Page 1

ONE OF MY KIND ISSUE TWO: PRINT

GUERRILLA GIRLS   ­  SORAYA SYED  ­ SARA SALEM  ­  ROSIE MARTIN


!"#$%&'(')*&+$%&',%-+'.#+/# Designer & curator Rose Nordin

Assistant Editor Heiba Lamara Supported by Sabba Khan & Hudda Khaireh Issue two, Autumn 2013. Cover image by Alana Questell. ©OOMK Zine. If you wish to reproduce any content from OOMK Zine  please contact the relevant artist/s listed.  ­ For submissions, advertising and press queries please contact:  oomkzine@gmail.com Facebook: OOMK Zine Twitter: @oomkzine ­ www.oomk.net 


“Art may be the only space a women can be whole without being seen” ­ Nayyirah Waheed 


4


ILLUSTRATION + 18. CHRISTINE ROSCH  + 24. ALANA QUESTELL  + 62. SOFIA NIAZI              + 66. MEHWISH IQBAL  + 68. MERYEM MEG  + 78. MAHWISH CHISHTY       + 92. AMY LAMBERT  + 103. LEILA ABDUL RAZZAQ  + 108. ROSE NORDIN  PRINT + 07. DAKSHEETA PATTNI  + 08. EMILY EVANS + 41. GUERILLA GIRLS   + 50. SEE RED  + 71. STRIKE  + 68. LIMNER JOURNAL    + 76. FLORENCE SHAW  + 86. SORAYA SYED  + 93. ALEESHA NANDHRA WRITTEN WORDS + 14. HEIBA LAMARA  + 20. HANNAH HABIBI HOPKIN   + 34. FATEMA ZEHRA + 40. AURELLA YUSSUF  + 46. HANA RIAZ    + 64. SARA SALEM  + 94. RACHAEL HOPKIN  + 101. HADEEL ELTAYEB  PHOTOGRAPHY  + 30. ROSE NORDIN  + 36. ABBAS ZAHEDI  + 39. FARAH ELAHI + 49. SABBA KHAN  + 83. AYA HAIDAR  + 98. HOURIA NIATI     MORE + 26. ROSIE MARTIN  + 58. NASREEN RAJA  + 70. CHRISTINE BJERKE   + 80. PATRICK GALLAGHER  + 90. FUAD ALI  + 104. RABIAH ABDULLA 

5


6


In our second issue, we discover a world of creatives  and collectives who are making impressions with  print. Their involvement and engagement with print  processes as a tool of expression and communication is  a testament to the power and enduring role of print in  art and activism. From the books that open our hearts, to the adverts  that wall paper our cities, to the leaflets that stir  us to action ­ print moves around us and we move  around it.  

7


HEIBA LAMARA

The name of John La Rose is synonymous with independent radical Black  publishing in Britain and the Caribbean. A committed trade unionist,  activist, and poet in his native Trinidad, La Rose came to London in  1961 with sophisticated ideas on the relationship between print and  politics formed by the anti­colonial struggles in the Caribbean.

16


The power of British imperialism 

radical Black publishing houses 

and colonialism in Africa and 

in 1966, from their bedsit in 

the Caribbean stemmed not only 

Haringey. They contributed to 

from physical force, but from 

the momentum of radical Black 

its ability to Name. Like the 

activity and debate taking place 

flora and fauna, the indigenous 

internationally. They brought 

people of these “new” lands were 

back out­of­print works and 

cut, catalogued, and classified. 

rare works which illustrated 

The data accumulated assisted in 

the themes and concerns of New 

consolidating Britain’s power and

Beacon. Their first publication, 

its ability to manufacture and 

a volume of La Rose’s poems, 

regulate what was known about 

Foundations, served as a 

“Others” and through colonial 

declaration of historical 

educational practice, what they 

consciousness.

were allowed to know about  themselves. The printing press, 

La Rose, Barbadian poet, 

introduced in the 1400’s, 

literary critic and historian 

become the machine through 

Kamau Braithwaite and Jamaica 

which new narratives were 

poet, novelist, academic and 

recorded; publishers became the 

broadcaster Andrew Salkey formed 

channel through which they were 

the pioneering Caribbean Artist 

disseminated.

Movement. Using their Honda 50  as transport, La Rose and White 

“The old publishing firms”, La 

sold New Beacon publications 

Rose wrote to a friend in 1969, 

at CAM events, in addition to 

“[…] grew up within the colonial 

distributing friend’s writing, 

preferential market, and not 

or facilitating their requests 

only gave us the word but told 

for books. The Caribbean Artist 

us how to use it”. Having grown 

Movement grew into a major 

up within a colonial society, 

literary and cultural movement 

he envisioned a tradition 

and assisted in generating a 

of publishing which gave “an 

cultural resurgence among West 

independent validation of 

Indians living in Britain. As a 

one’s own culture, history, and 

result of the demand for books 

politics”. Publication, he wrote, 

CAM produced, New Beacon grew 

“implies autonomy and initiative­

through an informal distribution 

the validation of ourselves. 

network into a booksellers and 

That’s why I founded New Beacon 

international book service.

Books”.

Sarah White describes how the  book­laden bedsit, the site 

John La Rose and his partner, 

of New Beacon activity for 

Sarah White, launched New 

many years, gave way to larger 

Beacon, one of Britain’s first 

premises in 1969. While the 

17


HANNAH HABIBI HOPKIN I am the proud owner of a NO MORE PAGE THREE T­shirt, which I  recently wore on television, giving the campaign its brief debut on  the Islam Channel.  As I was about to go on air, with the slogan emblazoned across my  chest in bold, I suddenly thought ­  “I hope that this is not mistaken for priggishness...” 

Opposition to Page 3 can easily be reduced to campaigning for  moralism, (unfortunately even unwittingly by those in support of  the cause), and so supporters of Page 3 quickly dismiss NO MORE  PAGE THREE campaigners as straight­faced prudes and killjoys. In  my opinion the opposite of nudity is not to wear modest clothing,  but rather,simply, not being nude. I am not outright offended by  the sight of bare breasts, nudity doesn’t shock me, and in fact  sometimes I even like it! But when it comes to nudity and in  particular female nudity with all its implications, it boils down  to context. The catchphrase ‘News Not Boobs’ is not a call for  political correctness, but rather a request that a newspaper’s  column inches not be used for blatant titillation and sexism. 22


The Sun and supporters of Page 3 smear the NMP3 campaign as a  movement of pedantic, humourless feminists, and this isn’t the  first time the newspaper has responded to anti Page 3 campaigners  with anti­feminist attacks.  In 2004 (before the current NMP3  campaign began) the Labour MP Claire Short called for an end to  Page 3, prompting The Sun to brand her “fat and jealous”. Despite  the nastiness associated with the strip, I can’t tell you how many  times I have heard it said that Page 3 is just “a harmless bit of  fun”, implying that those of us who are against it have no sense  of humour. Of course, it is highly possible that some signatories  to the NMP3 petition would fit into the description of “pedantic,  humourless feminists”, but where they are completely wrong is the  suggestion that Page 3 is harmless fun.   The creator of the NMP3 campaign, Lucy Holmes, drew the unpalatable  correlation between Page 3 and sexual violence in an article for The  Independent: “The Page 3 image is there for no other reason than the  sexual gratification of men.  She’s a sex object. But when figures  range from 300,000 women being sexually assaulted and 60,000 raped  each year, to 1 in 4 who have been sexually assaulted, is it wise to  be repeatedly perpetuating a notion that women are sexual objects?”   And when you find out that The Sun has a website and mobile app that  allows you to view a Page 3 model in 360º, as if you were doing  a bit of online shopping, the objectification of these women is  inescapable.  The app carries the  instructions: “To see her from  every angle, left­click, hold and drag your cursor”. Exposing the implications of this objectification proves that Page  3 is not likely to be “harmless” ­ but is it still fun?  In the  last few weeks The Sun decided to remove the only bit of Page 3  that I ever found laughable. ‘NEWS IN BRIEFS’ was a tiny text box  that appeared alongside the model, and containing a news­related  quotation supposedly from the naked woman herself. Frequently  bizarre and implausibly worded, we’d have topless JODI, 23,  from Camberwell quoting Voltaire in relation to the UK economic  situation, or near­naked LUCY, 21, from Middlesex lamenting  political turmoil in Egypt. Some might say this was tongue in cheek  ­ bringing the news to the boobs – but The Sun was revelling in the  absurdity of the juxtaposition of photo and comment, so NEWS IN  BRIEFS looked like plain old taking­the­piss out of women to me– cos  we all know attractiveness and intelligence don’t mix, right?

23


www.hannahhabibi.com

24


So Page 3 isn’t really harmless, 

fig leaves, but I do believe that 

or very funny, but hey, at least 

it is time The Sun turned over a 

the Page 3 excuseniks aren’t 

new leaf, one which breaks away 

trying to say it’s something more 

from such blatant sexism, and is 

highbrow… oh wait! Take a look at 

befitting of UK newspapers in 

the comments section after any 

the 21st Century.  And with the 

anti Page 3 article and along 

abandonment of the topless Page 

with the standard vitriol aimed 

3 by the Irish Sun this August, 

at feminists, you’ll find some 

I believe that more than ever 

pretty lame arguments in Page 

the tide is with us.  If you go 

3’s defence; “appreciation of 

to the NMP3 petition website 

the female form”, “empowering 

www.nomorepagethree.org you 

women”, “freedom of speech”.  

will find numerous significant 

If any of those arguments were 

arguments for why there should 

true then why are all the Page 3 

be no more Page 3, for example 

models of a certain size, age and 

Sabrina Mahfouz’s poignant 

ethnicity?  Where are the women 

poem No More Page 3, with the 

over 25?  The women whose breasts 

cutting lines “This society 

aren’t pneumatic?  If they really 

sees women as bodies that are 

are celebrating the female body 

commodities; But only at their 

it seems very strange that in 

peak of conceivability; After 

a world full of various female 

which please go away and don’t 

forms Page 3 only has the one 

say anything; Not that you ever 

form on offer.  As for women’s 

had anything to say anyway”.  

empowerment, unfortunately 

With the surging support for the 

the current Page 3 set up has 

NMP3 campaign, and over 120,000 

me believing that a woman’s 

signatories to the petition, it 

achievements are proportional 

is clear that we do have a lot 

to her bra size!  Perhaps 

to say… Whether we display our 

dedicating half a page to a woman 

opposition by wearing a slogan 

in her work clothes­ a doctor, 

T­shirt, or by petitioning our 

an engineer, a pilot­ might be 

MPs to have The Sun sold from 

slightly more appropriate.  And 

the top shelf, now is the time 

I’m all for freedom of speech – 

to fight against Page 3 and the 

so, Dear Page 3 supporters, how 

caricaturing of women as either 

about a bit of gender equality, 

good­time­girls, or humourless 

shall we have alternate days 

feminists.

of male and female Page 3 like  the tabloids in Austria?! No? I  didn’t think so! I am not a prude, I don’t want to  hide nude women and men behind 

www.nomorepagethree.org

25


Founder of the London Guantanamo Campaign The London Guantanamo Campaign (LGC) was founded in 2006 and has  been campaigning since for the return of innocent British residents  imprisoned without due process in Guantanamo Bay.   “On a professional basis, I work with words every day, but I have  always preferred actions. I have been involved with humanitarian  organisations since my early teens but my passion has always been  for human rights and justice.I set up the London Guantanamo Campaign  in 2006, working with the families of some of the remaining British  residents held in Guantanamo Bay, and a small core of activists grew  out of that. At the time, there were a number of grassroots groups  working on the issue elsewhere across the UK. We worked closely  with them, and continue to work with NGOs working on this issue and  a large number of related grassroots organisations. Guantanamo Bay  does not exist in a vacuum and we always make the links between it  and other global problems. As a grassroots organisation, we are all  volunteers and our work is almost entirely self­funded. Everyone has  different skills that they can contribute to make a difference.  Human rights do not have the acceptability of charity or  humanitarian work. It is a thankless task and has risks. People you  know no longer wish to be associated with you and winning over the  trust of vulnerable people, who have been let down too often, is  hard work and takes a lot of personal integrity. What the campaign  lacks in material and human resources is made up for in enthusiasm  and passion, and the impact of our very small campaign shows  globally. Guantanamo has never been a mainstream concern and for a  long time, there was little interest, with the world resigned to the  broken promises of politicians, but we didn’t forget, give up or  move on with the latest trends. As with all other matters, the fate  of Guantanamo Bay and its prisoners ultimately lies in the hands  of God, but that’s not an excuse to be complacent and do nothing.  I organise most of the LGC’s events, so if you’re interested in  getting involved, get in touch as I can think of jobs for everyone.  I’ve been involved in human rights for over a decade and have a keen  dedication to justice. An important thing about the campaigning  work I do is that it is not exclusive or focused on one set of  individuals. Justice and human rights belong to everyone.” 40


Photos by Farah Elahi www.londonguantanamocampaign.blogspot.co.uk

41


AURELLA YUSUF interviews the Guerrilla Girls + What sparked the  initial poster campaign?  Twenty­eight years ago, we got the idea to put up  a couple of posters on the streets of New York  City about the state of women artists in the  New York Art world. It wasn’t a pretty picture.  But we had a new idea about how to construct  political art — to twist an issue around and  present it in a way that hadn’t been seen before.  The Guerrilla Girls were born: an anonymous group  of artists who wear gorilla masks in public  and take the names of dead women artists as  pseudonyms. Who knew that our work would cause  all hell to break loose? Who knew it would cause  a crisis of conscience about diversity in the art  world, something museums, collectors and critics  had denied for a long time. Now, it’s a no  brainer...you can’t tell the story of a culture  without all the voices in it. We also take on  Hollywood, politics and pop culture. What kind of response did you get from the art  world, and also the general public? Our strategy worked. Lots of people in the  art world were pissed at us, but some of them  changed their bad behaviour when we showed  them how discriminatory they had been. Lots of  other people in the art world were thrilled  that someone was standing up to the entrenched,  corrupt system.  As for the general public, we are still pretty  much under the radar, but our influence is  growing all the time. The best part; we get  thousands of emails every year from people all  over the world, age 8 to 80, telling us they use  our work as a model for doing their own crazy  kind of activism.

44


www.guerrillagirls.com

45


See Red Women’s Workshop was a screen­print workshop run as a  women’s collective between 1974 and the early 1990s. The workshop  was based in South London and produced some of the most striking  posters and pamphlets to emerge from the ongoing feminist movement.  Sofia Niazi interviews founding members Pru Stevenson and Susan  Mackie from See Red Workshop 1973­2002.

+ What is See Red Women’s workshop and how did it come about? See Red Women’s Workshop was founded by three ex art students in  1973. We met through an ad placed in Red Rag ­ a radical feminist  magazine ­ asking for women interested in forming a group to explore  and combat the negative images of women in advertising and the  media. See Red grew out of that meeting and a collective was formed  producing silk screened posters for the women’s liberation movement  as well as for community groups and others on request.   Working collectively was central to the ethos of See Red, as  was sharing skills and knowledge. Members belonged to women’s 

52


consciousness raising groups and were active in various radical  and alternative organisations. In the early days the posters were  mainly produced about our own personal experiences as women, about  the oppression of housework, childcare, and the negative images  of women. We always thought of it as propaganda for the women’s  movement.  It was 1973 ­ 1974, and as young women interested in politics and  social issues we became very interested in the women’s liberation  movement as it came into being. We were there at the right time in  the right place, and we were part of it as well. We didn’t go in to  create the ideas, we went in to promote the ideas of the women’s  movement, to try and make it clear that the personal is political.    You couldn’t just go in and do feminist posters then come home and  do something completely different – we lived and breathed it. We  came to it because we’d done graphics and fine art and felt that  we wanted to do something that we knew we could do well, but do  it with and for the women’s movement. It was a lot to do with the  images of women and the way that women were portrayed in the media  ­ they were very sexist times. That was the norm then, girls did  this and boys did that, and things were just starting to be thought  about. Men were going out and doing all sorts of left wing political  activities, which we could do to a certain extent, but women were  very marginalised and felt displaced within that. 

53


SARA SALEM Although my father is Muslim I never consider my upbringing to  have been a “Muslim” one. We were never told to pray, fast, or  read Qur’an, and when we did, it was more a social and cultural  formality. It was only much later, when I was sixteen that I began  to think of myself as belonging to a community of Muslims.

I began reading about Islam, talking to everyone about it.  Around  this time I moved to Cairo, which undoubtedly affected my sudden  need to discover what Islam was and whether or not I believed in  it. Mostly the questions I had stemmed from a very emotional and  non­rational need to connect with life at a deeper level. Was life  just about going to university, getting married, having children,  writing articles? It seemed too mechanical, too boring, too devoid  of essence. So, stereotypically, I became one of those people who  looked for more by turning to religion.   I quickly embraced Islam, and it became an important part of my  life. There were issues, however, that always made me uncomfortable,  and which resulted in me going through long phases of not praying or  feeling connected to God. The issues usually revolved around gender  ­ as a feminist, there were certain aspects about the Quran, and  especially the Hadith, which troubled me.   Chief among these issues was the question of whom God was addressing  in the Quran. It seemed to me that God’s audience was primarily men,  although the gender­neutral term “believers” appeared regularly.  The Hadith presented an even more worrying challenge, as I tried to  grapple with what seemed like contradictions between the Hadith and  the message of the Quran. 66


I began to explore Islamic feminism, and the works of Asma Barlas,  Kecia Ali, Leila Ahmed, Amina Wadud, Khaled abou Fadl, Farid  Esack, and Fatima Mernissi opened up an entirely new world to me.  These women (and sometimes men) were approaching the Islamic texts  with the certainty that God did not privilege men over women.  This certainty came from somewhere much deeper than rationality  or textual deduction; it came from belief and faith. Starting  from that point and then moving towards rationality made all the  difference. The work these women created was stunning in both its  content as well as its ultimate goal: to show that God is not what  so many male interpreters have (unknowingly) made God out to be.  That interpretation is a subjective act that is dependent upon our  positions in society and our own histories; that once the Qur’an  was revealed, it became an interpretation in and of itself; that  power has played a central role in how we have come to understand  Islam today; and that some interpretations have dominated, have  been amplified, and by extension other voices have been muted or  silenced.   A feminist reading of the Quran changed the way I saw many things in  life, not just religion. The first step towards change is imagining  a different reality. This act of imagining is already subversive,  because it shows you that what exists now is not natural and does  not have to exist. Imagining a better world is already an act of  resistance, as well as an act of critical thinking. That is what  these Islamic feminists did; they showed me (and many others) that a  different Islam is possible.   The Quran speaks to me at a very deep level, and in a way that  no other text has been able to. Praying makes me feel connected  to myself, to others, and to God, and constantly reminds me to be  humble, grateful and hopeful. Being in Mecca and Madinah have been  indescribable experiences that have made me feel things that no  amount of reading or writing has ever made me feel. Spirituality  feeds us in more ways than we are used to; it is different from  the day­to­day achievements and minor victories we revel in, it’s  different from our overly­rational and overly­mechanised lives. It  is much deeper than that.   So, this is a thank you to those who dared to re­interpret the  Quran. It’s not an easy thing to do—it is a sacred text revered  by millions. These peopl were attacked and ostracized, and yet  persevered to show that the Quran is for all. Thank ­ you.  

67


76


(Limner image by Grace Helmer) 77


PREDATOR MAHWISH CHISHTY

The American led drone war savaging the border between Pakistan and  Afghanistan hovers in the minds of many. Returning to her hometown  of Lahore in 2011, Mahwish Chishty was moved to merge new media and  conceptual work with traditional practice, to re­render silhouettes  of unmanned Drones as vibrant cultural images inspired by Pakistan’s  colourful truck art or Jingle truck tradition. We felt her project  beautifully captured the eeriness of the present as seen through the  eyes of both past generations and haunted future generations. www.mahachishty.com 80


REPORTAGE ILLUSTRATION

81


SUBMISSIONS ISSUE 3

DEADLINE: 1ST FEBRUARY 2014

The theme for issue 3 is DRAWING, any written or visual submissions  related to drawing are welcome. Here are some ideas: reporting,  sketching, inventing, experimenting, tracing, planning, capturing,  imagining, remembering, laughing.  More general submissions relating to women, spirituality, creative  practices and play are also very welcome, OOMK loves surprises so if  you’ve got something special send it our way!  Submissions to oomkzine@gmail.com

112


DESIGN + ILLUSTRATION SERVICES

Studio One of My Kind is opening for business. We offer design and illustration services:   + editorial design and layout  + editorial illustration + branding (web + print) + poster design  + cute sticker design www.oomk.net/studio

Enquiries to Sofia & Rose at studiooomk@gmail.com

113


“More than machinery we need humanity. More than  cleverness, we need kindness and gentleness.” — Charlie Chaplin

ISSN 2051­9907

OOMK 2 Preview  

This preview contains 28 pages of the original 114 pages, the complete version can be purchased at www.oomk.net

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you