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in music

in fashion

jun ramos anthony hooper + inventory magazine

skratch bastid

jerrica santos skye wallace and more!

Gladys Perint Palmer in beauty

new fall trends are in! hair, makeup and more! mens grooming tips to stay fresh this fall september 2013

autumn

vol. 1, issue 6


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masthead editor-in-chief

| ghazal elhaei

creative director photo director

| marchel eang | reema ismail

video director beauty director fashion editor

| alex ross

| kaycee camaclang | caity rowlands

photography contributors reema ismail, ameeqa ali, alex ross, berkley vopnfjord megan bourne, marchel eang

contributors monica pankiewicz, anisa chaki, frances thomas, savannah reitz, tiffany morton, sheena antonios, carlo reyes, kenneth wyse

on the cover skratch bastid photographed by ghazal elhaei edited by marchel eang


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Vol. 1 , Issue 6 st e ptember 201 3 T he autumn Issue

a letter from the editor When I was in high school, September not only marked a year closer to freedom but a chance to reinvent myself. I’ve done it all: the punk princess, the preppy girl, the hood rat and come the twelfth grade, the “I don’t care anymore and will wear sweatpants to school everyday” look. Shame, I know. To this day, that feeling of reinvention never goes away. The early weeks of fall where the leaves change colour and the air is as crisp as the new boots guiding me through the streets of Downtown Vancouver is as intoxicating as devouring the September issues of the world. I still take the early days of September as a chance to try something I’ve never done; whether it’s a new hair cut, a new attempt at mastering heels or a new jacket that I obsess over. Our pages are filled with individuals who have challenged the odds and are influencing us with that certain sense of je ne sais quoi that leaves you both envious and adorned. They’re all doing something new in an old fashioned way - with pride, passion and a determination to their craft. I can’t think of a better collective of artists to feature in our first September issue than the talent we have brought on.

one1one social

“At each point in our lives, we are at a crossroads. We are the fruit of our past and we are the architects of our future… If you want to know your past, look at your present circumstances. If you want to know your future, look at what is in your mind.” —Matthieu Ricard

Ghazal Elhaei


contents music 6

Jerrica Santos

10

Skye Wallace

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Record Shop

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Plugged In

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skratch bastid

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One 2 Watch: Okibi beauty

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men: grooming

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women's hair: trend report fall 2013

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makeup: trend report fall 2013

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makeup: new collections

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Avant Garden fashion

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jun ramos

52

anthony hooper of inventory magazine

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Gladys Perint Palmer

62

Punk off

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A Modern Affair

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Closet Raid

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Black is the New Black

92

Killjoy

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New Forms

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jerrica santos Text Ghazal Elhaei Photography Ameeqa Ali Photo Editing Marchel Eang

W

hen little girls dream of becoming a star, many leave it at just that. A dream. However for the few that put in the work—like Jerrica Santos—watching their dreams become realities leave you inspired. Her justification as an artist is defined by moments of clarity that clearly state the path she should venture towards is one in the performing arts. Whilst in university, Santos was pursuing a career in biological sciences, with intentions of continuing her education in optometry. With relative ease, she was able to balance her music and her studies; her graduation welcoming several acceptances into various doctorate programs across North America. An accomplishment that reigned with pride also left the songstress torn; making a difficult decision of putting her medical career on hold to fully pursue her role as a performer. continued on pg. 8 ➟

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“I flew home one night from my last interview in Boston and I made the decision. I decided to put my medical career on hold, for now, to follow my passion. It’s one of the best decisions I have ever made to date.” Santos, a classically trained pianist, identifies herself as a true rhythm and blues artist - growing up immersed within the genre, having recorded two RnB records and working with the likes of Get Right Music - but understands the importance of adapting and changing with current industry trends. “ I absolutely love the feel, the sound, the soul and energy of RnB. My biggest idol is Alicia Keys; I felt a connection to her as an artist and her sound when I first heard her. I relate to her music, as I am also a classical pianist and RnB vocalist. As I grew as an artist, I began indulging in different genres. I enjoy singing and creating music in a variety of genres including electronic and popular music. At the moment I am currently working on a new electronic dance sound. As I work with new producers in this genre, I am exploring wonderful aspects of my music and myself as I delve into this new genre.” She refers to the process as “a grind and a hell of a journey that I absolutely love.” Devoted to her craft, she spends every day practicing her vocal, piano and writing techniques. Humble about her individual skills, she accredits the importance of having a strong team around her. Currently working with various producers and songwriters, and with her management team, Powerhouse Station, to focus and create her art. Her inspiration derives from her own life and those surrounding her to turn those significant moments and stories into songs; “as sappy as it is, I enjoy love and heartbreak stories.” When Santos takes the stage, she demands it, putting on a performance that rivals those of legendary divas. “I would have to say my favourite performance, would be my winning performance at Variety’s Got Talent.

I had one shot, one song, one performance to win me the title; to a sold-out crowd in Vancouver, I rocked out “Crazy” by Gnarls Barkley to win over likes of star panelled judges which included Bruce Allen (Michael Buble’s Manager.)” Having personally seen the performance at a different event, it’s obvious to see why she won. There’s a formula for strong artists who have mastered the stage and the key is knowing how to cope with nerves and mistakes. “I always get nervous before every performance, no matter how small or how big. However, I take that nervous energy and use it to my advantage and take that energy to take my performance to kick up my performance to that next level and I enjoy the exhilaration. I don’t like to admit it, but I make mistakes from time to time. I’ll say the wrong lyrics or sing a few wrong notes. During a performance, most of the time the audience doesn’t know, so I never show it. If they think it I may have made a mistake, I convince them otherwise by working through it like it was supposed to be that; you know, improvise. Only over a lot of experience have I learned this; it’s gotten easier to handle my nerves over hundreds of shows but it would not be the same without it.” Her positive energy is reflective in her style as well; her image representing a colourful and bold powering sense of self awareness and confidence. When timing permits, she loves shopping in her spare time. She follows the influences of Ciara and Kelly Rowland, and finds her inspiration through Instagram, blogs and fashion magazines. When it comes to the look on stage, she always tries to maintain professional but aims to stand out; claiming that her look is “not your typical girl next door.” Often wearing new looks on stage, she looks to major brands like Top Shop, H&M, Forever 21 and American Apparel to fill her ever expanding wardrobe.


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This fall, she’s releasing her new single, “Illuminate,” an electronic dance track that she has been working on with up and coming electronic producer, Trevor Hoffman. She’s also going to be working on a new EP with a few music videos to accompany the release. It’s not hard to predict that Santos will make her mark in the industry - her aspirations including commercial success as an artist and to have her songs on heavy rotation on radio - will come to her soon enough. “I am not where I want be at yet but what I do know that it takes an incredible amount of hard work. You have to surround yourself with those who will push you and support you in your endeavours. You’ll be surprised by where this journey takes you and you have to be ready for it. Don’t be afraid of change or failure. Don’t be afraid to explore different aspects of your art. I have achieved many goals I have made for myself as an artist, such as becoming a strong performer, musician and becoming a professional teacher. However, my next and biggest goal is becoming a known artist; to be able to share my music with a larger audience.”

www.jerricasantos.com www.facebook.com/jerrica.santos.music www.twitter.com/jerricasantos www.instagram.com/jerricasantos www.youtube.com/liljemboogaloo


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s k ye wall ace Text Ghazal Elhaei Photography daniel david

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hen Skye Wallace first walked through the doors of the Media Club, her quiet and soft spoken nature was a stark contrast to watching her on stage later that night: hauntingly beautiful and eerie. The past few months have been busy and never-ending; it's surprising that she comes across so unfazed by the challenges and pressures of an up-andcoming artist. Having moved around a lot when she was younger gave her an advantage to be able to handle this summer's transient lifestyle, with no fixed address. Since the get-go, music has always been something that she has pursued and has been passionate about. Cultivated to do so from an early age by her family, she accredits them to be the biggest inspiration to not look at challenges in life and see them as looming, impossible negatives. "Fortunately, my family instilled in me the mindset to not give in to hopelessness when it rears its ugly head. I get that most from my sister, who - while it was medically deemed at birth that she would never be able to walk - has overcome so many physical challenges and now walks with gusto. She even climbed Machu Picchu a few years ago to raise funds for Equip Kids International, under her own (very apt) campaign title 'Anything Is Possible'." The balancing act between life and music comes very naturally after having worked on it for quite some time. Her affinity is complimented by her roots, learning her first guitar and vocal song, Bob Dylan's 'The Times They Are A-Changin'. Her Bob Dylan and Neil Young phase hit her pretty hard when she first started writing, also delving into very different records like Against Me!'s Reinventing Axl Rose. She admits that her first "real" love would be the entirety of Randy Travis' 1987 album, Always and Forever. Wallace's presence on stage reflects the tones of the voices who inspired her. When comparing her light-hearted spirit to the darkness that overcomes the stage, she becomes absorbed in her stories - that of which are often times very intense. continued on pg. 12 âž&#x;

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"The last show I played, someone came up to me and said, "you scared the shit out of me." Luckily, they meant it as a compliment. That kind of portrayal comes with the territory of writing about dead things, tragedy, and even turn-of-the-century Northern Ontario. I'm glad it comes off as haunting; that's the desired effect." An emotion of enchantment is what she aims to evoke throughout every show. This confidence has thrived since her first show, an intermission performance at the Heritage Playhouse on the Sunshine Coast when she was fifteen. "It was being filmed, to what end I don't know. I do recall that it was nerve-wracking as hell." She calls on her release show she held back in March of this year; having never felt so absorbed in the energy created in that old Railtown gallerywarehouse-turned-guitar-shop and filled to the brim with good people and sound. Other highlighted shows of the year include opening for the Rural Alberta Advantage for the opening show of Sled Island in Calgary and this year's North Country Fair. Her humility allows her to embrace every aspect of performing in its entirety. "I guess the most important part would be going into a performance without the expectation for perfection. I believe that growth and progress happen naturally, and sometimes manifest themselves as mistakes. So that makes mistakes rather exciting, while they're not the most fun. And besides, the audience won't often recognize a mistake took place if you don't let on." Wallace is currently developing her sound, incorporating different elements from various genres, and honing in on stories to tell. Having just signed with new management, Nightheat Entertainment, the next year will hold recording, great shows, and no signs of slowing down on the horizon.

www.skyewallace.com www.facebook.com/skyewallacemusic www.twitter.com/skyewallace www.skyewallace.bandcamp.com


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rec ord shop new albums we can’t wait to listen to

M83

Formed in 2001, the psychedelic rock band M83 was named after the spiral galaxy Messier 83. Consisting of Anthony Gonzales, Ian Young, Morgan Kibby, Loic Maurin, and Jordan Lawlor; the band released their selfentitled album in 2001. The band then followed with their second album Dead Cities, Red Seas & Lost Ghosts in spring of 2003. In July of 2011 “Midnight City,” the first single off of the band’s album “Hurry Up, We’re Dreaming” became #1 on Pitchfork’s Top 100 Track List, while the album placed #3 on the Top 50 Albums of the 2011 List.

Iggy Azalea Amethyst Amelia Kelly, more commonly known as Iggy Azalea is a 23-year-old Australian Recording Artist. Mostly known for her controversial songs “Pu$$y” and “Two Times,” which went viral on YouTube. Azalea is also a model represented by Wilhelmina Models and was named the “new face of Levi Jeans” in 2012. On the pursuit of her future rapping career, Azalea ditched high school and traveled to the United States just shortly after her 16th birthday. Telling her parents that she was embarking on a holiday with a close friend, Azalea later informed them that she was in fact not returning home. Azalea later become the first female, as well as the first non-American rapper to be featured on XXL’s annual Top 10 Freshman issue. Iggy Azalea is set to release her debut studio album, The New Classics, later this month. Meese Although broken up, Meese is a band that will never get old.

Originally from Denver Colorado, the band was made up of Patrick Meese, Nathan Meese, Ben Haley and Mike Ayars. Named after the creators, Patrick Meese and Nathan Meese, the band in total released 5 albums and EP’s. Sharing the stage with bands like Paramore, Our Lady Peace, The Fray, Switchfoot, and many others; the band gained a lot of recognition. In July of 2009, the band released their only major studio album “Broadcast” and in May of 2010 unfortunately announced the breakup of Meese. Text/ Monica Pankewicz


one1one magazine

plugged in a few artist (new and old) worth knowing about.

John Legend “Love In The Future” Set to release on September 3rd, Love In The Future will be the fourth studio album for 34 year old singer-songwriter, John Legend. Featuring artists like Rick Ross, Stacy Barthe, Seal and produced by Legend, Kanye West, and Dave Tozer. The album’s first single is entitled “Who Do We Think We Are,” which features Rick Ross. The winner of a whopping 9 Grammy’s, Legend also received the Starlight Award from the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2007.

MGMT “MGMT” One of our favourite bands, MGMT, is set to release their upcoming album on September 17th. On their past spring tour, the band premiered their first song off their upcoming album in Croatia. “Alien Days” received warm reviews from crowds and critics alike. The psychedelic rock band, generally known for their hits such as “Electric Feel” and “Kids” are winners of 4 NME awards and 1 Grammy.

Justin Timberlake “The 20/20 Experience: 2 of 2” Justin Timberlake is set to mark his fourth album release with The 20/20 Experience: 2 of 2. Already having released the lead single “Take Back the Night”, the album will be composed of 11 tracks, as well as an unannounced “special surprise”. Upon release, both The 20/20 Experience: 1 of 2 and The 20/20 Experience: 2 of 2 will be packaged together and sold as The 20/20 Experience: The Complete Experience. The album is now available for pre-sale and is set to drop on September 30th.

Text/ Monica Pankewicz

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sk ratch bastid Skratch of All Trades Photography & Text Ghazal Elhaei

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aul "Skratch Bastid" Murphy and I are walking across the Squamish Valley Music Festival grounds, surrounded by a sea of euphoric music lovers - fans and artists alike - as we immediately delve into some of our favourite jazz finds. My most recent being a live recording of the 1964 Newport Jazz Festival that I gifted a vinyl of to Murphy and his a recommendation to listen to Ramsey Lewis Trio's "Summertime," a record originating from 1961. The musical journey led us into the media tents tucked in the outskirts of the festival, where we indulged even further to Murphy's life behind the Skratch. The past few months have presented a significant balance in Murphy's world between touring and enjoying the summer season. Having performed at various festivals such as the Evolve Festival, the Calgary Stampede, Squamish Valley Music Festival and the Salmon Arm Roots and Blues Festival hasn't stopped him from also spending some quality time with loved ones in Bermuda, or something as simple as going down to the lake with ten of his closest friends. "If you don't leave yourself that extra time to enjoy it, then it feels like a job. When I go somewhere, I go out of my way to make sure I can also enjoy the place." continued on pg. 18 âž&#x;

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Playing to a crowd successfully is a craft that one can master only over time. "One of the things that I pride myself in as a DJ is reading a crowd. Going into the situation, I normally have an idea and a rough shell of what I'm going to do but that can change. Obviously I have a message that I want to get across but there are different ways of getting it there. There are always fixed things in your set, but as a DJ you're allowed the liberty to move around genres, styles of music, and tempos - because every crowd is a little different - I try to be balanced across all spectrums." Murphy can be classified as a "Golden Boy" of the born and raised Hip-Hop Generation. Hip-Hop is where he is from, though he does pay attention to other genres - noting that sampled music is where his passion lays. Before stepping on stage, Murphy likes to go out and have a look around. "I don't like to play a show without getting a vibe first - especially with a music festival - you can't always afford yourself that time, but when you do it's nice. I like to check out what's going on and with what I see, I'll make a folder of in my head of what I want to play. It comes back to reading a crowd even before a show." Growing up, Murphy was encouraged into his role as Skratch by his mother, who helped cultivate his talents from his teenage years. Pushing him into his first few battles that have led the Nova Scotia native to have placed 2nd twice in the Canadian DMC Championships. As well as having won the Montreal Underground DJ (MUDJ) title back to back in '06 and '07, as well as being a three-time Scribble Jam Champion in '04, '06, and '07. In the same way that he enjoys playing different genres, Murphy likes to take on various roles musically as well. His showmanship combined with his production talents has landed him the opportunities to work with the likes of several artists. His most recent release being the production of Shad's record "Stylin" featuring Saukrates as well as two other tracks on Shad's upcoming release, Flying Colours. If one were a fly a wall they would see Murphy and Shad just hanging out. "He's my homie. We get together and usually the first thing we do for the first hour is talk music or basketball - just hang out. Then he'll ask what I've been up to, I'll play him a few ideas and he writes to it." A process that led to the creation of the leading single, as well as collaborations with Classified and Vancouver local Sophia Danai. When watching Murphy take the stage, his infectious energy and passion behind the table makes you want to move; his presence


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empowers the audience to give their all during his performance. We started touching base on all of the performers at the festival and comparing various Hip-Hop acts. "You look at a band like Jurassic 5 (who played the night before) and they put on an incredible live set. You look at them and it's just a DJ and MC show - but they take it to another level. They have two amazing DJ's: Numark and Cut Chemist - going back and forth. Furthermore, they as MC's: they write together as a group, they're a true group. They fill in each other's line and they have a choreographed show. You don't get that a lot in Hip-Hop." There's a lot of aggression in HipHop today, similar to that of the 80's but Murphy believes that the soul in Hip-Hop is still out there, we just don't get to hear it on the radio or in mainstream. He notes that music trends have a a lot of similarities to fashion, where the cycle is ever changing - usually at a rapid pace. With the instant access and gratification that audiences today have, it's becomes difficult to pinpoint what is on trend on and what isn't. "The message of the music spreads so quickly, I almost find it redundant to say is it going to go back to what it used to be because this cycle is going so quick now. There's inflections of all different eras in music. What I try to do now is make music that is inspired by all different eras. I'm a huge classic Hip-Hop fan, but I like modern southern rap and drum machine beats. It's just the image of Hip-Hop is perceived differently."

There's something distinctive about Murphy that sets him apart from other DJ's; so I asked if there was a difference in who he was as Paul Murphy versus Skratch Bastid. "Not really. Some people say it's my smile and they always ask me, why are you always smiling? I mean, I do have the best job in the world. My thing is that I'm a pretty positive person. My image is to be positive and to share that with people and I know that not everyone is and that some are deprived of positivity, so I like to do my part. That sounds so hippie, but it's true."

www.skratchbastid.com www.soundcloud.com/skratchbastid‎ www.twitter.com/SkratchBastid www.facebook.com/skratchbastid www.instagram.com/skratchbastid


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o n e 2 wa t c h

oki bi Text Ghazal Elhaei Photography alex ross

When we met with Christopher Robin, he was getting a fresh cut and shave at Fortknight Men Boutique. His spirit was infectious as we sat back and took in the twist of tradition and modern style that was a reflection of not only his own personality, but that of his alter-ego, OKIBI.

Defining Moment I think I’ve always had an affinity for music, both creating and curating. The moment I decided I wanted to be a DJ however, I was probably 13 or 14 years old. I was watching Much Music late at night and a video of a DJ Krush performance came on. I couldn’t fathom what I was seeing or hearing -- this layered, syncopated and physical soundscape. It was entrancing. From that moment, I fell in love with the turntable as an instrument. YouTube wasn’t around yet, but I was somehow able to track down DMC routines online. The more I saw and heard, the more infatuated I became. I was obsessed with record digging, and I raided the shops every weekend for everything from DJ Shadow to Boards of Canada, black and post metal, acid jazz, hardcore and hip-hop. continued on pg. 24 ➟


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Mastering the Craft I am entirely self taught when it comes to DJing and live performance. Before tutorials were readily available, it was constant trial and error. I was the only kid in my town with turntables. When I started hanging out with other DJs, my skills really began to develop. Jamming is everything. I would go to shows and just trainspot the DJs -- absorbing everything I could: every touch of the platter, twist of a knob and fader movement. Whitebird and ISBOW records in Victoria (both now closed) became two important hubs for me. I would spend hours digging for music, and it was in the Whitebird backroom that I found my first real introduction to digital production. I had been around Akai MPC samplers and modular synthesizers, but as a broke teenager, digital audio was both affordable and openended. Those weekends in the backroom took me away from a solely DJ perspective of curation and performance, and introduced me to an entirely new world. With some mentoring, I felt I had become an artist. I could express myself through my own soundscapes and productions. Only now am I really returning to analog and hardware production. Record Shop Before I really immersed myself in record digging, I inherited a crate of dusty records from a friend. It was mostly battle breaks and hip-hop. Drum and bass was the first genre to really capture my attention on vinyl. I can’t really remember the first records I bought, but they were definitely True Playaz or Ganja Records releases. Growing Up My father was the musician of the house. He would (and still does) play the guitar and bass. I was raised on the blues -- Muddy Waters, B. B. King and Clapton. To this day, I’m still somewhat infatuated with cassette tapes. Of my siblings, I’m the only one that has pursued music. Other Options I actually have an associate arts degree in English. I’ve always enjoy writing, but I’ve realized it’s something I do for myself. Currently, I’m in my second year of a fashion

marketing diploma. This time next year, I want to have my own retail and studio space. Notable Moments I’m not really sure how to define notable. In the last year or so, I’ve played a number of festivals and nightclubs in Vancouver and on the Island. I released a solo EP on Bass Taste Records last December, and a recent joint EP with fellow Vancouverite, Self Evident, on Dipped Recordings. I helped launch Euphoric Records, a house and bass music label spearheaded by my good friend, Desolate. I also did some much needed touring with Union Sound System, a live sound concept I founded in Victoria. Up next? I have a joint EP with Desolate nearing completion. I’m also working on a solo album of purely GRAVELIFE sounds -- raw, syncopated, polyrhythmic, sample-based abyss. Style Game My sense of fashion or style really developed after I stopped caring. For a number of years, I more or less dropped out of society. I was a dirty crust punk -- diving for food, playing music in the street and patching my clothes together. DIY or die. As I’ve grown, I’ve adapted a lot of that same mentality to my personal sense of style. I’m trying to distance myself from the idea of fast fashion. Hype is hype, and as much as I can appreciate certain pieces, I’m much more interested in unique, eclectic and timeless aesthetics. Lately, I’ve been trying to buy as local as possible. There’s a lot of amazing apparel and goods being created in this city. I’m also somewhat obsessed with body modification. Piercings, tattoos, scarification, implants -- it’s all good. Style Influences I feel like I’m more influenced by the cultures I grew up in than specific figures. Hip-hop and street fashion has always really permeated my sense of style, as well as motorcycle, bicycle, skateboard, punk and metal cultures. I love digging for vintage clothing; it’s analogous to record digging. Some contemporary designers I’m feeling at the moment include Mark McNairy, Dr. Romanelli and Rav Matharu. continued on pg. 27 ➟


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NINE Hats I guess it was last fall, I stopped into the Nine Vancouver headquarters on Keefer St. to pick up a strapback cap. Some people collect sneakers, but I’m all about the headwear. Anyways, after chatting with Niks and Tasha for a bit, I ended up modelling a line for their lookbook that season. Since then, I’ve helped develop the marketing coordination on a number of collections. I also performed at the recent “Gala” collection release party at The Corner Store. I love Nine headwear. It’s NOT generic, mass-produced, made in Vietnam, poorly-embroidered snapbacks, which unfortunately, seem to generate most of the hype today. Nine’s attention to detail to next level -- design, textiles, fit and finish. Plus, it’s designed, sourced, manufactured and distributed in Vancouver. For the price of a couple Supreme knock-offs in the Chinatown night market, you could have copped local. I’m sure this sounds somewhat biased, but honestly, we need to support local fashion. This is our community. The Journey to Vancouver Without diving into the grittier bits, it’s been tumultuous to say the least. Relationships and networks have crumbled, and new ones have been forged. Vancouver is definitely where I belong, right now. I’ve found an amazing community in Gastown, and my network has grown a hundred times over since leaving the Island. It’s easy to plateau in a small town, and while Vancouver isn’t a big city, the opportunities, the lifestyle and the cultures here are like nothing else. Moving here was one of the best things I could have done, on more than a few levels. The Next Chapter I’m continuing work on my collaborative EP with Desolate and my solo LP throughout the fall. I’m a lot more productive in the cooler months. Summer is when I like to perform, winter is when I create. I’m sure I’ll continue to pop up for local gigs at spots like Celebrities Nightclub, Fortune Sound and Killjoy, always bringing something a bit different to each set. My experimental live P.A. side-project with Elliott Langley, AUTOMATON (http://www.theautomaton.bandcamp.com), is also building up steam for a third (and possibly final) release. I never know quite what I’m doing though, so keep it locked.

www.djokibi.com www.soundcloud.com/okibi www.facebook.com/djokibi www.twitter.com/okibi www.instagram.com/okibi


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Grooming mens skin care

Call it metrosexual or whatever you may want to, but skin care is important whether you're male or female. As simple as it may be to women, it can seem like quite the daunting task for men.

1. WASH: Run some lukewarm water and rinse your face

thoroughly. Add a pea-sized amount of face cleanser to your hands and work the cleanser in circular motions onto your face. Do this for about two to three minutes and rinse the cleanser off your skin. Make sure to get every bit of cleanser off. For men who are daily shavers, this will help ease your shave by removing the dirt and oil from your skin that create bumps on your skin helping your razor guide smoothly.

2. TONER/ASTRINGENT: What’s the difference? Depends

on your skin type. For sensitive and/or dry skin use Toner. If you have combination/oily skin use Astringent. Take your toner or astringent and put it onto a clean cotton pad or cotton ball and gently wipe this onto your face. This will get rid of the oils that cause acne and any dirt that got missed when cleansing your face.

3. MOISTURIZE: This must be done immediately after

toning your face. Again, take a pea sized amount and use circular motions to smooth this onto the skin and take it down to your neck. The first place to show age is the neck, so keeping your neck moisturized will keep those ladies guessing your age. Text/ Kaycee Camaclang


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How to determine your skin type: Wash your face regularly (Step 1) and skip the other two steps. Wait about 5-10 minutes and avoid touching your face. Take a facial tissue and rub it gently against different areas of your face. Look closely into a mirror. Does your skin feel tight and do you see it start to flake? These are the signs of dry skin. Is your skin shiny and does the tissue have oil residue from your face? These are signs of oily skin. If you have all of these issues on different parts of your face, you fall under the oily/ combination skin category. This will help determine what type of skin care to use.

Kiehls Facial Fuel: http://www.kiehls.ca

Lab Series Daily Moisture Defense Lotion http://www.labseries.com

Clinique Scruffing Lotion http://www.clinique.com

L'Oreal Paris Hydra-Power Cleanser http://www.lorealparis.ca

Anthony Logistics For Men Astringent http://anthony.com

Dove Men + Care Face Wash http://www.dove.ca


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Hair

fall 2013

New season, new look. Try some of these off the runway looks this upcoming season.

❶ For those of you who love an effortless look, try a low ponytail at

the nape of your neck with your fringe and layers loose or tucked behind your ears. For those without layers or a fringe, try a deep side part and have all your hair slicked smooth onto the head— Both styles very reminiscent of the 90’s. 

❷ Having a bad hair day? Try a side french braid or fish-tail braid

paired with a statement headband or clip.

❸ The top-knot bun or ballerina bun is still on the runways for this season. Add some flair to your bun with a scarf or knit head-band.

❹ 40’s and 50’s hair is big this fall on the runway. Deep waves kept

loose at the root of the hair and softens towards the ends of the hair with a deep side part.

❺ The wet look doesn’t literally mean your hair has to be wet, try

slicking your high ponytail back with shine hairspray instead of your regular hairspray to achieve that wet look.

❻ The Bouffant is back. Add some tease to the crown of your hair and smooth it down with a comb over top. Place the rest of your hair in a low bun, a twist or incorporate it into a simple updo.

❼ Of course, the tousled “just got out of bed” look will forever be

on trend. But who really has amazing hair right when they get up in the AM? Try braiding your hair loosely before bed or putting it into a loose bun at the top of your head. Release it when you’re getting for the day to reveal voluminous, textured hair. Add few curls here and there to add some definition.

Text/ Tiffany Morton


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� Makeup fall 2013


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Ditch the bronzer from the warmer months and think more matte, flawless skin. You don't need to be a supermodel to look like one this fall. Here are some of our favourite fall trends this season to try out.

✏ Can't do without your bronzer? Instead of using it to

look more tan, try contouring your face with your bronzer instead. Concentrate it in the hollows of your cheeks, the jaw line and the hairline to give your face a more defined look.

✏ Bold brows are back in full effect. Define your brows

with your favourite brow product - powder, pencil, gel. Whatever it may be, put it to use. This season there is no such thing as too much eyebrows.

✏ Simplify your look by adding one bit of boldness. Try a pop of colour on your lips and leaving your eyes with just mascara. Or a soft smokey smudged out eye with a nude coloured lip. ✏ Swap the dewy skin for a matte finished look. Try a foundation with a matte finish or apply powder to your existing foundation. Take a big fluffy brush and dab it into your powder.

✏ Natural toned blush with a matte finish was a hit on the runway this season. Think of the colour you get on your face after a long workout or when you blush. The colour of Text/ Tiffany Morton

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Makeup

new collections fall 2013

Just because the sun isn't out doesn't mean you have to coop yourself up inside. Keep the glam up during the colder months and try out some of our favourite collections that have come out this fall. Text/ Kaycee Camaclang

Chanel “Superstition” collection Available Hudson Bay Beauty Counters or www.chanel.com

Dior “Mystic Metallics” collection Available at Hudson Bay Beauty Counters or www.dior.com


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Too Faced “Pretty Rebel” collection Available at your local Sephora or www.toofaced.com

Laura Mercier “Dark Spell” Collection Available at Holt Renfrew Beauty Counters or www.lauramercier.com

Urban Decay Fall 2013 Collection Available at your local Sephora or www.urbandecay.com

MAC "Antonio Lopez" Fall Collection Available at any MAC Cosmectics or www.maccosmetics.com

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avant Makeup Artist Tiffany Morton

Hair Stylist Savannah Reitz


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garden

Photographer Daniel David

Models Alex Hall, Sally Lunn, Allie Pehleman


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THE CULTURE OF TOTAL BEAUTY Exclusive, holistic care for beauty in harmony with people and nature. In selected spas and salons.

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Jun Ramos

of Ramos & Fortier and Men’s Fashion Week Text: Anisa Chaki Photography: Reema Ismail

Exceptionally poised, impeccably dressed and über confident; to classify Jun Ramos as ‘well-rounded’ would almost be an understatement. One half of men’s accessories brand, Ramos & Fortier and Founder & Creative Director behind Men’s Fashion Week Vancouver; Ramos has it all. Upon identifying a void in our city’s fashion community, he started Men’s Fashion Week Vancouver for one reason: to provide local talent with a platform; a place to show off their designs that they wouldn’t otherwise have access to. I got the opportunity to sit down with Ramos where I learned it’s about putting all the “fashion bitchiness” aside and allowing the designers to be the true stars of the show. continued on pg. 43 ➟


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What first peaked your interest in fashion? My background is actually very different. I have an engineering degree; so right after college, I did that for about three years. But of course, just like everybody else, I have several interests. And I do equally like the sciences and the creative arts but I grew up with great mentors and they always told me, “you don’t have to choose just one life.” If you want to do engineering; do it. If you want to do fashion; do it. If you want to do both at the same time; why not? Even as a kid I was always interested in anything creative or beautiful. Can you tell me a little bit more about the designing you’ve done for your men’s accessories company, Ramos and Fortier? Ramos and Fortier was established in 2010. My business partner and I were just tired of that typical men’s chain that you see guys wearing. You know the chain I mean? Every guy seems to have that chain. So, we wanted to design something new or source something from all over the world and we did that. So we design and then have it manufactured overseas. The goal is to have it manufactured here [in Canada] in the future. We want to create jobs for Canadians and we want to be able to have that stamp on our packages that state that it’s ‘Made in Canada’.

“I grew up with great mentors and they always told me, ‘you don’t have to choose just one life.’” Tell me more about your involvement within the Vancouver Fashion Industry. The idea for the Vancouver Fashion Industry came in 2011 and the concept is a coworking space. We noticed that there are a lot of small business owners. For example, if you’re a small business owner and you live in a basement you don’t necessarily want to meet your clients in your basement, right? So we thought, why don’t we have a coworking space for everybody in the creative industry. Makeup artists, photographers, models and the like; you can use the coworking space as your office or you can meet clients there, use the boardroom, etc. So, that’s what we’re trying to do. As long as your business is creative, then you can join in. And it’s not about making money, we just want it to break even; it’s about availability. So tell me more about this season of Men’s Fashion Week. What’s new and what’s different from previous years? What’s new? Well, in terms of media and government involvement; this is the biggest season for us. We have an upcoming event in London co-hosted by the High Commission of Canada in London and that’s in February and we have another partnership with IDS West [Interior Design Show West] and we will be involved in their opening party. After Men’s Fashion Week we have these two big events lined up so I’m probably not going to get much sleep for a while. Plus we have a ton of new designers this year. continued on pg. 47 ➟


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How many designers are in the show? There will be twelve because we compressed it to two days. So one day is the media event and one day is for the actual main show. We did it like that, so it’s more efficient for the buyers. Buyers don’t want to come for five days. They’re busy; they want to see everything in one day and that’s it. Why menswear? Because I’m a man, ha-ha. I mean, Vancouver is getting there, in terms of menswear. The women of course, they’re naturally good at it but for men, Vancouverites still need a little bit of a push. You still see a lot of baggy pants, a lot of baseball caps worn backwards and that needs to go. That’s why we’re here, we’re educating the men of Vancouver and those of Canada. Sometimes they just need ideas because they don’t know what to wear but once they see it, they understand: ‘Oh, I can wear it like that’. Why do you think menswear designers are so undervalued? Do you want to get men more interested in fashion or just increase awareness in the industry overall? In terms of sales, if you look at the actual annual sales in numbers in Canada or around the world, it’s actually 50/50 or close to that. There is definitely business there but of course, traditionally, men don’t shop. They only go to stores when they need something. That’s not true for all men, of course, some guys are creative so they know what to do. But for the women in their lives that shop for their men, we wanted to give them choices.

Why do it in Vancouver? It’s my home. The first time I came here twelve years ago I was surprised that there wasn’t a menswear event. I mean, we’re so close to The States and I know that Canadian designers go to the U.S. to join their fashion weeks but in the press, they don’t get talked about. We needed something on our own – for our own talents and I wasn’t going to wait for the city or the government to start it because it might have never happened. What inspires you lately? Seeing new things. When I travel and see people and how they live, their love of life; that inspires me. Colours, what they wear, what they eat and their neighbourhoods. That’s why I can’t just stay in one place. I also like to look at magazines and go to museums to see what others are doing and what inspires them which in turn inspires me. How do you feel about trends; do you think you need to be aware of them? I myself, don’t go for trends; that’s just me, I have my own style. From a business point of view, of course. You need to be on top of that. Of course I’m in tune to the trends and I know what’s happening because it’s a part of my business. continued on pg. 48 ➟


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What’s your favourite thing about your job? Probably meeting people that I would not normally meet. I meet people in various industries; in T.V., public relations, makeup, hairstyling, photographers and yourself. That’s probably the best part. Least favourite? Every season I get stressed like crazy. Not because we don’t prepare because we prepare months and months in advance. But what stresses me out is people that don’t respond right away. Hundreds of people are involved, even in a two-day event like ours; hundreds. And you don’t hear from some of them until the very last week. That stresses me out. How do you find balance? For a while I’ve been just focused and stressed out about business because this is my company. My name is in the company name so obviously that stresses me out. I look to rollerblading or hiking with my buddies for down time. I have a ton of interests and I make sure that I have enough time for myself. I read a quote the other day somewhere that said something like “I don’t like work, no man does but I like what’s in the work – the chance to find yourself.” Do you feel like you have found yourself in your work? Correct. Yes, absolutely. When you’re younger, you don’t know what you want, you try to live your life the way other people want you to. I’m at that stage in my life where I’m going to live my life the way that I want and it doesn’t matter what other people think. At the end of the day, they’re not thinking about me. I’m thinking about me.

When I ask Ramos if he has any final thoughts, it’s apparent that his passion for what he does is all-encompassing. He strives to bring about change in the next generation, leaving the industry on a more united front. “Fashion attitudes” aside, he started Men’s Fashion Week for the designers, for the talent, and for the art itself. He continues to do it for the same reasons.

www.mensfashionweek.ca www.twitter.com/mensfashionweek www.facebook.com/ramosandfortier


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j un ramos Favourite place to shop in Vancouver? Zara.

Drink of choice? Tequila.

What’s your number one style pet peeve? There’s so many. Probably anything oversized.

Favourite menswear designer? Lucas Ossendrijver [the creative director of Lanvin]

Favourite local designers? Haha, I love them all.

What job would you be doing if you weren’t doing this? Something in computing or engineering.

What job would you not want to do? Ever? Work in a funeral home.

Favourite sound? Michael McDonald.

What turns you on? Intelligence. And creativity.

What turns you off? Lack of confidence.


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Designing Today A Profile of Inventory Magazine’s Anthony Hooper

Text Frances Thomas

Photos Alex Ross

It’s tempting to call Anthony Hooper a renaissance man, but such a term seems somewhat antiquated, what with its 15th century origins and all. No, the fitting term to describe Hooper is a 21st century man: creative yet mathematical; free-thinking with a strong affinity for convention; confident in everything from design and art to equations and accounting. In essence, an artist who is not starving.

Hooper is the Art and Design Director of Inventory, a three-and-a-half-year old renaissance company in its own right. The brand exists as an online blog and store, a biannual print magazine, two storefronts – one in Vancouver and one in New York – and also sells merchandise at Dover Street Market’s London and Tokyo locations. The company’s unique approach to retail is tightly edited and palpably conceptual: the storefronts are small and minimally stocked, carrying only a few select and under-the-radar brands of apparel, magazines, and accessories.

What keeps the Inventory philosophy pristine is its core creative team consisting of just five around-theclock members. “Being small is what makes us great,” says Hooper. Ryan Willms, Simon Roe, and Owen Parrott – Inventory’s creators – began with a simple vision of “what was missing from their lives.” They set out to blog in a new way, profiling not just the brands they admired but also the people behind those brands. Before long, a storefront and a magazine supplemented the blog. “The company has grown very organically,” Hooper explains. continued on pg. 53

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Hooper is a poster boy for success after art school. After graduating from the IDEA (Illustration/ Design: Elements and Applications) diploma program at Capilano University in May of 2010, Hooper went to work as an intern at Toolbox Design in Yaletown. Soon after joining the team at Toolbox, Hooper was approached by Inventory. Hooper was conflicted due to his commitments at Toolbox: “It was an odd situation where as an intern I had a huge responsibility.” After some rumination, Hooper devised a way to commit to both companies by having Toolbox take on Inventory as a client, with Hooper acting as the go-between. As a result, Hooper’s first issue with Inventory, issue five, was produced from Toolbox. After issue five, Hooper transitioned into a full-time position

“I have this weird balance between being creative and artistic and irrational and all of the things that come along with that”

at Inventory. “It was kind of like they poached me. And I was happy to be poached,” Hooper recalls. While letting go of his position at an established design agency with benefits and stability was difficult, Hooper “was starting to realize that the stability wasn’t as important at that point in time for me.” Learning to embrace his artistic tendencies – and the professional uncertainty that comes along with them – did not always come comfortably to Hooper. After high school, Hooper pursued a degree in accounting at the University of Calgary. He left the program just a few credits shy of graduating. “I decided it wasn’t worth going back,” he remembers. “Maybe one day. Probably not.” Hooper’s creativity was present from a young age and was nurtured by his grandmother, a visual artist and theatre maven. In a different yet equally influential way, his father, a medical doctor, impressed a scientific approach to life upon Hooper. Toss into that melting pot a background in accounting, and Hooper’s strengths have a wide breadth. “I have this weird balance between being creative and artistic and irrational and all of the things that come along with that but then I’m also drawn to organization and rational systems.” This left and right brain amalgam comes to life in the pages of Inventory Magazine, where loose, fluid imagery is grounded by grid-

based design. “I do believe that the conventions are there for a reason. I think a lot of people are drawn to the magazine because it feels quite refined and organized and it lets the reader digest it easily,” Hooper explains. As for defining his responsibilities at Inventory, the list is broad: “It’s basically anything that’s visual.” Hooper’s job focuses less on content creation and more on content organization. His work can include anything from apparel labels and shop bags to online content and magazine design. Concerning the magazine, some of his responsibilities are selecting images for each story, setting the type and designing the page layouts. Sifting material through the inimitable Inventory lens is an onerous task: for any given story in the magazine, Hooper can be given up to a hundred photos to edit down to around thirty. Each profile in the magazine seeks to strike a balance between words and imagery, marrying print and photojournalism to create a comprehensive story around subjects. The photo essays are subtle, almost quiet in their sensibilities; a quality that is intentional on Hooper’s part. He is drawn to details – a half-empty coffee mug, the stub of a pencil – that tell a more intimate story. “I refer to them more as incidental photos. They contribute to the overall story without saying a whole lot.”


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“That’s the subtlety of the brand: it’s not flashy,” Hooper says, referring to the minimalist aesthetic and near-secret storefront locations. The Vancouver store on 45 Powell Street is small and easy to miss walking by. The New York store is even more off the beaten path, located in an area called Slappy Cove on 12 Extra Place. The New York location is in an alley behind the famed CBGB club, now a John Varvatos store. “The intention is to let people find us if and when they want to. We attract a certain type of customer because we are a bit more of a destination shop,” Hooper explains. What keeps Inventory from spreading itself too thin is its dedication to maintaining a pure modus operandi. All three facets of the company – the magazine, the stores, and the online platform – complement and enhance each other in synergy. While different in form, they deliver the same exclusive and selective content. In today’s business landscape, publications and storefronts alike often feel pressure to focus solely on the digital side, forgoing the tactile experience of reading and buying for the trend towards e-commerce. What sets Inventory apart is that it remains faithful to the real-life experience of going into a store or picking up a magazine while still embracing the surge into the virtual market and the global connections e-commerce nurtures. In some ways, the bygone connotation of a renaissance man is perfectly fitting to describe Hooper. While Hooper has studied how to digitally apply his work for virtual mediums, he still values print over anything: “You love to see the work that you do printed – it’s not the same digitally. Somehow it doesn’t represent the amount of time or energy invested when you see it on a

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screen versus when you’re holding it or it’s on a wall.” Perhaps the single loudest message behind Hooper’s success is that being an artist of today – and a renaissance one at that – means being comfortable with numbers and conventions and yes, that proverbial computer screen, while still finding ways to actualize the physical experience of art. Hooper’s work at Inventory magazine proves that the print medium is not “dead,” it’s just different from what it used to be. Different. Now that is what constitutes 21st century thinking.

www.inventorymagazine.com www.inventorymagazine.tumblr.com www.facebook.com/inventorymagazine www.twitter.com/INVENTORY_ www.instagram.com/inventorymagazine


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G l adys P erint Pal m e r Illustrating Her Destiny Text Adriana Marchand Illustrations Gladys Perint Palmer

We speak with Gladys Perint Palmer renown Fashion Illustrator, about life, fashion and her new book “Adam & Yves.” Gladys Perint Palmer’s GPP’s illustrations are bright spectral reveries; a great leap into the amazon of fashion. Her Darwinian sketches, done in ink, marker and the odd crayon capture the colourful runway creatures and socialites amongst London, Paris and Milan with wit and sparkle. Rosita Missoni equally comments, “With her passion for style and unique sense of humour, Gladys catches in her beautiful drawings in the Magic of Fashion.” A fearless commentator of celebrity couture,

GPP has contributed her bold art and writing styles to publication such as Vogue, Women’s Wear Daily, Jardin de Mode and Harper’s Bazaar. Although her work is soaked with celebrities and worldrenowned designers, her world truly revolves around her love of illustration and family, spending time with her husband Simon in they’re homes in San Rafael and Denman Island, (a small island off of the coast of Vancouver Island.) Apart from spending time in the studio, GPP continues to pour her continued on pg. 58 ➟

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time and attention into her role as Executive Director of The School of Fashion for The Academy of Art University in San Francisco. She has achieved immense recognition for her student’s talent, being the only school to present a MFA Graduate collection annually at Mercedes Benz Fashion Week since 2005. Her thoughts on art, life, education and rising to success are sure to inspire the generation, shining a hopeful light on the world of fashion and whomever may dare to delve in. Friendships in Fashion No, there are no true friends and there are true enemies. There is nothing like success that brings out the worst in people. Nobody is happy for you; your mother might be, your father maybe, your teacher? No, I had a teacher at Parsons who was furious with me. But I do have a group. They came about at different times and they are very special to me. I’m very grateful they exist but you don’t know if they are going to be great friends for a long time. When my first book “Fashion People,” came out, a lot of my colleagues were quite friendly but not great friends. Soon after that they stopped saying hello to me when it was doing quite well. It’s not the nicest world. Pursuits Past Passion I would never give up my job for anything else because I love writing and I love to draw. What I like to do, I do on my own and I don’t need other people but I need the fashion shows for material. I love going to the fashion shows and I love being on my own and working on my art. Generational Gaps There is talent in every generation and you never know where it’s coming from. Talents are not unique to any generation; I mean if you look at history, there have always been talented people. I really feel this generation is terrific, the students I have at the school are so keen and motivated and thirsty for knowledge and its rather sad that they don’t get much support at home. It’s very unusual for families to sit down at a table together and eat and talk, I mean that’s the only exception to this generation.

Encouraging Success First of all, I tell my students to learn all the rules, they have to know the rules. Once they have learned the rules, they can forget about them but without the knowledge of the rules: you don’t get anywhere. I think you have to decide where your interests are and really zero in on that and not try to dilute it with a bunch of silly liberal art classes. Also, today’s schools don’t consider late development. They are very often the most talented people. What parents and schools want nowadays are these very sort of active little teenagers, who will burn out in no time; it shouldn’t be a race at that age. Destination, Vancouver Actually, what brought me to Vancouver is a really funny story. I have a cousin who lives in Vancouver with three sons and one of his son’s was getting married. I was talking to my cousin’s wife and she said, “they’re getting married on Galiano Island.” And I said, you must be joking! Because I was thinking of John Galliano, and she had no idea what I was talking about. “Oh no,” She said, “It’s very nice, it’s got a Mediterranean microclimate.” It wasn’t until a bit later when I was at a party in San Francisco and the word Mediterranean microclimate popped up again. You know when you hear something twice, it begins to sort of stick. We didn’t end up on Galiano Island but Denman was close enough. Fashion in Vancouver You don’t see much fashion in Vancouver. Fashion is in Paris. Well… there’s always a time where somebody does something extraordinary in the most unlikely place. There is no ‘this is where it is and this is where it isn’t’. And honestly, I don’t know Vancouver that well. It’s a gorgeous city, the food is delightful but I haven’t seen anybody emerge from Vancouver who took my breath away in sense of style.

continued on pg. 61 ➟


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“Once you’ve been illustrated by Gladys Palmer, you are part of fashion history.” —Cameron Silver, Owner of Decades

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West Coast Island Life vs Fashion Week The contrast is very strange but I like both. However, I think prefer Denman. I was just sitting last week at one of those quarrelsome town meetings and I thought to myself next week at this time I’ll be at Dior. It’s just funny. And you know people say to me “isn’t it terribly boring to be on Denman?” and I say, “No I love being here.” Fashion in Today’s Generation I have no idea where fashion is going today. In my mothers day, they would say the hemline had to be 20 inch from the floor and the spring colour was going to be yellow; well that’s all gone! You wear what suits you, what you feel like wearing. But nobody knows. Now you have Anna Wintour, who most people are so critical of, has been very good to this generation and young designers. She has really helped them try to get off the ground. Gladys has just recently published her latest book “Adams & Yves,” a whimsical safari through fashion history. GPP manages to machete this thick jungle down to the most memorable moments of fashion from the beginning of time “Adam” to today’s “Yves.” Totalling 190 illustrations, “Adams & Yves” is the ultimate picture book for anyone who has two eyes and a brain. Gladys Palmer’s knack for relating things with such wit and intelligence will have you chuckling all the way through. You can smell the ink: honesty and Chanel °5 wafting up from the pages through the motion of her every brush stroke. That’s what makes her work so unforgettable.

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K N U P zabeth i l E a Sierr odels model lhelmina m of wi Bourne n a g e M raphy aei photog al Elh z a h G g Stylin l Eang e h c r a g M editin

oFf


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turtle neck Skirt Stylist’s Own Scarves Stylist’s own Creepers Demonia (uk) Socks Topshop


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Jacket Warpaint Pants H&M boots Dr. martens hat Topshop body chain and belt Charles and grace


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opposite page sweater Evan Ducharme Necklaces Charles and grace Toque Burton This page vest and gloves War paint Dress H&M

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hat Patricia fields body chain Charles and grace jacket War paint dress H&M


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A MODERN AFFAIR Model jessi morton Photography & Editing Daniel David Styling Ghazal Elhaei styling assistant Catherine Cheung

Accessories Charles and grace Dress Evan Ducharme


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Accessories Charles and grace Dress Evan Ducharme


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dress evan ducharme


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Dress Evan clayton Shoes Model’s Own

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cape Dress Evan ducharme


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Stylist Sheena Antonios

Photography Berkley Vopnfjord Model Therese MacCallum

It has happened to all of us, we look into our closets and can’t help but feel bored with our wardrobe options. However, with our bank accounts low and our credit cards maxed, we aren’t exactly in a position go out and buy new threads. It is in these moments that we should consider, as we once did, sneaking a peak at our boyfriend or brother’s closet to change it up. Remember that you once liked the idea of layering with collared shirts or sporting an oversized jacket. Perhaps the ‘boyfriend’ fad is over but that doesn’t mean you can’t revisit the trend from time to time. Re-make the realization that you can shop in your man’s closet for free. Special thanks to Citizen Clothing, located 2541 Estevan Ave. Victoria, BC


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previous page Hat Stylist’s Own Blazer Vintage, Stylist’s Own White button up Denham Henley Crossley Necklace Wolf Circus this page Jacket Aritzia Button-up Aspesi Pants Baldwin Belt Apolis Shoes Topshop Bandana LBM1911


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Hat Polar Red t-shirt Vintage, photographer’s own (from Buffalo Exchange, Portland Oregon) White button up Denham Pants American Apparel Shoes New Balance Watch Citizen Sports Jacket H&M


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BLACK is the new black Model Lexus Davies of numa models Photographer Reema Ismail Creative Direction/wardrobe Styling Caity Rowlands MUA Kaycee Camaclang Hair Savannah Reitz


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previous and this page cap Aritzia jacket Texman vintage- mintage necklace H&m gown Synikal rings H&m opposite page cap Aritzia shirt American apparel jacket Danier leather shorts H&m shoes Jeffrey campbell necklaces Topshop ring Aldo infinity ring Brandy melville


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cap Aritzia necklace H&m gown Synikal rings H&m

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top H&m skirt french connection archive cloak Sycamore necklace Topshop rings H&m


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cap Aritzia skirt H&m bralette Models own archive cardigan Sycamore necklace Topshop bomber jacket Topshop


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photography marchel eang styling kenneth wyse models Qiao Li & Colter Mclean of Family Management


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Qiao wears Hat Patricia fields Bowtie Stylist’s Own Shirt Calvin Klein Suit H&M Shoes Aldo


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colter wears suit DKNY shirt Alternative Earth from Diverse Group Showroom Scarf McQueen Watch bros Shoes Aldo


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Qiao wears Shirt Topshop Suit H&M Brogues aldo Colter wears Varsity jacket H&M Couture shirt H&M Bow tie Thomas pink Pants DKNY hat Stylist’s Own Shoes aldo


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colter wears Jacket Sisley Shirt alternative from the diverse group showroom pants DKNY Fur collar stylists own


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qiao wears Jacket H&M Shirt Calvin Klein Fur collar Stylists own


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NEW FORMS

styling carlo Reyes Photography & creative direction Marchel eang Set & wardrobe Assistant Saul Alviar model Patrick Sherwood of family management


Toque Local Heroes Shirt Dolce & Gabbana kilt Photographer’s Own


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opposite page hat H&M shirt jacket Four Horsemen top Topshop Pants Hugo Boss Socks Gap Shoes Topman this page white Shirt J.W. Anderson x Topshop overshirt H&M Pocket square Stylist’s Own Suit Topman Shoes Topman


Hat H&M shirt Topshop Sweater Topman Pants Topman


hat local heroes sweatshirt Four Horsemen turtleneck Topman layered Shorts is not dead bag jennyfleur loves


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Jacket Topshop Shirt zara man neckpiece stylist’s own


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this page Jacket zara Shirt club monago pin Topshop Pants Fabrixquare Socks Model’s Own Boots Dr. Martens opposite page hat H&M outer shirt Four Horsemen Inner Shirt Topman Shorts Photographer’s Own Tights Topshop


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Shirt Topshop Dress H&M Bag Maison Martin Margiela X h&M Shoes Converse


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this page hat Kesh x american apparel jacket topshop shirt forever xxi Pants H&M Socks stylist’s own creepers t.u.k.


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WHE RE TO BUY Aldo

Calvin Klein

Dr. Martens

www.aldoshoes.com

www.calvinklein.com

www.drmartens.com

Charles & Grace

www.drmartenscanada.ca

Alexander McQueen

www.charlesandgracejewelry.com

www.alexandermcqueen.com

Evan Clayton Citizen

www.facebook.com/evan.clayton

Alternative Earth from the Diverse Group Showroom

www.citizenclothing.ca

Evan Ducharme

www.alternativeapparel.com

Converse

www.facebook.com/ evanducharmecollection

American Apparel www.americanapparel.net Apolis www.apolisglobal.com Aritzia www.aritzia.com Aspesi us.aspesi.com Baldwin www.baldwindenim.com Brandy Melville www.brandymelvilleusa.com www.brandymelville.ca Burton ca.burton.com

www.converse.com The Corner Store www.complexonline.com Crossley www.crossley.it Danier Leather www.danier.com Demonia (UK) www.demonia.co.uk Denham www.denhamthejeanmaker.com DKNY www.dkny.com Dolce & Gabbana www.dolcegabbana.com

The Four Horsemen www.fourhorsemen.ca H&M www.hm.com Hugo Boss www.hugoboss.com Jeffery Campbell www.jeffreycampbellshoes.com Jennyfleur Loves... www.jennyfleur.com LBM1911 www.lubiam.it Local Heros www.localheroesstore.com


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Mintage Vintage

Topman

www.mintagevintage.com

www.topman.com www.hudsonsbay.com/topman

New Balance www.newbalance.com

Topshop

www.newbalance.ca

www.topshop.com www.hudsonsbay.com/topshop

Patricia Fields www.patriciafield.com

T.U.K. Shoes www.tukshoes.com

Poler www.polerstuff.com

War Paint www.warpaintmade.com

Sisley www.sisley.com

Wolf Circus

Swedish Hasbeens

www.wolfcircus.com

www.swedishhasbeens.com Sycamore www.etsy.com/shop/ sycamorearchive Synikal www.facebook.com/ synikalclothing Texman www.texman.dk Thomas Pink www.thomaspink.com

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ISSUE SIX  

One1One Magazine presents their September Issue. Featuring Skratch Bastid, Jerrica Santos, Skye Wallace, Jun Ramos, Anthony Hooper, Gladys...

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