OLTRE - Volume 3: The Taste Issue

Page 22

FALL 2023 TRAVEL BEYOND
ÓL·TRE
From The Desk Of Global Travel Collection OLTRE is an Italian word meaning “over, above and beyond.” Which is exactly what travel advisors strive to do for our clients: Plan trips that go beyond the expected. We hope you enjoy this edition of OLTRE, our exclusive luxury travel lifestyle magazine. From restaurant recommendations to hotel reviews and explorations of destinations around the world, it’s filled with ideas to inspire your wanderlust. Please contact us to help you plan your next trip – and beyond. Thank you for being a valued client. Global Travel Collection 212-755-4550 hello@globaltravelcollection.com
Wishyouwerehere!

OLTRE VOLUME 3 CONTENTS THE TASTE ISSUE 2

AT A GLANCE

SEARCHING FOR UNICORNS 66

FIRST IMPRESSIONS

16

SOUND/BAR

Bangkok, Thailand

OLTRE’s Volume 3 soundtrack channels the jazzy musings of DJ Maarten Goetheer of Lennon's Bar, home to one of Asia's largest vinyl collections.

RESTAURANT REVIEW

94

Buffalo, New York

This issue’s gallery shines a spotlight on the satirical landscapes and cityscapes of Jeffrey Czum.

Tokyo, Japan

A popular manga series helped transform Tokyo into the most interesting place in the world to drink wine — from the city’s poshest restaurants to the hidden bars of Shinjuku’s drinking alleys.

Oceanside, California

Matsu is one of the best restaurants on the West Coast. But it’s so under-the-radar that most people, even serious foodies, don’t know it exists.

SMOCK CONTROL

Tel Aviv, Israel

What began with aprons quickly morphed into a full-fledged clothing line for two up-andcoming designers from Ukraine. Plus: Tel Aviv’s hottest shuk.

Brixen, Italy

At one of the highest points of Italy’s Alto Adige, near the Austrian border, a new mountaintop resort proves both restorative and delicious. And those views of the Dolomites? Just... wow.

ENCHANTED FOREST 32
38
48
Fall 2023
Elegance reinvented. The Flying Spur Azure A luxury sedan offering unrivalled comfort and elegance. Visit BentleyMotors.com. The name ‘Bentley’ and the ‘B’ in wings device are registered trademarks. © 2023 Bentley Motors Inc. Model shown: Flying Spur Azure.

La Dolce Vita

Pizza, pasta, spritzes and so many breathtaking rooftop views: Rome’s food scene is eternal, even as it evolves. What’s more, there’s also a full-blown hotel renaissance underway. From classic trattorias to fine dining, from charming boutique hotels to the palatial grande dames, we present our 70 favorite places to drink, eat and sleep.

4 OLTRE VOLUME 3 CONTENTS THE TASTE ISSUE THE OLTRE GUIDE: ROME, ITALY 78

ELEVATED COMFORT FOR IMPROVED HEADSPACE.

Recline, dine, power up and refresh — all in one sitting — with Delta One.®

CRYSTAL HEALING

Around the World

52

Florence, Italy

Mediterranean

THE LEGEND

98

Southeast Asia

Travel inspires personal taste — including at home. Here’s how to manifest the interior aesthetic of three in-demand designers from the Philippines, Thailand and Singapore.

20

104

Around the World

Sydney, Paris, London, New York, Los Angeles... These are the restaurant openings that have us obsessed right now. Plus: Cool things to do!

Istanbul, Turkey

Cannes, France

6 OLTRE VOLUME 3 CONTENTS THE TASTE ISSUE BATHING BEAUTY
AIR & CRUISE NEWS
An unexpected discovery resulted in a fab new spa for one of Florence’s oldest hotels.
THE OLTRE Q&A IMPRINT CONTRIBUTORS PERSPECTIVE 8 10 12
The superluxe airport lounge everyone is talking about. Plus: VIP restaurant access in the South of France, and more exciting news from the air and sea.
NEWS & BUZZ
44
28
On the heels of unveiling her latest triumph, The Peninsula Istanbul, the first lady of Turkish design sits down for our Q&A. One of the grandest hotels of the Côte d'Azur reopened after a three-year closure, looking more glamorous than ever.
BRINGING IT HOME 58
Crystal Cruises is back, and we’re on board to see what’s changed — and what hasn't.
Make Every Moment Delightful 455 Madison Avenue at 50th Street, New York, NY

A MATTER OF TASTE

Taste has many definitions, but perhaps my favorite is this: “A manner or aesthetic quality indicative of such discernment or appreciation.”

Subjectivity aside, its application spans all interests, from food and fashion to art and design and beyond. Not coincidentally, you’ll find those topics and more in this issue of OLTRE.

Food, of course, is central to the travel experience and is a particular passion of our staff. (In fact, editorial director Brad A. Johnson hails as an award-winning restaurant critic and food writer.) Like many of you, we make restaurant reservations as soon as (and sometimes before) we secure our hotel rooms. We plan entire itineraries around where we want to eat, when, and never miss a meal. Italy is the OG dining destination, and we think you’ll love our Rome guide (page 78) – which includes not only where to eat and drink but also what to wear and where to stay. (Good to know: the city has more than two dozen Select hotels, which offer special perks and amenities when you book through your travel advisor.)

On the other side of the globe, Japan has been the travel darling of late – if it’s on your list, too, you’ll want to read our manga-inspired take on Tokyo wine bars (page 66). There’s much more, from high-demand destinations to less-traversed corners of the globe.

We’d be remiss to not address the elephant in the room: Travelling this year has been quite the challenge. Though we’re beginning to see some relief, hotels and flights cost more than ever, restaurants and tours are booked up months in advance and the potential hassle factor is high. That’s where a trusted travel advisor can make your life so much easier, from their expertise and connections in planning (and securing those hard-to-get reservations) to their ability to save the day when things go wrong. They can also recommend offthe-beaten-path places that aren’t on the mainstream radar – yet – and know the best ways to visit perennial hotspots in the slow season to avoid the throngs of tourists. Savvy and smart – now that’s in good taste.

FOODIE FINDS

My kitchen is full of souvenirs I’ve toted home from my travels, from Turkish ceramics to Costa Rican hot sauces (alas, that bottle of Italian limoncello didn’t survive the flight home, but my luggage smelled lovely). We asked a few travel advisors what they shop for when they travel:

“I purchase sets of dinnerware on my travels. When I host dinner parties at home, those place settings from around the world set the tone for a fun evening.”

“Fresh vanilla beans and tonka beans are available at many outdoor markets throughout France, especially Provence and the Basque region. They’re high quality and reasonably priced.”

“A trio of truffle honey, salt and marmalade as mementos from a truffle-hunting experience in Croatia.”

“I love shopping in supermarkets abroad for products I’ve not seen at home. The last time I was in France, I bought essence of mushrooms and lavender vinegar.”

Evens Leandre NOTED PERSPECTIVE 8 OLTRE VOLUME 3
Our travel agency can make it happen. Contact us today.

Cruises Destinations

Hotel Marketing

Hotel Programs

In-Country Partners

Partner Marketing

Advertising Sales

Pam Young

Brian Hegarty

Alexandra Rivera

Pam Meehan

Haisley Smith

Stephen McGillivray

Lisa Calderone-Spierings

Laurelei Papajani

Senior Vice President, Editorial Vice President, Publishing

Editorial Director

Design Director

Copy Editor

International Correspondents

Contributors

Elaine Srnka

Laura Sport

Brad A. Johnson

Devin Duckworth

Jennifer Weston

Sara Lieberman (Paris), Kathryn Romeyn (Bali), Chris Schalkx (Bangkok), Laura Schooling (London)

Shalev Ariel, Addison Bailey, Amy Bizzarri, Alessandra Caponegro, Jeffrey Czum, Ashley Edes, Eleonora Gaspari, Nicholas Gil, Maarten Goetheer, Massimo Gradini, Elizabeth Heath, Callum Inskip, Laura Itzkowitz, Anna Lee, Devorah Lev-Tov, Cristina Mazza, Sophie Minchilli, Teddy Minford, Don Nichols, Sara Petrucci, Marta Riello, Marina Spironetti, Clara Tuma

ADVERTISING & MARKETING

Account Management

Marni Becker

Marshall Davenport

Melissa Dobmeier

Dennis Grunden

Catherine Johns

Kim Kearns

Ronald Laing

Sinead O’Connell

Loyde Pires

Jeanne Watters

Danielle Whitmore

Direct advertising inquiries to advertising@oltremag.com

INTERNOVA TRAVEL GROUP

Chief Executive Officer President, Global Travel Collection President, Travel Leaders Group

Chief Financial Officer

Chief Information Officer

Select Hotel Rate Key

$ = Under $500

$$ = $500 - $1,000

$$$ = $1,000 - $1,500

$$$$ = Over $1,500

J.D. O’Hara

Angie Licea

John Lovell

Robert Klug

Jeremy Van Kuyk

Categories reflect average midseason rate for standard room. Your travel advisor can secure complimentary Select perks such as hotel credits, breakfast for two, early check-in/late check-out (based on availability) and other extras.

ON THE FRONT COVER:

Shot on location at the Roman Forum. Photography by Callum Inskip.

ON THE BACK COVER:

Shot on location at Matsu. Photography by Brad A. Johnson.

GTC Marketing

Elizabeth Broehl

Cortney Woody

Jocelyn Acosta

Felipe Castro

Strategic Development

Public Relations

Josh Stevens

Gina Nisi

Executive Vice President, Partner Relations

Executive Vice President, Partner Relations

Senior Vice President, Public Relations

Albert Herrera

Peter Vlitas

Elizabeth Gaerlan

OLTRE is published quarterly by Internova Travel Group, one of the largest travel services companies in the world. Internova brands represent more than 100,000 travel advisors in over 6,000 company-owned and affiliated locations throughout the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom, with a presence in more than 80 countries. Publisher assumes no responsibility for representations or changes to travel information and pricing described herein, which are subject to change and availability, and restrictions may apply. Nothing may be reprinted in whole or in part without written consent of Publisher. Direct editorial and subscription inquiries to editors@oltremag.com and advertising requests to advertising@oltremag.com. Internova Travel Group is headquartered at 1633 Broadway, New York, NY 10019; Internova.com. Copyright © 2023 Internova Travel Group.

HUMANS IMPRINT
10 OLTRE VOLUME 3

Embark on a Culinary Journey to Galápagos

Set sail with Lindblad Expeditions-National Geographic and enjoy a fresh taste of the islands with of our sustainable farm-to-table food program.

CONTACT YOUR TRAVEL ADVISOR TO PLAN YOUR EXPEDITION

HUMANS OF VOLUME 3

Fall 2023

Brad A. Johnson Editorial Director Orange County, California

Devin Duckworth Design Director Los Angeles, California

Jeffrey Czum Photographer Buffalo, New York

Ashley Edes Visual Artist New York, New York

Nicholas Gill Writer Pound Ridge, New York

Elizabeth Heath Writer Umbria, Italy

Laura Itzkovitz Writer Rome, Italy

Anna Lee Artist Phoenix, Arizona

Sara Lieberman Writer Paris, France

Don Nichols Writer Dallas, Texas

Kathryn Romeyn Correspondent Bali, Indonesia

Chris Schalkx Correspondent Bangkok, Thailand

Marina Spironetti Writer/Photographer Milan, Italy

Clara Tuma Photographer France & Switzerland

HUMANS CONTRIBUTORS 12 OLTRE VOLUME 3
©2023 Abercrombie & Kent, USA, LLC CST #2007274-20 CHOOSE FROM A WORLD OF DESTINATIONS EAST AFRICA | SOUTHERN AFRICA | ISRAEL, JORDAN & EGYPT | AUSTRALIA | INDIA | SPAIN & MOROCCO | GREECE & TURKEY ITALY & ITS ISLANDS | THE MEDITERRANEAN | EUROPE’S ICONIC CAPITALS | ARGENTINA, CHILE & BRAZIL | MEXICO To learn more about A&K’s Wings Over the World journeys, contact your travel advisor. ® Join A&K on an extraordinary Wings Over the World journey, led by an incomparable Resident Tour Director ® and featuring an average maximum group size of 13 guests. See and experience more than you ever thought possible on a single itinerary, enjoying a spectacular adventure made possible by the flexibility and exclusivity of privately chartered flights. It’s small-group travel at its most elevated and refined. Experience an Incredible Small
Journey by
Air
Group
Private

Style and Substance

Introducing CURATED Hotels & Resorts, a new collection of design-inspired lifestyle hotels and resorts that offers modern travelers an escape from the ordinary.

With creativity and innovation at their core, these vibrant properties make every stay more interesting –think artful atmospheres, whimsical touches and indulgent extras – all in colorful destinations around the world.

Connect with your travel advisor to discover the difference when your getaway is truly CURATED.

La Fantaisie, Paris

MILLION DOLLAR LISTINGS

Glamping, 2022

ARTIST JEFFREY CZUM EXPLORES A NEW FRONTIER IN THE WORLD OF LUXURY DESIGNER KNOCKOFFS.

Buffalo, New York

RADAR FIRST IMPRESSIONS 16 OLTRE VOLUME 3
Boot, 2022
17
Jeffrey Czum is a photographer and digital collage artist based in Buffalo, New York. He creates satirical, dreamlike landscapes and cityscapes that challenge our perspective of popular brands, often through themes of travel and conspicuous consumption. jeffreyczum.com Hermès Palms, 2022 Chateau, 2022

Now - February 4

WHAT’S ON

SAVE THE DATE: THESE ARE THE TOP EVENTS, CONCERTS AND FESTIVALS ON OUR AGENDA THIS SEASON.

October 7 - 15

October 15 - 22

October 19 - 22

Paris, France

The Final Months”

Albuquerque, New Mexico International Balloon Fiesta. It’s also chileroasting season!

Sydney, Australia

Film, music, tech… SXSW goes international for the first time

Palm Springs, California

Fall Modernism Week: modern architecture, design and art

December 23

November 16

November 8

November 3 - 5

Oakland, California

Anita Baker’s final performance of her yearlong tour

Las Vegas, Nevada Opening day of the Formula 1 racetrack and arena

London, England

“Women in Revolt!” at Tate Britain, featuring 100 UK women artists

Torino, Italy

Artissima, one Italy’s biggest art fairs and a hotbed of emerging talent

Adriano Pucciarelli (Paris), Chase McBride (Albuquerque), Manny Moreno (Sydney), Richard Lund (Palm Springs), Emma Raphael (London), Raymond Boyd, Getty Images (Anita Baker)
RADAR NEWS & BUZZ 18
OLTRE VOLUME 3
Musée d’Orsay, “Van Gogh in Auvers-surOise:
A safari is unlike any other experience and Micato Safaris is unlike any other company: For every safari sold, we send a child to school.
T E N -T I M E # 1 WIN N E R : Wor l d ’s Be st S af ar i Outfitter , Tr avel + Le i sur e M i cato i s the only tour co mp any i n t he T r avel + Lei s ure H all o f F a m e CONTACT YOUR TRAVEL ADVISOR F O R DETAI L S
T he World’s Most Awarded Safari Company.

WHERE TO EAT NEXT

A PIZZA BAR IN LOS ANGELES, A CEVICHE SHACK IN THE PHILIPPINES, A POSH FRENCH SALON IN PARIS, A SEE-AND-BE-SEEN SEAFOOD HOUSE IN LONDON, A FRENCH BISTRO IN TORONTO… WHEREVER YOU’RE GOING, DO NOT SLEEP ON YOUR MEAL PLANS. HIGH AND LOW, THESE ARE THE LATEST OPENINGS THAT HAVE US OBSESSED RIGHT NOW.

RADAR NEWS & BUZZ 20 OLTRE VOLUME 3
REPORTING: BRAD A. JOHNSON, SARA LIEBERMAN, KATHRYN ROMEYN, LAURA SCHOOLING AND CHRIS SCHALKX RESERVED: (Above) Bar Monette in Santa Monica, California.

BAR MONETTE

Santa Monica, California

This has been a banner year for new restaurants in Los Angeles, but of all the fabulous new places to eat, there might be nothing more exciting than when Neapolitan pizza, black truffles and ossetra caviar come together in the same cozy, casual confines, with chandeliers, tapered candles, mismatched baroque flatware and terrific wines — across the street from the beach. It’s such a cool vibe. The guy behind it is Toronto expat and rising-star chef Sean MacDonald. barmonette.com

Healdsburg,

The former general manager (Jonny Barr), chef de cuisine (Sean McGaughey) and baker (Melissa McGaughey) of Sonoma wine country ’ s SingleThread — the best restaurant in California for much of this decade — have banded together to open a wood-fire Italian joint with Wes Anderson vibes less than a block away. Must order: whole spatchcock for the table. moltiamici.com

BAZAAR New York, NY

THE

MOLTI AMICI California
José Andrés deserves a Nobel Peace Prize for his humanitarian work. But for the moment, he’s on our radar for what might be his most important iteration yet of The Bazaar. This warm and theatrical outpost occupies two floors of The Ritz-Carlton New York, NoMad, at the intersection of Broadway and 28th Street. Here is where Spain meets Japan. Must order: madai crudo. thebazaar.com 21
The Bazaar
Floating Island at Bar Monette Leo Cabal (Bar Monette), Björn Wallander (The Bazaar by Jose Andrés)

DAPHNE

Toronto, Canada

The hitmakers behind Kōst, Ultra and Margo have done it again. Daphne is an elegant French bistro in the heart of downtown, and it is hands-down the hottest power lunch in Toronto. The dining room is perfectly lovely, but the city’s biggest power brokers prefer the courtyard. Must order: steak frites. daphnetoronto.com

MANZI’S London, England

Throughout the aughts and well beyond, The Wolseley was everything — assuming you could get a table. For the foreseeable future, the new great test of social status might be Manzi’s, a new seafood restaurant from the same group in the heart of Soho, with former Wolseley chef Christian Turner behind the stoves. Blue and white with marble all over — and the salty scent of fresh seafood in the air — it’s a stunner. Must order: Dorset crab. manzis.co.uk

CHOP CHOP COOK SHOP

Bangkok, Thailand

Chef, author and culinary historian David Thompson is widely regarded as one of the world’s leading authorities on Thai cooking, and his Bangkok restaurant Aksorn is sublime. He’s just followed that with Chop Chop Cook Shop, a casual diner in a beautiful, multistory heritage building in Bangkok’s Chinatown, where he explores the Thai-Chinese mashup that has long defined this neighborhood. goldsmithbkk.com

OLTRE VOLUME 3 RADAR NEWS & BUZZ
22
Daphne Chop Chop Cook Shop

CEV Siargao Island, Philippines

In the surfer hub of General Luna, on Siargao Island in the southeastern Philippines, CEV takes full advantage of its seaside adjacency with a menu dedicated exclusively to kinilaw (a Filipino type of ceviche). The chef/owner is a Manila-born finance-guy-turned-surfer who went to culinary school in New York. Must order: whatever the fishermen catch. @cevsiargao

MIDDEN

Sydney, Australia

Art and culture at the Sydney Opera House are not limited to the stage. The iconic building also boasts a collection of outstanding restaurants, including the just added Midden by Mark Olive, one of Australia’s best-known First Nations chefs. His menu focuses on native Australian ingredients and indigenous tradition. Think blue gum-smoked barramundi, wallaby shanks braised in bush tomato, and quandong-glazed chicken stuffed with Warrigal greens. middensydney.com.au

ESPADON

Paris, France

The Ritz hotel has been operating without its marquee restaurant, Les Jardins de L’Espadon, since it closed early in the pandemic. That drought came to an end in September with the opening of Espadon, a completely revamped 30-seat salon for Michelin-starred chef Eugénie Béziat, who describes her cooking as “French cuisine that’s constantly searching for tastes and smells from faraway places.” Must order: bisque of lobster, cassava and hibiscus flower. ritzparis.com

23
Espadon at The Ritz
Brad A Johnson
Kinilaw at CEV
(Daphne), Chris Schalkx (Chop Chop and CEV)

WHAT TO SEE AND DO NEXT: NEWS FLASHES FROM AROUND THE WORLD.

CULINARY Marrakech, Morocco

The 53-room, 9-acre, Royal Mansour recently debuted the Royal Mansour Cooking School, where guests can cook alongside the resort’s top chefs, including the Michelin-starred Hélène Darroze and her team, who oversee the Moroccan restaurant La Grand Table Marocaine and will soon debut a French restaurant, La Grand Brasserie. Classes start at $155.

HOT SHOTS

ART

Prague, Czech Republic

Renowned contemporary artist David Černý has opened a spectacular gallery, Musoleum , to house his life’s work. It ’ s located in a historic building (formerly a distillery) in the arts district of SmÍchov on the outskirts of the city. musoleum.cz

WORKSHOP

Yosemite National Park, California

The Ansel Adams Gallery inside Yosemite National Park has partnered with the Relais & Châteaux resort Château du Sureau for a VIP hands-on photography workshop. With the posh, 10-room resort near the park’s entrance as their basecamp, guests will follow in the footsteps of the legendary landscape photographer to capture their own versions of his most famous images. Limited engagement November 3-5. From $2,700, anseladams.com

CASINO

Las Vegas, Nevada

For years, we’ve been asking, “Is it ever going to open?” Finally, the 67-story Fontainebleu Las Vegas (tallest building on The Strip and extension of the Miami Beach original) has set an opening date, albeit vaguely: December. The 3,644room mega-hotel will be Vegas’ first completely new luxury casino resort in nearly 20 years.

RADAR NEWS & BUZZ 24 OLTRE VOLUME 3
Royal Mansour Cooking School Musoleum Château du Sureau Fontainebleau Las Vegas

CA R IB B E A N TA STE TH E STORY

Distinctively flavorful, Caribbean cuisine fuses a multitude of culinar y traditions from French, West African, Spanish, Indian, British, American, and other origins. As the O cial Cruise Line of the James Beard Foundation, we ’ re passionate about bringing the authentic flavors of each region to our table. On a Windstar voyage, guests savor traditional foods, explore local markets with our Chef, and add new understandings to inspire one's inner foodie. Plus, our new innovative plant-based program is designed with guests' health and the environment in mind. For a true taste of the Caribbean, Windstar knows the way.

Contact

CARIBBE A N W I N D Y A C H T S S T A R P L US Y A CHT S
O F T H E
your
Travel Advisor today for All-Inclusive or Cruise-Only Fares and Exclusive Amenities.
Professional

ART

Paris, France

Art powerhouse Hauser & Wirth debuts its first France gallery in Paris in October. The inaugural exhibit features a collection of paintings from Los Angeles artist Henry Taylor, whose work captures a range of emotions and conditions of the Black experience, past and present. hauserwirth.com

HOT SHOTS

FASHION

London, England

Flagship shuffle: Local menswear brand Wax London has just expanded with the debut of a new marquee store in Spitalfields, waxlondon.com . Meanwhile, womenswear darling Manière De Voir has just outdone itself with a fabulous new shop on Oxford Street, manieredevoir.com

Spitalfields

MUSEUM

Istanbul, Turkey

In June, the Istanbul Museum of Modern Art, designed by Renzo Piano, opened on the city’s waterfront — or, rather, reopened. The original Istanbul Modern, also designed by Piano, debuted in 2004 but quickly outgrew its footprint. After a teardown and rebuild, the museum is back and more than double its original size. And Richard Wentworth’s permanent installation False Ceiling once again greets visitors at the entrance.

TEQUILA

Grand Velas Riviera Nayarit recently debuted an all-inclusive, five-night Tequila experience that includes a private helicopter from its beach on the Pacific to the distilleries of Tequila. The exclusive itinerary includes horseback riding through the agave fields, single-barrel tequila tasting, private barbecue, spa treatments and an elaborate dinner at the resort’s Mexican restaurant, Frida. Starting at $38,100 for two

REPORTING:
RADAR NEWS & BUZZ 26 OLTRE VOLUME 3
ADDISON BAILEY, SARA LIEBERMAN, DON NICHOLS AND LAURA SCHOOLING Hauser & Wirth Istanbul Museum of Modern Art Riviera Nayarit, Mexico Grand Velas helicopter Jack Bass (Spitafields Market), Cemal Emde (Istanbul Museum of Modern Art)

A World of Possibility Awaits

The first global luxury hotel brand, pioneering international travel for 75 years. Indulge in world-class cuisine, rejuvenate in lavish spas, and create unforgettable memories against captivating backdrops. Whether urban exploration or serene escapes, elevate your travel experience and live the #InterContinentalLife. For reservations, contact your travel professional

InterContinental Maldives Maamunagau Resort InterContinental London Park Lane InterContinental Dominica Cabrits Resort & Spa InterContinental Bora Bora Resort Thalasso Spa

FRENCH CONNECTION

TWO POWERHOUSE BRANDS TEAM UP IN THE MIDDLE EAST FOR WHAT IS SURE TO BE THE HOTTEST AIRPORT LOUNGE OF THE YEAR.

Doha, Qatar

Louis Vuitton has partnered with renowned French chef Yannick Alléno to launch the co-branded Louis Vuitton Lounge by Yannick Alléno at Hamad International Airport in Doha, Qatar. Now open above Vuitton’s airport store, the high-on-glam collaboration sports a sleek tropical look with plenty of lush greenery, quetzal bird creations overhead and designer furnishings throughout, including Costela armchairs by Martin Eisler and tables by Paola Lenti. From the kitchen, the Michelin-famous chef serves an expansive menu of both French and international fare. For breakfast and brunch, selections range from freshly baked viennoiserie and smoked fish platters to caviar and scrambled eggs (stamped with the LV monogram). If taking advantage of the lounge during lunch or dinner, it might be confit lamb shoulder with yuzu. The 24-hour lounge is open to first- or business-class passengers on Qatar Airways, plus select Louis Vuitton clients regardless of airline.

AND IN OTHER AIR NEWS...

Taipei-based Starlux Airlines , which made its U.S. debut last April flying an Airbus A350 between Los Angeles and Taipei, has increased that service from five times weekly to daily. The threeyear-old company touts itself as a luxury carrier and delivers on that claim. At LAX, through the airline’s partnership with PS (the airport’s private VIP terminal), Starlux’s first-class passengers get chauffeur service to and from the aircraft and access to expedited customs and TSA security checkpoints. The carrier plans to expand to San Francisco in December and Seattle in 2024.

All Nippon Airways (ANA) has just revamped its sake cellar. The airline now offers 34 sake selections that rotate monthly in first and business class and in its lounges (up from only eight labels previously). The new offerings include ultra-premium bottlings whose allocations are often reserved for Michelin-rated restaurants, such as a Jikon “Nabari” Junmai Daiginjo or Aramasa No. 6 X-Type Daiginjo.

In July, Air France debuted the first of its new A350s with an upgraded business-class cabin. At press time, the airline hadn’t yet announced a permanent route for it, though. Air France has 20 more planes on order that it will roll out through 2025, all with the new cabins. Forty-eight lie-flat seats provide direct aisle access and offer privacy via a sliding door. It’s a 1-2-1 configuration with a panel between center seats that passengers traveling together can lower. Tech amenities include a 20-inch, high-definition, anti-glare screen, a noise-canceling headset and Bluetooth connection. The carrier first introduced the new cabin in January on a Boeing 777300 between New York JFK and Paris, which is still in service.

RADAR AIR NEWS
OLTRE VOLUME 3 28
Clubhouse Excess: The Louis Vuitton Lounge by Yannick Alléno in Doha, Qatar. WRITING: DON NICHOLS

VOYAGE AROUND THE GLOBE IN STYLE ON BOARD OUR BEAUTIFULLY RENOVATED SHIPS, WHERE WORLD-CLASS DINING AND ENTERTAINMENT MEET EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE AND EXPERIENCES.

TO VIEW AND BOOK ONE OF OUR CURATED ITINERARIES, CONTACT YOUR PREFERRED TRAVEL ADVISOR.

Rendering of Umi Uma aboard Crystal Symphony

Super Mauro Land

STAR CHEF MAURO COLAGRECO WELCOMES SILVERSEA CRUISES INTO HIS PRIVATE TASTING KITCHEN AND GARDENS IN THE SOUTH OF FRANCE.

Silversea Cruises has partnered with chef Mauro Colagreco to offer guests access to his three Michelin-starred Mirazur in Menton, France — one of the toughest reservations in the world. The first seating already took place this summer, but the cruise line will offer more chances next summer. As part of the brand’s Sea and Land Taste (S.A.L.T) program, and limited to only 12 people per cruise, the excursion is offered on calls to Menton and Monaco by Silver Dawn, Silver Moon, Silver Nova and, when it launches, Silver Ray

Grazing on Colagreco’s celebrated cuisine might be enticement enough for most, but the all-day immersive experience involves far more than just eating. Guests will also go shopping in Menton’s Old Town market with a member of the kitchen team, meet artisanal bakers at the chef’s own sustainable bakery and learn about the groundbreaking research underway in the gardens. Silversea’s Mediterranean itineraries range from 7 to 34 nights, starting at $6,200. The Mirazur excursion starts at $1,499 per person.

ALSO HAPPENING...

Two Relais & Châteaux chefs from New Zealand will headline gala dinners Down Under aboard Ponant’s Le Lapérouse First up, Dec. 3-10, is Jimmy McIntyre of Otahuna Lodge, followed by Norka Mella Munoz of Wharekauhau Country Estate, February 22-29. Both chefs will also lead cooking demos. Rates from $5,590.

Tauck will add six new river itineraries in 2024 — all with dinners ashore in grand settings. For example, on a Danube cruise, guests will break bread in the 1784 Palais Pallavicini in Vienna, which has hosted the likes of Ludwig van Beethoven and Franz Schubert. On the Main River near Frankfurt, guests will convene at the 1893 Schlosshotel Kronberg, which was originally built for Empress Victoria Friedrich and later became a temporary home to Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower after World War II. Rates from $4,690.

Scenic welcomes Top Chef alumnus Bryan Voltaggio aboard a Panama Canal cruise on Scenic Eclipse II October 31-November 8 as well as for a river cruise in Bordeaux on Scenic Diamond June 18-25 Rates: Eclipse II from $10,590; Diamond from $5,657.

Regent Seven Seas Cruises recently introduced 128 new Mediterranean excursions, all with good food in mind. On the Spanish island of Menorca, for example, guests will dine on local lobster prepared by a chef in Fornells, a traditional whitewashed fishing village. Meanwhile, in the hilltop village of Scala on Italy’s Amalfi Coast, excursions include a tour and lunch on a familyowned farm. Rates from $10,200.

AmaWaterways offers a series of wine cruises in the year ahead, including a new seven-night Burgundy itinerary departing July 4, 2024, hosted by California winemaker Jeff Runquist. While sailing through the Saône from Lyon, famed for its gastronomy, to Dijon on the 144-passenger AmaCello, expect market tours, vineyard visits and plenty of regional wine tasting. Salut! Rates from $4,499.

RADAR CRUISE NEWS OLTRE VOLUME 3
WRITING: DON NICHOLS VIP ACCESS: (From Top) Chef Mario Colagreco in his garden in Menton, France. The recently launched Silversea Silver Nova in the Mediterranean.
30

FOR

SOUND/BAR

Bangkok, Thailand

01. “River’s Island” by Kiyotaka Sugiyama, S. Kiyotaka and Omega Tribe

02. “ペインテッド・パラダイス” by Jiro Inagaki and His Soul Media

03. “Sweet Agnes” by Masayoshi Takanaka

04. “Jazzy Night” by Miki Matsubara

05. “Brasilian Skies” by Masayoshi Takanaka

06. “抱かれに来た女” by Kingo Hamada

07. “Windy Summer” by Anri

08. “Tokyo Sniper” by 流線形

09. “Talio No Theme” by 流線形 and Hitomitoi

10. “This Is All I Have For You (2018 Remaster)” by Makoto Matsushita

11. “Pick Up The Pieces” by 石川 晶

12. “とばして Taxi Man” by Yurie Kokubu

13. “Bewitched (Are You Leaving Soon)” by Naomi Akimoto

14. “Wash” by Miki Matsubara

15. “Mystery Girl” by I Rein for Rein

16. “On the Move” by Jun Fukamachi

17. “Mystical Composer” by Momoko Kikuchi

18. “Communication (2012 Remaster)” by Junko Yagami

19. “バルト—クの影” by Akira Inoue

20. “Believin’” by Naniwa Express

21. “Business Man, Pt. 1 (2018 Remaster)” by Makoto Matsushita

22. “Teibo” by Atsuko Nina

Rosewood Bangkok

The 158-room hotel occupies a striking 30-story tower in the heart of the city’s Central Business District. Your travel advisor can secure Select perks, including a $100 resort credit and daily breakfast for two. $

23. “What a Woman Feels Inside” by Yasuko Agawa

24. “I Thought It Was You” by 笠井紀美子 and Herbie Hancock

25. “Rainy Driver” by Hitomi Tohyama

The DJ booth occupies a prime corner of the Rosewood’s 30th-floor lounge, surrounded by wraparound skyline views. More than 6,000 vinyl records line the walls. It is an extraordinary library, spanning decades of hits and obscurities alike in genres ranging from vintage American boogie to old-school hip-hop. Nobody knows their way around this stockpile better than the hotel’s music director and resident turntablist (plus son of a jazz musician) Maarten Goetheer, a Dutchman who has been spinning records for more than 25 years.

WRITING: BRAD A. JOHNSON

PHOTOGRAPHY: CHRIS SCHALKX

Scan

to open our playlist in Spotify.
OLTRE’S VOLUME 3 PLAYLIST, WE COLLABORATED WITH LENNON’S BAR AT ROSEWOOD BANGKOK. THE RESIDENT DJ'S LATEST OBSESSION (AND NOW OURS) IS JAPANESE JAZZ-FUSION AND JAZZ-FUNK.
RADAR PLAYLIST
32 OLTRE VOLUME 3
Record Player: Maarten Goetheer.

SET SAIL ON A JOURNEY OF DISCOVERY

With the freedom to immerse yourself in life’s exceptional experiences, explore unexpected hideaways, and stir curiosities that inspire deeper connections. Marvel at the beauty of the world through fresh eyes.

For more information, contact your travel professional.

MAROC Tanger

ART SAIL

GIVING FRESH MEANING TO AN “ART MOVEMENT,” A MAJOR NEW MUSEUM WILL SOON SET SAIL FROM THE MEDITERRANEAN COAST.

Marseille, France

ITALIE Venise

CROATIE Rijeka

Cannes

FRANCE

Marseille

ESPAGNE

ALGÉRIE Alger

For centuries, people have visited art museums to ogle at brushstrokes and admire the likes of sculpted stone and photographic exposures. But in the coming months, a new museum will flip the script by coming to the people. Or, rather, floating to them. Beginning October 12, Art Explorer — a 152-foot-long catamaran filled with art — will debut on the docks of Marseille’s Vieux Port in France. After a 13-day festival along the quay, during which the boat will unveil its inaugural exhibition from the Louvre Museum titled “Icons! Images, Discourses and Representations of Women in the Mediterranean,” the boat will embark on a 15-country tour from the Maghreb to the Middle East, visiting 20 ports over the course of two years.

TUNISIE

MALTE La Valette

RADAR ARTS 34 OLTRE VOLUME 3
Lisbonne
Tunis PORTUGAL

Only At The Arizona Biltmore

Stay at the reimagined Arizona Biltmore and experience modern luxuries through our historic halls. Rejuvenate at the Forbes 4-Star Tierra Luna Spa, savor Latin flavors with a smoky twist at Renata’s Hearth, and delight in exceptional, personalized service at the exclusive Citrus Club; available with select room types.

Designed to accommodate up to 2,000 visitors a day at port, and considered the largest catamaran in the world, the boat was built in the Admiral Yachts shipyards in Italy. “We are approaching this aquatic museum as a veritable work of art, and its construction is bringing together materials, craftsmanship and technical expertise of the highest level,” says architect Axel de Beaufort.

The project is the brainchild of Frédèric Jousset, a tech entrepreneur and art enthusiast who has tapped 15 different curators from each of the participating countries on the itinerary to craft varying programs that reflect the art and culture of each destination. At every stop, a temporary pavilion designed by architect Jean-Michel Wilmotte will be erected dockside to accommodate events for up to 10,000 visitors and feature multidisciplinary festivals and performances from dance to film.

“We want to make Art Explora for culture what Greenpeace is for the environment and Amnesty International is for human rights: a benchmark in its field, an international player in the public interest,” says Jousset. “The boat will weave a thread that connects cities, builds bridges between countries, supports local artistic and associative scenes, and brings citizens together.”

Details:

Inaugural show runs October 12 - 25 in Marseille. Visit artexplora.org for additional locations and dates.

RADAR ARTS 36 OLTRE VOLUME 3
Art Movement: Artist renderings of the upcoming Art Explora catamaran museum.

Experience an epicurean journey like no other.

Imagine a journey so intimately unique, all your senses are satisfied beyond belief. In this case, your sense of taste should be prepared for an unforgettable

Calmly glide down some of the most pristine rivers in France, the epicenter of fine dining. Immerse yourself in the gastronomic wonders of the Rhone River, the Bordeaux region and their local ingredients while sailing on the Scenic Sapphire or Scenic Diamond, our premiere luxury river cruises. Scenic offers world-class onboard dining, “Scenic Culinaire” master classes, plus the opportunity to shop with a chef and explore the local culinary flavors or learn the art of French wine making.

With an unrivaled range of 10 dining options and our Scenic Épicure master class on our Scenic Eclipse Ocean voyages, there is no shortage of choices to fill even the most discriminating tastes. Be among a group of just 10 guests to relish an unforgettable, 11-course dégustation meal, personally delivered and presented to your table by our Head Chef.

Whether you choose to embark on a river cruise or an ocean voyage with Scenic, you will experience a truly all-inclusive culinary journey that will enrich your pallet and satisfy your wanderlust.

Contact your Professional Travel Advisor to book now

CHECK

SMOCK

RADAR SCOUTED 38 OLTRE VOLUME 3

A NEW SUSTAINABLE CLOTHING BRAND MAKES ITS MARK WITH A UTILITARIAN TWIST. IT ALL STARTED WITH APRONS.

Tel Aviv, Israel

For Denis and Archie Ryabko, success was born out of procrastination. The brothers, who moved from Ukraine to Israel in 2000 and 2006, respectively, found they couldn’t motivate each morning. “We’d have one coffee, and then another, and then Facebook and then email and…” says Denis, before Archie chimes in: “You eat, and have a nap, and then it’s 5 p.m. and you realize you didn’t start work!” So they decided to craft aprons for themselves to encourage a “heigh-ho, heighho” workman spirit. They’d put them on and — boom! — be in a crafty state of mind.

Fabricated from recycled textiles and secured with brass grommets and leather, the aprons took off and became the centerpiece of the Ryabkos’ new brand, Havie MNFCT. The brothers quickly realized there was an untapped market for the sleek, upscale coverlets — among bartenders and barbers at first. Next thing they knew, they were taking orders from renowned French chef Alain Ducasse, whose staff wear them aboard his floating restaurant in Paris, Ducasse sur Seine. And in Tel Aviv, mixologists at the bars Jasper and Concierge wear them, as do the baristas at trendy Cafelix coffee roasters and the tattoo artists at Gida studio. Even the staff at the posh Drisco Hotel wear the brand now.

Utility Men: (Top) Leather and (below) surplus canvas aprons at Havie MNFCT. (Opposite, left to right) Denis and Archie Ryabko at their shop in Tel Aviv.
39
WRITING: SARA LIEBERMAN PHOTOGRAPHY: SHALEV ARIEL

Clever as the brothers are, they are completely self-taught. “All we had was an industrial sewing machine and Google,” says Archie, who along with his brother is trained in graphic design. They first attempted bags, playing around with leather because it ages well and, with time, grows more interesting. But after coming up with the apron and other wearable silhouettes, they decided to find materials that come with character already built-in. They began sourcing pre-worn and torn textiles from Israel’s army junkyard.

“Everything is outside,” Archie says of the experience gathering supplies. “There are no shelves. You’re just digging through big piles of dust.”

Now, with a brick-and-mortar studio in Tel Aviv’s Florentin neighborhood, instead of just trying to capture a preconceived mood, they let their found materials guide the inspiration and production. The line has grown to include pants, jackets, vests and hats. Whether sewn together from deadstock or the military reserve, each item is unisex and handcrafted. A pair of oversized pants might be made from a 1970s army stretcher, while a hat or a kimono is constructed from tent scraps or faded fatigues dating to the British Mandate. “There is a certain romance in finding someone’s initials handwritten on an old army tent,” they say. “It makes us think of the lives and the adventures that these objects were part of.”

Details:

Stock aprons range from $150 to $300; clothing from $85 for hats to $375 for pants. Bespoke options available by appointment at Poriya 3, Tel Aviv, Israel. havie-mnfct.com

RADAR SCOUTED
Multitasking: Havie MNFCT aprons are popular not only with chefs and bartenders but also barbers and craft artisans.
40 OLTRE VOLUME 3
41
Recycling Center: Havie MNFCT sources much of its fabrics from Israel’s military surplus junkyard.

PLUS: WHEN IN TEL AVIV, DON’T MISS THE CITY’S COOLEST MARKET.

Most travelers to Tel Aviv make time to visit Shuk HaCarmel — a massive open-air market (shuk in Hebrew) filled with vendors selling everything from cheap housewares to farmfresh produce — but if you ask any local chef to name a favorite bazaar, a lesser-known name always comes up: Shuk Levinsky in the city’s Florentin neighborhood.

Chef Tomer Tal of restaurant George & John at the new Drisco Hotel likes Levinsky because of its authenticity and sense of place. “The experience and knowledge of the merchants, who have emigrated from around the world, create one of the most exciting outdoor food markets in Israel,” he says.

It’s not a new market. It was founded in the 1920s by Jewish migrants from Thessaloniki who were later joined by Persians in the ’50s. The 13 blocks of Levinsky Street are still filled with old-style delicatessens and fragrant spice and nut shops, but in just the last few years, Levinsky has evolved from a quiet place to find traditional foods to a stylish home to Tel Aviv’s trendiest restaurants, cafes and bars.

Shirel Berger, chef/owner of Opa, a fine-dining vegan restaurant, sources nuts from Muli, a old roastery in Levinsky. “They have the best salt-roasted almonds, grown in northern Israel.” She buys fresh flowers at Hemda.

Other popular shops in the market include Tavlinsky for hand-blended spice mixes, Haim Rafael for pickles, olives and spicy salads, and Dragon, an Asian grocery store. The recently opened Tirza wine bar is the buzzy sister spot to acclaimed upscale restaurant OCD. And one can’t discuss Levinsky without mentioning Cafe Levinsky 41, home to the beloved gazoz, an artisanal fizzy drink that’s as vibrant in looks as it is in taste.

WRITING: DEVORAH LEV-TOV

Stay:

Breezy and modern with a stunning glass elevator at its core, the 11-suite R48 Hotel and Garden opened in March inside an original Bauhaus landmark. The Chefs Table restaurant is impeccable. Lovely pool. $$$$

The 42-room Drisco Hotel opened in 2018 after a complete refurbishment of a building that had operated as a hotel in Tel Aviv since 1866. The restaurant, George and John, is one of the best in Israel. Charming rooftop terrace. $$$

Both hotels are within easy walking distance of Havie MNFCT (and Shuk Levinsky). Your travel advisor can secure Select perks, including a $100 resort credit and daily breakfast for two.

RADAR SCOUTED 42 OLTRE VOLUME 3
Fresh Cuts: This seasons produce, elixirs and spices can be found throughout Shuk Levinsky. Dan Perez

The Greatest Show on Earth

The Northern Lights of Finland 8 Days | 11 Meals

Glide through pine-scented forests on an authentic Finnish sleigh. Sip glögi in Helsinki’s Market Square. Search for the northern lights from the warmth of a cozy glass igloo in Lapland.

Collette’s been a leader in guided travel since 1918. Our tours include the must-sees and local experiences, accommodations, and an expert Tour Manager.

Breathe in the arctic air and relax. We’ll take care of the rest.

your travel advisor for more information Kakslauttanen Arctic Resort, Lapland, Finland
Contact
BY TRAVELERS, FOR TRAVELERS.

BATHING BEAUTY

Insider Insight:

“I like to recommend the best hotels that aren’t necessarily part of a major chain. Helvetia & Bristol is a beautiful property with a lot of history. It's also competitively priced and centrally located.”

– Jeremy Kenter, travel advisor

RADAR SPA & WELLNESS
OLTRE
3
VOLUME
44

AN UNEXPECTED DISCOVERY RESULTED IN A FAB NEW SPA FOR ONE OF FLORENCE’S OLDEST HOTELS.

Florence, Italy

Florence’s storied Helvetia & Bristol Hotel recently reopened after an extensive renovation and expansion overseen by famed London designer Anouska Hempel. Headlining the reopening was the Bristol Wing, a new addition of 25 rooms and suites made possible by the acquisition of the former Bank of Rome headquarters next door.

The Bristol Wing is a contemporary homage to the palazzo’s legacy as a haven for artists, writers and cognoscenti — and as a nearly obligatory stopover for travelers passing through Florence on The Grand Tour. The revamp touched everything, including the hotel’s dining and drinking venues, a plush and welcoming lobby lounge and its idyllic winter garden.

But perhaps the biggest news was an unexpected, yet fitting, discovery: the ruins of an ancient Roman bath complex, or thermae, that dates to the city’s days as Florentia, a strategic settlement of Republican and Imperial Rome. The remains found underneath the Bank of Rome harken back to the roots of water wellness. After all, it’s from the Latin salus per aquam (health through water) that the word spa is derived.

General manager Federico Versari recalls the discovery of the ancient baths as “an enchanting surprise,” and one that was immediately incorporated into the renovation plans by adding a 550-square-foot spa with water as its theme.

“Unveiling Roman and medieval ruins during the restoration gave us the possibility to focus on the history not only of the building but also of Florence,” Versari says. “And we discovered the city once had a huge spa in the same place where we now

stand. This is how our Roman baths were born.”

While experiences at LA SPA Helvetia & Bristol recall the Roman origins of the space, the hotel’s guests today luxuriate in what are surely much posher surroundings than their predecessors enjoyed.

A ritual circuit includes a caldarium (steam sauna), sudatorium (dry sauna), ice-covered frigidarium (cold bath) and tepidarium (a tepid room for relaxing and restoring body temperature that has a salt floor to help improve respiration and reduce inflammation).

The centerpiece of the spa is the lacus quietis, a large tepid pool with hydromassaging jets and submerged, builtin loungers. This tranquil, dimly lit space feels the most Roman of them all, with sections of the original stone walls and arches left visible to remind modern visitors that they are literally soaking in the ancient history of Florence.

WRITING: ELIZABETH HEATH

Details:

The Bristol Wing has 25 contemporary rooms; the Helvetia Wing, 89 classical rooms. Your travel advisor can secure Select perks, including $100 resort credit, sparkling wine and chocolates, plus daily access to the spa’s Roman Bath Path. $$$

45
Water Quality: LA SPA at Helvetia & Bristol in Florence.

RACE TO THE RIVIERA

An Exclusive Formula 1 Adventure in Monaco

Embark on a luxurious 8-day voyage aboard Atlas Ocean Voyages’ World Traveller yacht. Take in the beauty of the riviera with celebratory champagne and grand dining venues at sea before heading to the F1 Grand Prix. On race-day, enjoy exclusive amenities and the best views of the circuit from the historic Princess Grace Academy viewing lounge. This unique experience offers a rare opportunity to witness one of the world’s most sought-after F1 events, paired with an exquisite voyage along the coast.

FOR DETAILS OR TO BOOK, CONNECT WITH YOUR TRAVEL ADVISOR.

ENCHANTED FOREST

HOTEL REVIEW
OLTRE VOLUME 3 48

AT ONE OF THE HIGHEST POINTS OF ITALY’S ALTO ADIGE, NEAR THE AUSTRIAN BORDER, A RECENTLY OPENED MOUNTAINTOP RESORT PROVES BOTH RESTORATIVE AND DELICIOUS.

Brixen, Italy

The meditative experience begins from the car window as I drive toward the southern slope of the Ploseberg mountain in Italy’s South Tyrol. Every hairpin turn offers a different scene. As altitude increases, vineyards and apple orchards give way to green pastures. Suddenly, the jagged peaks of the Geisler range and the Peitlerkofel massif come into sight, bursting from a thick pine forest. Undoubtedly, this is one of the most dramatic spectacles of the Italian Alps.

Upon arrival at Forestis, a boutique hotel at the summit, that view of the Dolomites becomes even more unreal, a framed postcard that becomes the polar star of my stay.

The regenerative power of this corner of South Tyrol was already clear to the Habsburg monarchy in 1912, when they commissioned starchitect Otto Wagner to build a sanatorium here. Plans were disrupted by WWI and the fall of the AustroHungarian empire, which led to the transition of the area into Italian territory.

More than a century later, the abandoned property has been converted into a sleek wellbeing sanctuary and spa, thanks to the vision of Stefan Hinteregger and Teresa Unterthiner, the sustainability-minded young couple at the helm of Forestis.

Completed in 2020, the renovation — led by architect Armin Sader — centers around three towers connected to the historic building via a glass tunnel that's invisible from outside. The minimalist structures rise upward like the surrounding trees and blend harmoniously with the environment.

All 62 wood-paneled rooms provide panoramic views and balconies facing the mountains. Two 2,500-square-foot penthouse suites offer the added luxury of secluded rooftop pools — con vista. No artworks; no pictures on the walls. There’s no need for distractions where nature reigns supreme.

49
Peak Freshness: (Above) Chef Roland Lamprecht and (below) a rooftop patio at Forestis in Italy. (Opposite) View of the Dolomites from the hotel pool. WRITING: MARINA SPIRONETTI PHOTOGRAPHY: MARINA SPIRONETTI & KONSTANTIN VOLKMAR
OLTRE VOLUME 3
50 HOTEL REVIEW
High Times: All rooms at Forestis offer views of the Dolomites.

The restaurant shares the same philosophy, with a dining room that’s tiered like a movie theater and each table is nestled into a cozy, seashell-shaped pod. Thanks to phenomenal acoustics, diners have the illusion of being alone with these floor-to-ceiling views — even when the hotel is at capacity.

The symbiosis with nature permeates everything here. The water is Plose, renowned for its lightness and purity. The spring from which it comes rises just 50 meters from Forestis.

Chef Roland Lamprecht’s daily-changing menu focuses on seasonality and foraged ingredients. My detox menu features a potato risotto topped by a generous grate of black truffle, as well as an interesting plant-based version of Tyrolean gröstl (normally a meat-and-potato hash) made instead with artichokes and Taggiasca olives. The inventiveness of pastry chef Alessio Galli makes desserts a true joy also. A most memorable dessert he calls “campari” bravely combines the bitterness of Italy’s iconic liqueur with the balsamic taste of mountain pine Chantilly, softened by the tart sweetness of fresh raspberries.

There’s plenty to keep you entertained should you wish to explore the area. In temperate weather, the spa offers Celtic yoga in the woods. And come winter, when the mountains are covered in snow, a quiet forest path leads directly from the hotel’s ski room to a chairlift that takes you to the mountain station of the Plose ski resort. Truth is, I’d rather stay in-house. The peacefulness of the place is something you’ll want to enjoy as much as possible, all wrapped up in a snuggly blanket by the firepit in the garden, sipping an herbal tea in the sleek spa or amid the vapors of the heated outdoor pool in the early morning. As someone there said to me with a warm smile: “We are very close to the skies here.”

Insider Insight:

“Each guest is assigned a specific table at the restaurant for the duration of their stay. So you can dine at any time you want — no need to make any reservations. And the view of the Dolomites is spectacular.” – Sandie Wiesenthal, travel advisor

Forestis Dolomites , Brixen, Italy

Your travel advisor can arrange transfers to the hotel; the nearest train station is in Brixen, 11 miles away. Select perks include a $100 resort and daily breakfast for two. $$

51
Cocooning: (Above) Cozy booths in the tiered dining room at Forestis. (Top) Traditional Schlutzkrapfen (stuffed pasta) with spinach, sage flowers and wild herbs, and a salad of mixed greens and grains.

CRYSTAL HEALING

ONE OF THE MOST AWARDED (AND BRIEFLY NOTORIOUS) CRUISE LINES OF ALL TIME, CRYSTAL MAKES ITS TRIUMPHANT RETURN.

52 FEATURE CRUISE REVIEW OLTRE VOLUME 3

WRITING: DON NICHOLS

When Crystal Cruises suspended operations last year, loyal fans bemoaned its demise, despite the financial drama that played out in the news. Happier headlines soon followed, announcing that Abercrombie & Kent had acquired the brand’s primary ships, Serenity and Symphony , with plans to start sailing them again after extensive refurbishments.

And now, amid much buzz, Crystal (sans “Cruises” in the name) is back: Serenity began plying the seas again at the end of July, and Symphony set sail in September. Plus, the company just announced it will add two more classic ships and two expedition ships over the next six years.

A half dozen travel advisors from Internova Travel Group (some Crystal veterans, others newbies) were onboard when Serenity returned to the Mediterranean this summer. We checked in as they provided updates from the back-in-service ship.

Among the changes? A&K reduced overall capacity by combining and expanding many of Serenity ’s existing cabins. The new owners replaced the Italian restaurant Prego with a new one called Osteria d’Ovidio. They retained Nobu Matsuhisa ’ s restaurant but gave it a new look. And the spa got revamped. But some things didn’t change: The main dining room remains relatively the same, and Crystal continues its tradition of having one formal night per week at sea. And, most importantly, 80 percent of the crew is back.

The advisors liked what they saw. Here are their thoughts.

53
Tutto Bene: The new Italian restaurant on board, Osteria d’Ovidio. (Opposite) Crystal Serenity

SO, HOW DOES SHE LOOK?

Peter Lloyd (39-year travel advisor, more than 100 Crystal sailings) : Serenity is as pretty as it was 20 years ago, in an updated way. It’s a solid, lovely ship, but it’s not like a new one, a megaship or one with three-story atriums and glass elevators. It never had any of that.

David Locke (18-year travel advisor, nine Crystal sailings) : Frankly, the ship was tired before, but it has been completely redecorated and revamped. The carpeting is new; the soft goods are new; the hallways are better lit.

DOES IT STILL FEEL LIKE CRYSTAL?

PL: Yes. We’re seeing familiar faces everywhere. The crew was always Crystal’s secret sauce.

Gene Lashley (39-year travel advisor, more than 100 Crystal sailings) : We have known the head maître d ’ at the Waterside Restaurant (the main dining room) for 20 years. It’s nice to see him back. And at the Avenue Saloon, our favorite bartender from years ago remembered us. He even remembered we like martinis.

Cindy Locke (18-year travel advisor, nine Crystal sailings) : When we saw our butler from nine years ago in a hallway, we hugged and talked. It was like greeting an old family member.

DL : The crew is still friendly and engaging. Crystal always hired for personality, knowing they could teach people the skills they needed, and that philosophy hasn’t changed.

DOES THE SHIP FEEL SPACIOUS?

Brooke Liberman (Four-year travel advisor, first time on Crystal) : It never feels crowded. You get a restaurant table anytime you want. You never have to wait for loungers at the pool — but this wasn’t a full sailing, so that might change. Still, I don’t think it will ever feel overly crowded with only 700 passengers because there are so many places to eat, so many options of where to go and things to do.

DL: No crowds — and since it was built for 1,000 passengers and now holds only about 700, I think it will always feel more spacious than the new ships that are built for 600 or 700.

HOW ARE THE ACCOMMODATIONS?

Diana Castillo (Six-year travel advisor, first time on Crystal) : I’d describe my Aquamarine Veranda Suite as an entry-level room in a 5-star hotel. It’s nearly 350 square feet and has a walk-in closet. I only feel like I’m on a ship when there’s movement from the ocean.

GL: The cabins are lighter, brighter and beautiful. Our 430-square-foot Sapphire Veranda Suite is two cabins made into one, with every inch of it new. The bed is wonderful, and instead of a tub in the bathroom, there’s now a 3-by-7-foot shower with great water pressure. It’s the best shower we’ve had on a ship.

54 OLTRE VOLUME 3
FEATURE CRUISE REVIEW
Serenity Now: (Top and above) Serenity's new Junior Penthouse cabins exemplify the cruise line’s updated style.

A place of wonder

ARE YOU EATING AND DRINKING WELL?

DL: The food is excellent. We haven ’ t been disappointed once, and the service is superb. At breakfast in Waterside, I asked for an espresso with four shots. The next morning, the waiter brought another espresso with four shots before I could order it. That makes you feel special, like you’re at home.

CL: Talking to our dinner waiter was like chatting with an uncle sharing his life with us.

BL: One of our favorites dishes was the yellowtail sashimi at Taste Kitchen. It was so good that we ordered more, and then went back another day to eat it again. Also, the tuna was so fresh.

PL: Our meal at Nobu Matsuhisa’s Umi Uma was as good as any we’ve had on land. My Wagyu beef was super tender and full of flavor. It comes neatly sliced and beautifully presented. Others at our table said the miso cod is out-of-this-world delicious.

DC: At Crystal Cove, I ordered a Johnny Walker Black Label with a shot and a half and flat water. The next night, the same bartender made it the same way without my having to ask. He already knew how I wanted it.

DO YOU FEEL SUFFICIENTLY ENTERTAINED?

BL: They had a Billy Joel tribute show by James Fox, and who doesn’t enjoy singing along to their favorite songs and dancing in their seats? Fox was terrific at the piano and singing Joel’s hits.

DC: Two nights a week, they offered two different shows in opposing theaters. If you didn’t like one, you could go to the other and still enjoy good entertainment that evening.

WHAT SURPRISED YOU THE MOST?

DC: There’s no more casino on board, but they told us that could change.

DL: The service and food at the new Italian restaurant were fabulous. But people expecting the magic of that old Prego experience need to adjust their expectations.

PL: Previously, only the Penthouses and higher cabin categories came with butler service. But every stateroom has a butler now.

Details:

Crystal Serenity itineraries start at $4,700 for eight nights, with sailings this fall and winter from the U.S., Canada and Caribbean. The ship’s 141-day World Cruise departs from Miami on January 18, 2024, starting at $68,000. Symphony’s first Grand Journey, 68 nights, sails from Sydney to Singapore on January 4, 2o24, starting at $34,200.

56 FEATURE CRUISE REVIEW OLTRE VOLUME 3
Glitz and Glam: (From top) Crystal Serenity bartender, wagyu beef tenderloin in the Vintage Room, and formal night at sea.
Treating Ourselves Now We’re Best Overall Cruise Line Best Dining Best Cabins Best Service Best ValueFor-Money From stargazing at the exclusive Richard’s Rooftop to priority access for dining and events, sailing aboard our exclusively adult voyages in one of our glamorous, Tom Dixon-designed RockStar Quarters sets you up for an epic holiday with luxurious extras and brilliant perks. Follow the sun in style on the lady ships earning a wave of awards — including Condé Nast Traveler’s Best New Cruises in the World and Travel + Leisure’s Best Cruise Line. CONTACT YOUR TRAVEL ADVISOR TO LEARN MORE.

interior ministers

WRITING: KATHRYN ROMEYN

COLLAGES: ASHLEY EDES

FEATURE INTERIOR DESIGN 58 OLTRE VOLUME 3

MANIFESTING THE INTERIOR AESTHETICS OF SOUTHEAST ASIA'S HOTTEST DESIGNERS.

Thailand — Philippines — Singapore

Not all souvenirs fit easily into a carry-on.

It happens. You’re strolling the shops while on vacation halfway around the world, and you come across an amazing chair — or perhaps a lamp or a table — that you can’t live without. So don't.

Travel inspires our personal tastes, and that extends to how we decorate our homes. With this in mind, we put together mood boards to introduce three designers everyone should be on the lookout for when traveling to Southeast Asia.

And never mind the carry-on. You’ll need a different form of transport to bring home the furniture, textiles and accent pieces of these innovative artisans, whose studios focus on heritage craftsmanship and indigenous materials reimagined. Any one of their pieces can easily become a room definer and a conversation starter.

59
FEATURE INTERIOR DESIGN 60 OLTRE VOLUME 3

THE NATURALIST: KENNETH COBONPUE

Cebu and Manila, Philippines

Filipino industrial designer Kenneth Cobonpue has showrooms in Cebu and Manila. Since the launch of his eponymous brand in 1999, Cobonpue’s work has appeared in Wynn Las Vegas and Nobu hotels, as well as in Ocean’s 13 , plus homes, airports, chapels and playgrounds. But he dreams bigger. His next goal: to design and build his own boutique hotel in Cebu, the island home base where craftsmen and artisans make his brand’s distinct “pieces of engineered artistry.”

Elegant biomorphic forms in candy colors — his whimsical Bloom chair, for example — are influenced by concepts of transparency and filtered light. “Because my designs incorporate an element of nature into a space, I think they help provide a biophilic connection to the natural world,” says Cobonpue, who feels his organic designs have “an inherent dramatic element and free-spirited aesthetic” that punctuate spaces of any style.

He has been driven to experiment with design since growing up the child of an interior and furniture designer mother, who brought him to exhibitions around the world. To wit, his inventions include a handwoven bamboo and carbon-fiber electric car and an eco-tricycle spin on a typical Asian form of transportation. “I find that, in constantly searching for inspiration all the time, the mind somehow becomes more receptive to finding it, and the ideas begin to flow faster as a result.” kennethcobonpue.com

61
Just Ken: (Opposite, clockwise from top left) Yin & Yang sofa, designer Kenneth Cobonpue, woven Carousel hanging lamps, Bouquet side tables, Zaza chairs, Bloom easy chairs, Dragon Tail lamp and Pierre plant holder.
FEATURE INTERIOR DESIGN 62 OLTRE VOLUME 3

THE TRADITIONALIST: TEERAPOJ 'PETE' TEEROPAS

Bangkok, Thailand

“My designs are bold, but I am quiet in person,” says the Bangkok-raised designer Teerapoj “Pete” Teeropas, who worked for several design brands in Thailand and completed residencies in Indonesia and Morocco before launching his own “non-pretentious, technique-focused” brand, Kitt. Ta.Khon, in 2019. Vibrant bordering on tribal, his furniture plays imaginatively with rattan weaving techniques learned from multigenerational Thai artisans.

“I like to compare my furniture to a pair of earrings: something that complements and highlights the features of one’s face,” says Teeropas, whose latest tradition-meets–popculture design, the BoaBoa chair, features 12 different vivid color options. He wants his furniture to accentuate the space and reflect the character of the owner. A devout student of Thai craft, he’s exploring the “typography of weaving” for a series of headboards that will define a forthcoming boutique hotel, “translating objects from vendor carts, tuk-tuks, street signs and more into weaving patterns.”

Always pushing boundaries, Teeropas recently tried his hand at site-specific sculpture for the exhibition Traditions Transformed at ATT 19, the Charoen Krung gallery where his work is shown, and helped create the first modern furniture book in Thailand for his mentor, Suwan Kongkhunthian. “As designers, our resources and references are always from Western designers and books… It is a shame. My design language goes against modern technology and relies on humans and their abilities for production,” he says. “That thinking allows me to connect with my humanness, linking with my Southeast Asian origins.” kitt-ta-khon.com

63
Orange Crush: (Opposite, clockwise from top left) Orange Libra seat, black Rojjarnar chair, a residential project in Phuket, orange and blue BoaBoa chair, a bedroom in Phuket, red and blue Sukpha stool, and designer Teerapoj “Pete” Teeropas.
FEATURE INTERIOR DESIGN 64 OLTRE VOLUME 3

THE ROMANTIC: JESSICA WONG

Orchard Road, Singapore

Rich, moving stories from friends, family, makers, customers and strangers are what continue to drive Singaporean creator Jessica Wong to design relatable furniture imbued with meaning and nostalgia. Handcrafted stools, screens, bar carts and more are under the flag of her contemporary design label Scene Shang, which she began in 2014 after architectural studies and stints in interior and graphic design.

In a young city rooted in tradition but with a global outlook, Wong is happiest when she’s riffing on antique Chinese furniture or reimagining museum pieces with a lighter, brighter eye. She’s particularly proud of the walnut and brass Xuan table that transforms from a console into a triangular or square table for dining or ever-popular games of mah-jongg. “Our work thrives best in spaces where the people who live in them love history and culture and who themselves have interesting stories to tell,” Wong says.

The Scene Shang store on Orchard Road is the best place to appreciate her refined iterations of sustainable Southeast Asian materials such as rattan and cane. “[We] preserve our Asian heritage by referencing our roots and giving a new voice to that, so our heritage can continue to develop and grow along with us,” says the designer, whose thinking is so fresh that she’s been using AI software to delve into the tension between technology and tradition. “I love navigating the past and putting a new, fresh spin onto it.” sceneshang.com

65
Scene Maker : (Opposite, from top left) A custom chair, Yan chair, Xuan table, The Lady cane chair, custom chair inspired by Chinese pottery, Yan sofa and chairs, The Gentleman cane chair and designer Jessica Wong.
FEATURE TOKYO WINE TOUR 66 OLTRE VOLUME 3

A POPULAR MANGA SERIES — AND, MORE RECENTLY A HIT SHOW ON APPLE TV+ — HELPED TRANSFORM TOKYO INTO THE MOST INTERESTING PLACE IN THE WORLD TO DRINK WINE, AND NOT JUST FOR THE FAMOUS GRAND CRUS THAT INSPIRED THIS STORY IN THE FIRST PLACE.

Tokyo, Japan

WRITING: NICHOLAS GILL ILLUSTRATIONS: ANNA LEE

Searching FOR UNICORNS

67

Ducking out of the rain, down a flight of winding stairs in an alleyway in Akasaka, I find a black door with a note on it, asking those entering to not wear excessive perfume. “Our bar is very small, and the place to enjoy the Jura wine (aroma and taste),” it reads.

Goût de Jaune admits just a few people each night. I snagged a spot only due to a sudden cancellation. Inside, there are a couple of black booths and a wooden bar topped with winenerd books, including Camilla Gjerde’s We Don’t Want Any Crap in Our Wine . Everything served is exclusively from Jura, a cool-climate French region between Burgundy and Switzerland.

Although Goût de Jaune (instagram.com/shohei_miumiu1109) serves a full menu of Chinese food — Xinjiang-style lamb and cold jellyfish, for example — it appears that most guests aren’t eating. Like me, they’re here for the wine. There is no wine list, just what owner/sommelier Shohei Miura wants to open for the night. You’re at his whim, which can include bottles of a sherry-like vin jaune from the 1970s, sometimes older. Tonight, he’s already opened a few oxidative whites. I opt for a glass of 2020 Savagnin (not to be confused with Sauvignon) from Bénédictine & Stéphane Tissot. It is acidic upfront, mellowing into a floral softness as the sommelier tells me about his passion for Jura. He’s been in love with the region for 20 years, he says, but it was only recently that a bar with a niche focus like this was possible. Japanese wine culture underwent a seismic transformation after the publication of Tadashi Agi and Shu Okimoto’s manga series The Drops of God , which began publication in 2004 — initially in Japanese, but with English translations beginning in 2020. It didn’t take long after that for Apple TV + to turn the series into a glossy drama, the first season of which just wrapped in June. Fans and critics are already predicting the show to be renewed.

68 FEATURE TOKYO WINE TOUR OLTRE VOLUME 3
69
Japan‘s Labyrinth: Some of Tokyo’s best drinking spots are hidden in the alleyways in Shinjuku and Shibuya.

The Drops of God tells a tale of two half-siblings who compete to inherit the multimillion-dollar cellar of their wine-critic father by identifying 13 rare wines from his notes. The authors came up with the idea after tasting a bottle of 1985 Domaine de la Romanée-Conti Échézeaux.

With accessible poetic language, the 44-book saga demystified wine even as it glamorized it, attracting a readership of 300 million — and with that the power to shift the global wine market. When the series featured a 2001 Château Mont-Pérat, the price shot up 1,000 percent, and the Bordeaux winery doubled production.

“ Drops of God mainstreamed wine connoisseurship,” says Melinda Joe, a Tokyo-based food and drink writer. It’s a sunny afternoon in the city, and we’re sipping a Japanese orange wine at Lou , ( instagram.com/lou_nakano ) a bustling wine bar and café tucked amid the ramen shops of Nakano. “It wasn’t just about expensive wines,” she tells me, “But good wines at any price point. People could relate to it.”

Tokyo’s best restaurants have always stocked their cellars with Bordeaux crus, but the idea of what great wine can be has noticeably evolved in recent years. At the Four Seasons Hotel Tokyo at Marunouchi, British chef Daniel Calvert’s two-Michelin-star Sézanne ( sezanne.tokyo ) blends Japanese minimalism with French pomp. The dining room overlooks the city’s busiest train station. Fowl arrive with their heads and feet intact. Caviar is heaped atop avocado with shaved sudachi lime. Wine parings range from big name Bordeaux such as Château Clerc Milon to off-the-radar finds like highaltitude Alsatian Rieslings. But it is Champagne about which the restaurant gets most excited. This becomes clear from the very start when the sommelier wheels a bubbly-stocked Christofle trolley to the table. Calvert is a Krug ambassador, so you can expect to find that, and it would be hard to go wrong. But look closer, and you’ll notice Ulysse Collin and other eccentrics like Henri Giraud Esprit Nature Brut, which pairs beautifully with green asparagus covered in sake kasu.

70 FEATURE TOKYO WINE TOUR OLTRE VOLUME 3
71
“When Drops of God featured a 2001 Château Mont-Perat, the price shot up 1,000 percent.”
Bubble & Chic: (Above) Sézanne at Four Seasons Hotel Tokyo at Marunouchi has one of the city’s most impressive Champagne selections. (Opposite) Two of the wines that inspired and helped to popularize The Drops of God.
72 FEATURE TOKYO WINE TOUR OLTRE VOLUME 3
“I have become convinced there is no better place in the world to drink wine right now than Tokyo.”

And down the street at est (est-tokyo.com) , the Michelin-star restaurant at the newer Four Seasons Hotel at Otemachi, chef Guillaume Bracaval keeps the sommelier on his toes. The restaurant is French in theory, but the menu at est veers decidedly more Japanese than French, as Bracaval has an affinity for cooking and finishing his dishes with vinegars, a technique more often associated with sushi chefs. Thus, sommelier Takeshi Shimura has stocked the cellar with littleknown Japanese wines that can stand up to those flavors. There are orange wines made from koshu (a grape with a thousandyear history), blaufränkisch grown by a German in Hokkaido and a late harvest semillon from Kyoto. They are all elegant and surprising and not something you could have imagined at a restaurant as posh as this in Tokyo until recently.

Moving from one wine list to the next across the city, I become convinced there is no better place in the world to drink wine right now than Tokyo. Whenever I’ve hopped from bar to bar in Paris or New York, everything starts to

feel the same: copied and pasted lists of hyped-up producers that draw the same crowd. Here, however, everyone chases their own geeked-out passions, resulting in drinking experiences that spiral in countless directions.

In Shibuya, I join a mid-afternoon queue at Ahiru Store (instagram.com/ahiruani) — a neighborhood bistro that's not quite French, not quite Japanese, but somewhere in between — and afterward at the nearby Le Cabaret (instagram.com/lecabaretinfo), a classic Parisian-style bistro, to try wines from obscure French producers with allocations so small, few ever hear of them. Not far from there, three floors up, at a listening bar called Studio Mule (facebook.com/mulemusiq2004), I sit in a minimalist space designed by the renowned architect Koichi Futatsumata at a granite bar between a wall of vinyl records and a wall of idiosyncratic French wines. Music and wine are the twin passions of Japanese record producer Toshiya Kawasaki, who created the bar as his own personal hangout. “He’s on his way in,” the sommelier says, “and you never know who he might bring with him.”

73
Domaine Hosting: (Above, from left) Neighborhood bistro Ahiru Store and listening bar Studio Mule in Shibuya. (Opposite) Four Seasons Hotel Tokyo at Otemachi, where the wine list at est celebrates rare and unusual wines made in Japan.

Each destination proves more unique than the last, with wines by the glass readily accessible from $8 to $35. At templequiet Bunon ( bunon.jp ), I drink Radikon while snacking on pickled fiddleheads. When I get to La Pioche ( facebook. com/2013lapioche ), I sip a natural chardonnay from New Zealand while the sound system reverberates with Korean American rapper Kero One. At the subterranean Wineshop Flow ( instagram.com/wineshop_flow ), I taste more from cult Chilean producer Cacique Maravilla than I’ve ever seen in Chile. At Maz ( maztokyo.jp ), a restaurant from Peruvian chef Virgilio Martínez, I enjoy funky wines from around South America, like an impossible-to-find single-vineyard syrah from the highaltitude Elqui Valley. At Neo ( instagram.com/neo_hokuro ), a standing bar, I hone in on a red blend from 140-year-old vines in Loire. And when I get to Pitou ( instagram.com/barpitou ), an

eight-seat bar in the middle of the chaos that is Golden Gai, a sparkling Japanese rosé makes my head spin.

Deep within the maze of Tokyo’s drinking alleys, Winestand Waltz (instagram.com/wine.stand_waltz) can be tricky to find. Yasuhiro Ooyama, known as the wine professor, heats up a slice of his famous salé while pouring pinot grisante into glasses with the bar’s name etched in — a logo in which the Ws and D clearly imitate the typography of Walt Disney.

What I come to appreciate is how intensely personal each setting is. Each shares the owner’s love of wine, as niche and particular as it may be, but there is never a feeling of it being the right way to enjoy it. Or that this region or this producer is superior or that someone who drinks such-and-such wine should fit a certain profile. In Tokyo, the once-impenetrable walls around great wine are being broken down. And we are all better for it.

74 FEATURE TOKYO WINE TOUR OLTRE VOLUME 3
Bottle Works: La Pioche, whose front porch is always lined with empty bottles so you can’t miss it, is a fashionable wine bar and bistro in the Chuo ward, on the edge of Ginza, easily accessible from Tokyo Station or Otemachi.

Stay:

The 190-room Four Seasons Hotel Tokyo at Otemachi opened in the summer of 2020 and occupies the top six floors of a shimmering new 39-story tower, where the hotel rooms’ floor-to-ceiling windows offer sweeping views of the Imperial Palace and gardens. And just down the street, the intimate 57-room Four Seasons Hotel Tokyo at Marunouchi — completely renovated during the pandemic — resides in a tower that rises directly above Tokyo Station, the busiest train station in the world and the literal gateway to anywhere in the city. Don’t worry — the hotel’s entrance is private and somewhat hidden, creating a sense of tranquility amid the frenzy.

Your travel advisor can customize a wine-themed itinerary for Tokyo. Select perks at these hotels include a $100 resort credit and daily breakfast for two. $$$$

FEATURE TOKYO WINE TOUR OLTRE VOLUME 3
Treasure Vault: (Above) The wine shelves at subterranean Wineshop Flow in Shibuya. (Below) Sommelier Yasuhiro Ooyama at Winestand Waltz in the drinking alleys of Shibuya.
76

japan.travel/en/us/

Enjoy a trip to Japan following the easing of travel restrictions.

“O k a e r i ”

Re unite in J apan

Come and immerse yourself in spectacular natural wonders throughout the seasons –from powder snow in winter to springtime cherry blossoms in full bloom. Not to mention a vibrant traditional culture and exquisite seasonal cuisine. A warm welcome awaits – now is the time to visit Japan!

FEATURE DESTINATION GUIDE 78 OLTRE VOLUME 3
LA DOLCE VITA: Near Capitoline Hill, model Marta wears a Luisa Spagnoli dress with District People sunglasses.

ITALY

LOVE with

PIZZA, PASTA, SPRITZES AND SO MANY INCREDIBLE ROOFTOP VIEWS: ROME’S FOOD SCENE IS ETERNAL, EVEN AS IT EVOLVES. MANGIA BENE! BUT THE HOTEL SCENE? THERE’S A FULL-BLOWN RENAISSANCE UNDER WAY, WITH NO SIGNS OF SLOWING DOWN.

There’s a common saying in Rome: that the city is like a lasagna, with many layers. Over the course of more than two millennia, people simply built on top of what was there. Romans live and breathe this powerful combination of history and innovation, and the same goes for the city’s restaurant scene. Perhaps that’s why it’s so fitting that they compare the city itself to a lasagna. Food is a Roman obsession.

Romans are fiercely proud of their traditional recipes. They know what’s in season when and order accordingly. It’s comforting knowing that you can go to just about any old-school trattoria and find the holy quartet of Roman pastas: carbonara, amatriciana, gricia and cacio e pepe. But if you return to that same trattoria in a different season, the vegetables served as antipasti or side dishes will be different. What’s known as la cucina romana is sometimes also called

la cucina povera (kitchen of the poor, or, peasant cuisine) because it was born out of poverty. Resourceful as they are, Romans have a knack for taking a few humble ingredients — a pinch of guanciale, say, and some salty pecorino cheese — and transforming them into sublime delicacies.

That said, Romans aren’t afraid of innovation. After all, they’ve been looking to other cultures for inspiration since the days of Augustus Caesar. Today, a new wave of innovative chefs incorporates Asian spices and global techniques for a modern take. The city’s top bartenders shake up cocktails inspired by New York or Tokyo, but they also still love a great spritz. Amazing food can be found in buzzy new hotels like Six Senses just as well as at stalwarts such as Hotel de Russie. Some critics might bemoan the globalization, but for Romans, looking beyond Rome is natural. It’s just another layer.

WRITING: LAURA ITZKOWITZ, WITH AMY BIZZARRI, SOPHIE MINCHILLI AND BRAD A. JOHNSON PHOTOGRAPHY: CALLUM INSKIP Rome,
Italy from
79
FEATURE DESTINATION GUIDE OLTRE VOLUME 3
a
80
MARKET DAYS: Browsing the cured meats and cheeses at Antica Salumeria by the Pantheon, Marta wears Nineminutes suit while Massimo wears a Family First sweater with Berluti trousers and SO shoes.

to drink, eat and sleep.

81
These are our 70 favorite places in Rome

SIP

Cielo Bar

Come for the scene, but stay for the artisanal cocktails, because the rooftop bar at Hotel de la Ville is more than just another pretty view. But (of course) there's that, too.

Chorus Café

This glamorous spot near Vatican City seems plucked from an Italian film. The cocktails are endlessly inventive, like an unusual gin-based almond piña colada.

Drink Kong

Housemade cordials, creative cocktails, unconventional flavors and Asian dim sum converge at this dark and moody, neon-lit drinking den in Monti.

The Hassler Bar

The “hidden” lounge at Hotel Hassler is one of the worst-kept secrets in Rome. Word’s been out ever since Princess Diana declared this bar’s Bellini to be the best in Italy. Still is.

Il Goccetto

Scusi. Scusi.” It’s crowded, so you’ll have to nudge your way toward the counter to place an order at this locals'-favorite wine bar and bottle shop near Piazza Navona. Terrific antipasti, salumi and cheese, too.

Notos Rooftop

Six Senses Rome’s rooftop oasis overlooks bustling Via del Corso. Great spritzes and people watching. Posh, yet laid-back.

Rimessa Roscioli

Open only a few years, the ultimate Regola wine bar has become one of the best places in the city to learn about Italian wine and food in a young, communal environment. They have fun cooking classes, too.

Oro Bistrot Bar

Artisanal cocktails and quintessential Roman sunsets — ooh! — from a terraced rooftop overlooking the Forum.

Retrovino

Aesthetically modest wine bar and bottle shop in Campo Marzio has one of the finest natural wine selections around. Grape enthusiasts shouldn't miss this one.

82 FEATURE DESTINATION GUIDE OLTRE VOLUME 3
“CIN CIN!” (Above) At Ristorante Santa Lucia in Campo Marzio, Marta wears an Ermanno Scervino blouse with Voodoo Jewels jewelry, Massimo wears a Missoni sweater and trousers. (Opposite) At a market in Campo de’ Fiori, Marta wears a Luisa Spagnoli top and coat and Miu Miu sunglasses, Massimo wears a Family First coat with District People sunglasses.

EAT

Acquasanta

Artful seafood in a minimalist space in Testaccio. The 20-page wine list emphasizes biodynamic, locally produced wines. Must order: tuna tartare with watermelon extract and mustard vinegar.

Al Pompiere

A locals’ favorite in the Jewish Ghetto, where waiter Mauro (here for 50 years) makes everyone feel like family. Must order: deepfried artichokes and tagliolini al limone.

Anima

Celebrated chef Paola Colucci has brought her greatest hits — artisanal focaccia, sublime pastas — to the Rome EDITION.

Armando al Pantheon

A go-to spot for cacio e pepe and trippa alla romana since 1961. Must order: torta antica, a cake made with ricotta, strawberry jam, poppy and sesame seeds.

Antica Salumeria

Before anything else, go here first and stock up on wine, salumi and cheese. This legendary shop near the Pantheon also makes great sandwiches and cookies.

Bonci Pizzarium

This hole-in-the-wall in Prati is the domain of legendary pizzaiolo Gabriele Bonci, who makes unrivaled pizza al taglio. Just avoid peak lunch hours, when the queue can be absolutely unbearable.

Casa Bleve

Sumptuous riffs on the richest Roman classics are expertly paired with wines from the extensive underground cellars (take a peek), which date to the reign of Augustus. Baroqueera elegance near Piazza Navona.

Checchino dal 1887

Old-school cucina romana in Testaccio focuses on the “fifth quarter” of the animal, a.k.a. offal. Must order: veal foot with carrot, beans and celery relish. Seriously, just get it.

Colline Emiliane

Although open since 1931 in Trevi, this Emiliainspired pasta shop didn't appear on the paparazzi radar until the 1960s, when regulars Federico Fellini and Marcello Mastroianni put it there. Must order: pumpkin gnocchi with black truffle and parmesan sauce.

*

Da Enzo al 29

Archetypal trattoria in Trastevere with all the essential pastas, plus outdoor tables on a cobblestone street. The atmosphere is jovial, bordering on boisterous. Must order: anything with rigatoni. Rome in a nutshell.

Gelateria del Teatro

The best gelato (and cannoli) in the city, near Piazza Navona. Extra-long lines on weekends.

* Pictured

83
*

Glass Hostaria

Chef Cristina Bowerman’s strictly seasonal menu features some of Trastevere’s most creative flavors. Shrimp tartare with licorice mayo? Oh, hell yes. You’ll want to summon the sommelier. The wine list is extensive, and you might need a guide.

Grappolo D’Oro

This is a true gem in Campo de’ Fiori, a neighborhood otherwise filled with tourist traps. The kitchen adheres to an authentic slow-food ethos. All products come from local farms. Must order: roasted lamb.

Il Localino

One of the few traditional, non-touristy restaurants in the Via Veneto/Villa Borghese area. Outstanding seafood. The menu changes daily: spot prawns, razor clams, branzino, tuna crudo…

Il Ristorante – Niko Romito

Cutting-edge chef Niko Romito reinterprets the Italian essentials inside the buzzy new Bulgari Hotel. Reserve well ahead. Tables here can be hard to come by.

Insider Insight:

“What I love about Da Enzo al 29 is that it has not changed — ever. The cacio e pepe, carbonara, amatriciana... It is as Roman as you can get! Arrive early, because they don’t accept reservations.” —Simone Amorico, Access Italy

Ineo

The sultry, dimly lit space inside Anantara Palazzo Naiadi sets the stage for chef Heros De Agostinis’ fusion of the local and the exotic. This is one of Rome’s most innovative dining experiences.

La Ciambella

Chef Francesca Ciucci and her all-women crew reinvent country cooking with upscale flair at this farmhouse-inspired wine bar near the Pantheon. To get started: freshly baked ciambella with caviar.

La Matriciana dal 1870

An enduring classic near Piazza della Repubblica, with original décor from the 1930s. This perennial hot spot claims to have introduced bucatini all’amatriciana to Rome. Tasting is believing.

La Terrazza

Theatrical tasting menus in a dramatic dining room atop the Hotel Eden — it’s showtime. Get a head start with an aperitivo at the adjacent rooftop bar, Il Giardino.

Le Jardin de Russie

Exemplary, earnest cuisine — and eternal power lunch — in Rome’s most enchanting garden. Chef Fulvio Pierangelini proves the simplest recipes are often the best.

Marco Martini Roma

Chef Marco Martini serves an imaginative 10-course tasting menu in a charming alfresco dining room in Testaccio. The stunningly beautiful food is always changing. Hashtag: #theartofplating.

Mercato di Testaccio

Rome’s quintessential covered market is a must-see. Stalls sell fresh fruit, veggies, meat, cheese and more. Make a beeline for Casa Manco for incredible pizza.

Osteria der Belli

Seafood at this Trastevere spot is inspired by the family’s native Sardinia. Think marinated swordfish, squid with artichokes, and peppery mussels, plus a heaping plate of spaghetti and clams with grated bottarga. The outdoor ambience is always festive and fun.

84 FEATURE DESTINATION GUIDE OLTRE VOLUME 3
COMFORT ZONE: (Above) Cacio e pepe and rigatoni all’amatriciana at Da Enzo al 29 in Trastevere. Marta wears a Vernisse dress with VADA sunglasses, Massimo wears a Berluti top and jacket.

Per Me Giulio Terrinoni

Sleek, ultra-fine dining from chef Giulio Terrinoni. Exquisite 10-course tasting menus. Quaint dining terrace on the cobblestoned lane just off Via Giulia in Regola. Dress up for this one.

Pianostrada

Shabby-chic space in Regola sparks joy with mismatched vintage chairs, a chef’s counter and a romantic garden. The menu (by a female-led team) changes constantly: tempura squid salad, beef carpaccio, extraordinary vegetables. It is impossible to order the wrong thing here.

Piatto Romano

You can’t come to Rome without ordering cacio e pepe (two or three times). Ensure this Testaccio spot is one of those stops. The owner comes to the table with a pepper grinder to finish the dish with a flamboyant flourish. You'll be smiling.

Pierluigi

An eternal go-to in Regola for excellent seafood. Perfect atmosphere to enjoy alfresco dining at the edge of a charming piazza. Must order: the best scampi in Rome.

Pizzeria Emma

Thin-crust, wood-fired pizza perfection in Campo de' Fiori. Plus stuffed and fried zucchini blossoms. Excellent wines. How did so many celebrities discover this little place?

Ristorante Santa Lucia

Regional Italian staples mingled with original recipes. Always superb, especially the scampi. Beautiful terrace on a quiet cobblestoned street behind Piazza Navona.

85 *
Building Blocks: The Forum in Rome, Italy. Christoph Schmid
86 FEATURE DESTINATION GUIDE OLTRE VOLUME 3
WHEN IN ROME: A quiet moment on the streets of Trastevere. Marta wears a Vernisse dress with VADA sunglasses and Giuseppe Zanotti shoes. Massimo wears a Berluti top, jacket and trousers with District People sunglasses and SO shoes. (Opposite) Street scene in Trastevere.

NEW MUSEUM: THE HISTORY OF COOKING

Rome has no shortage of museums, but this is a first. Rossano Boscolo, the renowned pâtissier and founder of the Campus Etoile culinary academy in Tuscany, recently opened the Garum Biblioteca e Museo della Cucina to display the vast collection of antique books, recipes and culinary tools he amassed over the years on his journey to becoming one of Italy’s most celebrated chefs. The museum gets its name from the fermented, ketchup-like fish sauce, garum, which used to be the most popular condiment of ancient Rome. The eclectic collection, housed in a former monastery across from the Circus Maximus, highlights the history of cooking from the 15th century to present day.

The main floor shines the spotlight on the whimsical tools that transformed the culinary process, including Renaissance gelato molds in the form of cherubs, plus 18th-century gingerbread molds and butter churn. The second floor features more than 120 rare cookbooks, ranging from the 1517 edition of “De honesta voluptate et valetudine” (“On honorable pleasure and health”), the first printed cookbook by Renaissance gastronomist Bartolomeo Sacchi, to the 1940 “La nuova cucina economica,” a New York-published cookbook by Rosa Aiello, who geared her content toward recent immigrants looking to recreate their favorite Italian dishes in America. Guided tours are complimentary, by appointment only. museodellacucina.com

WRITING: AMY BIZZARRI

Rocco Ristorante

The platonic ideal of a neighborhood trattoria in Monti: a genuine no-nonsense host, home cooking by her husband, white tablecloths and Pink Floyd posters. Oh, yeah, it’s a vibe.

Salumeria Roscioli

Crowded elbow-to-elbow, this is the archetype of Roman dining. What started out as a humble deli counter is now part of a burgeoning, family-run empire. Must order: carbonara and wine. Linger. Soak it all in.

SantoPalato

Run by rising-star chef Sarah Cicolini, this newish upstart in San Giovanni rivals Roscioli for the best carbonara in town. It’s where the cool kids eat. For now, it’s still a locals’ secret.

Seu Pizza Illuminati

Trastevere’s most creative pizza comes from next-gen pizzaiolo Pier Daniele Seu. Focus on pizza, but don’t overlook the fried starters.

Supplizio

Fancified “street food” in Campo de’ Fiori from one of the city’s top chefs, Arcangelo Dandini. Grilled mozzarella sandwiches, potato croquettes, eggplant meatballs and cold beer.

Spirito Di Vino

In a grand palazzo in Trastevere, dine on pork shoulder stew made from a recipe that originated in the era of Julius Caesar. Must see: Ask for a tour of the 7,000-bottle wine cellar, which dates to 80 B.C.

Taverna Trilussa

There’s always a queue for this see-andbe-seen patio in Trastevere. Most diners are here for the classic bucatini all’amatriciana and tagliolini with black truffles. Plus: They serve the best hams Italy has to offer.

Trecca cucina di Mercato

This recent arrival in Ostiense has already become a no-frills institution. The daily changing chalkboard menu is heavily influenced by offal. Fantastic natural wines. Must order: pasta all’amatriciana.

87

STAY

Anantara Palazzo Naiadi

Anantara recently took over, refurbished and relaunched this storied 232-room hotel overlooking the Fontana della Naiadi at Piazza della Repubblica in Monti. $$-$$$

Baglioni Hotel Regina

This is the epitome of Italian art deco on the Via Veneto with 116 rooms, meticulously maintained. And that three-bedroom penthouse — oh, my! $$$-$$$$

Bulgari Hotel

New this year: glam-o-rama in a 20th-century complex near the Spanish Steps, with 114 rooms and a 16,000-square-foot spa. The rooftop is a veritable forest. $$$$

Hotel Hassler

Perched literally at the top of the Spanish Steps, with 87 rooms, a classic bar, lovely courtyard and spectacular views from the rooftop. Two penthouses and two presidential suites. $$$$

Hotel d’Inghilterra

Plushy and colorful, like a peacock, since 1845 in a 16th-century palazzo with 84 rooms in the heart of Rome’s fashion district. $$

Hotel de la Ville

Rocco Forte panache near the Spanish Steps, with 104 rooms and a terrific thermal spa. The views from the rooftop are magical. $$$$

Hotel de Russie

This is the OG Rocco Forte hotel, adjacent to Piazza del Popolo, with 120 rooms, a truly gorgeous penthouse and one of Rome’s most romantic courtyard restaurants. $$$$

Hotel Eden

Dorchester Collection splendor and hospitality, with 98 rooms, no two alike. Adjacent to the gardens of Villa Borghese, just off the Via Veneto. Timeless. $$$$

Hotel Splendide Royal Rome

Adjacent to the Via Veneto, overlooking the Villa Borghese, with 78 rooms. Suites have park views and fireplaces. Full butler service available upon request. $$$

Hotel Vilòn

Eclectic vernacular of art deco, contemporary and baroque, with only 17 rooms, many with views into the private garden of Palazzo Borghese. It feels like a private mansion. $$$$

InterContinental

Just opened in May in the heart of the Via Veneto, with 160 rooms. The seven-story building was originally built in 1900 to house foreign ambassadors, and later served as the library of the U.S. Embassy. $$$

J.K. Place

Stylish, understated and highly personalized. Only 27 rooms. Formerly Rome’s school of architecture. Don’t miss: The Fiat e-bikes. $$$$

Palazzo Ripetta

Recently renovated, this 78-room boutique hotel doubles as an art gallery. In the 17th century, this was a nunnery. $$$

88 FEATURE DESTINATION GUIDE OLTRE VOLUME 3
* * *
Holiday Spectacular: (From top) Villa Medici Penthouse at Hotel Hassler, the foyer at Hotel de la Ville, the dining room of Le Jardin de Russie at Hotel de Russie and a suite bedroom at The St. Regis.

Insider Insight:

“Room to book: The two-bedroom Mellini Suite at Six Senses has a terrace overlooking Via del Corso and is eye-level with a 5th-century sculpture on the Church of San Marcello.” —Ashley Les, travel advisor

89
POSTMODERN REVIVAL: In the lobby of Six Senses Rome. Marta wears a GIADA dress with VADA sunglasses, Massimo wears a Family First suit with Officina Artistica shirt.

Portrait Roma

Adjacent to the flagship Salvatore Ferragamo store, this micro hotel with 14 rooms was the original Portrait in the Lungarno family's hospitality portfolio. Still as cool as ever. $$$$

Rocco Forte House

RF’s most exclusive address in Rome feels like a private club, with only five sumptuous multibedroom apartments. Bring the posse. $$$$

Singer Palace

Hip and contemporary, 30 rooms, rooftop cocktails, nightly live music. A hotel since 2018, this was formerly the Italian headquarters of the Singer sewing machine company. $$$-$$$$

Six Senses

The talk of the town since it opened in March. Postmodern design unfolds with soothing earth tones and pastels in the Palazzo Salviati Cesi Mellini on Via del Corso. Fab rooftop lounge, 96 rooms and a subterranean spa with thermal baths and biohacking therapies. $$$-$$$$

Sofitel Villa Borghese

Elegant and modern, with 78 rooms and a rooftop garden, adjacent to Villa Borghese. $-$$

The St. Regis Iconoclastic grandeur, 161 rooms, fashionable lobby lounge, nightly Champagne sabering. Ask your butler to wake you in the morning by sneaking in and drawing the drapes. $$$-$$$$

The First Musica

Next-gen boutique hotel in Prati, with 24 rooms, overlooking the Tiber River. Indoor pool. $$

The First Roma Arte

Just around the corner from the Neptune Fountain, this 29-room hotel (mostly suites) displays more than 200 original artworks. $$

The First Roma Dolce Residential-style ambience on the Via del Corso. Casual and understated, with 23 rooms and a popular afternoon tea. $$-$$$$

The Rome Edition

Opened in May, just off the Via Veneto, with a rooftop pool and dramatic hanging garden. The 93 minimalist bedrooms channel Ian Schrager’s stark, less-is-more aesthetic. $$$

Villa Agrippina, Gran Meliá

This walled-in complex near the Vatican feels like a country resort, with sprawling gardens, 100 rooms and a Clarins Spa. $$-$$$

Villa Spalletti Trivelli

Relax in one of the Jacuzzis next to the bar on the rooftop, overlooking the Trevi Fountain. Posh and quaint, with only 17 rooms. $$

Westin Excelsior

Legendary 316-room palazzo on the Via Veneto overlooks a charming park, just around the corner from the presidential palace and gardens. $$

Your travel advisor can secure Select perks, including a $100 resort credit and daily breakfast for two, plus additional amenities, at these hotels.

STILL MORE TO COME

Rome’s hotel renaissance continues apace. Before year ’ s end, Roma Palazzo — sister to Hotel Vilòn — will debut on Via del Corso, and a Nobu Hotel will land on the Via Veneto. After that, Four Seasons , Rosewood and Corinthia all have openings slated for 2024. Also under construction: The Baccarat Hotel , due to arrive in 2025.

90 FEATURE DESTINATION GUIDE OLTRE VOLUME 3
*
*
Natural Blonde: The Lata Suite at Six Senses Rome.

Start planning your 2024 getaways NOW! Secure space with your Travel Advisor today.

Classic Vacations offers a highly curated collection of preferred properties throughout Europe, including Italy, Greece, Spain, France, England, and beyond, and has long been known for its commitment to providing the highest level of service and attention to detail.

CONTACT YOUR TRAVEL ADVISOR NOW!

ART DIRECTION: DEVIN DUCKWORTH STYLING: ELEONORA GASPARI

BEAUTY: SARA PETRUCCI

MODELING: MARTA @ MODELS MILANO & MASSIMO @ FASHION MODEL MGMT

STYLIST ASSISTANT: ALESSANDRA CAPONEGRO

PRODUCTION: CRISTINA MAZZA @ PALAZZO STUDIO

92 FEATURE DESTINATION GUIDE OLTRE VOLUME 3
PRETTY
IN PINK: At a market in Campo de’ Fiori, Marta wears a Luisa Spagnoli coat and GIADA earrings.

WHERE THE WORLD TURNS

SQUID

GAME

SPOTLIGHT RESTAURANT 94 OLTRE VOLUME 3
WRITING & PHOTOGRAPHY: BRAD A. JOHNSON

Oceanside, California

It’s not the tuna, but the melon, that registers first. The honeydew hits sweet and musky. No matter how much you love melons, they rarely taste this good — except in Japan, where people routinely pay exorbitant sums, in the basements of fancy department stores, for special fruits with lofty pedigrees. But this one’s from a farm just down the road.

After that initial rush of sweetness, the melon steps aside to allow the tuna to timidly introduce itself.

“Oh, hello.”

It’s in this moment, when I taste the tuna, that I start to fully appreciate the depth and seriousness of Matsu, a 48seat Japanese restaurant in Oceanside, a short walk from the beach, in northern San Diego County.

The tuna is cut from a 45-pound bluefin caught off the California coast and delivered directly to the kitchen. The three tiny spoonfuls I’ve just devoured came from the bottom loin and the belly (toro), pulverized into what can best be

described as a pudding. When swirled together with that melon, it tastes like freshly cried tears. Not the sad kind, but the happy ones. I can’t stop smiling.

Oceanside doesn’t register on most travelers’ radars, unless they have just enlisted in the Marines. And while this drive-by military town boasts one of the most picturesque beaches in California, it wasn’t until a couple of years ago that anyone paid any attention to it as a vacation spot. That changed during the pandemic when paternal twin hotels, Mission Pacific and Seabird Resort, opened on The Strand. Slowly but surely, it’s also because of Matsu, which just celebrated its second anniversary.

The chef/owner is William Eick, a white guy. And, yes, he understands that some people will accuse him of cultural appropriation. They already have. But he’s unfazed. “Haters are going to hate,” he says. “My best customers are Japanese. That’s who I listen to.”

MATSU IS ONE OF THE BEST RESTAURANTS ON THE WEST COAST. BUT MOST PEOPLE, EVEN SERIOUS FOODIES, STILL DON’T KNOW IT EXISTS.
95
CULTURAL APROPOS: Aori ika squid stuffed with California sunflower at Matsu in northern San Diego County. (Opposite) The restaurant exterior.

Details:

Tasting menus only, 6 to 10 courses, $95 - $220. 626 S. Tremont St., Oceanside, CA; eatatmatsu.com

Stay:

The 161-room Mission Pacific and 226-room Seabird Resort both overlook the beach, right down the street from Matsu. Your travel advisor can secure Select benefits, including a $100 resort credit and daily breakfast for two. $$

96 SPOTLIGHT RESTAURANT OLTRE VOLUME 3

Eick began cooking in Southern California nearly two decades ago, a journey that started randomly at a Japanese restaurant (long since closed), where he learned how to cook tempura and how to handle a hibachi grill. Something stuck. After that, he worked in a string of high-end kitchens, the best in the region, but struggled to find his groove.

“I chased those tastes for years in other restaurants,” he says — until one day when he finally realized he was never going to achieve those flavors, that umami, of his original mentor’s cuisine, unless he cooked in a Japanese style again. So he took a trip to Japan. “It felt like I had finally come home, like I had finally found the tastes I had been searching for, for so long.”

It might be counterproductive for me to suggest that the most exciting things you’ll eat at Matsu will be the cabbage and the squid. So instead, I’ll offer this advice: Don’t look at the menu. Just let the chef cook. And when the servers deliver each dish, ask them to go away and come back after the first bite to tell you more about what you’re eating. But first, try to guess. You’ll be wrong, of course. And when you find out, you will be amazed.

Squid is one of the answers, but even after you know this, you’ll wonder if the better question might have been, “What kind of squid is this, exactly?” Depending on the season, it might be sumi ika, or mongo ika, which are cuttlefish and slightly sweeter. Or it could be aori ika, a bigfin reef squid from Nagasaki. More importantly — and the more complete answer: Eick stuffs the squid with California sunflower that’s been cooked four different ways. Then he dusts it with the green powder of dehydrated sunflower leaves.

California has the best Japanese restaurants in America. This is a fact. It’s no accident that the Michelin Guide has recognized more Japanese restaurants than any other category in the state. And Matsu is better than many of those with the most stars. Or at least different. This isn’t sushi. Eick doesn’t attempt kaiseki. However, he is the only person cooking like this — and it is extraordinary: shrimp tempura, oak-grilled sablefish, shio koji marinated duck breast and, yes, charred cabbage with caviar. ( See our back cover. ) Matsu should be on the radar of anyone who takes food seriously — including those Michelin inspectors, who have (somehow, so far) overlooked this place.

97
IN THE GROOVE: Chef/owner William Eick preparing tuna and melon, the first course in his Japanese tasting menu. (Opposite) The dining room at Matsu.

FRENCH EVOLUTION

SPOTLIGHT THE LEGEND 98 OLTRE VOLUME 3

Cannes, France

When Elton John famously “threw a wobbler” and trashed his suite at the Carlton Cannes in the South of France after filming his 1983 music video for “I’m Still Standing,” one could argue that the hotel had entered a new era of infamy.

When it first opened in 1911, the neo-Baroque Carlton (financed by the Russian grandson of Tsar Nicholas I) was a hotel fit for royalty — a reputation sealed in 1955 when Grace Kelly met Prince Rainier of Monaco during the 1955 Cannes Film Festival, where she was promoting To Catch a Thief . (The Carlton has a starring role in the iconic Hitchcock flick and also makes an appearance in the 1970 comedy There’s a Girl in My Soup, starring Goldie Hawn and Peter Sellers.)

The hotel grabbed headlines again in 1994 when armed robbers made off with $60 million worth of jewelry from its shop, a story that repeated itself in 2013 as thieves stole $137 million in diamonds in broad daylight. When the Carlton closed in 2020, it was ready for a comeback.

After a $375 million renovation at the hands of artisans so skilled they’re entrusted with the upkeep of Versailles, the hotel reopened in March under the Regent Hotels banner. With 369 rooms, it remains, arguably, the most beautiful address on the Croisette. Sometimes a renovation can suck the heart and soul from a building, but this grand old property still feels impossibly chic, with original decor like Murano glass chandeliers juxtaposed with modern elements, like the newly added Le C Club Fitness & Spa, complete with a boxing ring.

Ready to Rumble: (Above) The lobby lounge at Carlton Cannes and (below) Riviera Restaurant by chef Laurent Bunel. (Opposite) The hotel’s facade and an interior stairwell.
ONE OF THE GRANDEST HOTELS IN THE CÔTE D’AZUR REOPENED AFTER A THREE-YEAR CLOSURE — NOT ONLY STILL STANDING, BUT MORE GLAMOROUS THAN EVER.
WRITING: TEDDY MINFORD
99
PHOTOGRAPHY: CLARA TUMA
SPOTLIGHT THE LEGEND OLTRE VOLUME 3 100
Umbrella Season: Ice cream cart on Carlton Cannes’ boardwalk. (Opposite) The Beach Club in high season.
101

The Carlton exudes an effortless elegance, from the marble lobby outfitted with comfortable couches and chairs for afternoon tea, to the courtyard infinity pool, surrounded by potted palms and cabanas.

Upstairs in the rooms, plush cream furnishings with rattan accents are restrained but stunning. (My favorite spot was a chaise in front of the French doors leading out to our balcony, where I could sit and enjoy the sea breeze while eating macarons.)

Even in the off-season, it felt as glamorous as ever, just warm enough to eat outside at the preppy-meets-posh Carlton Beach Club, and quiet enough to read a book in the stylish lobby. It’s an urban resort where you could spend entire days without leaving the property — except to take a stroll along the Croisette.

In its 100 years on the French Riviera, the Carlton has seen more than its fair share of headlines, but this might be the most exciting chapter yet.

OLTRE VOLUME 3
Oh Cannes Do: (Clockwise from top left) The Carlton’s garden courtyard and pool, and the Escoffier bar at Riviera restaurant. (Opposite) A newly redesigned room with balcony facing the sea.
SPOTLIGHT THE LEGEND 102

Your travel advisor can secure Select perks, including $100 resort credit, complimentary one-way airport transfer and daily breakfast for two. $ - $$

Carlton Cannes, a Regent Hotel, French Riviera
103

THE OLTRE Q&A

WITH ZEYNEP FADILLIOĞLU

“I’M A GREAT DISCOVERER. A VOYEUR,” SAYS ZEYNEP

Fadıllıoğlu , dubbed the first lady of Turkish interior design. “ I like watching and studying people. I like studying traditions and culture.” The owner of an eponymous architecture and design firm with offices not only in Istanbul and London — the two places she calls home — but also in Doha, Oman and Berlin, has done just that in destinations around the world. Much of that work will be chronicled in the forthcoming Rizzoli monograph, Zeynep Fadıllıoğlu: Luxury Redefined , to be released in December.

When she designed Istanbul’s gracefully curvaceous Şakirin Mosque in 2009, she boldly pushed the limits for the fairer sex. It was the first time in history that a woman had designed a mosque. A fan of the city’s cultural “extremeness,” she has since designed more than a dozen mosques, along with lavish homes and hotels across Turkey, the Middle East and Europe.

Her latest triumph: The Peninsula Istanbul. It was “a major schooling for me.” The hotel opened this spring on the Bosphorus Strait and encompasses three historical landmarks plus one entirely new building, along with a private dock, rooftop restaurant and pair of swimming pools. Designing the hotel’s spa allowed her to introduce the surrounding Galataport neighborhood’s ancient Seljuk origins with palatial pools and cascading light. “We used the best artists of Turkey, so craftsmanship took another level — it’s very, very sophisticated,” says Fadıllıoğlu.

How many passports do you have?

Two: French and Turkish.

Earliest memory of travel?

I used to be a Turkish champion skier, and when I was eight years old, my father took me by car from Kitzbühel to St. Moritz and then Cortina d’Ampezzo. It was amazing because, in those years, they were the best three locations for skiing. Coming back, we were on these roads through Yugoslavia, Ljubljana and so on. It stayed in my memory.

What is your greatest extravagance when traveling? Adding a spa or cultural experience to a business trip.

What is the one trait you cannot tolerate in a hotel? Lack of cleanliness. I think it’s disturbing.

When and where are you happiest?

In ski resorts whenever there’s nice weather, or on a boat on a blue trip down the Aegean Sea.

Do you wear sweatpants on airplanes?

I don’t wear sweatpants.

Where do you go for great architecture and design?

In Egypt, Luxor and Aswan. Venice and Florence for certain periods; Japan for others; Cambodia for sculpturesque periods. I love discovering the old parts of towns — for example, in Jeddah and Malta. I follow cultures through architecture.

At what age did you have your first romantic getaway? It was pretty late. Ha. Let's just leave it at that!

What is your most common request of hotel room service? The minute I enter, I ask for a tea.

What has been your most meaningful trip?

My husband’s 60th birthday. I organized 50 people from Turkey to India. I was dead by the end.

INTERVIEW THE LAST WORD
Bige Yalin OLTRE VOLUME 3
Turkish Delight: Zeynep Fadillioğlu in the Peninsula Suite at The Peninsula Istanbul.
104

Step aboard a world of unparalleled experiences where your journey is our passion. Explore sun-kissed capitals and charming villages through exquisite locally sourced food and wine and a variety of included excursions, such as guided hikes and bike rides. Revel in the summer sunshine, take a dip in the refreshing sun-deck pool and immerse yourself in traditions that have spanned generations.

contact your travel advisor to plan your next vacation

Global Travel Collection advisors are your secret weapon when it comes to travel planning, and OLTRE your inspiration. This issue highlights culinary travel and international tastemakers in fashion, style and design.

Enjoy this debut issue with our compliments — and let us know when you’re ready to see the world from a different view.

Global Travel Collection

212-755-4550

hello@globaltravelcollection.com

VOLUME 3: THE TASTE ISSUE

LA DOLCE VITA: OUR GUIDE TO EATING, DRINKING AND SLEEPING IN ROME

TOKYO BY THE GLASS: HOW A COMIC BOOK TRANSFORMED JAPAN’S WINE CULTURE

WHERE TO EAT NEXT: THE LATEST RESTAURANT OBSESSIONS IN PARIS, LONDON, TORONTO, SYDNEY...

BANGKOK BEATS: A DJ-CURATED PLAYLIST

CRYSTAL COMEBACK: THE RETURN OF A CLASSIC

STYLE WATCH: 3 HOT DESIGNERS TO KNOW

PLUS: HOTEL REVIEWS, ART HAPPENINGS AND MORE

Issuu converts static files into: digital portfolios, online yearbooks, online catalogs, digital photo albums and more. Sign up and create your flipbook.