, proven at the small-scale. It can be anything from a 10cm x 10cm construction panel with low conductivity, low weight and high mechanical strength, to a new material for controlled drug release made in tens of grams batches.

Safety

A SUCCESSFUL SCALE-UP PROJECT DRIVES A PROVEN CONCEPT FROM THE L AB TO A C O M M E R C I A L LY R E L E VA N T D E M O N S T R AT I O N

IP landscape Market intelligence

stages and the required documentation should be produced to show compliance with current regulations. This may involve restrictions on production scale and additional equipment and plant modifications. Not all equipment is available for hazardous areas and ignition sourcefree electricals are very costly, potentially resulting in the need for a re-design of the process. Another hazard impacted by scale-up is the heat generated by exothermic reactions. During large-scale exothermic reactions, more heat is generated by the larger reacting mass and the heat removal capacity is lower due to the lower surface area to volume ratio. A heat and mass balance model can predict the temperature increase during the reaction. The model must be validated against laboratory results and it can then be used to predict the maximum temperature achieved by the system under normal operating conditions or worst-case scenario. Limited batch size, low operating temperature, greater dilutions or fed-batch strategies are usually used to control exothermic reactions at large-scale.

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 2 3


SUPPORT

S T E P 3 : T E C H N O LO G Y TRANSFER

If the proposed process is considered safe and reliable, the next step is the core of the scale-up exercise. Technology transfer is an umbrella definition which covers a variety of activities aimed at delivering the process to the pilot plant or production area. At this stage, even more differences between lab and larger scale come up and are dealt with. For example, the vessel cleaning process must be defined as it is not possible to carry the beaker to the sink anymore or scrape off any leftover solid build-up. Some outputs of the third stage include engineering drawings, detailed equipment and peripherals’ design and sizing. If the process is transferred to an existing plant, it is important to involve those who are managing the

facilities to check equipment availability or any other existing restrictions and requirements.

S T E P 4 : R E G U L AT O R Y

Steps 3 and 4 can occur simultaneously, as they are intimately linked. For a pharmaceutical process, it is necessary to ensure that cGMP guidelines are met, which covers the type of construction material that can be used and identifies the type of documentation and validation testing required. Similar measures will apply to other regulated industries.

STEP 5: BUDGET AND PROCUREMENT

At this stage, it is now possible to contact suppliers and prepare a budget depending on the equipment and ancillaries required. In some cases, tailored equipment may be required.

AN EFFICIENT SCALE-UP DE VELOPMENT RELIES ON THE E XPERIENCE OF THE P E O P L E IN V O LV E D, S O K N O W - H O W I S V E RY PRECIOUS AND NEEDS TO BE PROTECTED

It is at this stage where a commercial decision is required to assess whether the performances justify the additional costs or whether a compromise (or indeed an appropriate alternative) must be sought. Additional activities such as delivery logistics and site modifications must also be considered as they can add delays and costs to the project. Maintaining a good relationship with the suppliers and having a flexible plan can be enormously beneficial in mitigating this phase. Additionally, there are two nontechnical activities which must coincide with each step throughout the project: intellectual property and market awareness.

IP LANDSCAPE

Intellectual property and know-how can change or develop during the scale-up process. It is also crucial to be aware of existing patents and freedom-to-operate restrictions before starting production. Changes may be made to the initial process, making the existing patents irrelevant or too limiting. An efficient scale-up development relies on the experience of the people involved, so know-how is very precious and needs to be protected.

Required expertise

Activities and tools

Outputs

Process design

R&D, analytical techniques, engineering

DOE, experimental work and data interpretation

Design space and critical quality attributes

Safety

Health and safety, operations, engineering

Access to database and current regulations

Risk assessments documentation

Technology transfer

Engineering, operations, site manager

Experimental work, calculations, cleaning validations

Engineering documentation, drawings and equipment sizing

Regulatory

QC/QA, engineering, site manager

Certification and documentation preparation

Standards and regulation compliance paperwork

Budget and procurement

Procurement, engineering, supply chain, site manager

Supplier visits and discussions

Supplier and equipment list, budget and lead time, site requirements

Expertise and tools required for scale-up studies and typical outputs

2 4 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | S U M M E R 2 0 18

MARKET AW A R E N E S S

When manufacturing is involved, the time from concept to commercialisation can extend to a number of years. During this period, the demand for the product may change. The product or process may become superseded or, alternatively, demand may increase to justify the release of the extra budget. Periodical market checks are recommended to ensure a positive business outcome.


KNFlab_Teaser_UK_(LABOR&MORE)_Mar_14 06/03/2014 11:21 Page 1

Process design

NO

Safety

Gate1: Safe and reliable?

YES Technology transfer

Regulatory

Budget

NO

Gate2: Value for money?

Decision-making flow chart

YES Procurement

SUMM ARY

As might be expected, scale-up activities are not linear processes. Some can occur simultaneously, and some initial decisions may need to be revisited as problems arise. Concise planning and project management with regular milestones are crucial to give the right visibility to all the aspects of the project as they vary and develop. The key decision points revolve around (i) whether the product can be produced safely at the suggested production scale using the currently proposed process and (ii) whether it represents value for money. If either of these points is not met, the process will require some reconsideration for a successful commercial roll-out. ■

KNF LAB PUMPS AND SYSTEMS YOU KNOWING WHAT DESERVE COUNTS

BETTER.

You deserve KNF – the winning formula for practical laboratory pumps and systems.

Our deserve aim is to lighten of routine laboratory You KNF –the theburden winning formula for tasks by providing easy-to-use systems which practical laboratory pumps and systems. combine quiet operation, high performance and absolute reliability.

Our aim is to lighten the burden of routine laboratory Discover the latest in practical laboratory technology, tasks bytoproviding easy-to-use systems which just go www.knf.co.uk. combine quiet operation, high performance and absolute reliability. KNF Neuberger UK Ltd

Avenue 2, Station Lane Ind Estate

Discover the latest in practical Witney, Oxfordshire, OX28 4FA laboratory technology, info@knf.co.uk just go to www.knf.co.uk.

For further assistance with scale-up, please visit: www.lucideon.com KNF Neuberger UK Ltd Ave 2, Station Lane Ind Est, Witney, Oxon, OX28 4FA Tel: 01993 778373 info@knf.co.uk

R E A D O N L I N E AT: U K S PA . O R G . U K / B R E A K T H R O U G H

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 2 5


SUPPORT

Particle size Particle Size Range*

Particle size distributions from sub-nanometer to millimetres 0.1NM

1NM

10NM

AUTOMATED IMAGING < 1μM to >3MM SPATIAL FILTER VELOCIMETRY < 50μM to 6MM

3

LASER DIFFRACTION <100NM to >2MM RESONANT MASS MEASUREMENT** 50NM to 5μM NANOPARTICLE TRACKING ANALYSIS <30NM to >1μM DYNAMIC LIGHT SCATTERING <1NM to >1μM

1

SMALL ANGLE X-RAY SCATTERING 1NM to 100NM TAYLOR DISPERSION ANALYSIS 0.2NM to >20NM *All particle size ranges are sample dependent **Particle size ranges are sample and sensor dependent

2 6 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | S U M M E R 2 0 18

2


IMAGE KEY

1 Atom: 0.1 - 0.5NM 2 DNA (diameter): 2NM 3 Buckyball (C60): 1NM 5 Bacteria: 0.2 - 2μM 6 Red Blood Cells: 7 -8μM 7 Ant: 6-12MM

100NM

1μM

4 Virus: 20 - 300NM

10μM

100μM

1MM

10MM

6

4 7

5

R E A D O N L I N E AT: U K S PA . O R G . U K / B R E A K T H R O U G H

P

article size is an important physical property of particulate samples and measurement of particle size distribution is a critical parameter in the manufacture of many products. Quantum size effects are observed as particles are reduced below around 100nm and are clear in grain sizes below 10nm. Because of these phenomena, particle size impacts on electronic properties, physiochemical properties and catalysis, among others. In biology, physiological properties of biological structures are also size-dependent. Characterisation of millimetre to sub-nanometre particles requires different technological approaches.

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 2 7


ecotech autoclaves that donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cost the Earth.

A world class research and development centre at the heart of the UKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life sciences cluster BioPark offers you specialist laboratories, ready to use office space and conference facilities so that you can grow and develop your new products and technologies

Designed and built in the UK, Touchclave-ecotech offers high performance sterilization whilst using up to 55% less power and 80% less water. Contact us for more information

30

T: +44 (0) 1457 876221 E: info@lte-scientific.co.uk

Just minutes from

London by train

LTE-SCIENTIFIC.CO.UK SCIENTIFIC | MEDICAL | SERVICE

Call us on 01707 356100 or visit www.biopark.co.uk GA16473/??/12_16

2 8 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | S U M M E R 2 0 18

BioPark Advert_86x125.5mm_29JUN17.indd 1

29/06/2017 11:02


Science Foundation Ireland; CONFIRM Smart Manufacturing Research Centre

M

Professor Conor McCarthy CONFIRM CENTRE DIRECTOR & PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR

Conor is the Centre Director for CONFIRM – Smart Manufacturing, a new national SFI Research Centre, and Chair of Lightweight Structures at the University of Limerick

anufacturing has been through numerous reinventions as it keeps pace with technological advancement. Beginning with steam and the first mechanised production tools; next came electricity and the first assembly lines for production on another scale; computers beckoned the next revolution and the introduction of automation. Now, we find ourselves in Industry 4.0, where automation and computing have merged into smart manufacturing, a phenomenon that is all about adding intelligence into production systems and supply chains. Enabling communication between the product and machine – with robust scientific models of their interacting process – leads to each product having what is known as a digital twin, a cyber-physical record of where it was machined, conditions of storage, supply chain information and much more.

R E A D O N L I N E AT: U K S PA . O R G . U K / B R E A K T H R O U G H

S M A RT M A N U FA C T U R I N G

Smart Manufacturing is set to change how companies structure their manufacturing operations, and how they cooperate with suppliers and customers. Adopting the smart manufacturing transformation is critical for the long-term competitiveness of Irish industry. This will take significant national focus and investment. We must ensure that manufacturing in Ireland does not get left behind as the rest of the world’s manufacturing forges ahead. The CONFIRM SFI Research Centre is a consortium of over 200 researchers led by University of Limerick looking to develop new technologies; carry out fundamental research in manufacturing; and carrying out industrially targeted projects, working directly with its 42 Industry partners across MNC and SME sectors. The Centre is supported through a €47 million investment from the Irish government

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 2 9


SUPPORT

24%

of Ireland’s total economic output is in the manufacturing sector

CONFIRM will act as a beacon, attracting world-renowned researchers to Irish shores

- through Science Foundation Ireland – and industry partners, making it one of the largest new R&D centres in the country.

IRISH COMPETITIVENESS

The manufacturing sector is the second largest employer in Ireland and accounts for 24 per cent of total economic output €110 billion in exports. CONFIRM seeks to integrate new technologies it develops to increase product line adaptability, enable real-time decision making, shorten supplychains, and speed up the development of new innovations to produce higher-quality goods at reduced costs across all industry sectors. CONFIRM will be revolutionary for Irish manufacturing competitiveness, delivering the technological advances and expertise for a smart manufacturing innovation ecosystem, enabling companies to compete within the rapidly changing global landscape, and boosting Ireland’s reputation as a leading international manufacturing location. The three principle areas of focus to CONFIRM’s research include. Virtual Industrialisation, which focuses on adaptive data analytics and optimisation for smart manufacturing; end-to-end supply chains and predictive modelling of manufacturing. Secondly, Cyber Physical Manufacturing Systems which focus on connected infrastructures, machines & software systems; data, information, knowledge integration, security and technology adoption; and semantic interoperability and data analytics for production. Finally, Self-Aware Manufacturing Systems, that will provide a network of machines with ability to perform more efficiently, collaboratively and resiliently. The approach to

Smart Manufacturing is set to change how companies structure their manufacturing operations

THE CONFIRM SFI RESE ARCH CENTRE IS A CONSORTIUM OF OVER 200 RESE ARCHERS LED BY UNIVERSIT Y OF LIMERICK innovating these three systems will be built upon the development of smart products, smart machine, smart production systems and smart supply chains. As the Centre progresses, these and other smart technologies will be the focus of testbeds and prototype line initiatives, which will provide versatile, adaptable facilities for collaborative assessment and validation of Confirm’s technologies by all stakeholders.

I N D U S T RY C O L L A B O R AT I O N

Collaboration with industry is a key priority for CONFIRM. Fundamental research into data analytics, artificial intelligence, predictive modelling, sensors, material processing and robotics forms the backbone of the centre’s remit, furthering our understanding as to the scope and

potential of these areas. The involvement of industry partners, however, gives us the opportunity to integrate new and impactful breakthroughs into real world applications. Goal-oriented customised Industry projects drive the direction for some of the Centre’s research into more targeted and economically valuable outcomes. CONFIRM’s Industry partners include some of the world’s leaders in advanced manufacturing, including large multinational corporations as well as small to medium enterprises and Irish start-ups. As an academically led SFI Research Centre, CONFIRM also has a mandate to support the education and training of the next generation of scientists and engineers. A total of 87 PhD students are to be recruited to complete their studies at the University of Limerick or with one of the seven partner institutions: the Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Cork Institute of Technology, National University of Ireland Galway, Athlone Institute of Technology, Maynooth University and Limerick Institute of Technology. CONFIRM will also act as a beacon for international talent, attracting world-renowned researchers to Irish shores as the Centre establishes the leading role Ireland will play in the global smart manufacturing revolution. ■

For further information, please visit: www.sfi.ie/sfi-research-centres/confirm/

3 0 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | S U M M E R 2 0 18


AD_127206_Apprenticeships_Breakthrough_v1_1-2PageHoriz 16/07/2018 14:02 Page 1

CENTRE FOR HIGHER & DEGREE APPRENTICESHIPS University of Kent offers Technician Scientist and Laboratory Scientist Higher and Degree apprenticeships. • Taking on apprentices is a cost-effective way to upskill your existing workforce, or attract talented people, with up to 100% of training costs fully covered by levy payments or government co-investment. • Apprenticeships are underpinned by degrees in Applied Bioscience or Applied Chemical Sciences. • With flexible start dates (September, January & May), the degree programmes are delivered nationwide via blended learning – a mixture of on-line and face-to-face teaching.

For more information, including details on a fully managed service and other higher & degree apprenticeships contact

T: 01634 888459 E: apprenticeships@kent.ac.uk www.kent.ac.uk/apprenticeships

Nook is a mobile huddle pod for innovation spaces and offices, helping people to connect and concentrate more deeply. Nook mobility brings agility to a workspace. Proven in Science Parks, Coworking Spaces, Innovation & Growth Hubs +many more. Flexible Design. Fast Delivery. UK made

nookpod.com +44 333 577 6665 hello@nookpod.com

R E A D O N L I N E AT: U K S PA . O R G . U K / B R E A K T H R O U G H

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 3 1


SUPPORT

Non-animal nanosafety Physiologically Anchored Tools for Realistic nanOmateriaL hazard aSsessment (PATROLS)

I Professor Shareen H Doak PROFESSOR OF GENOTOXICOLOGY & CANCER, SWANSEA UNIVERSITY MEDICAL SCHOOL

Shareen is the Medical School’s Director of the Centre for NanoHealth and she leads the In Vitro Toxicology Group

n January 2018, scientists at Swansea University Medical School initiated an international collaborative grant in excess of €12 million, funded by the European Commission, to develop novel cutting-edge tests to minimise the use of animals when assessing safety concerns surrounding nanotechnology. Swansea University is the lead partner in an international team of scientists including academic, industrial, government and risk assessment partners working on this major project entitled Physiologically Anchored Tools for Realistic nanOmateriaL hazard aSsessment (PATROLS). The project involves a total of 24 partners spread across 13 countries through Europe and across the globe including Canada, Japan, Korea, Taiwan and the US.

NANOSAFETY TESTING

Nanotechnology greatly enhances crucial aspects of our lives and is already integrated into products across all sectors, from cosmetics, to industrial processes and novel materials, saving energy, resources and improving functionality of materials from sun screen to concrete.

3 2 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | S U M M E R 2 0 18

Science behind nanomaterials development is racing ahead of regulation, and advances in safety testing are now enabling improved assessment of materials. This ensures that novel materials are safe for consumers and the environment throughout the whole lifecycle of the material and the products into which it is integrated. Several challenges currently exist in the field of nanosafety testing: standard non-animal tests are unreliable for nanomaterials, so there is a greater emphasis on evaluating their safety in animals. However, animal tests are also unsuitable as they are expensive, timeconsuming, and are associated with substantial moral concerns. Additionally, these tests do not predict the consequences of long term, low dose exposure on both human health and the environment. PATROLS “aims” to address these limitations by providing state-of-the-art 3D cell culture models of the human lung, gastrointestinal tract and liver. The project is also developing advanced methods for environmental safety testing and computational models. Furthermore, exposure under realistic conditions


£5bn

had been invested in global nanotechnology by 2014

(low concentrations over extended time periods) will be applied to understand the true risk associated with nanomaterials in consumer products. These novel tools will allow us to more accurately predict human health and environmental safety of engineered nanomaterials, reducing the need to test on animals.

E X P E RT C O L L A B O R AT I O N

The PATROLS project involves many of Europe’s leading experts in nanosafety, ecotoxicology, cell biology, systems biology, computational modelling, tissue engineering and material science. The partners also span multiple sectors including industry, government, academia, regulators and risk assessors. This range of expertise will allow PATROLS to develop the next generation of non-animal nanosafety testing solutions, to protect consumers, workers, patients and our environment, allowing us to enjoy the benefits that nanotechnological developments promise to have on our daily lives. In addition to European expertise, the PATROLS partnership includes highly regarded experts located in the US, Canada and Asia. This breadth of international collaboration is of great importance to ensure that the project as a whole learns and builds on best practice internationally, whilst simultaneously enabling the advances developed in PATROLS to facilitate a global consensus on nanosafety testing approaches.

NANOSAFETY AT GROUND LEVEL

Many companies move into nanomaterials production and handling as an evolution of their business, rather than ‘THEIR core business mission’. However, they face a significant challenge to integrate additional regulatory requirements into planning and budgets. Advanced test systems for nanomaterial safety assessment, such as those being developed by PATROLS are most likely to be accessed through specialist service providers, rather than integrated in house, and where there is a clear regulatory requirement or market driver for their use. Information such as this helps projects such as PATROLS to address not only the scientific strength of advanced materials but also to ensure that they sit within a clear framework for company use, linked to regulatory requirements.

P AT R O L S I S A N I N T E R N AT I O N A L PROJECT COMBINING A TE AM OF ACADEMICS, INDUSTRIAL SCIENTISTS, GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS AND RISK A S S E S S O R S T O D E L I V E R A D VA N C E D A N D RE ALISTIC TOOLS AND ME THODS FOR N A N O M AT E R I A L S A F E T Y A S S E S S M E N T I N V E S T I G AT I N G I M PA C T

Fuels: Nanotechnology can address the shortage of fossil fuels such as diesel and gasoline by making the production of fuels from low grade raw materials economical, increasing the mileage of engines, and making the production of fuels from normal raw materials more efficient. ■

Medicine: Researchers are developing customised nanoparticles the size of molecules that can deliver drugs directly to diseased cells in the body. When it is perfected, this method should greatly reduce the damage that treatments such as chemotherapy cause to a patient’s healthy cells. The Centre for NanoHealth at Swansea University is currently conducting research in areas including Cell Biology of Cancer and Reproduction, Nanomedicine, Informatics and Modelling, Regenerative Medicine and Medical Devices.

For further information, please visit: www.patrols-h2020.eu

Investigating the toxicity and environmental impact of nanomaterials is vital, as nanotechnology can create many new materials and devices with a vast range of applications such as in nanomedicine, nanoelectronics, biomaterials energy production, and wideranging consumer products, for example:

PATROLS has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 760813.

Food: Nanotechnology is having an impact on several aspects of food science, from how food is grown to how it is packaged. Companies are developing nanomaterials that will make a difference not only to how food tastes, but also in food safety, and the health benefits that food delivers. Fuel Cells: Nanotechnology is being used to reduce the cost of catalysts used in fuel cells to produce hydrogen ions from fuel such as methanol and to improve the efficiency of membranes used in fuel cells to separate hydrogen ions from other gases such as oxygen. Solar Cells: Companies have developed nanotech solar cells that can be manufactured at significantly lower cost than conventional solar cells.

PATROLS

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 3 3


BUILDING LABORATORY SOLUTIONS

UK MANUFACTURER BASED IN CAMBRIDGE LABORATORY FURNITURE SUPPLY AND INSTALLATION FULL TURNKEY LABORATORY SOLUTIONS PROJECT MANAGEMENT - M&E SERVICES FLOORING AND PARTITIONS FUME CUPBOARDS AND EXTRACTION OFFICES AND WRITE UP AREAS 3D VISUALISATION AND DESIGN

T: 01223 894833 E: SALES@INTERFOCUS.CO.UK MYNEWLAB.COM

OUR NEW SHOWROOM IS NOW OPEN


2

million people live within an hour’s drive of Swansea

BUCANIER Project Officers meet via video conference

BUCANIER builds business

T

Progressing open and collaborative mind-sets

oday, more than ever before, UK and Irish business need to think about their respective contexts in the wider world, and how opportunity can be found in change. While the movement of goods and services are the subject of significant current debate, the fuel of innovation - knowledge and creativity - is not constrained by borders or political movements. From the perspective of progressing open and collaborative mind-sets, greater outcomes are achieved through networks that include both local and international partnerships. In parallel, while innovation emerges from often complex interactions and conditions, process can provide a structured approach and greatly support the chances of success; particularly when drawing upon experience and capability beyond the organisation.

BUILDING TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS

Recognising these dynamics, BUCANIER is strongly aligned with the ambitions of building technology business, building upon current foundations that include the UKSPA member partners; Bridge Innovation Centre, the Institute of Life Sciences and the Beacon Centre, along a south-west Wales corridor which reaches out to partners in the Republic of Ireland.

R E A D O N L I N E AT: U K S PA . O R G . U K / B R E A K T H R O U G H

The initiative transcends buildings and borders using a Learning Journey as a framework, supported by resources drawn from private and public sectors in west Wales and the east of the Republic of Ireland. The initiative leverages the communities and capabilities of the partner incubator/science parks into the wider ecosystem to develop denser networks and greater deal flow.

P O R O U S WA L L S F O R L E A R N I N G Dr Gareth Davies ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF BUSINESS IN THE SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT, SWANSEA UNIVERSITY

Gareth is an Associate Professor in Swansea University’s School of Management, with research interests in innovation management and regional economic development. He has supported Welsh Government in policy development as well working on projects around the world to develop science park and technology transfer models

The role of learning is key in innovation, resulting in knowledge, experience and success. Capturing and sharing this for others to use and achieve success more readily is an ongoing process and a planned legacy for the regions BUCANIER will bring together. Supporting individual entrepreneurs, SMEs and public-sector partners with transnational perspectives who wish to share this journey, BUCANIER will help use the porous walls of Open Innovation to demonstrate what can be achieved together. ■

For further information on the BUCANIER project, please visit: www.bucanier.eu Funded by the European Regional Development Fund through the Ireland Wales Cooperation Programme

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 3 5


ADVERTORIAL

A grand vision Jisc and UKSPA - helping you realise your digital vision

H Jon Tucker EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR – MEMBERS AND CUSTOMERS, JISC

Managing relationships with all higher education, further education, alternative providers and stakeholders, including enterprise customers, Jon’s role is to ensure both member and customer satisfaction and keep Jisc sustainable

3 6 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | S U M M E R 2 0 18

onouring the concept that small changes can create big waves, UKSPA and Jisc are excited to announce a new Digital Partnership, which will spark future collaboration with UKSPA and its members. Jisc provide the UK’s national education and research network (NREN), Janet, and provide digital solutions for UK education and research, in order for the UK to be the most digitally-advanced education and research nation in the world. It’s a grand vision but one we know is within our reach, particularly when we come together to share knowledge and expertise. With many of our members reaching out to us to make the most of their connection, and many science parks being university owned and operated, working

closer with UKSPA seemed like the logical next step, and one which could lead to very exciting cross-sector collaborations for our members.

V I TA L I N F R A S T R U C T U R E

Through embarking on this partnership with UKSPA, Jisc are supporting the aspirations of their research and science park members alike, to benefit from the high-speed connectivity of Janet. With dedicated cyber security, and extra services such as DDoS mitigation coming as standard, there’s a huge opportunity for big-data projects that would otherwise seem like science fiction. And with science parks a key part of delivering the UK’s industrial strategy, the infrastructure to seamlessly share data with universities and research institutes will be vital.


WITH MANY OF OUR MEMBERS RE ACHING OUT TO US TO MAKE T HE M O S T O F T HE IR C O NNE C T I O N , A ND M A N Y S CIE N C E PA R K S B E I N G U N I V E R S I T Y O W N E D A N D O P E R AT E D , W O R K I N G C L O S E R W I T H U K S P A S E E M E D L I K E T H E L O G I C A L N E X T S T E P, A N D ONE WHICH COULD LE AD TO VERY E XCITING CROSS -SECTOR C O L L A B O R AT I O N S F O R O U R M E M B E R S Delivering a world-class NREN, serving over 18 million users, the Janet Network provides UK enterprises with a highly-reliable and secure network, enabling national and international communication and collaboration. Janet is regarded as mission-critical to the UK knowledge economy and we know it’s able to do much more for UKSPA members. It’s great to be announcing our ambitions here.

TO M O R R O W ’ S N E T W O R K TO DAY

The Janet network isn’t limited solely to education and research ventures. As a good proportion of the UK’s science parks are commercial concerns and we are extending our service offering to science and technology parks, technology incubators and innovation centres. We’re open to business customers who share our values – such as not-forprofits, public bodies and researchlinked enterprises, and any profits we make from working with customers will be reinvested in Jisc and the Janet Network – helping to sustain the membership benefits we provide. Supporting members with their business requirements is very much aligned to the offer we give to university campuses, research institutions and further education college groups. As a Jisc customer, you access many of the

benefits of Jisc membership – including the performance, reliability and security of the Janet Network – while the fees you pay help support the network and services for the Jisc community. It’s all about being faster, quicker, and more secure; your digital future, together. Another key part of Jisc’s offer is Eduroam – the seamless Wi-Fi students and university staff have come to expect as standard. This service has been enabled at a number of science parks already, most recently Bristol and Bath Science Parks, where Eduroam connectivity for visiting academics from the UK - and the rest of the world - can still connect effortlessly, via their usual provider. Eduroam is used in 76 countries, so it’s a safe bet for our collaborative global future.

CULHAM SCIENCE CENTRE

The home of UKAEA, or the UK Atomic Energy Centre, Culham Science Centre also houses the UK’s Centre for Fusion Energy. Whilst UKAEA has been a Jisc member for many years, the network was previously unavailable to commercial tenants at Culham. Through collaboration with others, Jisc has delivered a managed service directly to the centre’s tenants. Frustrated customers, with broadband issues and

expensive fibre installation beyond their means, can now access a new range of services through Jisc’s Janet network. The Centre for Fusion Energy describes the possibilities which connection to the Janet network brings: ‘Our scientists and engineers are working with partners around the globe to develop fusion as a new source of cleaner energy for tomorrow’s power stations.’ For Culham Science Centre itself, there’s a new lease of life – broadband has been transformed from limiting possible new tenants, to being both an asset and a selling point. ■

Interested in becoming a Jisc customer? Please contact Christian.evans@jisc.ac.uk It’s all about being faster, quicker, and more secure

Did you know? Jisc’s Janet network covers the UK from Cornwall to the Shetlands and Belfast to East Anglia

It carries over 1.5 PBytes of information annually, equivalent to all the photos held on Facebook across the world

At its heart lies over 8,500 km of optical fibre with a backbone operating at 600 Gbit/s, and with the capability to expand exponentially to meet future demands

R E A D O N L I N E AT: U K S PA . O R G . U K / B R E A K T H R O U G H

Jisc has a total of over 1.5 Tbit/s of connectivity to hundreds of global networks, cloud services, content providers and more

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 3 7


31 October & 1 November 2018 | NEC, Birmingham

Discovering innovation at the heart of the laboratory industry NEW for 2018 • • • • • •

Conference powered by Lab News Lab News Pavilion SLS Pavilion Sustainable Laboratory feature area Dedicated VIP lounge Bespoke sponsorship opportunities

Contact: Mauricio Montes e mauricio.montes@easyfairs.com t +44 (0)20 3196 4355

BOOK NOW www.lab-innovations.com


Innovation

Extending the frontiers of UK science and industry

Graphene is a semi-metal made from one atom thick, planar sheets of carbon

Advanced materials

U

K industry is well placed to capitalise on the commercialisation of 2D materials and nano-enabled products and services by operating alone or in collaboration with international partners. The Nanotech Report 4th edition notes that as far back as 2005, nanotechnology was incorporated into more than $30 billion in manufactured goods globally. This was projected to increase to $2.6 trillion by 2014. Even if this is an overestimate, it is clear there is a vast market available for advanced materials. Anyone interested in sourcing nanomaterials and technologies may benefit from the nanowerk.com online database and catalogue, used here to research UK based raw nanomaterial suppliers. For all other newcomers to

the field, nanowerk.com has created a 26-page introduction section as well as a section on the successful founding and financing of nanotechnology companies.

N A N O PA RT I C L E S

Nanoparticles are in the size region of 1-100 nanometres and include a surrounding interfacial layer which is an integral part of the particle and affects all its properties. Nanoparticles can be simple, single elements as well as binary or complex compounds. Biological nanoparticles can be formed from polymers or lipids and be used to enclose and protect an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) for safe drug delivery in vivo, within harsh extracellular environmental conditions. Materials suppliers such as Goodfellow supply ceramic and metallic

R E A D O N L I N E AT: U K S PA . O R G . U K / B R E A K T H R O U G H

nanopowders such as aluminium and silicon nitrides and silicon and titanium carbides for additive manufacturing (3D printing) and other applications. Strem Chemicals UK is an independent distributor across the UK and Ireland with an extensive portfolio of nanoparticles and powders. BBI Solutions is a leading developer and manufacturer of raw materials and finished test platforms for the in-vitro diagnostics market. Keeling & Walker manufacture a range of nanoparticulate powders and dispersions from ceramic colours to electrical contact materials, glassmelting electrodes and catalysis. Liquids Research, Mentec Technology Centre, Bangor, North Wales, is a leading manufacturer of ferrofluids in which the magnetic nanoparticles

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 3 9


INNOVATION

are one of a variety of ferrites or transition metals, such as iron and cobalt. Mel Chemicals, headquartered in Manchester, is a global producer and supplier of zirconium nanoparticles and nano stabilised zirconia materials. QinetiQ Nanomaterials produces a wide range of nanopowders and provides application development support. Promethean Particles is a spin-out company from the University of Nottingham and has developed a unique reactor technology to allow unprecedented product control and flexibility in inorganic nanoparticle dispersion manufacture. Yorkshire Bioscience provides services and reagents for molecular biology research, to include nanodiamonds. Nanodiamonds may be used as new sorbents suitable for the separation, purification and immobilisation of nucleic acids and proteins. DNA molecules attached to diamond surfaces are accessible to enzymes and can be modified in surface enzymatic reactions.

QUANTUM DOTS

Quantum dots are central to nanotechnology. They are very nanosized semiconductor particles with highly specialised optical and electronic properties. Manchester-based Nanoco Technologies, leads the world in the development and production of heavy metal-free nanomaterials for use in displays, lighting, solar energy and bio-imaging.

GRAPHENE

Graphene is a semi-metal made from one atom thick, planar sheets of carbon. The atoms are arranged in a honeycomb-shaped lattice and each atom has a small overlap between its

Flexible Nanomaterial Graphene is made up of atoms arranged in a honeycomb-shaped lattice

valence and conduction band which provides unusual properties. Just some of the potential applications for graphene include lightweight, thin, flexible, yet durable display screens, electric/photonics circuits, solar cells, and enhancements in various medical, chemical and industrial processes. 2-DTech is a graphene company closely aligned with Manchester’s world-leading graphene group. The company supplies the highest quality graphene and other 2-D materials internationally. They also work closely with industry and researchers to help turn scientific innovation into groundbreaking products. AMD (Advanced Material Development) is partnering with the University of Sussex in moving to commercial

ANYONE INTERESTED IN SOURCING N A N O M AT E R I A L S A N D T E C H N O L O G I E S M AY B E N E F I T F R O M T H E N A N O W E R K . C O M O N L I N E D ATA B A S E A N D C ATA L O G U E 4 0 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | S U M M E R 2 0 18

production of high end graphene and other nanomaterial inks and emulsions under the brand name of nHance™. AMD aims to advance this material’s research to commercial success and beyond and to continue delivering a funding pipeline to the best university departments in the UK. Applied Graphene Materials has developed a proprietary bottom up process for the production of high specification graphene. GOgraphene are specialist manufacturers and suppliers of graphene oxide. Graphene Industries is the world’s first supplier of atomically thin, crystallographically perfect films of graphitic carbon, known as graphenes. Thomas Swan supplies multi-kg quantities of few layer graphene nanoplatelets as well as non-carbon 2D materials such as boron nitride and molybdenum disulphide. Graphitene develops and manufactures graphitene, the purest graphene, able to meet the requirements of focus industries that produce products such as cement and asphalt concretes, composites, protective coatings, energy generation and storage businesses. Haydale is a global solutions company, enhancing applications of


$2bn

was the value of the global market for nanocomposites in 2017

molecular units either organic (e.g. DNA) or inorganic (e.g. Mo6S9â&#x2C6;&#x2019;xIx). Nanofibres can be generated from different polymers and hence have different physical properties and application potentials. Examples of natural polymers include collagen, cellulose, silk fibroin, keratin, gelatin and polysaccharides such as chitosan and alginate. Examples of synthetic polymers include poly(lactic acid) (PLA), polycaprolactone (PCL), polyurethane (PU), poly(lactic-coglycolic acid) (PLGA), poly(3hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV), and poly(ethylene-covinylacetate) (PEVA).

CARBON NANOTUBES

materials by changing their essential properties using graphene and nano materials. RD Graphene was incorporated after winning the Scottish Higgs Edge 2016 for its transformational, patent pending Graphene manufacturing process. The invented process is disruptive as it enables the use of Graphene in an unlimited number of applications. Application sectors for this groundbreaking technology are (bio-) sensors, energy, flexible electronics, wearables, water treatment and many more.

Carbon nanotubes are allotropes of carbon with a cylindrical nanostructure. These cylindrical carbon molecules have unusual properties, which are valuable for nanotechnology, electronics, optics and other fields of materials science and technology. UK manufacturers and suppliers of carbon nanotubes include Haydale, Thomas Swan, and Hubron. Hubron is an independent distributor currently serving various sectors which include rubber &

plastics; adhesives & sealants; coatings & inks; structural composites; polyurethane; lubricants and certain parts of the healthcare and cosmetic markets.

FULLERENES & BUCKYBALLS

A fullerene is a molecule of carbon in the form of a hollow sphere, ellipsoid, tube, or other shape. Spherical fullerenes, also referred to as Buckminsterfullerenes or buckyballs (C60),resemble the balls used in association football. Halogenation, the addition of fluorine, chlorine, and bromine, results in a flattening of the C60 framework into a drum-shaped molecule. Fullerenes may be used for drug delivery systems in the body, in lubricants and as catalysts. In the UK, Materials Technologies Research (MTR) applies synthesis, separation, and purification of fullerene products, supplying a broad spectrum of high quality fullerenes and their derivatives. Ossila was founded by organic electronics research scientists with the aim of providing the components, equipment and materials (including nanomaterials such as fullerenes) to enable faster and smarter research and discovery. â&#x2013;

Carbon nanotubes 3D rendering

NANOFIBRES & NANOWIRES

Both nanofibers and nanowire structures have diameters within the nanometre range, but nanofibres are long and flexible, whilst nanowires are short and rigid. Nowhere in the UK currently manufactures either, with the nearest suppliers being found in Spain, Germany and Austria. Many different types of nanowires exist, including superconducting (e.g. YBCO), metallic (e.g. Ni, Pt, Au), semiconducting (e.g. silicon nanowires; SiNWs, InP, GaN) and insulating (e.g. SiO2, TiO2). Molecular nanowires are composed of repeating

R E A D O N L I N E AT: U K S PA . O R G . U K / B R E A K T H R O U G H

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 41


Co-located with 2 leading events Graphene Expo is uniquely positioned alongside 2 other leading exhibitions, allowing both exhibitors and visitors to benefit from the multidisciplinary nature of these sciences. Taking place at Coventry’s Ricoh Area makes the venue easily accessible from anywhere in the UK and overseas.

Technology in a Vacuum

Discover the science of graphene for photonic and optoelectronic applications

Vacuum Expo is the UK’s premier showcase for industrial applications and scientific vacuum technologies. The event brings together all aspects of industry and research, helping visitors develop strong business relationships, research solutions, examine technologies for academia, research and technology for manufacturing.

Photonex is the UK’s leading photonics event where light technology comes alive. PHOTONEX brings together all aspects of industry and academia, enabling attendees to research solutions, examine applications for photonics in research and investigate future solutions.

FREEFREE

TO TO ATTEND ATTEND

10TH10TH & 11TH OCTOBER 2018 2018 & 11TH OCTOBER RICOH ARENA COVENTRY RICOH ARENA COVENTRY

GENERATE | MANIPULATE | MEASURE | MANUFACTURE | APPLY GENERATE | MANIPULATE | MEASURE | MANUFACTURE | APPLY

PHOTONEX EUROPE LIVE!LIVE! is theis UK’s premier showcase PHOTONEX EUROPE the UK’s premier showcase Discover the science of graphene for event dedicated to photonics and light technologies ExhibitingDiscover & dedicated toapplications photonics and theevent science of graphene forlight technologies photonic and optoelectronic Sponsorship

photonic and optoelectronic applications

Opportunities

To take part in the next event, please contact: Laurence Devereux, Event Director

Co-located Call +44 (0)1372 750555 or email: ld@graphene-expo.org The Enlighten Conference Graphene Expo 2018 is organised by Xmark Media Ltd Old Village Hall, The Street, Effingham, Surrey KT24 5JS, UK

www.graphene-expo.org

One-day meeting | Graphene & Emerging 2D materials

FREE

TO ATTEND

1

Co-located Exhibitions · Multiple Conferences · Expert TalksTalks · One·Venue Co-located Exhibitions · Multiple Conferences · Expert One Venue GENERATE | MANIP www.graphene-expo.org Please register for updates at www.photonex.org Please register for updates at www.photonex.org PHOTONEX EUR

event dedicat

Looking for a professional company that relocates www.graphene-expo.org scientific equipment?

www.graphene-expo.org

Large or small, our proven process will ensure a safe and successful move Call Benchmark Services today

on 01480 423810 or visit www.benchmark-services.co.uk

4 2 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | S U M M E R 2 0 18

Co-located Exhibitions

Please re


£13m

of state-of-the-art equipment is housed in the National Graphene Institute

Unknown unknowns “Generally, I am a blue-sky researcher looking for ‘unknown unknowns’”

C

ollaboration is key at the National Graphene Institute (NGI) with over 80 companies partnering with The University of Manchester to work with graphene and related 2D materials. These collaborations offer industrial partners the opportunity to work alongside more than 250 multidisciplinary researchers, as well as world-leading academics such as Nobel prize winners, Sir Professor Andre Geim and Professor Sir Konstantin ‘Kostya’ Novoselov FRS. Led by both professors, the NGI’s Condensed Matter Physics (CMP) Group researches nanoscale and mesoscopic materials, such as graphene, metamaterials and quantum fluids and solids. The university prides itself in taking a concerted and creative approach to tackling the scientific unknowns of these remarkable materials. Known for his Friday night experiments that led to the diamagnetic levitation of frogs, gecko tape and the discovery of graphene, here Prof Sir Andre Geim discusses his current research.

2D NOTHING

“Generally, I am a blue-sky researcher looking for ‘unknown unknowns’. Finding those is highly unpredictable, although chances get better if you scout away from madding crowds. I am a fundamental researcher and there is no direct impact from industrial collaboration on my research.

Professor Sir Andre Geim REGIUS PROFESSOR AND ROYAL SOCIETY RESEARCH PROFESSOR, NATIONAL GRAPHENE INSTITUTE, UNIVERSITY OF MANCHESTER

Photography: Mark Epstein

Sir Andre Geim is Professor of Condensed Matter Physics at the National Graphene Institute. He has received many international awards and distinctions, including the John Carty Prize from the US National Academy of Sciences and the Copley Medal from the Royal Society. Most notably, he was awarded the 2010 Nobel Prize in Physics for his ground-breaking work on graphene

R E A D O N L I N E AT: U K S PA . O R G . U K / B R E A K T H R O U G H

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 4 3


INNOVATION

However, economic and societal needs are always at the back of my mind (as well as of many researchers like myself). Ariadne’s thread if you wish. In addition, it is interesting to follow industrial progress, which provides another, albeit indirect, source for new ideas and inspirations. Among recent exciting findings that we are actively developing is ‘2D nothing’, an empty space of only one atom thick which is left when you pull out a 2D material from a bulk crystal. Such ultimately thin channels and capillaries present a new system with unknown properties and potential. For example, we now study molecular transport (gas or liquid flows) through such angstrom-scale capillaries and the results are atypical, different from macroscopic channels. The properties of materials placed inside also become uncharacteristic. In this way, we have been able to create monolayer water (2D water). It shows rich behaviours that contrast with those of ordinary water.”

GRAPHENE

“The electronic properties of graphene have brought more surprises over the last ten years than perhaps any other material in history has delivered. Yet, for me it remains most counterintuitive that the one-atom thick material exists under ambient conditions (room temperature in air full of oxygen and moisture). No traditional material would survive thinning to such thicknesses. You can even make small graphene balloons and poke into them with a match. No traditional metal (steel or gold or anything) can withstand such a feat. Graphene is a frontrunner when it comes to potential future technologies and probably offers more possibilities than any other 2D material because of the exceptional electronic properties, chemical inertness and thermal stability. However, strength is in numbers. If graphene lacks a certain characteristic, related materials provide an ample choice for future technologies. Combining various 2D materials (with or without graphene) enhances possibilities even further. Basically, since the dawn of civilization humans dealt only with 3D materials. Now, suddenly, we have a new class of materials that are one atom or one molecule thick. And there are many hundreds of them and they can be used in millions of combinations. The journey has just started.”

4 4 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | S U M M E R 2 0 18

ABOUT THE COVER

“Hofstadter butterflies exist not in our world but only as energy spectra plotted as a function of carrier concentration and magnetic field. Any material has such a spectrum - that is, its energy depends on magnetic field and the number of charge carriers (electrons) - but such spectra are normally boring and featureless until you reach very high magnetic fields (hundreds of thousands Tesla) when theory predicts very intricate, self-replicating fractal energy spectra. As you zoom in, the original spectrum replicates itself and continues doing so at increasingly finer scales. Unfortunately, magnetic fields of this amplitude do not exist in our solar system, only around neutron stars. So no one was able to observe these spectral butterflies. There is a trick however that enables us to observe the equivalent of Hofstadter butterflies in the lab. We were able to make so-called graphene superlattices; an artificial material where atoms are placed on a surface 100 times more sparsely than the usual atomic distances. When measuring the energy spectra of our graphene superlattices, much lower magnetic fields allowed us to clearly observe their fractal spectrum.”

2D FUTURES?

“2D materials and their combinations will be investigated for many decades if not centuries, with researchers trying to find new applications. Currently, all we know has been gathered within the last ten years. This represents very limited knowledge. As far as the future is concerned, I can reasonably guess no further than 10-15 years ahead. During this initial period, we will see a gradual spread of graphene and 2D materials into a multitude of various industries, mostly trying to improve existing technologies and products. First, product characteristics will be improved by a few percent, making them more competitive (this can already be seen happening now) and then improvements will get bigger and more significant, supporting radically improved product performance. I don’t think we can reasonably expect any awe-inspiring revolutionary innovations within the next ten years. Only later, as the technology matures and becomes more accessible, will people start developing innovations that can truly be called revolutionary. 2D materials offer an extension rather than an alternative to silicon (Si); no one

tries to replace wood or aluminium. I expect silicon-based electronics will be around for many decades yet. However, these advanced materials we are working on are thin, flexible, transparent and of higher electronic quality. These properties will lead us naturally to extended product potential. If wafer-scale films of 2D InSe or black phosphorous were available now, they would immediately find applications in wearable electronics, for example. This revolution (mobile phones around your wrists or ankles; smart skin, etc.) is certainly coming, and 2D materials will either initiate it or at least speed it up. Future benefits will be enjoyed by all industries in which powdered (low-quality) 2D materials can be used. These applications will experience many small but valuable improvements. Potential outcomes might include better composite materials and textiles, energy storage (improvement in batteries), more durable tyres and plastics, anticorrosion paints and more.” ■

For further information about the NGI, visit: www.graphene.manchester.ac.uk


Unique, single to few layer, stable nano emulsions and inks Patent pending emulsion technology – tunable properties and tailored composition Graphene, MoS2 and BN

1%

Nano stabilised emulsions without binders

Controlled layer number

Low to super-high concentrations

Low-boiling point dispersions in H2O/surfactant or solvents

“The production of emulsions of graphene and other 2D nanomaterials is one of the greatest breakthroughs in nanotechnology and materials science of the last years. The use of AMD’s high-quality, stable emulsions allows my group to tackle new research challenges and explore new avenues exploiting the enormous potential of these unique materials.” Edgar Muñoz, Instituto de Carboquímica, Spain

For more information on our nHance nanomaterial range of products, please call +44 (0)1273 934685 or email contact@advmat.co.uk


INNOVATION

TFF Fridays Great spaces inspire curiosity-driven research

Professor Sir Andre Geim’s free-thinking ‘Friday sessions’ helped inspire the discovery of graphene… although perhaps not exactly like this!

4 6 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | S U M M E R 2 0 18


Nookpod: new ways of working

An oasis of calm in noisy environments, Nook is a portable work & meeting pod. Nook allows Science Park owners, tenants & visitors to: • Find headspace & concentrate • Hold small meetings & interviews • Make private phone & Skype calls • Use for training and pop-up clinics Fully mobile, with integrated power & lighting, available in a range of finishes, Nook can be made to suit any environment. With a variety of ways to own, rent and sponsor, Nook is changing how Science Parks and Coworking Spaces deploy and manage assets. “Our tenants love the nooks. They have helped us to create some very much in demand extra quiet meeting and workspaces in locations which weren’t really working for us.” Tom Beasley, Head of Bristol & Bath Science Park To find out more go to: www.nookpod.com Email: hello@nookpod.com or call: +44 (0) 333 577 6665

R E A D O N L I N E AT: U K S PA . O R G . U K / B R E A K T H R O U G H

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 4 7


INNOVATION

A conventional AFM probe

Feeling the nanoscale force Nanoscale vertically orientated probes improve atomic force microscopy

T

he atomic force microscope is capable of imaging at a much higher resolution than the light microscope, extending down to the atomic scale, because it is not subject to the diffraction limit of light. NuNano are a start-up based in Bristol, who manufacture the probes utilised in atomic force microscopy (AFM). Many important reactions take place on nanoscale surfaces, such as catalysis and DNA interactions. Crucial to the understanding of such reactions is the ability to image these surfaces and measure their physical properties. This can be performed using a powerful tool called the atomic force microscope. It differs from the more widely known light microscope in that, rather than

4 8 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | S U M M E R 2 0 18

making use of light and lenses to magnify objects not visible to the human eye, it uses the forces between a probe and the nanoscale surface of a sample.

TRADITIONAL AFM James Vicary CO-FOUNDER AND MANAGING DIRECTOR, NUNANO

James has fourteen years of experience in atomic force microscopy, of which nine were spent manufacturing unique cantilever sensors for research projects at the University of Bristol

Most commonly, an AFM probe consists of a micro-cantilever with a tetrahedral or conical tip positioned at its free end. When inserted into a conventional atomic force microscope, the probe is orientated such that the cantilever is horizontally mounted, and the tip faces the sample under study. A laser beam is reflected off the side of the cantilever facing away from the sample towards a photodetector and it is often necessary to increase the reflected laser signal by coating this side of the cantilever in a metal layer.


10­-15

newtons is equal to one femtonewton (fN)

T H E L M F M T E C H N I Q U E , U S I N G V E R T I C A L LY O R I E N TAT E D C A N T I L E V E R S , C A N M E A S U R E L AT E R A L A N D S H E A R F O R C E S W I T H N A N O M E T R E RESOLUTION AND FEMTO-NE W TON SENSITIVIT Y In the simplest form of AFM, the tip is scanned across the surface where it encounters features of varying height and thus, varying force interactions between its apex and the sample surface. The cantilever will deflect differently according to these varying force interactions and this leads to a change in position of the laser beam on the photodetector. An image and height profile of the surface is captured from this position shift. Horizontal positioning of the cantilever leads to some limitations in conventional AFM. Firstly, the probe is not sensitive to lateral and shear forces because it is only the deflection of the cantilever in the vertical direction that is measurable. Secondly, the stiffness of the cantilever must be sufficient for it to extend horizontally over the sample surface. This limits its sensitivity to the forces arising between the tip and the sample surface. Thirdly, shorter-range attractive forces experienced by the tip when it approaches the sample surface are often larger than the spring constant of the cantilever. As a result, the tip will jump into contact with the sample, known as a “jump-to-contact” event, which can cause damage to soft or sensitive samples. Vertically orientated cantilever

A wafer of NuNano probes

L AT E R A L M O L E C U L A R FORCE MICROSCOPY

To overcome these limitations of conventional AFM, NuNano has collaborated with Dr Massimo Antognozzi at the University of Bristol to manufacture vertically orientated cantilevers (their NuVOC range) for use in a technique called lateral molecular force microscopy (LMFM). A different detection system is needed for LMFM compared to conventional AFM, known as ‘scattering evanescent wave’ detection. A total internal reflected laser beam below the sample under study generates an evanescent electromagnetic field above the sample surface. The electromagnetic radiation is scattered when the free end of the cantilever enters the evanescent field. The position of this free end is detected from the scattered radiation striking a photodetector rather than that inferred from the deflection of the cantilever, as in conventional AFM. The vertical orientation of the cantilever means that a tip is not required and since the detection system does not involve reflection of a laser beam from the cantilever, metal coating of the cantilever is not needed. This

R E A D O N L I N E AT: U K S PA . O R G . U K / B R E A K T H R O U G H

greatly simplifies the manufacturing process. The elimination of “jump-tocontact” events with these vertically orientated probes means that they are suited for the study of very soft samples. Furthermore, they do not need to be as stiff as conventional AFM probes, making them highly sensitive. NuNano’s NuVOC probes have spring constants in the range 0.003 – 6000 pN/nm. The LMFM technique, using vertically orientated cantilevers, can measure lateral and shear forces with nanometre resolution and femto-Newton sensitivity. It has been used successfully to, for example, perform shear force imaging of DNA in liquid, track the evolution of hydration layers during metal nucleation in real-time, image the motion of the biomolecular motor, Kinesin in the lateral force direction, and study the mechanical properties of the adhesion protein, UspA1 when expressed on the cell surface of the bacterium, Moraxella catarrhalis. ■

For further information, please visit: www.nunano.com

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 4 9


INNOVATION

A Quantum Leap in Energy Discovery â&#x20AC;&#x153;The first quantum revolution enabled us to map the workings of the world in granular detail, discovering the rules that frame physical reality.â&#x20AC;?

A

s our understanding of this scientific field progresses, there is the distinct possibility that it could provide opportunities for developing the next generation of technology that could revolutionise every industry, from global communications to driverless cars. The energy sector is a good example of an industry that could be transformed by quantum technology. Quantum could open up an ultrahigh definition window into the earth, helping us to uncover vast and hidden energy reserves. Portable quantum gravity sensors that measure the gravitational field at the surface of the Earth to reveal subterranean

Dr Peter Thompson CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER, NATIONAL PHYSICAL LABORATORY Peter was head of the Counter Terrorism Science and Technology Centre, before returning to Dstl as a Programme Director for Science and Technology. Following a period in the Ministry of Defence headquarters, where he joined the Senior Civil Service leading Science and Technology policy, Peter returned to Dstl as a Board Member and Deputy Chief Executive, responsible for corporate strategy, governance, strategic relationships, communications and human resources. Peter took up his present role at NPL in September 2015

5 0 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | S U M M E R 2 0 18


28%

more energy is expected to be needed across the globe by 2040

A LT H O U G H F O S S I L F U E L S A R E F O R E C A S T T O P R O V I D E O V E R HALF OF PRIMARY WORLD ENERGY IN 2040, RESE ARCH S H O W S T H AT O I L F I R M S A R E N O L O N G E R S U F F I C I E N T LY INVESTING IN FINDING NE W RESERVES, PRESENTING A HUGE POTENTIAL PROBLEM FOR THE FUTURE

secrets, could both revolutionise the maintenance of underground energy pipelines, and produce high-speed, non-destructive methods of oil and gas exploration. At the same time, this technology could also dramatically lower the cost and environmental impact of energy exploration and enable us to find new fossil fuel reserves at a speed and scale that was previously unimaginable.

A T I M E LY S O LU T I O N

The emergence of quantum technology in the area could not be timelier. Although fossil fuels are forecast to provide over half of primary world energy in 2040, research shows that oil firms are no longer sufficiently investing in finding new reserves, presenting a huge potential problem for the future. Recent figures revealed a 12% drop in investment in oil exploration last year, with discoveries of conventional oil falling to 2.4 billion barrels, half the level of 2015, the year of the fewest new discoveries since 1952. Causes are complex, from the recent collapse in crude prices deterring investment in

exploration, to the high risk and cost of exploration in challenging environments, such as the quest for deepwater reserves. As a result, future energy prices could skyrocket as demand exceeds supply, leaving the world facing power shortages. Critically, it could lead to an overreliance on inflexible power sources such as wind and solar energy. This could be dangerous because they cannot be shamelessly scaled up or down to meet fluctuating demand and only work when the wind blows or the sun shines. Without new investment in exploration, the International Energy Agency warns that a supply crunch could come as early as 2020. The emergence of new quantum technologies, not just for oil and gas but many other industry sectors, is a success of the government’s investment in the UK Quantum Technologies Programme.

ENCOURAGING INVESTMENT

The recent Blackett Review argues that industry, academia and government must dramatically speed up the identification of areas of quantum with economic benefit, and that industry should also inject funds into those promising areas to accelerate commercialisation. Part of the barrier may be that quantum technology is based on advanced and extraordinary physics at the very

R E A D O N L I N E AT: U K S PA . O R G . U K / B R E A K T H R O U G H

cutting edge of science, which means it lacks the validation needed to drive early investment. Research into these applications of quantum in sectors, like the oil and gas industry, will be the focus of the national quantum activity that I will be leading, alongside Innovate UK and EPSRC, as well as other stakeholders in the UK Quantum Technologies Programme. Together we will align UK industry’s needs to the potential of emerging quantum technologies. The use of quantum technology for the low-cost discovery of future energy reserves could just be the tip of the iceberg. Quantum technologies hold enormous promise for a wide range of sectors and could form a multibillion-pound industry here in the UK. Making the most of this will require an increasingly joined-up approach between industry and government. We will work to create the optimum environment for public and private investment to turn these opportunities into reality and aim to give UK businesses first access to disruptive quantum technologies to drive international trade and business growth. ■

For further information, read NPL’s Insights issue 6 – Quantum: http://www.npl.co.uk/commercialservices/insights/issue-06/

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 5 1


Quantum physics primer A bite-sized cheat sheet for bite-sized physics

B

y harnessing the properties of quantum physics, the theory that describes the behaviour of matter at the atomic scale, scientists are developing technologies with unprecedented power and performance.

EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT QUANTUM PHYSICS BUT WERE AFRAID TO ASK:

1

At the quantum scale, objects behave as both waves and particles (wave-particle duality) - they share both wave-like properties such as frequency or wavelength, and particle-like properties such that they can be counted and are localised to some degree.

2

Quantum objects can be in a ‘superposition’ of states – any two (or more) quantum states can be added together and the result will be another valid quantum state; and conversely, every quantum state can be represented as a sum of two or more other distinct states. They can be here and there, up and down, on and off at the same time.

3

Quantum physics is discrete as the name ‘quantum’ reflects, energy contained in a quantum field comes in integer multiples of some fundamental energy.

4

Quantum physics is probabilistic it is impossible to predict the outcome of a single experiment on a

quantum system, predictions always involve inferring probability distributions (wavefunctions) from multiple repeated experiments.

5

Quantum physics is non-local the results of measurements made at one location can depend on properties of objects further away than light speed signals might travel. This phenomenon is referred to as quantum entanglement and means that it is impossible to observe a system without altering it.

6

Quantum physics is (mostly) very small - quantum effects get smaller as an object gets larger. Quantum phenomena are confined to the scale of atoms and fundamental particles. ■

Quantum Information Technologies QUANTUM COMPUTERS

• Operate on superposition of states • Quantum bits - called qubits can be both 0 and 1 • Delivers short cuts to enable much faster calculations

5 2 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | S U M M E R 2 0 18

QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY

• Capitalises on quantum entanglement • Instantly detects if a message has been intercepted in transit • Delivers ultra-secure privacy protection

QUANTUM SENSORS

• Exploit quantum correlations • Measure the effect of the quantum state of another system on itself • Achieve super-high-resolution and the greatest sensitivity possible


Growth

Sharing your success, best practice, and lessons learned

Product-service systems Succeeding in the servitisation journey

M

anufacturing is undergoing a transformation. Increasingly, manufacturers are offering services and solutions rather than products. Caterpillar helps its customer optimise production in their quarries and mines. John Deere helps farmers plough and harvest fields more quickly using GPS technology to track the location of equipment in fields. Rolls-Royce sells thrust rather than engines. Hitachi guarantees train availability, rather than simply providing rolling stock. BAE Systems contracts on the basis of fleet availability – guaranteeing that ships and planes will be available for a minimum number of operational days per year. All these firms are changing their business models. They are offering

Professor Andy Neely PRO-VICE-CHANCELLOR FOR ENTERPRISE AND BUSINESS RELATIONS, UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE, FOUNDING DIRECTOR OF THE CAMBRIDGE SERVICE ALLIANCE

Dr Jingchen Hou RESEARCH ANALYST AT THE STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIPS OFFICE, UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE

R E A D O N L I N E AT: U K S PA . O R G . U K / B R E A K T H R O U G H

services and solutions rather than simply delivering products. They are servitising – “innovating their capabilities and processes to better create mutual value through a shift from selling products to selling ProductService Systems”. Servitisation is a transformation journey - it involves firms developing the capabilities and processes they need to provide services and solutions that supplement their traditional product offerings. Research completed by the Cambridge Service Alliance suggests that firms that are servitising pay close attention to four essential factors: (i) the value proposition; (ii) the value delivery system; (iii) risk and accountability spread; and (iv) the ecosystem.

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 5 3


GROWTH

VA LU E P R O P O S I T I O N

Your value proposition defines how you create value for your customers. Servitised firms understand that many customers do not want to own products; instead what they really value is the capability those products deliver. There’s an old marketing adage “customers don’t want quarter inch drills, they want quarter inch holes”. So, it is with servitisation. Servitised companies understand what their customers truly value and then seek to optimise their offerings to align with their customer’s needs. A particularly useful question servitised companies ask is, “How can I help my customer? Help their customer do a better job?”. If you can crack this and develop a service offering that enables it, you are well on the way to defining a much more robust value proposition. Think of Caterpillar offering quarry optimisation services. The quarry’s customers want access to cheap and readily available materials. By optimising production efficiencies in the quarry, as well as uptime of equipment, Caterpillar helps its customers drive down their costs, which in turn enables them to offer a more plentiful supply of cheaper materials to their customers.

VA LU E D E L I V E RY

To deliver value propositions, organisations need value delivery systems – combinations of capabilities and processes that create value. These capabilities and process often GPS technology helps John Deere track equipment more efficiently in the field

Hitachi guarantees train availability rather than simply providing rolling stock

involve combining human skills with technical competencies. Increasingly, they are data enabled. As mentioned previously, John Deere uses GPS tracking technology to monitor the position of equipment in a field. This allows John Deere to optimise ploughing and harvesting schedules, plotting the most efficient routes through fields. Connecting positioning data to autonomous driving capabilities opens up the potential for driverless tractors and other farm equipment, a phenomenon already being observed in some countries and industries. Of course, when you are pooling capabilities and processes you may find

that not all of the necessary resources sit inside your firm. You may have to partner with others to pool capabilities. This is especially true today with the emergence of the internet of things and the associated data capabilitiesthat arise. Many original equipment manufacturers have chosen to partner with expert third parties who specialise in data analytics, so the original equipment manufacturers can concentrate on their core capabilities and let the third parties interrogate data and advise them on the insights that can derived. Designing a robust and effective value delivery system involves being clear about what capabilities and processes you require, how these have to be configured and whether you need to partner with others to access these.

R I S K A N D A C C O U N TA B I L I T Y

A consequence of committing to outcomes (and working more closely with third parties) is that firms increase the risks they are exposed to (and/or the accountability spread they face). By contracting for outcomes, providers become more deeply integrated with and dependent upon their customers. Take Pearson, for example, which is reinventing itself as a learning solutions provider as opposed to a publisher. If Pearson contracts on outcomes and guarantees to help school children achieve certain levels of academic attainment, it becomes incredibly dependent on the children themselves – will they work hard? – and the teachers – how effective are they? Unless everyone

5 4 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | S U M M E R 2 0 18


£6.7tn

is contributed to the global economy through manufacturing

Credit: press.hitachirail-eu.com

involved in the value delivery system works together and keeps their end of the bargain, Pearson will be unable to deliver the value proposition it has promised.

ECOSYSTEM

The final issue that firms that are servitising focus on is the ecosystem – understanding where roles and responsibilities across the ecosystem lie and which firms are best positioned to capture value. Apple provides a useful illustration. Much of Apple’s ecosystem is closed – design, manufacture, retail and distribution. By keeping control, Apple is able to manage quality as well as capture value from transactions. The one area where Apple has opened up its ecosystem to third parties is Apps development.

S E R V I T I S AT I O N I S A T R A N S F O R M AT I O N J O U R NE Y - I T IN V O LV E S F IR M S D E V E L O P IN G T HE C A PA B IL I T IE S A ND P R O C E S S E S T HE Y NE E D T O P R O V ID E S E R V I C E S A ND S O L U T I O N S T H AT S U P P L E ME N T T HE IR T R A D I T I O N A L P R O D U C T O F F E R IN G S Here Apple has encouraged as many people as possible to get involved in Apps development. The advantage of this is that if thousands of people are developing Apps it is really difficult to develop a unique App, and if it is difficult to develop a unique App it is difficult to charge a lot for any single App. There’s always a similar alternative App that provides competition. The consequence is that by having thousands of Apps developers, Apple drives down the cost of individual Apps to the end customer, creating value for them, but also locking them in to the Apple platform. This is a classic ecosystem play – Apple is deliberately thinking about how best to shape the ecosystem to its advantage, accessing the capabilities it needs to support its core offerings, while not sacrificing power and market control.

Servitisation is a fascinating phenomenon. Driven by the need to innovate business models and supported by new technological developments – the cloud, big data, machine learning, AI – manufacturers are increasingly questioning their old business models and starting to servitise. Servitisation, however, is not without risks and challenges. The complexity can often be underestimated. By paying account of four issues: value proposition, value delivery systems, accountability spread and ecosystems – you can maximise your chances of success. ■

For further information, please visit: www.cambridge-biomedical.com

Apple's ecosystem encourages as many people as possible to develop Apps

Credit: apple.com/newsroom

R E A D O N L I N E AT: U K S PA . O R G . U K / B R E A K T H R O U G H

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 5 5


GROWTH

Greetings to Galway UKSPA new full member; National University of Ireland Galway Business Innovation Centre, becomes the latest Irish member Collaboration between the UK and Ireland provides significant opportunities for UKSPA members and is a particular area of interest for the Association. We are, therefore, delighted to welcome NUI Galway Business Innovation Centre into UKSPA membership and look forward to further collaborative opportunities. NUI Galway was originally established in 1845 and now sits firmly in the top tier of research-intensive universities in Europe. The University is part of a dynamic research and innovation ecosystem in the west of Ireland with thriving medtech, ICT, marine and creative sectors. This has led to the development of centres of excellence and a state of the art Business Innovation Centre which plays a strategic role in the development of start-up companies, spin-ins and spin-outs, and attracts internationally renowned researchers.

Members collaborate UKSPA Business Affiliate; Cresco, builds on hugely successful links with Ireland by opening their new office in Galway

The Quadrangle Building at NUI Galway

There are currently 40 companies based on the beautiful river-side campus, which is also home to over 18,000 students and 2,500 staff. The Business Innovation Centre aims to create an environment which promotes entrepreneurialism and innovation, enhances spin-out formation and new business growth. The centre gives companies prime opportunity to benefit from the first-class facilities available in NUI Galway. Priority is given to companies spinning out from activity on campus and to other external start-up companies with the potential to benefit from close contact with the biosciences groups on the NUI Galway campus. The Centre also accommodates, where

Cresco, whose head office is at the Advanced Technology Innovation Centre at Loughborough University Science Park, are experts in securing grant funding for technology-based clients. They have a strong history of collaboration with Irish companies, and this exciting new partnership will see them establish roots at the Business Innovation Centre in Galway.

possible, entrepreneurial start-ups, industry spin outs and projects from external companies from around the world, that need access to the expertise and equipment available at NUI Galway in order to develop and function successfully. For those wanting to develop a medtech start-up, NUI Galway has dedicated programmes. These include BioExel, Ireland's first medtech accelerator, and the BioInnovate Programme which is based on an approach used in Stanford University. ■

For further information, please visit: http://tto.nuigalway.ie/en/business-innovation-centre

A growing number of UK companies have already moved some of their business operations to Ireland in preparation for Brexit, and Cresco see their partnership with NUI Galway creating new opportunities for collaboration between clients from the UK and Ireland. The Cresco team is already putting together project partnerships for many of their clients, aiming to build on the unprecedented success they have previously enjoyed with a great number of Irish companies. That success includes applications to the H2020 programme, in particular Phase 2 applications where Cresco has won more than €5.1million for Irish clients in the last 12 months. Cresco CEO, Jo Derbyshire, and the Cresco team have been working with Irish clients for some time, and an office at the NUI Galway Business Innovation Centre provides the ideal opportunity for the company to build on their success. ■

For further information, please visit: www.crescoinnovation.co.uk

5 6 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | S U M M E R 2 0 18


Newlands Science Park Encouraging high-technology and knowledge-based businesses in Hull New UKSPA member; Newland Science Park in Hull is in the Yorkshire and Humber region of England. The history of the science park dates back to 1983 when the University of Hull and Hull City Council met to discuss the City’s need to retain, and at the same time introduce and encourage, more high-technology and knowledgebased businesses within the area. Located on the University campus in a pleasant working environment, Newlands Science Park has all the benefits of the University close at hand, giving companies immediate access to

expertise and facilities not otherwise readily available to small organisations. Newlands Science Park aims to encourage companies engaged in developments complementary with work being undertaken by the University, to locate to NSP in order to foster collaboration; to speed up the technology transfer process by providing appropriate start-up and expansion facilities for businesses established by academics and graduates to exploit their research and development ideas; and to act as a focus to encourage the growth of high-technology and

knowledge-based industry in Kingston upon Hull and the immediate region. The Director of Business Engagement and Enterprise for Science and Engineering, Professor Phil Leigh commented, “The opportunity for the University of Hull to re-join UKSPA was a natural step now we are operating and managing Newlands Science Park as part of our Enterprise portfolio and offering to the region”. We believe Newlands Science Park based here on our extensive University Campus enables the University of Hull to increase our industry engagement and allow science and technology companies to locate or co-locate on the University of Hull campus. This allows increased access for industry to engage with our academics, students and portfolio of technical equipment. ■

For further information, please visit: www.hull.ac.uk

Harlow Science Park A joint venture between Harlow Council, Vinci UK Developments and Wrenbridge New UKSPA member; Harlow Science Park provides an exciting new development comprising 35 acres of land capable of delivering 675,000 sq ft of brand new buildings for the science and technology sectors. The project is a joint venture between Harlow Council, Vinci UK Developments Ltd and Wrenbridge and will have an end value in the order of £275m. The scheme forms part of the Harlow Enterprise which includes Kao Park. Kao Park will employ circa 1,500 people within the next 12 months and already includes organisations such as Raytheon, Arrow Electronics and Pearson and a new data centre campus. The scale of the science park is unique in the South East and once fully occupied will provide between 2,500 and 3,500 jobs. The science park will include a number of speculative buildings and also bespoke freehold and leasehold buildings built for occupiers. The first phase of the development will include a 30,000 sq ft, three-storey speculative office building that has been funded by Harlow council. To set the

tone for the rest of the scheme, it is aiming for a BREEAM (Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method) Excellent rating. The second building will be the MedTech Innovation Centre, a 15,000 sq ft research facility for Anglia Ruskin University. The university has had a presence in Harlow for the past 10 years through its relationship with Harlow College and it has a strong track record in medical R&D at its Chelmsford site, where it prototypes medical devices. The MedTech Innovation Centre is designed to be sublet in small units to start-up companies and postgraduates, offering

R E A D O N L I N E AT: U K S PA . O R G . U K / B R E A K T H R O U G H

an affordable base for R&D that could rapidly grow into something bigger. The new Junction 7a directly from the M11 will be open by 2021 and places the site at the heart of the London/Stansted/ Cambridge corridor. Access to Stansted Airport is within a 15-minute drive. Harlow itself is currently experiencing major growth, particularly with the relocation of Public Health England to the former GSK site, which will provide 2,500 jobs once fully operational. ■

For further information, please visit: www.helloharlow.co.uk

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 5 7


GROWTH

Perfect outcomes Scitech realise capital investments through new and enhanced facilities New UKSPA Business Affiliate member; Scitech, is an employee owned, highly specialised and skilled business offering a full range of engineering, construction and professional services, specifically designed and packaged to suit the needs of the life science sector. Scitech are ideally positioned to help UKSPA member organisations and their tenants realise their capital investments through development of new and enhanced facilities. Founded 16 years ago, Scitech provides the complete range of skills required for pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical projects entirely from its in-house resources. Currently the company has a resource of over 130 staff in the UK and Benelux and is opening a new South West office in Wales during summer 2018.

Having established a simple organisational structure, Scitech developed an open culture to facilitate good clear communications, ensuring rapid decision making. The team prides themselves on the collaborative and objective way they create solutions to match project requirements and client demands. Accomplished through technical excellence

and a rigorous approach to management and service delivery, they strive to achieve ‘perfect outcomes’. It is this that continues to satisfy clients and generates the advocates that drive growth. ■

For further information, please visit: www.scitech.com

Helping entrepreneurial UK thrive R&D Tax Solutions co-founder shares her knowledge with Finance Monthly New UKSPA Business Affiliate member; R&D Tax Solutions, was delighted to see co-founder and director, Laura Duggan, impart her vast knowledge on tax relief claims in the June issue of Finance Monthly. Laura discussed a number of issues relating to the successful processing of an R&D tax claim and about the position of – and the challenges faced by – R&D Tax Solutions in such a competitive industry. R&D Tax Solutions is a tax consultancy, specialised in

Laura Duggan, co-founder and director of R&D Tax Solutions

5 8 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | S U M M E R 2 0 18

the formulation and completion of research and development tax relief claims. Founded in 2014, the company set the vision to be the nation’s champion in this highly-specialist field. Senior team members have been delivering R&D claims in a range of industries for over a decade. Together they have recovered millions of pounds of overpaid corporation tax each year. They pride themselves on their in-depth understanding of the tax legislation and a close working relationship with HMRC, which has enabled them to maximise claims to date with 100% success.

Claiming R&D relief can be a straightforward process. Yet, as all things tax based, it is just as easy to get the process wrong. This is where the specialist team brings value to the relationship, by bringing combined years of experience in compiling successful claims. Offering a streamlined process, turning around claims in a matter of weeks with minimal disruption to your business, their Mission is to help entrepreneurial UK thrive. Clients vary in size from innovative start-ups to companies working in the global arena, and the company is committed to delivering real value, expertise and advice to the Science Park, Innovation and enterprise sector. ■

For further information, please visit: www.rndtax.co.uk


The impact of incubators and accelerators Nesta call to all UK incubators and accelerators for contributing data on the businesses applying to your facilities Nesta (the UK's innovation foundation), with funding from the Department of Business Energy and Industrial Strategy, are conducting

research into the impact of incubators and accelerators both on the businesses they support, but also on the wider ecosystem.

As part of this they aim to investigate which types of support (e.g. provision of workspace, mentoring, funding or training) add the most value. But they can't do this alone and need accelerators and incubators to help by contributing data. If you work for a accelerator or incubator and would like to assist this project, please do get in touch. By contributing, you will not only gain evidence of your programme’s impact, but will also help the sector as a whole. ■

To participate, please contact: christopher.burnett@nesta.org.uk

Hexagon Tower At the forefront of innovation in the North West of England New UKSPA member; Hexagon Tower, is the specialist science and technology facility located in Blackley, North Manchester. With easy links to road, rail and air networks, Hexagon consists of 169,537 sq ft (15,750 m2) of space over lower ground, ground and ten upper floors offering serviced offices and laboratory accommodation for scientific and technology-focused business. As a former ICI research, development and production centre much of the infrastructure for research and development is already in place but is adaptable to meet precise needs. Home to occupiers including Lubrizol, Lonza, Intertek and Randox, Hexagon Tower offers unrivalled accommodation for science and technology-based organisations and local businesses ranging from 150 sq ft (14 m2) up to 20,000 sq ft (1,858 m2). Fully furnished and serviced office solutions are also available. Hexagon’s unique design with 44 risers per floor and 3 metre ceiling height allows for highly flexible floor plates, suitable for a mixture of office or

Hexagon Tower has a unique design which makes it highly flexible for office or laboratory space

laboratory space. The range of businesses represented by occupiers at Hexagon provides great opportunities for effective business and social networking. The Tower has a newly refurbished reception area, gym, a new coffee point and a restaurant with break out pods suitable for informal meetings. The restaurant provides fantastic breakfast, lunch and corporate catering options for occupiers and guests. The new coffee point in the reception area will welcome our occupiers and guests, giving them an opportunity to grab a

R E A D O N L I N E AT: U K S PA . O R G . U K / B R E A K T H R O U G H

coffee or tea before starting their day. The site boasts 550 surface car parking spaces and is a short walk from Crumpsal Vale Metrolink station. Further investments are being made in energy resilience and tenant health and wellbeing, and form part of a larger development plan to keep Hexagon Tower at the forefront of innovation in the North of England. ■

For further information, please visit: www.hexagon-tower.co.uk

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 5 9


GROWTH Pictured (l-r) at NovaUCD are the founders of Kogii; Andrea Pignanelli, Callan Eldon and Karl Roe (Nick Bradshaw, Fotonic)

New startup to improve cycling safety Kogii wins 2018 UCD entrepreneurship programme for students Kogii (www.kogii.bike), an early-stage University College Dublin (UCD) student venture, has been declared overall winner of the 2018 UCD Start-up Stars Programme and has received a €3,000 cash prize. Kogii is developing an innovative and feature-rich smart bike light to improve real-time safety for cyclists. They plan to use the data acquired from the light’s sensors to help understand precisely what factors make a road dangerous for cyclists. The light, which is attached to a cyclist’s seatpost, uses motion sensing to

detect braking, and when it does, it behaves like a car brake light to assist drivers in understanding a cyclist’s intentions. Depending on ambient lighting conditions, the brightness of the light will also change to maximise the visibility of the cyclist. It brightens to improve visibility during the day and dims to avoid dazzling drivers at night. Kogii also incorporates proximity sensors to actively monitor surrounding vehicles. When vehicles come within a dangerous range of the cyclist, the light

will dynamically flash to alert drivers of potential danger and improve their visibility or awareness of the cyclist. Data from these sensors will also allow Kogii to develop interactive visualisation maps to show dangerous cycling zones, at differing times of the day, to improve awareness of such zones to cyclists and drivers. Tom Flanagan, UCD Director of Enterprise and Commercialisation said, “I would like to congratulate the founders of Kogii on winning the 2018 UCD Startup Stars Programme and I would like to commend all the students who participated in the programme.” The UCD Start-up Stars entrepreneurship programme, now in its 4th year, has been developed to assist UCD undergraduate and postgraduate students in refining start-up ideas through a series of structured workshops, including taught content from industry experts, interactive workshops and regular pitching sessions. In addition, each team also received a cash stipend and office space at NovaUCD. ■

The hashtag for this programme is: #UCDstartupStars

Catalyst Inc CEO to retire We wish Norman Apsley OBE the very best in his retirement Catalyst Inc recently announced the upcoming retirement of their esteemed CEO Norman Apsley OBE in December 2018. Dr Norman Apsley has devoted his career to enterprise promotion and for the last eighteen years has been the inspirational leader of Catalyst Inc (formerly the Northern Ireland Science Park) and is a man at the heart of stimulating innovation in Belfast and wider Northern Ireland. He is an advocate of the talent and ambition of innovators and inventors and his focus is unashamedly on the development and growth of what we term the Knowledge Economy; that is an economy built upon innovation, entrepreneurship and the intellectual capital within NI. Starting on a derelict site in the Titanic Quarter, which was the centre of

6 0 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | S U M M E R 2 0 18

NI’s former ship building industry, in fifteen years, under Norman’s leadership, we are now home to 200 innovative knowledge-based companies employing over 3,000 engineers, researchers, entrepreneurs and executives and now have 3 campuses – our headquarters in Belfast, our Innovation Centre in Derry/ Londonderry and an Innovation Centre in Ballymena. Just last month we were honoured to witness Norman receiving his Lifetime Achievement Award at the Belfast Telegraph Business Awards 2018.

Norman’s mission and that of Catalyst Inc, is to make our ambitious vision ‘for Northern Ireland to be one of the most entrepreneurial knowledge economies across Europe by 2030’ a reality. Norman is a visionary who has been at the forefront of developing a knowledge economy in Northern Ireland since 2000. ■

Send all correspondence to: ceo.catalyst@kornferry.com


New real-time operating system for satellites O.C.E. Technology and ESA commence €500k development project O.C.E. Technology (www.ocetechnology.com) recently announced that it is to develop a new real-time operating system in collaboration with the European Space Agency (ESA). The €500,000 project is expected to take 18 months to complete. The new operating system, which will be developed to flight quality standards, will contain some unique features for the advanced control of

satellite subsystems. The new operating system will allow deterministic scheduling of tasks and will use the new 16-bit SPARC REX instruction set to minimise its storage footprint. Barry Kavanagh, CEO, O.C.E. Technology, said, “This project with the European Space Agency will open up a host of new flight software opportunities for the company and together with our best-in-class debug software will be of

strong interest to the fast growing small satellite market.” O.C.E. Technology, headquartered at NovaUCD, the Centre for New Ventures and Entrepreneurs at University College Dublin, develops software for technical applications and supplies radiation-hardened chiplevel components targeted primarily at the space and high-reliability sectors. An Enterprise Ireland highpotential start-up, the company also supplies a range of satellite subsystems that are used to bring a satellite into a desired orientation in space at a desired spin rate. These subsystems are already well proven on the Chinese space programme. ■

For further information about NovaUCD companies, please visit: www.ucd.ie/innovation/entrepreneurs/ novaucdcompanies/

Local research infrastructure for startups Unit DX marks its one year anniversary with a visit to Parliament One year after opening, the central Bristol science hub is now home to 23 scientific and engineering companies, and hosts over 70 jobs in the city centre. The companies focus on a range of new technologies, from detecting methane gas leaks using drones to developing vaccine candidates for emerging infectious disease. The Unit DX team were invited to Parliament by Thangam Debbonaire, Bristol West MP, to discuss the importance of providing local research infrastructure for startups, to help unlock the enormous potential of University research and provide much-needed jobs for the city’s talented scientists. The growth of Bristol’s scientific ecosystem has been demonstrated by a record year for spin-outs from the University of Bristol in 2017. Dr Harry Destecroix, Director of Unit DX and Co-founder of University spin-out

Ziylo, said; “We started with a mission to form a scientific ecosystem in Bristol, because without lab space and a community, it is really difficult to start science companies. This huge increase in the formation of new enterprises is the result of a lot of talented people coming together to help create and develop the Bristol science cluster.” “We have also benefitted from great timing: there has been increased focus from government on the commercialisation of research, along with a cultural shift amongst researchers, who now see the spinout route as an attainable career path,” he said. “There has also been a change in the

R E A D O N L I N E AT: U K S PA . O R G . U K / B R E A K T H R O U G H

University’s approach to commercialisation, which has facilitated this shift. Now we are up and running; we will continue to focus on supporting these companies.” The centre works closely with the University of Bristol, particularly BrisSynBio and QTEC who have been instrumental in facilitating these spinouts, encouraging researchers to consider the real world applications of their work and supporting them through the commercialisation process. ■

For further information, please visit: www.unitdx.com

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 61


Celebrating 10 years of innovation support For more information, contact: Dr Mark Tock t: +44 (0)115 748 4608 e: Mark.Tock@nottingham.ac.uk

Co-working space now providing an ideal working environment for entrepreneurs. Call us for details on 0115 823 2269.

Hosting

26

events in 2018 including Innovation roundtable series

FINAL UNIP-10Yrs Advert - UKSPA_July18.indd 1

11/07/2018 11:56

FREE

TO ATTEND

10TH & 11TH OCTOBER 2018 RICOH ARENA COVENTRY

GENERATE | MANIPULATE | MEASURE | MANUFACTURE | APPLY

PHOTONEX EUROPE LIVE! is the UK’s premier showcase event dedicated to photonics and light technologies

Co-located Exhibitions · Multiple Conferences · Expert Talks · One Venue

Please register for updates at www.photonex.org 6 2 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | S U M M E R 2 0 18


Chance encounters Building to inspire breakthroughs

T

he joint developers behind Cambridge Biomedical Campus explain how collaboration is being built into its foundations to help inspire innovation and scientific breakthroughs. While necessity has long been acknowledged as the mother of invention, happenstance must be at least a favourite aunt. The ability of innovation to spring from small, often circumstantial beginnings is well evidenced in science – where might we be, for example, without the questionable lab practices of Alexander Fleming that gifted penicillin to the world? The abstractions of chaos theory aside, we have all had ‘lightbulb’

Andrew Blevins MANAGING DIRECTOR, LIBERTY PROPERTY TRUST

Andrew Carrington MANAGING DIRECTOR – STRATEGIC LAND, COUNTRYSIDE PROPERTIES

R E A D O N L I N E AT: U K S PA . O R G . U K / B R E A K T H R O U G H

moments in our own lives. Many of these may be the result of being in the right place at the right time or, crucially, with the right people. Sparking significant scientific discoveries in this way is a challenge, but the value of knowledge-sharing and collaboration is self-evident. This is particularly true of the life sciences sector, with data from Deloitte showing that the average cost of bringing a new drug to market is now an eyewatering £1.2 billion, with many promising drugs never even making it past the development stage. It is easy to see why a collaborative approach is needed to nurture innovation, but how can we achieve this?

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 6 3


GROWTH

Cambridge Biomedical Campus supports cutting-edge healthcare research

BETTER TOGETHER

We know that truly meaningful collaboration starts with the places where we work. The Cambridge Biomedical Campus is a great example of this, having supported a diverse life sciences community since the early 1960s. The site encourages innovation through its ‘ABC’ formula – that is the co-location of academics, businesses and clinicians – which helps accelerate the conversion of research into the next big breakthrough. It means that it is not just clinicians and businesses like AstraZeneca and GlaxoSmithKline that are on the campus, but academics from the University of Cambridge, Cancer Research UK and the Medical Research Council’s Laboratory of Molecular Biology too. As a result, commercial occupiers, researchers and NHS healthcare professionals can tap into the entire lifecycle of advancements in life sciences – with innovative ideas moving from the researcher’s lab bench, to the pre-clinical stages of drug development, through to clinical trials all in one place. The benefits of this approach are evident. GlaxoSmithKline’s trials unit, for example, is already working with its neighbour, Addenbrooke’s Hospital of the Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, on carefully

6 4 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | S U M M E R 2 0 18

T HE R I GH T INF R A S T RU C T U R E M U S T B E IN P L A C E T O S U P P O R T ME A NIN GF U L E N G A GE ME N T B E T W E E N IN S T I T U T I O N S controlled early clinical trials – ‘proof of concept studies’ – to evaluate potential new medicines. The value of this personal interaction in a busy world cannot be underestimated. It ensures that qualitative and quantitative data about drug trialling can be shared as easily and as quickly as possible, benefiting the development process and crucially the ultimate end users – patients. Greater collaboration and dialogue is an aspiration for many, but busy diaries and lengthy train journeys can too often get in the way. The campus is already home to 17,250 people including doctors, nurses, scientists and researchers – by 2021, this number will reach 21,000. By any measure, that’s certainly enough experts to change a lightbulb, but the master-planning of Cambridge Biomedical Campus goes further to encourage the ‘watercooler moments’ that have the potential to change the future of healthcare. Creating spaces where pharmaceutical and biomedical businesses, researchers

and clinicians can co-locate on one site is only one half of the puzzle. The right infrastructure must be in place to support meaningful engagement between institutions, with science clusters planned and designed with collaboration at the forefront. This means fostering thriving interdisciplinary communities to inspire innovation and creativity, rather than just a site housing different organisations working in isolation to their neighbours and sharing nothing more than a commute. The new Royal Papworth Hospital, opening on site in autumn 2018, will benefit from a tunnel connection to the other hospitals on the campus. This physical connectivity is just one manifestation of the ambition to foster closer working relationships between institutions on site, supported not only by the development of world-class facilities, but a genuine sense of community that encourages conversations to continue beyond the office.


B E Y O N D B R I C K S A N D M O RTA R

As well as providing the right spaces, you also need the right culture to support dialogue and partnership. Accordingly, organisations on site are promoting agile and responsive working and cross-sector interactions. The new Royal Papworth Hospital will embrace hotdesking to break down barriers between teams and, by extension, encourage them to adopt the same approach with external partners. This goes beyond the office. Encouraging casual interactions in public areas and coffee shops instead of more formal settings can often spark discovery – the same spirit that led Watson and Crick to announce their discovery of DNA sequencing in a local pub. As we build the Cambridge Biomedical Campus, we have deliberately focused on the spaces between the institutions on site to draw people out and get them talking. Art is not often thought of as going hand in hand with scientific discovery, but it is an important part of our contribution to the expanding site. We are investing more than £1.2 million in public art, including works by internationallyrenowned concept artist, Ryan Gander, as part of a landscape-led approach to expanding the development. These talking points to encourage interaction on the site are built-in ‘water cooler moments’. Housed within new green spaces and gardens threaded throughout the campus, the artwork will create inviting places where people from different disciplines and institutions can meet and share ideas

Aerial view of the Cambridge Biomedical Campus, which is being expanded by 90 acres

– discussing how patients felt about a recent trial or perhaps a new idea that could lead to the next breakthrough in oncology, benefiting thousands of people around the world.

BIGGER PICTURE

Encouraging more frequent discussions between academics and clinicians dealing with the complex biology of human disease and companies with the extensive and varied capabilities needed to apply this knowledge to drug development, is vital to advancing research, particularly as we search for treatments for less common and more challenging conditions. This is important not only for the global community that relies on advancements in the healthcare sector, but to help our country’s £64 billion life sciences industry to realise its potential to become a cornerstone of ‘UK plc’.

The new Royal Papworth Hospital opens on campus in autumn 2018

R E A D O N L I N E AT: U K S PA . O R G . U K / B R E A K T H R O U G H

As new and existing regional science clusters grow and develop, it is also important that these collaborative relationships are extended to the local community to make sure that neighbouring residents and businesses are brought with us as the industry evolves. The government’s Life Sciences Sector Deal – a key part of the Industrial Strategy White Paper – stresses the importance of creating prosperous communities, good jobs and greater earning power for all across the UK through the ongoing growth of life sciences. The Cambridge Biomedical Campus will be inviting the wider community to a series of events over the next year to tell its story. For example, as part of the Cambridge Science Festival organisations have welcomed thousands of people – young and old - to learn about what they do. Of course, the benefits of this engagement stretch both ways – the government has made it clear that the sector must drive progress from within, and the Campus knows it must do its bit to encourage the next generation of researchers and clinicians through this dialogue and knowledge sharing with the community. Who knows how many visitors may be inspired to take up a career in life sciences after getting a glimpse into the industry, and even more excitingly, what might they discover? ■

More information about the vision behind Cambridge Biomedical Campus and its ongoing expansion is available online: https://cambridge-biomedical.com

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 6 5


GROWTH

A new BRAIN

S

European Regional Development Fund supports Sussex-based open innovation network

ussex Innovation, the business incubation network owned by the University of Sussex, has secured a European Regional Development Fund grant for £600,000 to part-fund the launch of a new open innovation network across the ‘Coast to Capital’ region. BRAIN – the Business Research Academic Innovation Network – will run until 2020, helping innovative local startups and researchers to connect and collaborate with the large organisations and corporates based in the region. The partnerships will be facilitated by the experienced commercialisation team based at Sussex Innovation’s two hubs, on the University campus in Falmer, and in East Croydon. Sussex Innovation will look to build on its existing portfolio of product and service innovations that are currently being developed in the region and further afield, and match these with relevant commercial partners. The Coast to Capital LEP covers Brighton & Hove,

6 6 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | S U M M E R 2 0 18

Croydon, East Surrey, West Sussex and the Lewes District. Mike Herd, Executive Director of the Sussex Innovation Centre explained; “Most large organisations are keen to develop new ideas but have no process for bringing in innovations from outside. Internal R&D certainly has value, but it tends to be incremental in nature, rather than creating a step change within the business like an entirely new idea can. It’s very hard to dedicate time and resources to more disruptive ideas, because you need to focus on what’s most essential to the business. “The biggest, most successful companies realise this – it’s why initiatives like Google Campus and EDF Blue Lab have started to appear – but there are still lots of large businesses that can’t afford to risk that kind of investment. BRAIN will provide a network for those businesses to interact with innovators from outside of their current sector, introducing truly disruptive technologies, products and services.”

Partners in the scheme will be expected to participate in a process of collaborative product development – not simply signing retail agreements but acting as ‘customer mentors’ to help shape the progress of new products and services. As well as making direct introductions, Sussex Innovation will host a series of roundtable discussions and pitch events, starting in the autumn, to identify areas of opportunity around specific sectors of technology. Jonathan Sharrock, Chief Executive at Coast to Capital said; “Sussex Innovation’s vision for the BRAIN project to grow the local innovation sector through supporting small to medium sized businesses aligns well with the aims of Coast to Capital. It is exciting to think that innovations with a truly global reach could be developed on our doorstep through BRAIN.” ■

For more information, please visit: www.sinc.co.uk/brain


Dr Laure Chichet and Dr Isabelle Riou from Teledyne e2v visiting the labs in the Quantum Technology Hub

Bringing to life a faster, safer world Introducing the UK National Quantum Technology Hub in Sensors and Metrology

T

he development of quantum technology will have an undeniably transformative impact on everyday life, not to mention across huge industry sectors such as transport, civil engineering, communications, computing and even in space. Quantum technology will help to make the world a safer, faster and more productive place to live in. Led by the University of Birmingham, the UK Quantum Technology Hub for Sensors and Metrology develops cold atom science into a range of practical sensors for measuring basic quantities such as gravity, magnetic field, and time. The team is investigating how they can be used to address challenging problems such as seeing underground or imaging brain activity, both of which have significant economic and societal impact. Cold atom science exploits atoms that are cooled to temperatures near absolute zero, which enables atoms to unveil their wave-like nature. This makes them ideal systems for discovering new quantum behaviour and new states of matter. In particular, it makes them exquisitely sensitive to their environment. The capabilities these sensors offer will be hugely impactful across many engineering sectors. For example,

compared to the current commercially available sensor, the gravity sensor being developed by the Quantum Technology Hub will be able to see much deeper into the ground, and, with the help of 3D printing and novel designs for magnetic shielding, will produce incredibly precise detection results. Once the gravity sensor is fully developed and manufactured in volume, engineers will routinely be able to ‘see’ into the ground to examine the underground landscape, and help to prevent disasters arising from undetected sinkholes, and in more routine civil engineering, shorten the length of time for road works. The UK Quantum Technology Hub for Sensors and Metrology, led by the University of Birmingham’s Professor Kai Bongs, is one of four Hubs making up the UK National Quantum Technologies Programme, which is funded by Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS), delivered through the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) and Innovate UK. Other agencies such as the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl) and the Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) are also closely involved.

R E A D O N L I N E AT: U K S PA . O R G . U K / B R E A K T H R O U G H

This Quantum Technology Hub is partnered with five other universities across the UK (Sussex, Strathclyde, Nottingham, Southampton and Glasgow) enabling researchers to pool their expertise and thus maximise the potential of quantum sensor research. Uniquely, the Quantum Technology Hub has built strong links with key industry partners, such as Teledyne e2v, Network Rail and M Squared Lasers. Strong industrial links tie in with the overall objective of building quantum technology that meets the needs of end users. This ensures that the technology will be purpose-built for specific applications, rather than being simply an ‘exhibition’ of physics. An example of this is the development of quantum clocks, which are being built in collaboration with the National Physical Laboratory. The clocks will be more accurate than ever before and delivered in a package that will enable the management of critical high speed events in sectors such as banking and mobile communications. ■

For more information on the Quantum Technology Hub, please visit our website at www.quantumsensors.org

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 6 7


Industrial Applications and Scientific Vacuum Technologies

Technology in a Vacuum

Wednesday 10th & Thursday 11th October 2018 · Ricoh Arena Coventry

Behind Everything in Life, there’s Vacuum.

LED LIGHTING

PACEMAKER

INSULATING GLASS

TEXTILES PROCESSOR

DECORATIVE COATINGS

ANTI-REFLECTION COATING

TOUCH SCREENS

SURFACE COATINGS

register your interest - www.vacuum-expo.com 6 8 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | S U M M E R 2 0 18

INCORPORATING INDUSTRIAL · PROCESS · UTILITIES AUTOMOTIVE · VACUUM FURNACES

CO-LOCATED WITH

Don’t miss Europe’s premier vacuum technology exhibition & conference


Impact

Photo: © snap40 Ltd

Taking care of your people, places and public perception

Wearable gazelles Top ten UK wearable start-ups and scale-ups by investment raised

Snap40’s device continuously monitors patients from the upper arm across more health indicators than any other single device on the market

W Henry Whorwood SENIOR CONSULTANCY ASSOCIATE, BEAUHURST

Henry leads Beauhurst’s bespoke research on high-growth companies and their investors. He is a specialist in equity finance, crowdfunding and the high-growth landscape, and holds a BA in Classics from Oxford

earable technology, wearable devices, or ‘wearables’ are smart electronic devices with micro-controllers that can be worn on the body as implants or accessories. As part of the Internet of Things, wearables such as activity trackers use the internet to exchange data with a manufacturer, operator, and other connected devices, without human intervention. The UK is picking up the pace when it comes to investing in wearables, with one in seven Brits owning some form of wearable

technology. The current market is buoyant, and investors are very active with VC funds looking to back both the general trend and specific technologies being developed by ambitious founders running wellmanaged innovative companies. Crowdfunding websites, such as Kickstarter and Indiegogo, have also been instrumental in getting new start-ups off the ground. The following profiles represent the UK’s top ten wearable start-ups and scale-ups by investment capital according to data supplied by Beauhurst.

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 6 9


IMPACT

E V RY T H N G

www.evrythng.com The EVRYTHNG cloud-based platform connects brands directly with consumers and provides visibility and intelligence in the supply chain. Based in Camden, the company has raised more than £31 million to develop its IoT software platform that talks to any kind of smart product or smart packaging hardware. The solution connects all customer products to the Web, each with its own unique, real-time digital identity, to make them smarter. It simplifies the complexity of different protocols, embedded devices, or packaging, ensuring IoT products get to market faster. The EVRYTHNG team believes that every physical thing around us is coming to life digitally in some shape or form.

2

DNANUDGE

www.dnanudge.com DNAnudge is based in Westminster and has raised nearly £13 million in investment. The DNAnudge App provides users with the results of a DNA test and offers information about how their individual body is genetically wired to metabolise food. By clicking on ‘MyDNA report’ in the app, users can find comprehensive explanations of each of the genetic traits that they have been tested for, along with practical tips and tailored advice for them. The simple colour-coded layout helps explain how different dietary components may affect an individual’s health in the long term. By simply scanning the barcode of a food or drink product, users can instantly see whether it is a good match for them or not.

3

WAV E O P T I C S

www.enhancedworld.com WaveOptics has raised nearly £12.4 million in investment from its base in South Oxfordshire where they develop high-performance, easily manufacturable waveguides through which people see augmented reality. With a large eye-box and a high field of view, WaveOptics’ diffractive waveguides seamlessly combine real and virtual worlds using a unique and patented optical structure that enables two-dimensional pupil expansion. 2D pupil expansion is the technique that enables the provision of a very large eye-box using a very small light engine. Crisp text and imagery is

7 0 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | S U M M E R 2 0 18

Photo: old.facemed.co.uk

1

projected by the near-eye displays, presenting computer images that overlay the real world. Augmented and mixed reality headsets can be designed to be small, light and flexible.

4

SENSIIA

www.duofertility.com DuoFertility from Sensiia is the only fertility wearable that is accompanied by a personalised service. The sensor and App track and predict ovulation cycles and fertility experts help users make sense of their data and support them through fertility challenges such as low ovarian reserve and sperm motility. Worn under the arm and entirely replacing intrusive devices such as Thermometres, the small, discrete sensor syncs with the user’s mobile device and helps predict fertility days up to ten days in advance. Sensiia is based on Cambridge Science Park and has raised over £7.5 million to develop digital health solutions to better track, manage and improve health. The company is continuously looking at other areas of potential application for its platform.

5

A M B I C A R E H E A LT H

www.ambicarehealth.com Ambicare Health is based in West Lothian and has raised nearly £7.4 million to develop a portfolio of wearable light sources for medical and consumer healthcare applications. The concept underpinning all of Ambicare’s technology has been to replicate the science of light therapies already clinically proven and practiced in central medical facilities in wearable form. Ambicare’s patented platform technology allows the user to wear the light delivery device, powered by a rechargeable controller, in daily use, enabling the treatment to be delivered in safe and gentle doses, avoiding the necessity of

Ambicare Health’s Lustre Pure Light is a light therapy for spots and acne

being ‘tied’ to a static light source in a physician’s surgery or hospital environment. This key point of difference not only enhances user convenience but also delivers improved end results through consistency of the light delivery to the skin.

6

M O N I C A H E A LT H C A R E

www.monicahealthcare.com Monica Healthcare, Nottingham, has raised over £7.2 million and was acquired by GE Healthcare to expand their offering of digital Maternal-Infant Care in March 2017. The company’s advanced fetal monitors already empower midwives, labor and delivery nurses, and expectant women. The Novii Wireless Patch System is a small, reliable and accurate fetal heart rate monitor that does not require the clinical care team to adjust the transducer or re-position the belts: These were the


THE UK IS PICKING UP T H E PA C E W H E N I T COMES TO INVESTING IN WE AR ABLES, WITH ONE IN SE VEN BRITS OWNING SOME FORM OF WE AR ABLE TECHNOLOGY

The AcuPebble™ sensors from Acurable are a product of ten years of research Photo: acurable.com/press

key objectives for the Monica Healthcare development team; a wearable fetal heart rate monitor to make the delivery of fetal monitoring as user friendly for the care team as possible, whilst delivering a comfortable birthing experience for mothers and their babies.

7

E LV I E

Photo: elvie.com

www.elvie.com Elvie is based in Camden Town and has raised £5.2 million to develop and market its connected pelvic floor trainer that helps women improve their bladder control and sex life. The Elvie exerciser, which is inserted in the body and connects with an app, is a personal trainer for doing kegels. The exercises are particularly important for some women after giving birth, to address the problems with bladder control. But this new style of ‘femtech’ product also crosses the boundary between being a serious medical device and a lifestyle product. The company will use some of its capital to expand its product portfolio.

The Elvie exerciser is a connected pelvic floor trainer

8

SNAP40

9

BUDDI

www.snap40.com Snap40 in Edinburgh, raised nearly £4.2 million to enable hospitals to catch deteriorating health earlier using its proprietary medical-grade vital signs monitoring wearable arm-band and accompanying analysis software platform. The snap40 wearable device continuously monitors patients from the upper arm across more health indicators than any other single device on the market. Crucially, the company then uses this data to identify, in real-time, patients at risk of deteriorating. By alerting doctors and nurses early, they can take action, potentially saving the patient’s life, improving outcomes, and allowing them to return home sooner.

www.buddi.com Buddi raised over £2.5 million for their ‘go anywhere, anytime’ personal emergency response device which can be worn by someone at risk of falls when they are at home or out and about. It detects when the person wearing it falls or presses an alert button for help. Its 24-hour emergency response service can then talk to them through the device to establish the kind of assistance they need, find their location through a built-in GPS tracker and call the person looking after them. In June 2015, Buddi teamed up with Carers UK to offer a huge discount on their wearable monitoring service that enables people to live more independently for longer.

R E A D O N L I N E AT: U K S PA . O R G . U K / B R E A K T H R O U G H

10

ACURABLE

www.acurable.com Based in Hackney in London, Acurable raised £2.1 million in funding to produce the first wearable medical device able to accurately diagnose and manage respiratory conditions at home. The company’s patented technology, AcuPebble™, is a major engineering innovation and the product of ten years of research at Imperial College London. The first two applications of the technology are in sleep apnoea diagnosis and clinical research monitoring of patients. In parallel, the company is focused on continued R&D efforts to complete and launch additional products that will fundamentally improve other areas of healthcare such as the prevention of Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP) and the management of COPD acute exacerbations.

S TA RT U P D ATA

Beauhurst is a searchable database of the UK’s high-growth companies. Our platform is trusted by thousands of business professionals to help them find, research and monitor the most ambitious businesses in Britain. We collect data on every company that meets our unique criteria of highgrowth; from equity-backed startups to accelerator attendees, academic spinouts and fast-growing scaleups. ■

For more information and a free demonstration of the Beauhurst database, visit: www.beauhurst.com

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 7 1


IMPACT

Science Foundation Ireland; AMBER Advanced Materials and Bio-Engineering Research Centre

A

MBER; Advanced Materials and Bio-Engineering Research Centre, is the Science Foundation Ireland-funded National materials science research centre, hosted in Trinity College Dublin and co-founded by The Royal College of Surgeons and University College Cork. Last November, the centre published its impact assessment report which detailed the impact that AMBER, and its predecessor CRANN, have made to the Irish economy and the wider society over the last ten years. Working with the impact framework as defined by Science Foundation Ireland, AMBER attempted to quantitatively measure research impacts across seven key pillars – economic and commercial, societal,

7 2 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | S U M M E R 2 0 18

international engagement, policy & public services, health and wellbeing, environmental and human capacity.

KEY FINDINGS

Prof Michael Morris AMBER DIRECTOR AND PROFESSOR OF SURFACE AND INTERFACE CHEMISTRY, SCHOOL OF CHEMISTRY, TRINITY COLLEGE DUBLIN

Michael’s work in AMBER includes collaboration with Intel on the development of new technology for the manufacture of logic/memory circuitry

One of the key findings of the report demonstrates that continued funding (cycle II funding for AMBER is currently under review) will enable AMBER’s journey to become an international centre of choice for collaborative industry research and help Ireland further enhance its research profile in materials science. This will promote Ireland as a locus for attracting and growing hi-tech companies and encourage investment. AMBER’s vision is to grow and become a critical hub in the country’s innovation strategy - creating more opportunities for company spin-outs and growth.


6.4

million people live in the Republic of Ireland

M AT E R I A L S A N D N A N O R E S E A R C H S U P P O R T S 14 , 0 0 0 J O B S A N D H A L F A B I L L I O N E U R O O F E C O N O MI C IMPA C T IN IR E L A ND The centre has and will continue to attract leading industry and academic researchers into Ireland. For the report, AMBER commissioned Professor Brian Lucey, economist at Trinity College Dublin to undertake an economic impact evaluation and to measure the linkages between academics and business and community. Prof Lucey used an input-output approach to show that for every €1 invested, AMBER and CRANN have helped the Irish economy to grow by €5. AMBER and its predecessor CRANN generated over 14,000 jobs in Ireland over ten years and during this time had a total income of €108 million generating a gross output nationwide of over €505 million. The report highlighted that, since AMBER was established in 2013, the centre has brought in over €40.6M in European funding – >€20m from European Research Council (ERC) awards, >€15m from collaborative projects and €3m from Marie Sklodowska Curie awards. AMBER researchers have been awarded more ERC funding than any other research centre in Ireland (15 awards) and Prof Valeria Nicolosi is a five-time ERC awardee. During the report period, over 2,400 research papers, generating over 76,000 citations have been published by AMBER researchers. This is consistent with the output of the very best universities across

the globe and the centre can be properly described as world class. This academic leadership has been leveraged to provide disruptive research for the centre’s industry partners.

EMPIRICAL MEASURES

Prof Lucey’s team also empirically measured the linkages between academics based at CRANN and AMBER and business and community, using a field-tested survey instrument. AMBER and CRANN academics are highly engaged across a broad range of knowledge exchange activities and 79% of CRANN/AMBER academics gave invited lectures compared to 50% of Irish academics and 55% of UK academics. AMBER’s world-leading research has attracted and continues to attract FDI into Ireland, creating thousands of jobs and spurring growth amongst innovative domestic companies too. The institute has worked with more than 200 companies in Ireland and internationally and has received €5.2 M of industry cash in the last four years with a further €1.8M contracted. Leading multinationals such as Nokia Bell Labs and Western Digital have stated in this Impact Assessment Report that a key reason for their selecting Ireland as a base, is the quality of their work with AMBER.

NEW ADDITIVE M ANUFACTURING

There have been a number of exciting announcements by AMBER since the report including the establishment of a new additive manufacturing (AM, commonly known as 3D printing) research laboratory and a new strategic collaboration with Johnson & Johnson Services, Inc. to establish a collaborative laboratory focused on 3D bioprinting. The AR-Lab (Additive Research Laboratory) was established with a €4.3 million investment from Science Foundation Ireland and the European Research Council as well as strategic funding from Trinity. Additive manufacturing will be a major driver of technologies such as the internet-ofthings, wearable and flexible devices as well as personalised healthcare products. AMBER will partner with existing and new industry partners enabling next generation products from innovative SMEs and Multinationals. AMBER’s AR-Lab features a combination of both Irish and world first equipment and 3D printers – allowing industry a unique partnership opportunity. AMBER and the Johnson & Johnson 3D Printing Center of Excellence will establish a 3D bioprinting research laboratory at Trinity College Dublin affiliated with AMBER. The company will also engage in research projects focused initially in orthopaedics and in the long-term, offer its internal scientific experts as adjunct professors and engage in staff exchanges. The new Global Centre of Excellence for 3D bioprinting will transform healthcare delivery for patients and consumers and is due to be operational by the end of 2018. ■

The full report can be viewed at http://ambercentre.ie/images/uploads/news/ CRANN_AMBER_10_year_Impact_Final2.pdf Contact Prof Michael Morris: MORRISM2@tcd.ie

R E A D O N L I N E AT: U K S PA . O R G . U K / B R E A K T H R O U G H

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 7 3


Personalised nanomedicine Nanomedicine has the potential to revolutionise personalised healthcare, from prediction and diagnosis to treatment and monitoring THE BASICS

THE BIG WINS

1. Materials constructed at the nanoscale have many beneficial characteristics, such as electrical superconductivity, anti-bacterial properties or binding ability, which can be used in medicine.

Truly personalised technologies are still relatively far from commercialisation, so mainstream implementation of nanomedicine is still some way off.

2. Nanoparticles can penetrate living cells and are durable enough to withstand hostile environments within the body. 3. ‘Programmable’ nanomaterials, such as dendrimers or liposomes, can be fabricated to enclose active pharmaceutical ingredients, allowing targeted delivery of compounds to specific sites. 4. Nanomaterials under development include biocompatible replacements for body parts, such as bone, teeth and soft tissue. 5. Truly ‘smart’ drugs, multifunctional nanocarriers containing targeted, diagnostic and therapeutic agents personalised to the patient, could be the next step.

74 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | S U M M E R 2 0 18

The healthcare sector hopes to develop: • Diagnostics: exceptionally accurate sensors, capable of detecting and mapping hundreds or even thousands of diseases at the same time. • Controlled drug delivery: implantable nanodevices and tailored, controlled release drugs for extended disease management. • Tissue engineering: nanomaterial replacements to increase medical implant stability, reducing rejection rates.

THE NUMBERS The nanomedicine industry is expected to be worth $196 billion by 2020. The nanomaterial drug delivery market is set be worth $44.5 billion by 2019. Nanomedicine in the drug development sector alone is predicted to rise to $32.3 billion by 2019.


Graphene oxide (GO):

Gold:

Silica:

Monotomic sheets formed from oxidised graphite have unique electronic, thermal and mechnical properties

Nanoparticles of pure gold exhibit unique electrical, thermal, chemical and biological properties

A type of silica nanoparticle riddled with pores can hold large quantities of molecular imaging agents or drugs

Quantum dots (QDs):

Liposomes:

DNA tetrahedrons:

Nanocrystals of semiconductor materials exhibit quantum mechanical properties that could improve cancer imaging and molecular profiling

Spherical nanoscale vesciles composed of a hydrophilic core and hydrophobic lipid bilayer are widely used as containers for therapeutics or other biomedical agents

DNA nanostructures that can be modified to include molecular functions, such as molecular targeting, bioimaging and therapeutics

Spherical nucleic acids (SNAs):

DNA micelles:

Nucleic acid spheres encompassing nanoparticle cores are capable of sensitive molecular diagnostics and intracellular gene regulation

DNA-lipid monomers selfassemble into nanostructures that can be modified to include bioanalytical or therapeutic add-ons and delivered into cells without any transfection agents

DNA nanotrains: Aptamer-tethered linear DNA nanostructures with a high drug payload capacity for targeted delivery of drugs or bioimaging agents

R E A D O N L I N E AT: U K S PA . O R G . U K / B R E A K T H R O U G H

Image source: The Scientist Magazine, August 2014

THE NANOMEDICINE CABINET

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 7 5


Trends

Quantitive and qualitative analysis of the innovation ecosystem

Manufacturing miniaturisation

R

ichard Feynman, physicist and Nobel Laureate, gave a lecture in 1959 titled; There’s plenty of room at the bottom to the American Physical Society’s West Coast section in which he coined the term ‘miniaturisation’, and set two challenges, each with a prize of $1000. The first was to construct a tiny motor, and was won in 1960 by William McLellan who used conventional tools and meticulous craftsmanship. The second, was to scale down the entire Encyclopaedia Britannica to fit on the head of a pin; a feat which demands letters reduced to a scale of 1/25000. In 1985, a Stanford graduate student called Tom Newman, claimed the prize when he reduced the first paragraph of A Tale of Two Cities by 1/25000. While Feynman gets credited by some as having inspired the field of nanotechnology with his talk, research suggests his links to nanotechnology are historically retrospective. However, there is little doubt that the challenges he set

7 6 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | S U M M E R 2 0 18

fed into the field of miniaturisation which he ironically described at the time as ‘a field, in which little has been done, but in which an enormous amount can be done in principle.’

ECONOMIC SENSE

Miniaturisation makes economic sense. Driven by consumer demand for intelligent, multi-functional hand-held devices, products must cram an increasing number of sensors, actuators and processors into smaller packaging. Miniaturised products also benefit from low mechanical inertia, allowing precision movement and rapid actuation. Their low mass results in less thermal distortion and decreased mechanical vibration and lower thermal expansion offers higher dimensional

stability at high temperatures. Of course, smaller sized systems also require less materials to make and less space to store, making them cheaper to mass produce – although microsystems tend to demand reduced production volumes than those enjoyed by traditional advanced manufacturing.

I N T E R - D I S C I P L I N A RY

The development of miniaturised device components and micro- and nano-scale engineering systems can be hampered by adverse or intrinsic effects relating to quantum mechanical responses. While Feynman’s vision of miniaturisation was based in biological systems, today’s microfabrication methods also rely on physical-chemical processes, and nanomachining involves isolation, transportation and


“ M I N I AT U R I S AT I O N I S A F I E L D , I N W H I C H L I T T L E H A S BEEN DONE, BUT IN WHICH AN ENORMOUS AMOUNT CAN BE D ONE IN PRINCIPL E ” RICHARD E. FEYNMAN (1959) re-assembly at the atomic scale. So, engineers responsible for the miniaturised manufacturing toolbox must possess inter-disciplinary knowledge across all the basic sciences, as well as engineering.

M A N U FA C T U R I N G M E T H O D S

The microfabrication techniques developed for two-dimensional integrated circuits (ICs) are like those used for machining three-dimensional siliconbased microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) but they tend to incorporate a greater number of components for smaller batches of product. Most microsystems technology uses solid state physics-based top-down manufacturing methods, such as optical, electron beam lithography and thermal treatments that reduce large pieces of materials down to the nanoscale. Nanotechnology builds on quantum physics and introduces the bottomup approach, creating products by building them up from atomic- and molecular-scale components using chemical properties to manipulate self-assembly of molecules into functional components. Other miniaturised manufacturing methods being developed use combinations of the two whereby nanoscale molecules are integrated into a top-down solid-state framework. Manufacturing of nanoscale device components involves:

1

Isolation of atoms of selected materials using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM)

2

Assembly of loose atoms using the AFM or STM tip

3

Re-bonding of atoms using synthetic chemistry and/or biological means

Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) integrate electrical and mechanical functionality on the nanoscale and are the logical next step towards miniaturisation. All Nano manufacturing designs rely on the distinct mechanical properties of those raw materials used to make them, and advances in new materials such as graphene and carbon nanotubes extend product potential. So, nanotechnological innovations lead to the production of improved materials and new products as well as new manufacturing methods such as chemical vapor deposition, molecular beam epitaxy, atomic layer epitaxy, dip pen lithography, nanoimprint lithography, and roll-to-roll processing. Other innovative manufacturing approaches that offer promise in the fabrication of small features over large surface areas include; 3D printing using sound to manipulate material properties, contact-controlled chemical etching to produce semiconductor patterning, modulated surface energy to control additive manufacturing and adhesion processes, 3D printed shapememory polymer actuators that respond to environmental stimuli.

NANO-ENABLED PRODUCTS

Nano-enabled products take advantage of advanced material properties that offer greater strength, durability and resistance to specific substances and damage. Products can be ultrasensitive, ultra-light, water-resistant,

R E A D O N L I N E AT: U K S PA . O R G . U K / B R E A K T H R O U G H

light-resistant, antimicrobial, scratch-resistant or electrically conductive. Nanoscale transistors will lead to faster, more powerful, more energy efficient computers. Nanotechnology will enable low-cost batteries, cleaner energy systems, lightweight spacecraft, new vaccines and medicines, lab-on-a-chip applications, smart fabrics and surface coatings, efficient buildings and refrigeration systems, and new agri-tech crops that may help feed an increasingly over-populated planet.

BIG DEMANDS FOR A TINY FUTURE

According to experts, the development of manufacturing at the micro- and nano-scale will continue to bring change to our industrial landscape. Manufacturing will continue to shift away from machine tooling and robotic material handling towards physicalchemical processing. Decreased production volumes will demand new strategies to deliver costeffective and flexible production systems incorporating capitalintensive equipment. New packaging and assembly practices, as well as new product verification and quality assurance methods must be developed. Most importantly, a revised educational curriculum is essential to fulfil the human resource needs of these future technologies which require engineers to manipulate quantum effects within a world too small to see with the naked eye. ■

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 7 7


TRENDS

INVEST Essex’s Dave Russell-Graham talking with Baroness Rona Fairhead (Minister of State for Trade and Export Promotion, DIT) in the UK Pavilion

BIO and the Baroness Dave Russell-Graham reports from The Largest Business Partnering Event, enjoying breakfast with Baroness Rona Fairhead CBE

I Dave Russell-Graham INWARD INVESTMENT MANAGER, INVEST ESSEX

David works with the Life Sciences and Healthcare sectors for Invest Essex, the inward investment and business support agency

t was an honour to be part of a recordbreaking Biotechnology Innovation Organisation (BIO) International Convention last month. Celebrating the 25th anniversary of the event, it returned to its original home in Boston, Massachusetts (MA) from 4-7 June. Such was its popularity, the convention drew 18,289 biotechnology industry leaders – the most attendees in the last 10 years – from 49 US states and 67 countries. Getting the opportunity to showcase the life sciences work being done in the UK to people from all over the world is invaluable in order to generate further foreign direct investment (FDI). As Joanne Duncan, President, Membership and Business Operations at BIO put it at the conclusion of this year’s convention: “With 46,916 one-on-one meetings held during the last four days, we know that the knowledge exchange and partnerships forged this week have the potential to transform our world for the better.”

7 8 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | S U M M E R 2 0 18

That last figure set a Guinness World Record for ‘The Largest Business Partnering Event’, facilitated by BIO’s One-on-One Partnering™ system — a 13% increase over 2017.

U K N O. 1 I N E U R O P E

The UK is proud to be No.1 in Europe for life sciences inward investment and No.1 in Europe for clinical pipeline across all phases of development. In fact, the UK only ranks behind San Francisco and BIO hosts Boston for the amount of life science finance raised. But, of course, there is a lot of good work being done elsewhere so these conventions also serve as a reminder that further innovation is always necessary. Among the benefits of setting up a base in the UK – making it one of the best places in the world to undertake R&D, clinical development and manufacturing - are the fiscal incentives. As well as the UK offering an Enterprise Investment Scheme and capital investment allowances, it also offers the lowest Corporation Tax in the G7 – 17% by 2020.


HAPPY 70TH ANNIVERSARY NHS

Also key to the strength of the UK in the life sciences industry is the fact it is anchored by the world’s largest integrated health service. To acknowledge its achievements, the theme of the UK Pavilion at BIO was the 70th anniversary of the National Health Service. I spent the first morning at BIO on a fascinating tour of Cambridge, MA organised by One Nucleus and BioMed Realty accompanied by, amongst an international audience, James Palmer, the Mayor of Cambridge and Peterborough Combined Authority who later that morning went on to sign a ‘declaration to form partnership accord’ with his Cambridge, MA counterpart, Marc McGovern. On the tour we heard from the ‘$1Bn dollar lady’, Susan WindhamBannister, ex-CEO of the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center who was charged with administering a $1Bn life sciences investment state fund in 2008. Since then, the Greater Boston area has seen 18 of the world’s Top 20 pharmaceutical companies set up facilities, from zero in 2008! There is much to learn here for UK clusters - her initiatives included promoting entrepreneurship and start-up activity in Massachusetts, and building an innovation ecosystem that was a major

An overview of the UK and NI’s 24 stands at BIO

T H E U K I S P R O U D T O B E N O .1 I N E U R O P E F O R L I F E S C I E N C E S I N WA R D I N V E S T M E N T A ND NO.1 IN EUROPE FOR CLINICA L PIPELINE ACROSS ALL PHASES OF DE VELOPMENT draw for industry leaders. This was accompanied by enabling infrastructure, and housing that was reasonably priced for young entrepreneurs as well as addressing the skills agenda with local schools and colleges to ensure a continuous flow of talent at all levels. A parallel networking breakfast Baroness Rona session discussed Fairhead (left) ‘The NHS at 70, and British opportunities and Consulate, Harriet challenges, from Cross celebrating tackling AMR to realthe ‘NHS at 70’ world trial delivery’. Organised by the Northern Health Science Alliance, it was sponsored by the UK Department for International Trade (DIT) and Alderley Park. The breakfast gave an opportunity to welcome Baroness Rona Fairhead CBE, Minister of State for Trade and Export Promotion at DIT who was at BIO for the opening two days. In the evening the Baroness, alongside the British Consulate, Harriet Cross, hosted a reception at the Consulate’s residence in Boston (just round the corner from Cheers!). Organised by Santander and One Nucleus, this brought together key companies from both sides of the pond to network and discuss the synergies and opportunities for Transatlantic growth in both locations. On day two she spoke with companies in the UK Pavilion and cut a cake, alongside the British Consulate, Harriet Cross, to celebrate 70 years of the NHS.

R E A D O N L I N E AT: U K S PA . O R G . U K / B R E A K T H R O U G H

A N T I M I C R O B I A L R E S I S TA N C E

Among the other highlights in the UK Pavilion was a panel discussing ‘The Value of Addressing Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR)’. During this session, it was examined how we can better assess the value of new antimicrobials to individuals, health care systems, and society; how the unique attributes of novel antibiotics can be considered in reimbursement decision-making.

2 4 U K & N I S TA N D S

For my part, I was in Boston to represent INVEST Essex and Chesterford Research Park as part of the MedCity, London & Partners stand at BIO, which also included Stevenage Bioscience Catalyst, Harwell Healthtec Cluster and Oxford University Innovation – one of 24 stands covering the UK and Northern Ireland. INVEST Essex has been successful in assisting key industry players to the Chesterford Research Park in Saffron Walden and has been particularly instrumental in attracting three companies to the site: Evonetix, Enplas and Arecor. With Essex at the heart of the London-Stansted-Cambridge corridor, recently rebranded as the ‘UK’s Innovation Corridor’, it is to be hoped the upshot of my time in Boston will encourage more life sciences businesses to set up a base in the region. Overall, BIO was a fantastic experience and everyone in the UK Pavilion, and other UK companies at the conference, worked together to make the convention a tremendous success. Of course, with many new connections having been made and old and new relationships developed further, the work involved to meet the goal of attracting FDI into the UK has just been increased. ■

Dave works for Invest Essex: www.investessex.co.uk

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 7 9


TRENDS

Sci-Tech Daresbury

Digital Maturity Index

I

Research from digital marketing experts, Sharp Ahead, shows that 75% of innovation centres and 88% of science parks could benefit from basic, free digital marketing best practice

n the increasingly competitive flexible workspace market, these organisations are missing opportunities to attract new customers and tenants – and therefore meet important occupancy milestones. Research released from Google revealed that 89% of B2B researchers started their searches online – and that number will only continue to increase. Entrepreneurs looking for workspace, from laboratories to specialist workshops are no different. In fact, 71% of B2B researchers start their research with a generic search; for innovation centres and science parks, those researchers will be looking for terms such as “office space” or “lab space” and centres which are not taking advantage of digital best practice simply won’t be found. There are both paid and free ways for flexible workspaces to capture these

8 0 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | S U M M E R 2 0 18

Jennifer Esty DIGITAL MARKETING

Jennifer is a digital marketing expert with 20 years’ experience. Jennifer holds a BA from Harvard University and a MSc from Columbia University

prospective customers, but Sharp Ahead’s research demonstrated that of the 200 science parks and innovation centres analysed, most will not show up in these types of searches – and even in some cases in searches related to their own brand names. A few startling facts include: • 49% of innovation centres did not appear on the first page when searching for ‘rent office space’ in their geographic location • 12% of innovation centres did not appear on the first page when searching for ‘office space’ – even when the centres’ own brand names were included in the search term • 41% of science parks did not appear on the first page when searching for ‘lab space’ in their geographic location • 16% of science parks did not appear on the first page when searching for ‘lab


90.77%

global internet search market share is claimed by Google

G O O G L E R E V E A L E D T H AT 8 9 % O F B 2 B R E S E A R C H E R S S TA R T E D T H E I R S E A R C H E S O N L I N E — A N D T H AT N U M B E R W I L L O N LY C O N T I N U E T O I N C R E A S E

Google your centre or park and make sure the information that you see on the search engine results page is clear and comprehensive

space’ - even when the science parks’ own brand names were included in the search term

S E A R C H E N G I N E R E S U LT S

Sharp Ahead’s methodology also included reviewing the search engine results pages of every single centre and park in the survey. (A search engine results page is the page that Google returns when a user types in a search term.) Of the innovation centres analysed, only 35% received full marks for their brand search results page and science parks fared even worse, with only 8% receiving full marks. Some key features for a good search engine results page include: brand ads, helpful site links, Google My Business listings and easy to find information such as telephone numbers and directions. Onsite experience is just as important for science parks and innovation centres looking to attract new customers. Important technical elements such as having a responsive site and ensuring the website is secure

(using https) are critical for customers looking to find and interact with a prospective new workspace online. Again, the findings were concerning, with only 61% of science parks using https and only 45% of innovation centres using this important but low cost security feature. Google already prioritises secure (https) sites over those that are not, and its Chrome browser also shows users when sites are – or are not – secure, effectively dissuading prospective customers from visiting sites which are not clearly secure. Having a responsive site is equally as important. Back in 2015, Google found 42%

R E A D O N L I N E AT: U K S PA . O R G . U K / B R E A K T H R O U G H

of researchers use a mobile device during the B2B purchasing process, and they were seeing a 3X growth in mobile searches. Simply put: a poor experience on phone will mean that many prospective customers will choose to look elsewhere for their next workspace. The benefits of using digital marketing best practice extend beyond just enabling potential customers to find their next workspace. innovation centres and science parks looking to have a first-person relationship with their prospects and customers need to build their own pipelines, particularly in the new age of GDPR where data sharing even in the B2B market requires careful procurement, strict governance and well documented processes. Finally, Sharp Ahead’s research analysed the websites of the 200 innovation centres and science parks and found that most, 26% of innovation centres and 22% of science parks, offers visitors to their sites a poor user experience. So what does good look like? Google your centre or park and make sure the information that you see on the search engine results page is clear and comprehensive. Consider paid search marketing techniques to ensure that prospects actively looking for workspace in your geographic, or specialist sector, can find you easily. And make sure your website is responsive, secure and has up to date and relevant content – with clear contact information. ■

Onsite experience is just as important for science parks and innovation centres looking to attract new customers

S U M M E R 2 0 18 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | 8 1


DAY IN THE LIFE

Baltic Quarter, GATESHEAD, UK

BIOGRAPHY Chris is responsible for supporting the development of the North East’s newest innovation district, Baltic Quarter (located next to the iconic Gateshead Quays). He has worked in Business Development for over 20 years

Chris Pape

Portfolio Manager, Baltic Quarter I live locally so my commute only takes ten minutes. I usually get into the office around 8am. I mostly drive as there’s good parking on Baltic Quarter. Sometimes I’ll get the metro and walk to my office at Northern Design Centre, which also only takes ten minutes. Once in the office, I’ll make a brew then check my emails and diary. Today’s jam packed. I catch up with the team and have a quick chat with a passing resident in reception, reminding them that the fitness class is on tonight. JUN

20

GROWING BUSINESSES

My first appointment is with a tenant who’s looking to expand their team. We look at the options and it’s clear based on their needs (they started off with two people and now need an office for 15) that we can help them stay on Baltic Quarter as there’s room in the new office space at PROTO: The Emerging Technology Centre.

8 2 | U K S PA B R E A K T H R O U G H | S U M M E R 2 0 18

I N N O VAT I O N

Speaking of PROTO, I then spend a few hours with the Digital Catapult team to discuss specialist equipment for the onsite R&D facility. PROTO is Baltic Quarter’s

PROTO IS EUROPE'S FIRST P U R P O S E - B U I LT CENTRE FOR EMERGING TECH newest addition and Europe’s first purpose-built centre for emerging tech, focusing on immersive and part of the Digital Catapult network. The £8m complex will showcase up-and-coming immersive and AI technologies.

We decide to focus our initial efforts on 3D (photogrammetry) and motion capture.

N E W D E V E LO P M E N T

2pm: I grab a burger from Fat Hippo (amazing!) on my way to meet with Ryder architects and Gateshead Council’s project team. We look at designs for the new Grade A office block joining the suite of buildings on Baltic Quarter in 2019. Adding large floor plates for growing businesses to the Baltic Quarter offer will make such a difference. Now we can support small businesses employing a few people, expanding businesses that need space for 200 people, and everything in-between. 3.30pm: I walk back to NDC, settle down at my desk to answer emails and make some calls. 4.30pm: I meet with the council’s lead cabinet member. It’s an exciting time and I update him on our major projects. 6pm: I’m off home early for a change! ■


GUILDFORD, SURREY

Powering the economy through Science and Technology The Surrey Research Park is recognised as a centre of excellence in technology, science, health and engineering. To date it houses over 150 businesses, including leading players such as SSTL, BAE Systems Applied Intelligence Limited, IDBS, Optegra as well as many start-up R&D businesses, all of which enjoy the value of a great environment in an innovation district. The University of Surrey The Research Park is owned and managed by The University of Surrey renowned throughout the globe for its exceptional performance across teaching and research. The Park maintains close links with the university both physically and through its knowledge base. The Surrey Technology Centre The STC allows opportunities for opportunity led entrepreneurs and established companies to locate in serviced offices on flexible licence from 120 up to 900 sq ft. This centre incorporates a business incubator and an on-site support team. Larger units for corporates and high growth companies The Park has accommodation for companies requiring up to 60,000 sq ft. Outstanding amenities The Park sits at the edge of the thriving university campus with the ÂŁ40m Surrey Sports Park and Hotel within walking distance. There is easy access to the historic county town of Guildford which offers exciting retail and leisure facilities as well as a rail station, serving London Waterloo. Communications The Park enjoys outstanding communications with fast links to major airports, road and rail networks.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE WORLD FAMOUS SURREY RESEARCH PARK Telephone: 01483

579693

Email: sales@surrey.ac.uk

www.surrey-research-park.com


UKSPA - Breakthrough Issue 5  
UKSPA - Breakthrough Issue 5