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TRANSITION MAGAZINE | FALL 2014

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Stigma Shame Doubt Learn about the myths of ADHD. Learn about the common ways non-ADDers and ADDers who have experienced denial or shame stigmatize us. Learn to explain ADHD and counter stigma. Find different responses for media, health and education professionals, coworkers or family and friends. Choose statements you feel comfortable with; practice your delivery to be calm and confident; and aim to persuade and educate, not to attack. Call out stigma. Use facts. When appropriate, and depending on your confidence, comfort and the situation, explain why stigmas are myth. If you’re open to it, your personal ADHD story can be much more powerful than facts. It’s often harder to demonize a person you know. Build support among family and friends. ADHD is 80% genetic— your parent(s) may have it. Your family lives with it. Start building support with “ADD and Loving It!?”– two actors interviewing ADHD experts in the best video on adult ADHD out there.3 Think the long game. Make small personal victories. Build pressure for change that will help others. To learn more about ADHD stigma from the eyes of ADDers, visit my website. Pete Quily is an Adult ADHD coach who has ADHD and leads the Vancouver Adult ADD Support Group. He is on the board of CHADD Vancouver.

NOT ALL DISABILITIES ARE VISIBLE. A growing number of Canadians suffer from invisible disabilities, such as addictions and mental health issues. In fact, one in five Canadians will experience some form of mental illness during their lifetime. But did you know that: • People with disabilities have the right to equal employment opportunities? • People with disabilities have the right to work in an environment free of harassment and discrimination? • People with disabilities have the right to accommodation and accessibility? The Hospital Employees’ Union advocates for the rights of health care workers with disabilities. And we’re proud to support the work of the BC Coalition of People with Disabilities (soon to be Disability Alliance BC). www.disabilityalliancebc.org

Footnotes

Groups

1 addcoach4u.com/doesaddreallyexist.html

There are two ADHD Support groups in BC:

Dr. Russell Barkley, Monitor on Psychology, March 2012, p. 70

• Vancouver Adult ADD Support Group addcoach4u.com/adultadd.html

2

ADD and Loving It!? is available from totallyadd.com. http://totallyaddshop. com/products/add-loving-it#. U7JFo41dWmU

3

Online Pete’s online ADHD resources: addcoach4u.com

• CHADD Vancouver (Children & Adults with ADHD) vcn.bc.ca/ chaddvan? Vancouver ADHD Parent Program. (Must live in Vancouver) vch.ca/find_services/find_services/?&program_ id=130 T

What would it take to go public with ADHD? adultaddstrengths. com/category/what-would-it-taketo-go-public-with-adhd/

DISABILITY ALLIANCE BC (FORMERLY BC COALITION OF PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES)

www.disabilityalliancebc.org

Transition Fall 2014 | Stigma  

The quarterly magazine of Disability Alliance BC (formerly BC Coalition of People with Disabilities).

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