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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2011 ISSUE 32, VOL. 75

Lyonel Doherty photo

Students in Georgina Delagran’s class at Tuc-el-Nuit Elementary have been busy, with the help of parents, building bat boxes to enhance the population of these unique creatures. Shown from left are Josiah Teigen, Talynn Bicknell, and Steve Bicknell. Last week School District 53 voted to pursue the idea of closing Tuc-el-Nuit and amalgamating students with Oliver Elementary School. It’s one of four options the board identified to help address budget challenges and declining enrolment.

Trustees pursue amalgamation idea in Oliver Lyonel Doherty Oliver Chronicle School trustees have voted unanimously to consider potentially closing Tuc-el-Nuit Elementary and amalgamating the students with Oliver Elementary. “This option appears to be the least painful (of the four options proposed in the Capital Plan),” said trustee Michael Petersen at last week’s board meeting. Trustees discussed the options as part of a review to address fiscal challenges and the steady decline in enrolment. Closing Tuc-el-Nuit and amalgamating with OES will

PG A8

Children were wowed by “Sam the Magic Man” at the Oliver Library last week.

75th

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save the district nearly $400,000 a year. Among the positive outcomes, the board says amalgamation will provide a broader scope of learning opportunities (band and music) for the students, and will increase extracurricular opportunities. However, it would be a very tight fit, with no room for growth. Amalgamation is expected to exceed Oliver Elementary’s capacity of 450 students, and future growth potential may require the inclusion of a four-classroom addition. The board also assumes there will be a reduction of one principal, and at least one teacher and one clerical/library position. However, most of Tuc-el-Nuit staff would be

transferred to OES. Tuc-el-Nuit school principal Chris Hambleton declined to comment directly on the board’s decision, but said there will be a process initiated to elicit further input from the school community. Oliver Elementary School principal Mike Safek also declined to comment on the issue. But Ron Rachinski, president of the South Okanagan Similkameen Teachers’ Union, said he wasn’t happy about the proposed closure of Tuc-el-Nuit. “In my gut, it bothers me,” he told the Chronicle. Continued on Pg A2...

PG B3

Long-time teacher Greg Smith says goodbye to the classroom. He’s officially retired.

PG B9

Past coaches reminisce about SOSS’s east gym, which was closed down on Tuesday.

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A2 Oliver Chronicle Wednesday, February 2, 2011

NEWS

THE FRUIT & VINE The Oliver Chronicle welcomes comments highlighting readers’ feelings of appreciation towards an individual or group or sharing comments about things they would like to see improved. Submissions must have a name and phone number for verification purposes, but can be published anonymously. Content may be edited for clarity.

SWEET CHERRIES to the neighbours that clean driveways and come to help when there is a problem. You know who you are. -A grateful neighbour SWEET CHERRIES to the Knights of Columbus for our amazing “gratitude hamper” served in style from Wayne Danbrook for all our food bank assistance over the holiday season. -Thank you from all the Chronicle staff

...Continued from Pg A1

School amalgamation being considered However, he doesn’t believe the students’ education will be significantly impacted by the amalgamation. They will still have access to the same teachers and services, he said. But Rachinski expressed his concern about the potential loss of teaching staff, which would impact class sizes. He noted we really have to tackle the issue of educational funding, which is putting districts in the unfortunate position of closing schools. Cathy Gale, co-chair of the Parents Advisory Council at Tuc-el-Nuit, said Oliver has to look at this as a “combining of schools” rather than a closure. She agreed that the board, faced with a fiscal dilemma, has made a logical decision to investigate combining the schools. “We will still have an elementary school, students will not have to be bussed out of town, and OES would be more fully utilized.” But Gale said Tuc-el-Nuit has an extremely dynamic culture. “It would definitely be a loss for those who still have young families enrolled at Tuc-el-Nuit as they would lose their ‘neighbourhood’ school . . . unfortunately it is the emotional attachment to this fabulous school that tugs at heart

strings.” Board chair June Harrington said closing a school is a trustee’s “nightmare.” It’s the hardest thing to consider, but in this case, “Amalgamation makes the most sense with the least disruption to students and families,” she said. Petersen said amalgamation would not deprive any student of an education, and it would save the district $400,000. Oliver Trustee Tamela Edwards said it’s extravagant to continue to support two elementary schools in one community. She expressed her belief that amalgamating the two schools will make the education system in Oliver even better. Trustee Myrna Coates said the amalgamation will bring the community together. “I don’t see this as detrimental to the students to have education in a different building.” Trustee Marieze Tarr sees this as an opportunity to unite the community. She also believes it will give the students more opportunities than they currently have. She noted the transition to SOSS will be easier for the students. Trustee Sam Hancheroff said the board’s hands are tied. “If you don’t have the money,

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you have to do something. We’re not looking at laying off more staff.” The other option the board looked at was closing Osoyoos Secondary School and amalgamating those students with SOSS. This would save the district approximately $725,000 per year. But trustees voted not to pursue this option to the relief of Osoyoos Mayor Stu Wells. He said it was a big load off the community’s shoulders. But he said the troubling issue of declining enrolment must be addressed. “It’s up to Council, parents and trustees to make sure we don’t have to repeat this two years from now.” Wells noted the solution may be to find affordable housing in the community. Seventeen-year-old student Marina Hiebert came to the board meeting with a petition that has nearly 300 signatures opposing the controversial option. Trustees also rejected the option of moving Grade 4 students from Cawston Primary to Similkameen Elementary Secondary School. The board also decided not to spend $125,000 to renovate the Osoyoos bus garage to house YouLearn.ca. Instead, trustees voted to find a new home for the school, possibly in OSS.

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Oliver Chronicle

Box 880, 36083 - 97th Street, Oliver, BC V0H 1T0 ph: 250.498.3711 | fax: 250.498.3966 Office hours: Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. We accept Visa and Mastercard * Please use our mail slot for after-hours submissions *


Wednesday, February 2, 2011 Oliver Chronicle A3

NEWS

Council briefs Tree roots getting sick Director of Operations Shawn Goodsell has informed Council about a recently discovered root problem in newly planted boulevard trees in the Tuc-el-Nuit area. That’s why staff recommends that Council budget $8,000 per year (for five to six years) to replace these trees with new ones. A total of 113 trees need to be replaced.

Cemetery committee approved Council has approved the selection of a special committee to deal with cemetery matters. Councillor Michael Newman said a committee is necessary to deal with recent complaints from family members regarding how the cemetery is maintained. This committee will gather information and come up with recommendations. Newman said he has now read the cemetery bylaw and is up to speed on that document. Both Newman and Councillor Marji Basso will sit on the committee.

Acting mayor busy Acting mayor Jack Bennest has been a busy boy filling in for Mayor Pat Hampson for the past two weeks. Hampson is recovering from heart surgery after having a valve replaced. This is something he had anticipating since 1986. The operation was a success and he’s feeling quite well, making sure he gets back into his walking routine. He expects to be back into full mayoral action in another week or so.

Police briefs

Bennest said he’s had to field so many phone calls about Oliver’s population drop, based on questionable BC government statistics. He said its figures are based on how many building permits there are and how many people register with the health unit.

Basso eyes OBA Councillor Marji Basso is keeping an eye on the Oliver Business Association. She’s interested in OBA’s attempt to have more consistent hours for businesses on weekends. This is so people “don’t have to leave town” to their shopping excursions.

Schafer talks SAR Councillor Terry Schafer released some details on Oliver/Osoyoos Search and Rescue’s 2010 annual report. Schafer, representing the Emergency and Protective Services Committee, said SAR had 17 call-outs last year, including 12-13 missing individuals. The councillor said SAR acquired a grant of $37,000 for purchase of snowmobiles and a rescue toboggan. He also noted the group has five new members.

Plastic bags prohibited June 1 Town staff are preparing a bylaw amendment to prohibit the use of plastic bags for yard waste. This is part of a new solid waste and recycling contract awarded to BFI Canada for $160,000 per year (plus 45 cents each for additional garbage tags). Oliver residents will have to use Kraft paper bags or open containers for their yard waste beginning June 1.

2 year 3 year 4 year 5 year

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CASHABLE - 1.35%

On January 31 members of the Oliver/Osoyoos RCMP responded to an alleged home invasion and kidnapping at a residence in the 3,900 block of Highway 3, just east of Osoyoos. A male suspect entered the residence via an unlocked side door and confronted the two male occupants. After some discussion inside the residence, the suspect allegedly presented a can of bear spray, forcing one of the residents into his own vehicle and left west bound on Highway 3. The 20-year-old victim was able to contact his mother by text message, advising he had been kidnaped. A few moments later another short message consisted of the simple word, “Help.” The distraught mother, who was in the Kelowna area at the time, contacted the Kelowna Operational Communications Center advising of the message received from her son and relaying a description of the vehicle and licence plate. At approximately 4 p.m, the Blue 1999 Ford Ranger pick-up was located by a member of the South Okanagan Traffic Services and pulled over on Highway 3 near Cawston. The 49-year-old Vancouver male suspect was taken into custody without incident and the victim was located unharmed in the vehicle. The suspect is known to the victim and the incident is believed to be related to a failed business deal. The suspect, who cannot be identified at this time, remains in custody pending an appearance in Penticton court on February 1. He faces charges of break and enter, forcible confinement, theft over $5,000, and possession of a weapon. The matter is still under investigation.

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Meatloaf with gravy, mashed potatoes and veggies Pool on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Darts now on Thursdays at 7 p.m. Anyone interested in playing cribbage is to come to the Legion onThursday, Feb. 3rd at 7 p.m. As of Feb. 1st, all members will be requested to show membership cards either to a person on the door or to the bartender. Those who have not renewed 2011 memberships are no longer in good standing and must be signed in. Renew now!!!

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A4 Oliver Chronicle Wednesday, February 2, 2011

NEWS

Town looks at 2.9 per cent general tax increase Lyonel Doherty Oliver Chronicle The Town of Oliver is considering a small (2.9 per cent) general tax increase in 2011, which equates to an approximate increase of $9 per average household from last year.

At a recent budget meeting, Council was looking at a proposed property tax increase of three per cent. But that was pared down to 2.9. The increase is influenced by factors including inflation, benefit premium increases, and election/road referendum costs.

General property tax collections for 2011 cussed on January 25. It deferred and/or are budgeted at approximately $1 million. cut approximately $118,000 worth of projThe fire department levy on improvements ects (five in total) from the capital budget. has decreased by $4,899. Council decided not to spend $30,000 to Owners of a single family home will see build a new dog pound facility. Councillor their property taxes increase from ap- Michael Newman suggested that staff find proximately $447 to $457. Combined with someone to establish a containment facilthe decrease in the fire budget, the total ity to house collected dogs. Council agreed general tax increase equates to about 2.2 to advertise this position to see if there is per cent. any interest. Chief Financial Officer David Svetlichny Municipal Manager Tom Szalay said of noted that each additional one per cent tax the 24 dogs picked up last year, 11 had to increase represents approximately $10,000 be kept at the bylaw officer’s home until a in tax revenue. suitable home was found for them. Another noteworthy point is that over“She’s not doing that anymore and we’re all budgeted general operating expendi- not expecting her to do that.” tures have decreased from Szalay said if Council the prior year budget by 7.7 Council decided not decides not to build a dog per cent. pound, then dogs at large to spend $30,000 The majority of departwill not be picked up bements show a decrease in to build a new cause there is nowhere to expenditures. The two larg- dog pound facility. take them. est decreases are in the fire Councillor Michael Other capital projects department and business Newman suggested include: Town office fire and promotion. Fire de- that staff find somesprinkler system (now bepartment expenditures deing phased in over two creased 35 per cent because one to establish a years – $20,000 in 2011 and of no fire truck purchase containment facility $30,000 in 2012); Council this year. And business and to house collected chamber upgrade (2011 promotion expenditures dogs. budget reduced from decreased 37 per cent be$40,000 to $10,000); pedescause of a $28,000 reductrian crossing signal locator tion in economic development funding. (budget of $26,000 for two locators was cut Airport expenditures has increased 48 to $13,000 for one locator at 350 Avenue); per cent due to increasing strategic plan- and Public Works onsite parking/landscapning by $22,000 over the prior year. ing ($11,000 cost was deferred to 2012); Capital spending in 2011 includes a road The pedestrian crossing signal project referendum package. If the Town goes consists of replacing the existing buttons forth with this, future principal and inter- with new buttons that emit a faint beep est costs could be approximately $455,500 to indicate their location for blind/handiper year (based on $6 million borrowed capped people. over 20 years), said Svetlichny, who noted Szalay said the $6 million road referenthis would wipe out the Town’s reserves dum project, if approved, will cost housevery quickly. holds about $180 per year. To increase its projected reserve balCouncillor Jack Bennest said if the public ance of $438,300, Svetlichny said Council rejects it, Oliver’s streets will only be upshould either increase taxes or defer cer- graded once in awhile. tain capital projects. “There are lots of things we’d love to do, The latter is exactly what Council dis- but do we need to do all of them in 2011?”

Business award

Photo contributed

Chris Scheuren from the South Okanagan Chamber of Commerce presents Tamela Edwards from Expert Hearing Solutions in Oliver with a business award during the Chamber’s recent annual general meeting.


Wednesday, February 2, 2011 Oliver Chronicle A5

NEWS

Nigel Gobelle photo

Land of the little people Crews from H&M Excavating have been hard at work on replacing irrigation flumes 6 and 7. This 48-inch PVC pipe is taking the place of the old flumes on the irrigation canal. The canal will be up and running for irrigation season in April.

Anti-poverty advocates discuss solutions to troubling issues Lyonel Doherty Oliver Chronicle (This is Part 2 of a two-part series on the poverty forum held in Oliver on January 13.) Some Oliver residents want to know what they can do about poverty’s crippling effect on communities. A panel of resource people tried to answer that question at the January 13 forum, which attracted about 80 people. Oliver Mayor Pat Hampson said the Town has land it is willing to use (at no charge) for affordable housing. He noted the Town’s intention was to establish an affordable housing project with the Kiwanis Club, but funding problems resulted in the project being shelved for a year. Hampson stated there is a misconception that local governments have unlimited power. The truth is the provincial government continues to download responsibilities onto municipalities, the mayor lamented. BC Southern Interior MP Alex Atamanenko didn’t dispute that. He recalled that women’s centres were funded by the government, but that is no longer the case; they must now rely on gaming grants and fundraising. “There are lots of blueprint solutions, but it’s a matter of finding the political will to make the right choices,” said Atamanenko, who pointed out that 870,000 people in Canada use food banks. Anti-poverty advocate Julie Nyikos said if the community doesn’t unite against this social problem, it will increase, and so will crime. She stated there is a fine line between being wealthy and being poor. “You can be affluent one minute and then poor (the next).” Theresa Nolet from Penticton said people can start addressing poverty by spending their dollars locally and supporting small business. You might pay a little more, but the money stays in the community, she pointed out. “The big corporations have a plan and we don’t. They will take every last dollar . . . we’re becoming serfs again.” This prompted a suggestion that people should start boycotting these corporations. One member of the au-

dience said people are revolting because of the revolting situation they are in. Linda Bartram from Oliver said people had the opportunity to do something by voting for the single transferable vote system, but they didn’t. This would have led to parliamentary reform, making government more accountable to the people who voted them in. Local resident Alex Milner said the problem is that everything is disappearing and heading to the United States, including lumber and manufacturing plants. “I have trouble putting gas in my car with the price of gas here,” said Milner, who noted he can buy a gallon of milk in the US for $1.99, and a turkey for 29 cents a pound. Brita Park from Oliver said people can have an immediate effect on poverty by supporting the local food bank. “You can be part of the solution in little ways.” Rhonda Bruce, regional vice-president of the Hospital Employees’ Union (HEU), encouraged people to become educated and start lobbying their MLA. “Ask them what they stand for, and make sure everyone votes.” Bruce also encouraged everyone to set aside 15 per cent of their paycheques and then spend that money locally. Jim Ouellette from the Oliver food bank said it was community support that gave the food bank new digs. That proves that you can make things happen if you work together.

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A6 Oliver Chronicle Wednesday, February 2, 2011

Deighton Brothers

OPINION

Louis Deighton was the first man to produce apple juice commercially in all of Canada, and sold his product under the label “Deighton’s Apple Juice.” As a result of his efforts, the juice industry started and is today the multi-million dollar grower-owned Sun-Rype Product Ltd. Louis Deighton, along with his brother, William Deighton, initiated the Oliver Co-op Store and was made director of the Co-op in 1930. Louis married Molly (MacIntosh) on October 27, 1927.

THE OLIVER CHRONICLE WELCOMES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR on subjects of interest to our readers. Short letters are most likely to be chosen for publication, but the use of any material is at the discretion of the editor. The editor reserves the right to edit letters to meet space requirements, clarity or to avoid obscenity, libel or invasion of privacy. Upon request, we will use a pseudonym only, but only rarely and for compelling reasons. Letters published do not necessarily reflect the editorial policies or beliefs of this newspaper. All letters must include your first and last name, contact number, town or city of residence to be considered.

A lesson in social responsibility

Photograph Number: 2010.015.001 Date: 1930’s Photo: Courtesy of Oliver and District Archives, 250-498-4027

LETTERS

Y

ou can’t blame Susan Norman for losing a little faith in the human race. She was struck by a young driver and left wounded on the side of the road on December 29, the day society threw her for a loop. Although Norman refuses to believe the driver didn’t see her, it’s possible the young woman looked away for a second, heard a bump, and failed to see anything amiss in her rear view mirror. But are we to believe that the second driver directly behind her didn’t see anything either? That’s a hard wad to swallow. Nobody stopped or slowed down to help Norman, who could have suffered life-threatening injuries and could have died in the ditch like a stray cat. Perhaps the driver panicked and was too afraid to stop. That happens, and is understandable. But there comes a time when social and moral responsibility (and accountability) should prevail. At least you would think your conscience would be nagging you to own up to your mistake. Even if the young driver truly didn’t see Norman, she obviously found out what happened after talking to police and ICBC. But there was no phone call or even an apology to Norman. That’s disturbing. If you bump into someone in the supermarket, you say sorry. If you hurt someone’s feelings in an argument, you say sorry. It’s just common courtesy. The incident on December 29 appeared to be an accident; a mistake. So own up to it. The Chronicle gave the driver every opportunity to tell her side of the story, but she didn’t want to talk about it, which is her right. But she hurt someone physically and emotionally. Is a $400 fine for reckless driving enough? (Norman would probably pay $400 not to have a plate in her arm.) The incident looked like a clear case of hit and run because nobody stopped. Did the driver return to the scene later? Perhaps. There may be other circumstances but we are not privy to them. The police chose not to return our queries. This sounds like a perfect case for Oliver’s Restorative Justice program. Norman is more than a police file number, more than a name on a piece of paper. The same goes for the driver. Put aside all the paperwork and the legal system; we already know who that protects. We need to put more emphasis on moral responsibility and compassion, the lack of which leads to the downfall of our society.

The Oliver Chronicle welcomes letters to the editor. editor@oliverchronicle.com

Oliver needs new helicopter gig Editor, Oliver Chronicle: It amazes me how some people in Oliver try to stop new businesses starting up. Oliver needs new business and young pilots need training. Helicopters are not half as noisy as the small planes

www.oliverchronicle.com Published every Wednesday by Chronicle Newspaper Co. Publications Mail Registration No. 07453, ISSN 1195-5996

Mona Johnson, Oliver

Suck it up and quit belly-aching Editor, Oliver Chronicle: Not in my back yard? I have just read with interest the two letters complaining about helicopter noise. I live on 342 Avenue, half way between the highway and the airport. I rarely hear the airplanes at the airport but I sure do here the traffic (trucks and motorbikes, etc.) on the highway. I have lived here for over 20 and have learned to live with it. When I bought this house I bought it to be close to the airport . I own my own little aircraft and pay the Town to lease the property my

hangar sits on as well as taxes. If I was you I wouldn't be complaining about airport noise, because you will soon be complaining about truck noise from all the traffic going down 95th Street to get to the new mall they just put in. I think that siren on the firehall makes a lot more noise than any helicopter but I don't see you complaining about that. So suck it up and quit your belly-aching and get on with your life. Larry Chalmers Chairman, Oliver Hangar Assn.

Growing GM crops offers benefits Editor, Oliver Chronicle: It appears that the Oliver Chronicle forgot the saying that there are two sides to every story when it ran the recent article on Bill C-474. To help your readers get a better sense of the other side of this issue, I’d like to present some facts that were absent in that article. Farmers choose to grow GM crops because they offer meaningful benefits such as increased yields, improved nutritional value and environmentally sustainable production methods. This, in turn, leads to significant economic impacts, which according to a recent study result in $7.9 billion worth of additional economic benefit for farmers each year with the help of crop protection products and plant biotechnology. GM crops – which have been thoroughly tested over the course of the last two decades - are subject to Canada’s strict regulatory standards which ensure that not only do

Canadians have access to one of the safest food supplies in the world, but that our farmers are also well positioned to participate in foreign trade. The fact of the matter is Bill C-474 is based on nothing more than an ideological opposition to advancements in plant biotechnology and it has no basis in science. But don’t take our word for it. Ask the overwhelming number of farm groups – including the Grain Growers of Canada, the Western Canadian Wheat Growers Association, the Canadian Seed Trade Association, the Canola Council of Canada and the Canadian Canola Growers Association, among others – why they support Canada’s science-based regulatory system as a means for ensuring that Canadian farmers continue to benefit from access to the latest biotechnology tools in order to remain competitive on the global stage while protecting human health and the environment. Lorne Hepworth President, CropLife Canada Letters continued on Pg A11...

Staff

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towing gliders over my house, or visiting pilots diving and doing barrel rolls. As for pollution, anything that burns fuel pollutes.

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Wednesday, February 2, 2011 Oliver Chronicle A7

The next Arab-Israeli war: what would it be like?  It’s time to think about the nature of the next Arab-Israeli war. The release by the Arab satellite network al-Jazeera of 16,000 leaked Palestinian documents covering the past ten years of peace negotiations has driven a stake through the heart of the already moribund “peace process,” and we hear constant warnings that when the hope of a peace settlement Gwynne Dyer is finally extinguished, the next step is a return to war. So what would that war be like? Okay, back up a bit. What the leaked documents show is that the Palestinian negotiators were willing to make huge concessions on territory and other issues in return for Israeli recognition of an independent Palestinian state. They were well-meaning people playing a very bad hand as best they could, but the publication of these documents will destroy them politically. The spirit in which they approached the talks is exemplified in the first document in the trove, a memo on Palestinian negotiating strategy dated September 1999. It urges the negotiators to heed the advice of the Rolling Stones: “You can’t always get what you want, but if you try sometimes you might find that you get what you need.” According to the documents, in the past three years the Palestinians have offered to accept all of Israel’s illegal settlements around Jerusalem except one (Har Homa) as permanent parts of the Jewish state. Israel annexed all of East Jerusalem after it conquered it in the 1967 war, but international law forbids that and no other country sees the annexation as legal. The negotiators also offered to restrict the “right of re-

turn” of the millions of Palestinians descended from those who were driven from their homes in what is now Israel in 1948 to a mere 100,000 returnees over ten years. They even offered to put the most sacred site in Jerusalem, the Temple Mount/Haram al-Sharif, under the control of a joint committee. (It is currently administered by an Islamic foundation.) Even these concessions were not enough to persuade the Israelis to accept a Palestinian state within the pre1967 borders of the West Bank (including those parts of East Jerusalem still inhabited by Palestinians) and the Gaza Strip. They were enough, however, to make the negotiators reviled in almost every Palestinian home if they were ever revealed – and now they have been. Mahmoud Abbas, the president of the Palestinian Authority, chief negotiator Saeb Erekat and his predecessor Ahmed Qureia were just pragmatic men trying to cut the best deal possible in very difficult circumstances. They might even have been able to sell these concessions to the Palestinian people, if they had come as part of a comprehensive settlement leading to the end of the Israeli occupation and an independent Palestinian state. But in fact they got nothing for their concessions. The Israelis simply pocketed them and demanded more. Now that the details are known – leaked, almost certainly, by frustrated members of the Negotiation Support Unit that provided technical and legal backup for the Palestinian negotiators – Mahmoud Abbas and his colleagues are finished. Even the Palestinian Authority itself, and the whole concept of an independent state for Palestinians in a fraction of pre-partition Palestine, may not survive this blow. Fatah, the faction that effectively rules the parts of the West Bank not yet taken for Israeli settlements, is well past its

sell-by date as a national liberation movement, and may lose control of the area to the Islamist Hamas movement before we are very much older. Hamas, which already controls the Gaza Strip, rejects negotiations with Israel and the whole notion of a Palestinian state alongside Israel as part of a two-state future. We are continually told by various pundits that these developments can only lead to war, and they are probably right – but what kind of war? It would certainly not be like the Arab-Israeli wars of 1948, 1956, 1967 and 1973, in which regular armies fought stand-up battles with lots of heavy weapons. Egypt, Syria and Jordan, the countries that fought those wars on behalf of the Arabs, have long since abandoned the goal of matching Israeli military power. They don’t even buy the right kind of weapons, in the right amounts, to stand a chance against Israel on the battlefield. We will doubtless see more Israeli punishment attacks in which a hundred Palestinians or Lebanese die for every Israeli, like the “wars” against Lebanon in 2006 and in the Gaza Strip in 2008-09. We may well see a “third intifada,” another popular uprising against the Israeli occupation in the West Bank, probably accompanied by terrorist attacks in Israel itself. But we have seen all this before. It’s nothing to get excited about. In the long run, we may see some Arab states start working on nuclear weapons, to create some balance of forces between the two sides, but probably not for a while yet. In the meantime, the future for the Middle East is not mass destruction, but an unending series of Israeli military strikes that kill in the hundreds or thousands, not in the millions. Plus despair, of course.

Salmon farming and sustainability: it’s a real struggle The past few weeks have marked And so, for example, putan interesting time for salmon and ting shellfish farms below salmon farming in B.C. The first coma salmon farm helps feed mercial-scale ocean-based closedthe shellfish while cleaning containment salmon farm tanks are up some of the mess and being installed near Campbell River, potential damage of waste B.C., and the Global Aquaculture Alfrom the fish farm. Cooke liance (GAA) closed its public comAquaculture on Canada’s ment period on draft certification East Coast is now testing David Suzuki standards for salmon farms. Meanthe method, but it’s actually an ancient practice, while, a survey commissioned by developed in China for food the Pacific Salmon Foundation and the Fraser Basin Council showed that most production thousands of years ago. Although it has promising applications, British Columbians support making wild Pacific salmon the province’s official fish. it doesn’t move salmon farming out of the The Cohen Commission inquiry into Fra- red or “Avoid” category of ranking systems ser River sockeye salmon also resumed its like SeaChoice or the Monterey Bay Aquarium. To start, it doesn’t change some of the hearings. Some of this activity illustrates our fundamental challenges of sea lice and disstruggle to figure out whether or not ease from farms getting into the wild, nor farming salmon can be sustainable. It’s an does it change the fact that intensive open important but difficult question, in part net cage aquaculture has a heavy impact because the definition of “sustainable” is on ecosystems. On top of that, it doesn’t hard to pin down. And, along with issues address the crucial issue of what we feed to such as sea lice and other challenges with the farmed salmon. salmon farming, raising carnivorous fish And we don’t have enough informalike salmon will continue to raise questions tion about how much improvement IMTA about sustainability unless we find a way to actually delivers. This makes a recent anfeed them that doesn’t lead to the deple- nouncement by Loblaw that it will carry tion of other wild fish. It’s necessary to be and promote IMTA farmed salmon from clear about whether we’re getting closer to Canada’s East Coast frustrating and disapworking in balance with nature or whether pointing. The company has taken signifiwe are just trying things out without un- cant steps for seafood sustainability, but derstanding the full impacts. branding and promoting IMTA salmon, laFor example, the proposed GAA stan- belled WiseSource, muddies the waters. dards tell us little more than that the proAt best, IMTA is one small step on a long ducers are obeying the law. Although the ladder. Consumers don’t always have time industry trade association asserts that its to research every label, and so we must be Best Aquaculture Practices “assure health- rigorous about what we decide to promote. ful foods produced through environmenIf we want to farm salmon and protect tally and socially responsible means”, the wild salmon and ecosystems, the best apstandards don’t address the most critical proach involves closed containment sysenvironmental and social threats of open tems that separate farmed fish from wild net pen salmon farming, such as disease, fish. The four closed containment tanks parasites, and sustainable feed sources. being installed by AgriMarine Inc. near Another example of the controversy Campbell River are a start, as is the Sweetaround trying to achieve better salmon Spring Salmon land-based system that supfarming has to do with integrated multi- plies Overwaitea stores. SweetSpring does trophic aquaculture, or IMTA. With IMTA, an excellent job of reducing the use of wild waste from raising one aquaculture species, fish for feed, but no matter what systems like salmon, is used as food or fertilizer for we use, we must diversify into farmed speother species grown at the same farm site. cies that are lower down on the food chain

than salmon, cod, or tuna, so that we can better manage the resources needed to feed the fish and shellfish we produce through aquaculture. And if we continue to farm salmon, we must continue to find substitute feed sources that don’t lead to the depletion of

other fish stocks. British Columbians really do treasure wild salmon, but if we want to make it a symbol of the province, we must do everything we can to ensure that it remains a living symbol.

Regional District of Okanagan Similkameen Apologizes for the Short Notice of the Budget Public Meeting To the residents of Electoral Area C (Oliver Rural): Please accept the Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen’s apology for the insufficient notice that was provided to the Oliver Chronicle. The notice was inviting residents of Electoral Area ‘C’, to the Budget Public Meeting, that took place on Wednesday, January 26 to discuss the RDOS 2011 budget and how it will affect your property tax notice. Although it was in the Western the week before, we didn’t get it in the Oliver Chronicle until the day of the meeting. The cause of insufficient notice being provided to the Oliver Chronicle has been investigated and we are in the process of implementing measures that will help eliminate the problem occurring in the future. However, to what extent the RDOS 2011 budget will impact your property tax is important information that we would like to provide. Residents of Electoral Area C who would like to request an additional meeting, or want information on the budget, are asked to please contact Allan Patton, Area C Director at 250.485.2288 or Warren Everton, Regional District Finance Manager at 250.492.0237. Again, we would like to extend our sincere apology for not providing adequate notice in the Oliver Chronicle. Bill Newell CAO


A8 Oliver Chronicle Wednesday, February 2, 2011

PHOTO NEWS

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A message of hope

Photo contributed

The Watoto Children’s Choir from Africa will bring a “message of hope” to Oliver during a concert at Frank Venables Auditorium on February 8 starting at 6 p.m.

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Building permit values increase Last year saw an increase of $13.2 million in the value of building permits issued in the RDOS. A total of 416 permits were issued for a total value of $44,478,748. This

compares to 2009 when 419 permits were issued for a total value of $31,271,538. One of the sectors that saw an increase in activity last year was

single family dwellings (92 permits were issued in 2010, compared to 78 in 2009). The 92 permits were valued at $25,542,052.

DON’T GET DOWN ON DEPRESSION

Symptoms: ✽ ✽ ✽ ✽ ✽ ✽ ✽ ✽ ✽

Feeling sad or blue Crying spells Loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities Significant increase or decrease in appetite Significant weight loss or weight gain Agitation or irritability Fatigue or loss of energy Feelings of worthlessness or excessive guilt Thoughts of death or suicide

Throughout the course of our lives, we all experience periods of stress, unhappiness, sadness, or grief. But when these feelings make it hard for us to get through the day, we may have what is called “clinical depression.” It can challenge your ability to perform even routine daily activities. At its worst, it may lead you to contemplate, attempt, or commit suicide. Some people believe that depression is “normal” when things go wrong in life. On the contrary, clinical depression is always abnormal and always requires medical attention. The good news is that depression can be diagnosed and treated effectively in most people.

For help with understanding depression, speak to Larry at Oliver Pharmacy. 35824 - 97th Street, Oliver, BC phone: 250. 485.4007


Wednesday, February 2, 2011 Oliver Chronicle A9

PHOTO NEWS

Cubs, Beavers all set for breakfast On Saturday, Feb. 5 the Oliver Cubs are having a pancake breakfast at the Oliver Legion. Breakfast will start at 8:30 a.m. and run until 11:30 a.m. Join the group for a great and inexpensive breakfast

and support the kids. The Cubs also have a bake sale and silent auction going on at the same time. The Cubs and Beavers are working hard to raise funds for a sleep-over at the Vancouver Aquarium.

LOVE IN A BOX VALENTINES DINNER TO GO MONDAY, FEB. 14, 2011 DOLCI DELI & CATERING, OSOYOOS Fluffy Couscous Salad with Lemon Herb Tiger Prawns Sundried Tomato Stuffed Chicken with Roasted Red Pepper Sauce Scalloped Potatoes with Gruyere & Chef’s Season Vegetables Love Infused Strawberry Mousse Pre-order required. 250.495.6807 Your meal is ready in a few simple steps $25 per person • • •

Place your Valentine dinner order with Dolci and pick up a coupon for Road 13 Wines. Buy one bottle and get the second at 50% off. Enter at Road 13 Vineyards to win a gift basket from Road 13 and Dolci Deli.

Road 13 Vineyards is located 6 km south of Oliver or 13 km north of Osoyoos on Road 13. Open daily 10am to 3pm, Ph: 250.498.8330

Busy Beavers and Cubs

Photo contributed

The 1st Oliver Scouts invite everyone to a special fundraiser (pancakes, bake sale and silent auction) at the Oliver Legion on Saturday, Feb. 5 starting at 8:30 a.m. From left in back row are Islea Janzen, Larrisa Hunt, Dayna Hunt, and Caitlyn Fields. In front row are Faryn Janzen, Garret Janzen, Erika Hunt, Gavin Field, Matthew Mathin, and Ben Christainson.

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Photo contributed

The South Okanagan Chamber of Commerce elected its new executive at its recent annual general meeting. From left in back row are Seig Tennert, Linda Sheehy-Brownstein, Christopher Scheuren, Petra Veintimilla, and Jim King. In middle is Katie Amos. Seated in front from left are Steve Staresina, Holly Plante, and Linda Winje.

250-485-2877

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A10 Oliver Chronicle Wednesday, February 2, 2011

NEWS

A Grand Night

Photo contributed

Desert Sun Counselling and Resource Centre recently held its 6th annual Grand Night dinner, dance and silent auction. All proceeds went to The Safe Home Program, Community Kitchen/Garden and Men’s Counselling. Martin Cattermole (middle) was the “Grand Night” winner, with his wife Juleen McElgunn (right). At left is Desert Sun Executive Director Roxie Van Aller.

BCFGA convention hears debate on modified foods Wendy Johnson Special to the Chronicle

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where things are going and why Summerland isn’t seeing new personnel. This has been going on for some time but what preTwo resolutions stood out at the BC Fruit cipitated action now is that approximately Growers Association’s convention in Pent- 39 new researchers were being hired by icton on January 27-28. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada and As expected, Resolution 7—the asso- not one was coming to PARC—they are beciation’s rejection of genetically modified ing shuffled off to other research stations organisms until governments can assure across the country. So we need to press that genetically engineered foods would government to have these key scientific renot incur a market backlash and penalize search positions filled here.” conventional and organic growers—was He also took exception to some views passed by the membership but not before a expressed by keynote speaker Ben Stewart, spirited debate ensued. the Minister of AgriculNewly re-elected presiture. Stewart urged growdent, Joe Sardinha said ers to get out and promote Stewart urged growNeal Carter—the man at BC fruit, embrace technolers to get out and the centre of the issue ogy and find more ways to promote BC fruit, whose company Okanagan be self-sufficient. embrace technology Specialty Fruits has devel“That’s all very well but oped a genetically engiit takes a lot of capital to and find more ways neered apple—was present invest in more technology. to be self-sufficient. and took exception to the And saying farmers have tone of the resolution. to rely more on themSardinha took the selves, not government, mic himself, stating that market percep- didn’t sit well with delegates or the memtion couldn’t be discounted and growers bership. Agriculture funding in this provweren’t willing to endorse such an apple ince is just under half of the other provincvariety or any other genetically engineered es based on GDP; to be told you now have product, regardless of what the company’s to do with even less doesn’t bode well for owners and shareholders would like. BC agriculture. If you aren’t supply man“We aren’t willing to take that chance. agement you’re struggling and it has been And we haven’t seen Washington state re- four-and-a-half years of struggle for agrispond in a warm fashion to the whole con- culture in BC.” cept either. I think they are just as wary. Orchardist and Area C director, Allan “Maybe this is a great apple for the pro- Patton attended the convention too. cessing industry but we aren’t interested “We need a base price we can count on,” in growing slicing apples; we have a tough he said, adding that the cost of crop proenough time trying to sell fresh ones.” tection products should be considered and Sardinha told Carter and his proponents steps taken to insure growers wouldn’t that the BCFGA was more interested in get ‘dumped on’ by imports. He dismissed building a reputation based on unique fruit the prevailing notion that such a program flavours and environmentally friendly would run counter of any articles in NAFpractices such as the SIR program, and tak- TA. ing advantage of a climate that precludes “We can put anti-dumping protection the heavy use of fungicides such as those in without going against any international required by growers in eastern Canada. trade agreements. That’s bogus; nothing A late resolution dealing with the ap- more than a handy excuse not to give us parent cutback of scientists in several dis- anything.” ciplines at the Pacific Agri-Foods Research For Swaran Chahal, water issues and Centre in Summerland brought an emerg- crop protection programs were the most ing situation to the forefront, he said. For important. instance a plant pathologist and the cherry “We want to know why Crop Insurance plant breeder have retired from PARC and and AgriStability aren’t working. And we have not been replaced. want to know that water for our farms will “There are definite concerns about be protected in the future.”


Wednesday, February 2, 2011 Oliver Chronicle A11

NEWS

Machial expresses worry about impact of SWD Wendy Johnson Special to the Chronicle Rick Machial knows how to tell whether Spotted Wing Drosophila is in your crop: roll a cherry between your fingers; if beads of juice well up through the skin from miniscule entry holes drilled into the fruit, you have SWD. He made that unwanted discovery in some missed and still-hanging Lapins a week after his cherries had been harvested, tested and then cleared by the CFIA for export last summer; now Machial is waiting to see what the 2011 cherry season will bring. Growers are accustomed to waiting and seeing. That has always been part of an uneasy truce between their seasonal needs and the aloof dictates of weather systems that roll through the valley. But now orchardists’ role in this relationship takes on added meaning; the arrival of the international, multi-generational pest is changing how they manage their harvests and post-production practices. Machial said he is worried because many valley orchards are going from clean to contaminated within one season. “This is something we haven’t seen before. It is very prolific and we just don’t know how to control it yet,” said the independent grower and president of Fairview Orchards Ltd., a family-owned packinghouse.

However, any repercussions from SWD won’t occur in a vacuum. “People don’t realize how much money is generated by cherries in the local economy. They are a big cash crop and all that money gets returned to the community—from bank payments to diesel for growers’ equipment and machinery.” But that riddled cherry in the palm of his hand a week after he had packed his fruit for export, proved how quickly the situation can change for Okanagan growers—a realization that is being replicated in other agricultural regions of the world. So far the fly has defied translated1930s-era Japanese manuals; it can and does survive below freezing temperatures if it can find a warm place to over-winter. And it has found ways to adapt to the Okanagan’s arid climate, even though its preference is for cooler more humid areas. Getting growers to view their culls as potential breeding grounds for more SWD generations and safe havens for drosophilas seeking to snuggle in until summer is essential. Stringent sanitation and cull disposal still needs to be driven home to growers, Machial said. “There’s a lot we still need to learn too. We need to know when it first emerges so we can apply our first covers to target the first generation. That’s the key because it has

such a short window from larva-to-fly; we have to make sure we get them early. If you let your populations build up you’re going to lose the battle right away.” Now growers have eyes on their markets and ears open for information from various sources. A multi-continental hit from drosophila is coalescing into a worldwide determination to find its Achilles heel. Meanwhile, growers share their bits of knowledge and look for more. Machial said Washington farmers are using helicopters to spray a fine mist of Malathion on their infested cherry orchards. B.J. Thurlby, president of the Washington State Fruit Commission, noted that aerial spraying keeps the maximum residue levels low yet still permits shipping to foreign markets. He added that Washington, like other western states affected by SWD, is still dissecting incoming information and revealing puzzling insights of its own. “SWD is more prevalent in the northern part of Washington. It also showed up in greater numbers in November than it did in July. “Whatever the reasons, this is an issue we want people to be aware of; this isn’t something you can hide. It is upon us and we are going to deal with it.”

...Letters continued from Pg A6

Increase in water rates hurting people and their budgets Editor, Oliver Chronicle: Citizens of Oliver, are you aware of how much you will be paying for water next year?  When we were getting water meters installed, Town Council said the costs would not be much higher than we were already paying.  I just added my costs for next year - a

400 per cent increase.  I will be paying around $1,200 a year for water.  Granted, I have about 300 feet of cedars; that takes a lot of water to keep green. My garden and shrubs add up. People cannot afford such an increase. Does the Town want everything brown?  We needed an increase in the cost of water usage, but this is outrageous. My understanding of the function of the

mayor and Council is to work in the best interests of its citizens, but this huge increase in water costs will result in hurting people who are struggling to meet their budgets. Residents of Oliver have to unite and try to get Town Council to get back to reality in charging for water. Ron Unger, Oliver

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A12 Oliver Chronicle Wednesday, February 2, 2011

NEWS

Biggest Loser event is leading to more fitness Carol Sheridan Special to the Chronicle

enjoyed yesterday’s information session. I am sure I am not the only one who left with renewed motivation. I would gladly attend any others in the future. I could have sat The Oliver Biggest Loser (OBL) partici- and listened to Jorg speak for much longer. pants are now entering week four of their I also ended up talking to another lady who 12-week fitness challenge and it is great to I recognized from the first week and we see so many faces here at the community will be getting together at gym this Friday. centre on a daily basis taking various fit- Looking forward to any future sessions.” ness classes, working out in the gym, getHere’s a couple of tips for Biggest Loser ting out walking and stopping by to tell us participants and anyone looking to make how we are doing. change in their life: I’ve especially enjoyed hearing from 1. Stay focused on your long-term goals – participants who have met new workout write them down and put them somewhere buddies within the program. Trainer Jorg you can read them often. Break down Mardian hosted the first in smaller goals for yourself as a series of information seswell to be able to celebrate sions on Wednesday, Jan. Commit to getting more, for example, I will go 19. The session covered through three full to the gym two times this basic interval training and weeks of regular week or I will attend two daily nutrition and over 80 workouts, healthy fitness classes this week or per cent of our program eating and tracking I will stick to my nutrition participants were in attenplan all day today. activity and body dance. 2. Celebrate even the This last week was a big measurements and smallest of successes. Had one for our participants you will be more a great class or workout? to get through – did you likely to stick with Lose a pound or an inch – know that it takes a mini- any program. tell someone. Give yourself mum of 21 days for a percredit and congrats whenson to get into the habit of a ever it is warranted. Savour new routine? Every choice the feeling of your accomyou make each day for that three weeks - plishments and if you are a little down choosing healthy food options, choosing to or struggling with motivation recall that get up off the couch and out of the house feeling to help get yourself to that class or to that class or choosing to take that trip to make the right choice when ordering at a the weight room – builds a new habit base restaurant. and your body will get into the groove. 3. Make plans to work out with a buddy. Commit to getting through three full One of best things you can do to ensure you weeks of regular workouts, healthy eating stick to your workouts and class routine is and tracking activity and body measure- to make plans to meet a friend or workout ments and you will be much more likely to partner on a regular basis. It’s harder to stick with any program until the end. break your routine if you’ve got someone Testimonials keep coming in from OBL waiting for you to show up. Plus it is so participants. We have some folks who have much fun to get active with someone else lost between three to eight pounds, anoth- and share in the journey. er participant who has lost three inches off Congrats to all the Oliver Biggest Loser her waist or many others who are report- program participants on their progress and ing more motivation for exercise and eat- efforts to date and we at the Oliver Commuing right because of the program. Here is nity Centre wish you all the best on this exone testimonial from a participant that I citing journey. For more information about really wanted to share: our programs at the community centre call “Just a note to let you know how much I 250-498-4985.

Photo contributed

A cheque for SORCO Luke Ellis (left) of Valley First Credit Union presents a $1,000 cheque on behalf of Fidelity Investments to Ken Fujino from the South Okanagan Rehabilitation Centre for Owls.


Wednesday, February 2, 2011 Oliver Chronicle A13

NEWS

Photo contributed

Maria Ferreira of Interior Savings Credit Union in Oliver presents a cheque for $856 to James Ouellette of the Oliver food bank.

Interior Savings offers hand Contributed To the Chronicle In the month of December, Interior Savings’ “Spread the Joy” campaign raised $35,000 for local foodbanks in addition to many donations of food, supplies and warm clothing from members and employees.   All 21 branches collected donations to benefit a variety of local charities and, corporately, Interior Savings pledged $2 to a local food bank for every member who made an online bill payment in December, and $10 for every member who signed up for online banking. With overwhelming support from employees and members, the credit union saw record levels of online activity in December.  By way of a poll, employees selected food

banks as the beneficiary for this fundraiser. “Foodbanks provide everyone in the community with food and basic nutrition in their time of need,” said Kelly Pollard, Administrative Assistant at the Kelowna Corporate Office, “and we want to ensure everyone in our community, including all the children who depend on food banks, have access to the food they need.”   A total of $856 was presented to Jim Ouellette of the Oliver food bank, which comes at a time of year when donations to food banks typically drop off dramatically.   Through their own efforts each year, Interior Savings employees raise over $50,000 collectively for the community. That is in addition to the annual community investment made corporately through sponsorships, bursaries and donations.

YouLearn offers free courses to enhance your education Contributed To the Chronicle Success is in the air with the number of graduates from the Oliver Learning Centre set to exceed 15 this school year. With regular high school Grade 10, 11 and 12 courses, students of all ages are able to accumulate the credits they need to graduate as adults, or to upgrade, for free. “The best thing about this place is that you always leave happier than when you came in,” one student recently said about YouLearn. Currently working on Math 11 and English 12, while working full time, Matthew is just one of the busy students on course to graduate in the near future. There is no doubt that it is the team of dedicated people that ensures the Learning Centre is a welcoming and comfortable place to learn. If you want to be challenged in computers, talk to Miles. If Math is what you need to complete your Grade 12, then see Steve. And if you really want to improve your English, then you have to meet Ernie. Whatever your needs, one of the stellar teachers will support and help you along the way. A recent article in the Chronicle made reference to shortages in the labour market, with employers looking for specific skills and qualifications from their employees. As

baby boomers age and move on, these gaps are greater than ever. Many people already have skills and experiences which can be recognized through the Adult Graduation program. Immigrants to Canada, too, bring a wealth of knowledge, education and experience, much of which can be put towards a Grade 11 or 12, BC Ministry of Education approved course. If you are considering going to college or post-secondary education, then YouLearn is the place to work on your pre-requisite courses. At YouLearn.ca, students who want to learn a foreign language or English/ESL, have access to the widely-used program headed by Rosetta Stone. This program guarantees results and is designed to teach you to understand, read, write and speak the language you are learning. And for people who are looking to learn more about the rapidly changing world of technology, YouLearn offers a number of small group, teacher-led computer classes. These are grouped at various levels and will provide a head start on learning skills to complete the course. The Oliver YouLearn.ca classroom is open Monday through Thursday from 9 –11.20 a.m. and 12.40–3 p.m. It is also open on Tuesday and Wednesday evenings from 5.40–8 p.m. Drop in or call at 250-485-0303.

DEVELOPMENT OF A PEST MANAGEMENT PLAN File # 104-965-11/16 Weyerhaeuser (Princeton Timberlands) is developing an Integrated Pest Mgmt Plan under the BC Integrated Pest Management Act and associated regulations. The plan will describe a pest management program using Integrated Pest Management techniques. The purpose of this IPMP is to ensure effective and safe vegetation control within an integrated pest management program on crown land within the Southern Interior Forest Region, Forest Licenses FLA18674 Okanagan TSA, FLA18970 Boundary TSA, FLA18698 Merritt TSA and TFL 59. This region includes Weyerhaeuser’s Princeton Timberlands division’s operations on crown land and includes but is not limited to the surrounding areas of Oliver, Okanagan Falls, Penticton, Kelowna, Princeton and Lumby, BC. Under this IPMP, the following are a combination of selectively applied techniques or methods that will be used alone or in combination with one another to suppress and control competitive vegetation. Our approach to prompt site prep and planting with quality seedlings on the best microsites enhances our efforts towards reducing the number of instances where there will be the need for vegetation control. Preventive or minimizing soil disturbance, assessment and early recognition of vegetation problems are also carefully reviewed. Mechanical & Manual applications such as Hand Girdling, Brush and Chain saws, (brushing & weeding), Burning, Site Preparation, biological product Chontrol Peat Paste, Herbicide Application with ground foliar spraying, selective or spot treatment and basal bark. Herbicides proposed for use include, glyphosate (Vantage Forestry / VisionMax), and triclopyr (Garlon RTU). The proposed effective term of this IPMP is from March 31, 2011 to March 30, 2016. The proposed IPMP, diagrams and map(s) may be viewed at either of the Weyerhaeuser offices at 1655 Maple Street, Okanagan Falls, BC V0H1R2 or Old Hedley Road, Princeton, BC V0X 1W0. If you wish to review the document please phone for an appointment at 250-497-1223 or 250-295-4274 / Fax 250-497-1281 or you may request to receive further information in regards to this IPMP from the following contact: E-Qwest Consulting Ltd. e-qwest@shaw.ca Phone number 250-766-2677 Fax number 250-766-2677 A person wishing to contribute information about a proposed treatment site, relevant to the development of the Pest Management Plan, may send copies of the information to the applicant at the address above within 30 days of the publication of this notice.


A14 Oliver Chronicle Wednesday, February 2, 2011

NEWS

Hair Friends  Family hairstyling open Monday - Saturday!  Tanning Beds: 10 sessions for $40.00 — catch some sun on these long, grey days!  New lamps in tanning beds.  Call Lil, Jodi or Corinne. Photo contributed

Oliver Place Mall ~ 250.498.2068 1200, 34651 - 97th Street Oliver, BC

Thanks, Kenn Kenn Oldfield has been honoured for 16 plus years of service as a board member with the South Okanagan Chamber of Commerce.

Here’s food fit for a cat NOTICE OF INTENT RE: LIQUOR CONTROL AND LICENSING ACT APPLICATION FOR A WINERY SPECIAL EVENT AREA ENDORSEMENT An application for a winery special event area has been received by the Liquor Control and Licensing Branch from Dunham & Froese Estate Winery Ltd. The proposed location for this endorsement 38614 - 107th Street in Oliver. Proposed licensed hours are between 9 AM to 11 PM fro Monday to Sunday. There is no maximum person capacity as this will be an outdoor area only. Person capacities are only required for interior or patio areas. Residents and owners of businesses located within a 5 mile (8 km) radius of the proposed site may comment on this proposal by 1) Writing to: THE GENERAL MANAGER C/O Senior Licensing Analyst LIQUOR CONTROL AND LICENSING BRANCH PO BOX 9292 Victoria, BC V8W 9J8 2) Email to: lclb.lclb@gov.bc.ca PETITIONS AND FORM LETTERS WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED To ensure the consideration for your views, your comments, name and address must be received on or before February 28, 2011. Please note that your comments may be made available to the applicant or local government officials where disclosure is necessary to administer the licensing process.

So, what's the big deal about cat food? Why does it have such a huge influence on a cat's health? Well, simply put, food is body-fuel for cats. It nourishes each and every cell in the body and creates the energy necessary for life to happen. It's an overly simplified analogy, but cat food is to cats like gas is to cars. with Linda If you put the wrong type of gas in a car, it won't run well. But if you put in the correct fuel for that car, it runs better. Next to air, food is the substance our cats take into their bodies most often. How long they live, their quality of life, the health of their immune system, and their behaviour all depend greatly on the food they eat. Food is the foundation for health. It's really no different than what we hear today about human health. The experts keep telling us that if we wish to live a long healthy life, we need to eat more fresh real food and cut out the processed food products. It seems that every day brings new research to support this advice. As both humans and felines have strayed from eating fresh foods, both our species have suffered a huge increase in disease; obesity, diabetes, allergies, cancer, behaviour problems, and more. These days, there are so many bottles of nutritional "supplements" on the market, and so many processed fake foods that perhaps we've forgotten that, for both cats and humans, real fresh food is the original and best source of all those vitamins, minerals, enzymes, antioxidants, and other important nutrients necessary for good health. Even in our modern day, malnutrition is still a very real issue for cats (and humans). Malnutrition puts a great deal of stress on the body and lowers the energy needed to maintain good health. Malnutrition may be caused by lack of food, poor quality food, or food cats cannot utilize if it's not appropriate for their species: Felis domesticus. To understand what food is best for our cats, we need to know what type of food their anatomy is designed to best utilize.

Dr. Bruce Cauble, D.V.M., puts it very succinctly when he says "Animals, just like people, are still using digestive systems that evolved thousands of years ago, systems designed to provide them with nutrients derived from whole foods. You need only look at the digestive system of an organism to determine its appropriate diet." Buhler Simply put, we need to consider the physiological structure of the cat. When you have the chance, take a good look at your cat. It has needle-sharp teeth and claws meant to catch, hold, and tear flesh. It has ears that face forward and eyes in the front of its head to better focus on that mouse or bird it wants to chase. That mouse or bird is built differently, being a prey animal, they usually have eyes more to the side of their heads to better see who's trying to make them into lunch.Your cat's digestive system is brilliantly designed to eat specific foods. Proper foods are utilized swiftly and efficiently. That snuggly-wuggly kitty in your house is a well-developed predator. Officially, the cat is a carnivore. In fact, your cat is actually an obligatory carnivore, which means it must eat meat. Just because it resides in your home and enjoys your company doesn't change its physical makeup and its nature. Obviously, it should not eat the same food as a cow or a chicken because that's not how its body is designed. Cows and chickens are herbivores and are structurally quite different from your cat. Now, I'm not saying that you must place a live mouse in your cat's dinner bowl (although some cats would love it), but we do need to feed our cats as closely as we can to what they were built to eat. That's the responsible thing to do when you've chosen to live with a carnivore. Your feline friend's health will benefit greatly if you keep its natural dietary needs in mind when reading cat food product labels or choosing what type of food to put in its dish. more wet high protien foods and less dry kibbles are more of a natural food. Your kitty will thank you.

For Pet’s Sake


Wednesday, February 2, 2011 Oliver Chronicle A15

NEWS

Lyonel Doherty photo

There’s snow escape Children and families took advantage of a little snow fall recently to quench their need for speed on the Oliver hospital hill. Here, Hayden Murphy’s world is a blur.

Cawston growers win OYF award at gala Contributed To the Chronicle A former model and her husband from Cawston have been named the BC & Yukon Outstanding Young Farmers of 2011. Annemarie and Kevin Klippenstein of Klippers Organic Acres in Cawston received the prestigious award from BC Minister of Agriculture Ben Stewart during the annual BC Agriculture Gala in Abbotsford on January 26. Since acquiring their first five acres in November of 2000, the Klippensteins have steadily expanded their organic orchard and market garden and now farm close to 40 acres. Although their intent was to sell everything they produced at Vancouverarea farmers markets, they have now diversified their operation to include value-added fruit products and summer and winter community supported agriculture box programs, allowing them to have yearround income. This past year they also began a gift certificate program which allows consumers to purchase gift certificates at the beginning of the year and exchange them for produce through the season. A finalist for the OYF award in 2005, 2006 and 2007, Klippers Organic Acres was the first organic farm to have an Environmental Farm Plan and the first to be certified “Salmon Safe.” Kevin, a former bar and restaurant manager in Vancouver, is also chair of the new

Lordy, Lordy, look Who’s 40

Organic Farming Institute of BC and runs a farm apprenticeship program, providing accommodation and training for up to 10 apprentices a year. They also employ up to eight “Willing Workers On Organic Farms” (WOOFERS) at any given time. “We feel there’s a need for young farmers and we have a successful model to show them,” Kevin explains. Klippers harvests more than just vegetables and tree fruits. In 2009, they also began harvesting the sun, installing solar panels to power their drying facility and apprentice accommodations. Runners-up for the 2011 award were Ed and Laura Maljaars of Chilliwack. Together with Ed’s brother Tom and his wife Katrina, the Maljaars operate Starlane Dairy Ltd., one of the first BC farms with a Bedding Master to recycle its dairy manure into reusable bedding for their 145-cow milking herd. “The OYF program is all about finding people who are bright and forward-thinking and incredible ambassadors for agriculture,” says Canadian OYF Eastern vicepresident Jack Thomson. To be eligible for the Outstanding Young Farmer award, farmers must be between 19 and 40 years of age, derive at least two thirds of their income from farming and demonstrate progress in their agriculture careers. Nominees are judged on conservation practices, production history, financial and management practices, and community contributions.

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A16 Oliver Chronicle Wednesday, February 2, 2011

NEWS

Lyonel Doherty photo

Rally the troops

Students and staff at SOSS paid tribute to the old east gym on Monday, the day before it closed for good to make way for renovations. From left are James Gibson, Tim Grimard, Jessa Kriesel and Amanda Chyzzy getting ready for a multi-legged race in the gym.

Oliver Place Mall Oliver, B.C.

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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2011 ISSUE 32, VOL. 75

Lyonel Doherty photo

Little Princesses From right, little ballerinas Samantha Williams, Halee McLeod, Sofie Crook, and Erika Hunt line up patiently as they await their first “Princess Ballet” class at the Oliver Community Centre.

Hit and run victim reflects on scary ordeal Car keeps going after hitting woman, leaving her wounded Lyonel Doherty Oliver Chronicle

A 58-year-old Oliver woman hopes her terrifying ordeal with a young driver will compel others to be more socially responsible for their actions. Susan Norman is recovering from surgery after her right arm and wrist were broken in a hit and run incident on Sawmill Road on December 29. She was walking home on the side of the road when a passing vehicle struck her. Neither the offending vehicle nor the vehicle directly behind it stopped or slowed down, according to Norman. It wasn’t quite dark when she began walking home that afternoon. She remembers seeing two cars coming with their headlights on. “I was looking down at my feet, one was in the mud and the other was on the asphalt . . . I looked up and started to think, ‘what?’ when I got hit.” Norman said it was a horrible “thunk,” which spun her around. Staggering, she watched the cars disappear into

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the winter darkness. “Neither car touched the brakes . . . they didn’t even slow down.” After that, Norman felt the searing pain, but she managed to walk to a local business and phone her daughter and son-in-law, who drove her to the hospital. It never occurred to Norman to call the police. “I was so upset that somebody hit me and didn’t bother to help get me home.” Once at the hospital, Norman underwent surgery to have a plate inserted in her arm. Meanwhile, her son-inlaw, Brad Jones, went back to the accident scene looking for evidence, and he found the broken mirror that struck Norman. Jones told the Chronicle that he was waiting for police when he noticed an approaching car, but when it got close, it sped away. Jones believes it was the driver who hit Norman. Jones said he spoke to the RCMP regarding the evidence he found. “The cop said they won’t find the car, but I said, ‘we’ll find the car.’ It took us less than two hours to find the car.” Jones said he did his own investigating by putting the word out. He noted it is frustrating when you have to track down a suspect’s vehicle for the police.

The Chronicle made several attempts to get details of the investigation, but its emails and phone calls to the RCMP were not returned by press time. Jones wants to know why a criminal charge was not laid in this case. He found out that the young driver only received a $400 fine for reckless driving. Norman said she doesn’t want to cause a lot of trouble for this driver, she only wants her to realize that she behaved improperly. “Did she man up to it? That’s all I want to know. I got the impression she didn’t.” Nobody can convince Norman that the driver didn’t see her that afternoon. “It’s not possible that they didn’t see me. There were four headlights on me, and it wasn’t totally dark yet.” Norman said she’s concerned for the safety of other people in Oliver, including children and seniors, who may not be as lucky as she was that day. The Chronicle contacted the young driver, who declined to comment on the incident. “I’ve already dealt with ICBC . . . everyone already knows the story.” When asked if she wanted to tell her side of it, she declined again.


B2 Oliver Chronicle Wednesday, February 2, 2011

Developers update Desert Hills multiple housing plan Lyonel Doherty Oliver Chronicle Wish your family member or friend a Happy Birthday or Wedding Anniversary in the Oliver SuperValu Birthday corner. Phone the Oliver Chronicle at 250-498-3711 before noon on Friday to have your wish published, at no charge, the following week.

Lil Rourke . . . . . . . . . . Jan 30 . . . . . 71 . . . . . Love hubby, Lloyd Angelene Solien . . . . . Jan 30 . . . . . 15 . . . . . Mom, Aunty’s, cousins & friends Steph Kuehlem . . . . . . Feb 1 . . . . . . . 20? . . . . Chuckles from your friends Dianne Dias . . . . . . . . 40ish . . . . . . . Feb 3 . . . Hugs from Mom & Dad Marcel Girard . . . . . Feb 6 . . . . . . . ? . . . . . . . From the Chronicle

Winner of this week’s cake: Lil Rourke

Open: MONDAY - FRIDAY 8:30 A.M. - 9 P.M. • SATURDAY & SUNDAY 8:30 A.M. - 7 P.M.

Oliver Place Mall • ph: 250.498.4877 • www.oliversupervalu.com

Alberta

Is named after Princess Louise Caroline Alberta , (1848-1939) her mother was Queen Victoria and her father was Prince Albert, hence Alberta. Lake Louise is also named after her.

Developers of the “Desert Hills” housing project west of Oliver have been strongly advised by the Town to seek public support before moving ahead. That was the advice offered at a recent council meeting, where CTQ Consultants Ltd. updated the Town on the ambitious proposal. The developers want to apply for an OCP amendment, rezoning and subdivision of a piece of property on three benches (14.8 hectares) off 109 Street via 350 Ave. The proposed OCP amendment would re-designate the property from agriculture to medium density residential. The company is proposing to build approximately 170 units, featuring a mixture of townhouses and condominiums. The plan also includes a small (500 square metre) commercial component to provide the neighbourhood with basic needs. Graeme Dimmick from CTQ Consultants said the vision of the commercial element includes an agri-tourism approach, such as a winery, wine bar, bed and breakfast or other viticulture related activities. Dimmick said the proposal avoids urban sprawl and respects the hillside with the introduction of water conservation and geothermal technology. As background, the property was previously subject to annexation (attaching, uniting), and in 2008 was accepted into the Town of Oliver. The application was based on the Town’s desire to create increased housing options in the community. Upon inclusion, the property was subdivided, separating the agricultural land from the

CLUES ACROSS 1. Smallest mergansers 6. Minute floating marine tunicate 11. Made from genus quercus 12. Bored feelings 13. Spoke 15. Cry 18. Played the chanter 19. Lash 20. Shoots a marble 21. Dentist’s group 24. Trees in 11 across 25. Prince Hirobumi 26. Opposite of capitalism 30. Eats decaying wood 32. Facial twitch 33. E. central English river 35. Sound wave reflection 43. Goalless 44. Central processing unit 45. Wings 47. Million barrels per day (abbr.) 48. Noah’s oldest son (Bible) 49. Tenet 51. “Rocky” actress Talia 52. Bullocks 54. Repeated product phrase 55. A roofed patio 57. “Police station” in South Asian countries 58. Cosmogeny matter (pl) 59. 1967 Nobel chemist Manfred CLUES DOWN 1. Bouncing Bess 2. Australian friends 3. Supplemented with difficulty 4. Take in marriage 5. Tin 6. Antimony 7. Linen liturgical vestment 8. A country in SE Asia 9. Photocopy 10. Place of Hindus retreat 13. Ocular

land intended for urban development. Dimmick said a number of studies have been prepared or are underway. For example, a geotechnical report concluded that with appropriate slope setbacks and proper mitigation, the property is suitable for residential development. An environmental review concluded that no highly sensitive areas exist on site. A traffic impact study is underway, and a visual impact review will ensure that the proposed development integrates naturally into the site’s topography, Dimmick said. He noted the Agricultural Land Commission has already designated a buffer between the agricultural land and the residential development. A buffer consisting of appropriate plantings and fencing was previously defined by the land commission. Speaking on behalf of the developers, Ed Grifone said there will be minor upgrades to services, such as water and sewer. Councillor Michael Newman noted there have been previous concerns about this property encroaching on adjacent land boundaries, such as the cemetery. He said the issue encroaching development has been a “struggle” for the Town. But Grifone said they are respectful of adjacent uses and reiterated the measures they plan to take regarding buffering. Councillor Jack Bennest said the thought of having an orchard in between built-up areas is not very appealing to him. He advised the developers to engage the public as much as possible. Municipal Manager Tom Szalay questioned how much more traffic 350 Avenue will be subject to. He noted a formal public hearing will determine how much support there is for the proposal.

14. Lasso 16. Acorn tree 17. Wife of Saturn 21. Behave in a certain manner 22. Cease living 23. Swiss river 26. Painting on dry plaster 27. Not off 28. 6th tone of the scale 29. Pre-Columbian Indians of Peru 31. Bit-by-bit 34. The 26th state 36. Hour 37. Original Equipment Mfg. 38. Bachelor of Laws 39. Largest English dictionary (abbr.) 40. The most electropositive metal 41. Classical music for the stage

42. Spirit presiding over thing or place 43. In a wise way 45. Promotions 46. A piece of land 48. What the sun did yesterday 50. “Rule britannia” composer 51. Scum at the surface of molten metals 53. ___ Adams, early US patriot 54. Chinese term for poetry 56. Present tense of be 57. Atomic #52

...Solutions on Pg B10


COMMUNITY NEWS

Wednesday, February 2, 2011 Oliver Chronicle B3

Greg Smith retires with many fond memories Lyonel Doherty Oliver Chronicle Long-time social studies teacher Greg Smith (60) has retired from SOSS. As many know, he has molded many students into leaders, and will be greatly missed for his

positive influence. The Chronicle invited Smith to a Q and A session. So let’s get at it. Q: How long have you been teaching? I started teaching in 1981 in Powell River at Brooks Junior Secondary. From there I went to Campbell River where I taught

Lyonel Doherty photo

Retired teacher Greg Smith (middle) is surrounded by friends and colleagues, including (from left) Richard Jensen, Dan Fuller, Marty Campbell, and Ken Liefke.

adult education at Carihi Secondary and young offenders at a correctional facility near Campbell River. I then moved to the Okanagan and have taught at SOSS from 1989 (except for four years when I was the provincial K-12 Social Studies Curriculum Coordinator at the BC Ministry of Education in Victoria. I have taught social studies, history, geography, law and even a little math in my career. Q: What did you enjoy about teaching? Helping young people discover the lessons that mean something to them. Q: What are your fondest memories? My fondest memories come from seeing excited kids and from being a part of a fraternity of teachers that care so much about helping students achieve their goals. I like hearing the stories that students tell about when I taught them years ago. Q: Can you compare the attitudes of students of yesteryear to the students of today. I don't really think students have changed too much. My perceptions change as I get older but the more I read about children throughout history, the more I think that students haven't changed too much. Q: Do you think the majority of students have become more socially responsible? I hope so. Social responsibility is all of our jobs. If the society values it then it will be more a part of our curricula and students will get involved. Q: What have you tried to instill in your students? Thinking skills. Take action, don’t sit back and wait for things to happen. Go with your dreams.

Q: What will you miss the most about teaching at SOSS? The joy of teaching. It is never boring and something new happens every day. Q: What are your career highlights with students? Meeting the princes (Charles, William and Harry) in 1998 as we showed off the new website celebrating the 100th anniversary of the completion of the Parliament Buildings in Victoria. Taking the first group of SOSS students to Oliver’s “sister” cities in Bandai, Japan in 1990 and Lake Chelan, WA in 2010. Studying the Holocaust with students from across Canada in Israel in 1999. Spending a week camped out in the backwoods of Oregon (in 1994), dressed in medieval garb with a bus load of SOSS Grade 8 students along with 2,000 other people bent on recreating any time period where it was common for men to carry a sword. Visiting 11 different churches in the Okanagan with students as we studied different cultures and religions. Taking a group of SOSS students to Niagra Falls in 1994 and being given the Key to the City of Buffalo, New York. Another thing I remember that was very moving was placing two wreaths on behalf of the Town of Oliver and Branch 97 of the Royal Canadian Legion at the 90th anniversary of the Battle of Vimy Ridge at the Vimy Monument in France in 2007. There were 5,000 Canadian students in attendance. Q: What are your plans for retirement? Relax. Enjoy with family and friends . . . a little tennis, a little skiing, a little golf.

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3rd WEDNESDAYS - For ladies on their own. The Oliver/Osoyoos Friendship Club holds a lunch. We have interesting speakers and an excellent catered lunch. Call Carol at 250-498-2362 or Dorothy at 250-498-6210 for more information. THURSDAYS - Desert Sage Spinners & Weavers meet every Thursday from 9:30 am to 2pm. at community centre. New members welcome. Call 250-498-4959 for information. THURSDAYS - Come participate in an activity that will reduce stress. FREE Vipassana Meditation. 6:30 pm in the exercise studio below Desert Sun. Everyone welcome. THURSDAYS - Line dancing w/

Claire Denney 9am to 11am. Join the fun. Seniors centre. Call 250498-6142. 2nd THURSDAYS - The Oliver/ Osoyoos MS Group meets from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. in the basement of the Community Resources Building, Oliver. Contact Ron at 250-498-4372. SATURDAYS - Dance with the Oliver Senior’s Band at the Centre. 10:00 am – noon. 250-4986142. AL-ANON - Offers help to families and friends of alcoholics. Meetings on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday at various locations. There are regular meetings in Oliver. Call 250-490-9272 for information.

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B4 Oliver Chronicle Wednesday, February 2, 2011

Beltone hearing 2 x 7

Photo contributed

Men at play Oliver Rotary Club members have been busy constructing two adventure playgrounds in the cadets hangar. These playgrounds will be assembled, disassembled and shipped to two orphanages in the former Russian state of Moldova. From left are Ron Worth, Russell Work, John Bremmer, and Bob Ellis.

School board briefs Transportation fees still considered School District 53 is still looking at charging students a fee to ride the bus, but a “plan B” to address rising expenditures is also being scrutinized. A previous review revealed that transportation costs are approximately $150,000 to $200,000 more (on average) than funding received. To save costs, the board implemented a 3.2 kilometre walk limit for all students in 2009-10. As an alternative to rider charges, Director of Facililties Mitch Van Aller presented a “plan B,” which includes a 4.0 kilometre elementary school walk limit and a 4.8 kilometre secondary school walk limit. This would save the district two bus runs at $60,000. The board will discuss these options further.

Partnership approved The board has approved a special agreement where the district forms a partnership with post-secondary institutions. The purpose is to expand training and education opportunities to residents in the geographical areas covered by the agreement.

Enrolment goes up, down Superintendent of Schools Juleen McElgunn reported on November and December enrolment figures. She said elementary numbers are up five students, but secondary numbers are down 22 students.

Special status requested A letter to the BC Human Rights Tribunal sees School District 53 requesting special approval to restrict the hiring of Aboriginal support workers to candidates of Aboriginal ancestry. Historically, the district employs support workers of Aboriginal ancestry because it is “critical” to the positions, says Board Chair June Harrington. This practice has recently been challenged by district employees, resulting in this application to the tribunal. Superintendent Juleen McElgunn said the board wants an exemption to allow it to focus on hiring only Aboriginal people for Aboriginal support worker positions.

Van Aller to be shared Who would have thought Director of Facilities Mitch Van Aller was so popular that he has to be shared. As part of the Shared Business Service Model, the district has entered into another agreement to share Van Aller with the Gold/Trail school district. This will save money to reinvest in schools, says Superintendent Juleen McElgunn. She noted this is the second shared position. The district’s first one was secretary treasurer Lynda Minnabarriet from Gold/Trail district.

65th Annual

Game Banquet Sat., Feb 5th, 2011 • 5 p.m. Oliver Community Centre • Dinner - Dance • Draws & Door Prizes • Special Draws for Rifle & Bow

• Adults $25.00 • Youth 6-17 $15.00

Tickets available at: • All ‘Round Outfitters, in Oliver • KJ’s Sports • A1 Auto Salvage in Penticton


Wednesday, February 2, 2011 Oliver Chronicle B5

The Natural Family Health Clinic Learn how to improve circulation and health with CHELATION. Stop by for FREE information about this life giving therapy.

Winter special • 10% off 10 treatments!

1040 Main St, OK Falls, BC (Blue Building) 250-497-6681 www.drtamarabrowne.com

PROMENADE Wine & Tapas Bar

Join us

Saturday, February 12th for our Annual Valentines Dinner

Staff photo

Watch and wait Family and friends gather outside to watch members of the Oliver Fire Department battle a blaze that damaged a home in the 9,000 block of Island Road last week. The fire started in the chimney and spread to the attic, causing significant damage to the roof. The blaze was contained to a couple of rooms. Nobody was injured.

Thunder brings down the ‘boom’ Art Dias Special to the Chronicle

On Saturday, January 22 the South Okanagan Thunder travelled to Winfield for an evening minor hockey game, losing a heart breaker (7-4). On Friday, January 28 the Thunder hosted the Penticton Jr. Vees at the Osoyoos Sun Bowl arena. The game was full of fast action and big hits. Goaltending came from Tristan Hall-Baptiste who played the full 60 minutes making some big saves, keeping Penticton from only scoring one goal. The final score was 7-1 for the Thunder. Scoring came from Jaymin Dias 3G, 1A, Shelby Taylor 1G, 2A, Jarod Street 1G, 2A, Tristan Calverley 1G, David Launier 1G, and Keenen Holz, Quentin Murr, Tyler Holz each with an assist. On January 29 the Thunder hosted the Westside Warriors also at the Sun bowl with Narcisse Baptiste Mota

Enjoy a special 3 course meal created by Chef Justin Paakkunainen while listening to the soft sounds of local harpist Ingrid Schellenberg.

Promenade Wine & Tapas Bar

Reservation required $39.95 per person plus tax and gratuity *Adults Only* For more info, contact Sonja at 250-495-8201

starting in net, but after two quick goals he was relieved by Tristan Hall-Baptiste who played stellar between the pipes. Final score was 6-3 for the Thunder. Hats off to the referees and linesmen who officiated two great games. Scoring was as follows: Shelby Taylor 1G, 1A, Keenen Holz 1G, 1A, David Launier 1G, 1A, Jarod Street 1G, Graig Thompson 1G, Jaymin Dias 1G, Tristan Calverley and Kolten Smith each with an assist. Well, Thunder fans, that’s it for regular season play. Into the playoffs we Saturday, May 28th - Vince Vaccaro go. Good luck. Go, Thunder, go. Saturday, June 25th - Bend Sinister

AT

Osoyoos . British Columbia walnutbeachresort.com 250.495.5400

2011 Canadian Concert Series Saturday, July 23rd - The Matinee Saturday, August 27th - Odds Gate opens at 6:30pm. Concert starts at 7pm.

Red Wine & Chocolate Come and enjoy: • Complimentary samples of red wine and decadent chocolate • Harpist Ingrid Schellenberg

Join us for a fun-filled afternoon of indulgence!

Individual Tickets on sale March 1

$35 each

On sale now Season’s Pass (4 concerts) - $100 *Limited quantities of Season’s Passes available. **Tickets are non-refundable

Opening April 1st, 2011 Dinner & Concert Packages available. Please call for details. Please note that no chairs allowed at concerts. Blankets & cushions are welcome.

Saturday, February 12 from Noon to 3pm th

Tinhorn Creek Vineyards p: 498-3743 w: www.tinhorn.com

Tickets available from Tinhorn Creek by phone or at www.tinhorn.com/Wineshop/Events ph: 250.498.3743 e: winery@tinhorn.com w: tinhorn.com


B6 Oliver Chronicle Wednesday, February 2, 2011

ACCOUNTANTS

BUSINESS DIRECTORY CONTRACTORS

COUNSELLING

SERVICES Each office independently owned and operated.

Wine Capital Realty

Karen Lewis

Licensed Contractor

• Concrete • Framing • Finishing • • Cabinets • Trim • Crown Moulding • •All tile, crystal glass, slate, marble and granite applications • •Hardwood & laminate flooring• • Painting • Beautiful renovations of all kinds, custom changes. •

Ask for Bill

Box 220 9712 356th Avenue Oliver BC V0H 1T0

Realtor/Broker

“Your Okanagan Sunshine Lady” Call me for assistance when selling or buying your home.

PETS

or 250-485-8286

Tel: 250-498-6500 Cell: 250-487-8873

Email: karen@winecapitalrealty.com www.winecapitalrealty.com

AGGREGATES Ann Lerchs

Laura Ward

Immigration Law Family Law

A MOBILE SERVICE, PROVIDING EXPERT ANIMAL HEALTH CARE

216-284 Main Street Penticton, British Columbia V2A 5B2 Telephone 778-476-5965 www.lerchsandward.com

Green Lake Gunsmithing PLUMBING

Licensed and insured. We also carry Brandon Optics - the best scope for your money. 4528 Green Lake Road Hours: 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.

250.498.0697 •Hardiplank Siding •New Homes •Finishing •Framing •Vinyl Siding Soffit •Sidewalks

SERVICES

Brian Amos and Kevin Dockett....your Property Management Team for the South Okanagan; Penticton to Osoyoos. Strata & Rental Management. Call for further complete list of services.

EXPERIENCED RENOVATOR

Check our Property Management rating out at: www.stratawatch.ca

Box 960 35841-97th Street, Oliver, BC Ph: 250-498-4844 | Toll free: 1-877-498-4844 Fax: 250-498-3455 brian@amosrealty.com | www.amosrealty.com

30 Years experience

CONTRACTORS

• In all areas of interior and exterior renovations • Start to finish • Kitchen and Bathroom Renos • Finished Basements • Additions Beat the governments freeze on mortgage lending policies before they go into effect David 250-462-1850

MANY REFERENCES, FREE ESTIMATES

hourly rates or contract pricing

Each office independently owned and operated.

Wine Capital Realty

Canada’s Favourite Real Estate Agents! Box 220 - 9712 356th Avenue Oliver, BC V0H 1T0 Tel: 250-498-6500 Toll Free: 1-888-498-6588 Fax: 250-498-6504

Email: info@winecapitalrealty.com

www.winecapitalrealty.com

34577 - 91 St, Oliver BC, V0H 1T0


ADVANI LAW OFFICE

Oliver Chronicle

TELE-GUIDE 

9315 - 350th Avenue, Oliver, B.C. Ph: 250-498-8457 • Fax: 250-498-8458 – Legal services available in English & Hindi –

G. Andy Advani, Q.C., Barrister, Solicitor & Notary, holds three university degrees, including a Master of Laws degree from the University of Toronto; has practiced law for over 45 years and was appointed Queen’s Counsel in 1980. Studied under Bora Laskin Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada, has practiced in British Columbia for nearly 6 years.

Family Law • Wills • Estates • Criminal Defence Documents Witnessed - Notarized - Commissioned Land Transactions • Motor Vehicle Accidents Immigration & other areas too numerous to mention

Is Proudly Sponsored Each Week In The Oliver Chronicle By

The Advani Law Office

Only Queen’s Counsel in the South Okanagan

G. Andy Advani

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(15) DARTS 2010 Grand Slam

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(62) BUNDESLIGA KICK OFF! Soccer fans worldwide are treated to replays, highlights and the latest Bundesliga news.

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 Busytown Doodle Trollz Horseland Horseland Basketball St. John's vs. UCLA NCAA Golf Phoenix Open PGA Site: TPC of Scottsdale -- Scottsdale, Ariz. Paid 7:00 KAYU Marketplace Weekend Marketplace Teen News Paid Mother Accord.Jim Trout TV McCarver Without a Trace Bones  7:GMA Sat Emperor Replace. So Raven So Raven Hannah M. Suite Life Paid Paid Paid Kitchen Wipeout ESPN Sports Saturday (N)  7:00 Saturday Morning News FishCan. RealFish Powerboat Canadian News Simpsons   Catwoman  ('04) Halle Berry. 7:00 Local News Saturday Wild Life Pearlie Paid Figure Skating U.S. Exhibition Skiing World Championships FIS Judge Judy   Aviators WoodShop Hometime Rough Cut Old House Ask House T.Kitchen Chefs Meals Cook's V. Garden Antiques Roadshow American Masters G. Gables Kingdom Hobo Sue Thomas: F.B.Eye Conserve Conserve Is Written Car Canada's Worst Driver Worst Handyman Stevens Into Wild F.B.Eye  7:00 Saturday Morning News Driving TV RealFish Power TV Canadian  Catwoman  ('04) Halle Berry. House Simpsons Simpsons FamilyG   Super WHY Doodle Goldfish Dating Confidential Alpine Skiing FIS Hockey New York Rangers vs. MontrĂŠal Canadiens NHL Skiing World FIS News 7:00 Saturday Morning News FishCan. RealFish Power TV Canadian News Simpsons   Catwoman  ('04) Halle Berry. :35 George RobRobot DinoDan Magic Bus Arthur Mysteries Speaks W.Kratts Taste Gardens Gardens Can. Parks Can. Parks Rivers Rivers Meerkat  Motoring Golf '10 Long Drive World Champ X Games /:45 Crashed Ice Top 10 NFL Films Golf Phoenix Open PGA Site: TPC of Scottsdale -- Scottsdale, Ariz. SportsC   Gurbani Watno Dur Punjab Sarghi Punjab Perspect. Sangam Lok Virsa Mulaquat Aagaaz Punjab Di Global Bharat Sardari Gaunda 7:Movin'Up Moving Up Moving Up Dateline: Real Myst. Dateline: Real Myst. Dateline: Real Myst. Dateline: Real Myst. Dateline: Real Myst. Real Life  Travels RCTV Fish TV Paid Paid Departures Mantracker Survivorman Beyond Survival UFO Hunters "USOs" Mantrack  Exotic Day Off Cook Thin Pitchin' In Wild Chef Chopped B. Flay B. Flay Unwrapd Good Eats BestAte BestAte Diners Diners Pitchin' In  7:F Gordon  Silver Man  ('00) Paul Popowich. InnerSp. InnerSp. Stargate Universe Eureka Primeval Stargate Universe BHuman  Sell House Flip This House Flip This House Flip This House To Be Announced To Be Announced TBA  Paid Acc.Jim SEC Pre /:50 Basketball Auburn vs. Georgia NCAA Basketball Mississippi St. vs LSU NCAA Amer. Dad   Eddie  ('96) Whoopi Goldberg. :45  A Prairie Home Companion  ('06) Kevin Kline.   Honey  ('03,Dra) Lil' Romeo, Jessica Alba.  A Beautiful Mind  (2001,Drama) Jennifer Connelly, Russell Crowe. Art Mind  7:00 Man The Colony The Detonators Destroyed Destroyed River Monsters Gold Rush: Alaska Brew Masters MythBusters Cash Cab 7:00  Rumor Has It  ('05)  Love It or List It GroceryB Grin,Build  At Risk ('10) Andie MacDowell. GroceryB  Ocean's Eleven  ('01) George Clooney.  7:00 Pickers  Men of Honor  (2000,Drama) Cuba Gooding Jr., Robert De Niro. Master. UrbanLeg. American Pickers Weird  The Tuskegee Airmen  ('95) 5:30 Golf Qatar Masters EPGA -- Doha, Qatar Golf Pre. Golf Phoenix Open PGA Golf Pre. L/Haney L/Haney L/Haney L/Haney Golf GolfFix Golf Cent.  Connected Motocross Darts Premier League Pokerstars Big Game P.World NBA Act. Canucks Hockey 6:30 Soccer EPL  Garage Tour Car British Champ Tour Car DTM German TouringCar World FIA Midget '10 Chili Bowl Auto Racing Sports Car Challenge Superstar Jet Car MonsterJ.  CS:Miami Genevieve Bang Buck My Place Real Estate Flipping Out Marriage Income Property Ladder Ext. Makeover: Home HouseH House Holmes  Kingstar Thane Kingstar Fit First Indians Hook Up 1 Nature Rez Bluez  Red Planet  ('00,Sci-Fi) Val Kilmer, Carrie-Anne Moss. Infocus/In. Gardening P. Echo


Wednesday, February 2, 2011 Oliver Chronicle B7

COMMUNITY NEWS

Solid waste survey helps RDOS plan for recycling programs Contributed To the Chronicle

wheeled bins for waste collection; and bans on plastic bags and water bottles. While introducing residential food waste collection or Improvements to recycling topped the list of interests introducing wheeled carts for waste ranked high among for residents in the South Okanagan and Similkameen ar- the common suggestions for future programs, residents eas in a survey on waste management conducted in No- were somewhat divided - showing either strong support or vember and December. opposition for these ideas. The survey is part of gathering public feedback for the There was strong support for investigating “waste to region’s Solid Waste Management Plan for future waste, energy” systems, where garbage is turned into energy recycling and landfill programs. through a combustion process. There were a total of 575 responses from across the re“This type of feedback from residents and businesses gion. Based on the number of responses received, the sur- across the region will help guide decisions on what provey is considered accurate 19 times out of grams would work best to reduce and man20. age waste, while making the best use of our The results provide a snapshot of the tax dollars,” said Ashton. public’s current waste and recycling prac- There was strong “This survey is only one of the many actices, as well as preferences for future ser- support for investitivities planned to get feedback on future vices. waste management programs.” gating waste-to-en“Thank you to everyone who took the ergy systems, where Next steps time to complete the survey and provide The survey results will be combined their feedback on our recycling, waste re- garbage is turned with the work being done by the Public and duction and landfill programs,” said RDOS into energy through Technical Advisory Committees to look at Chair Dan Ashton. ways to better manage waste and recycling a combustion pro“The results tell us that recycling contin- cess. for the years to come. Both the survey and ues to be important to our residents. The committee work are the first steps in upsurvey also tells us that we could be dodating the region’s solid waste manageing more to reduce waste and protect our ment plan, as required by the Ministry of unique Okanagan environment.” Environment. Survey highlights The results of this work will be presented to communiKey highlights from the feedback about existing prac- ties for feedback at open houses to be held across the retices show: gion this spring. Abut 81 per cent set out one bag or less of garbage each The plan, once approved, will provide direction for what week; new services could be offered that will help the RDOS reWhile the majority (99 per cent) knows where to take duce waste and conserve resources. beverage and pop containers or paint for recycling, far The survey report is available on the RDOS website at fewer people know where to take other household hazard- www.rdos.bc.ca along with the minutes of the Advisory ous waste items like batteries, compact fluorescent lights Committee meetings. or used motor oil and oil filters. For more information the region’s Solid Waste ManageRespondents offered a number of common ideas for fu- ment Plan, visit www.rdos.bc.ca or email beintloordos. ture projects, some of which include: Increased informa- bc.ca. Or you can call toll free at 1-877-610-3737 ext. 4129 tion and education; collect food waste for composting; or 250-490-4129.

WE THINK: NATURAL GAS SMELLS LIKE MERCAPTAN, WHICH IS A NINE-LETTER WORD FOR “GET OUT!” Natural gas smells bad to keep you safe. If you smell rotten eggs, get out fast. Don’t smoke, light matches, use a cell or home phone or operate anything electrical. Get out and leave a door or window open. When you’re safe, call us at 1-800-663-9911, 911 or the fire department emergency number. Safety. We’ve got our best people on it.

Visit our web site for more safety information. Terasen Gas is the common name of Terasen Gas Inc., Terasen Gas (Vancouver Island) Inc., and Terasen Gas (Whistler) Inc. The companies are indirect, wholly owned subsidiaries of Fortis Inc. Terasen Gas uses the Terasen Gas name and logo under license from Terasen Inc.

Letters to the Editor

Send your letters to the editor to: editor@oliverchronicle.com Please include your name and phone number for verification purposes. *All letters must include your full name in order to be published.

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The Oliver Chronicle welcomes readers’ submissions to the Fruit and Vine. Please submit your comments to: publisher@oliverchronicle.com Submissions must include your name and phone number for verification purposes, but can be published anonymously. Content may be edited for clarity.

Directory of Religions LIVING WAY CHRISTIAN CENTRE

live * laugh * dream * love River Rd. & Hwy 97 - 3 miles north of Oliver Pastors Mark & Rae Pankratz Sunday Service 10:00 a.m. www.livingway.com 250.498.4595

ST. JOHN’S EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH (ELCIC) 10132 - 362nd Ave., Oliver (2 blocks west of Legion Hall Sunday Worship: 10 a.m. 250.498.8889

OLIVER ALLIANCE

Just north of town on Hwy 97 Lead Pastor: Jeremy Cook Associate Pastor: Steve McLean Pastor of Seniors: Henry Wiebe Sunday Services 9:30 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. Kids FORCE & Adult Sunday school at 9:30 a.m. Nursery care is available during both services.

Phone: 250.498.4253 www.oliveralliancechurch.com Office : 8:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Mon. - Fri.

ST. PAUL LUTHERAN CHURCH (LCC) Visitors welcome! 342nd Ave. at Airport Rd. Pastor Chuck Cooley Divine Service: 11 a.m. Sunday Sunday School: 11 a.m. during Worship Service Adult Bible Study: 9:45 a.m.

OLIVER WORD OF LIFE CENTRE

PARK DRIVE CHURCH

On 119 St. off of 350th Ave. 36672 - 79th St., Oliver Pastors Cameron Sunday Morning Worship & Margaret Ogilvie Service at 10:00 a.m. Sunday Services: Affiliated with Pentecostal AsMorning Worship: 10:30 a.m. semblies of Canada (includes Children’s Church) Phone: 250.498.2322 Wed. 7:00 p.m. - Bible Study Office hrs: 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. at the Church Tues. - Thurs. 250.498.4020 (home) 250.498.4434

SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH

All are welcome 10450 - 346th Ave. Pastor: Oscar Halvorson Services Saturday: Sabbath School: 9:30 a.m. Worship Service: 11 a.m. 250.498.4820

THE UNITED CHURCH OF CANADA All are welcome 9915 - 358th Ave. Minister: Ann White Services Sunday: Sunday School & Church Service: 10 a.m. 250.498.2781

ST. EDWARD THE CONFESSOR

(Anglican/Episcopal) Welcomes you! 34660 - 103 St., Oliver Rev. Patrick Reid Sunday Service: 11:00 a.m. Information: 250.498.2559

VALLEY CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH

30850 Black Sage Rd. Sunday Worship Gathering: 9:45 a.m. 250.498.4829


B8 Oliver Chronicle Wednesday, February 2, 2011

Smile of the week

John would be a one-man army to stop all wars What is your most important value and why? Honesty, in my opinion, is the most important value because without honesty there is no trust.

What would make Oliver a nicer community? If there were more social activities for everyone.

Why did you choose to live in this town? My parents moved here because of the nice community and great climate.

Do you have a goal in life? To help others.

What would be your ideal job? To be a Hollywood celebrity. Who inspires you the most? People who overcome big obstacles.

If you had one super power, what would it be? To be a one-man army who could stop all wars. If you won the $50 million Max lottery, what would you do with the money? I would start my own foundation to help those in need, and treat myself to a few things I have always wanted. If you were the Mayor of Oliver, what would you do? I would listen to the citizens and cut back on spending that doesn’t improve life in Oliver. If you were a fly, which wall in town would you like to inhabit? I would like to be in the Oliver Chronicle office so I could hear all the news immediately.

Staff photo

John Plesca

If a genie granted you three wishes, what would they be? I would end poverty in the world, give everyone a chance for an education, and I would save the third wish for an emergency. What is your greatest extravagance? My car. What living person do you most admire? Sir Richard Branson. When and where were you happiest? Blowing the horn on the Sun Princess as we sailed out of Tahiti. Which talent would you most like to have? To make people laugh.

What is your pet peeve in this community? People who walk in the street instead of on the sidewalk.

Who are your heroes in real life? My teachers.

If you could fast forward the Town of Oliver by 50 years, what can you visualize? A similar community which is more prosperous and developed with a hotel and more wineries.

What or who is your greatest love in your life? My parents.

What is the perfect day for you in Oliver? A summer day when I can kayak on Tuc-el-Nuit Lake. What community issues need the most attention? Oliver needs more good employment opportunities.

What is it that you most dislike? People who cannot accept other people’s cultures. What do you consider your greatest achievement? Working as a lifeguard at the Oliver pool. What is your favourite book? Around the World In 80 Days.

Jewellery Appraisals Have your jewellery valuated by Our GIA certified appraiser — on site Oslund Jewellers (since 1965) #203 - 311 Main Street, Penticton (above our old store) 250 492-8339


Wednesday, February 2, 2011 Oliver Chronicle B9

COMMUNITY NEWS

Teachers, coaches reminisce of old gymnasium Lyonel Doherty Oliver Chronicle There’s one thing the old east gym at SOSS will always have, and that’s “character.” That was clearly evident during a pep rally and goodbye party held in the gymnasium on Monday. The 62-year-old gym officially closed on February 1, making way for ambitious renovations that will transform SOSS into a new, state-of-the-art school. The east gym will house the new library and administration offices. Long-time physical education teacher Roger McKay will never forget stepping inside the gym for the first time in the 1960s. “It was dark. The walls were brown. It wasn’t a very pleasant place,” he recalled, adding the gym was also a little too short and narrow for safety’s sake. That’s because the lines were nearly hugging the walls, which prompted the school to erect cushioned pads But after the gym saw a little paint, some windows, and some murals, its character was born. McKay estimated that more than 60,000 physical education classes were taught in the gym. “Some people are really attached to it,” he said, noting his oldest son Spencer didn’t want to see the gymnasium closed. “He wants dibs on the centre circle,” McKay chuckled. Spencer McKay was a star basketball player at SOSS and went on to play for the Canadian National Team. Roger said the highlight for him was the 1986 provincial basketball championships, which the senior boys won in the gym. The team was coached by Ron Lee. “It was absolutely magnificent,” said Roger, who can still smell the popcorn. The gym was bursting at the seams with people, a situation that would have caused concern for the fire marshal. Although he’ll miss the old gym, Roger said he’s glad the students are getting a new one. “The only thing the new facility won’t have is character, so it will be up to the school to build that character into it.” Coaching veteran Marty Whiteman also has a “million memories” about the old gym. “There’s no other gym quite like it, with built-in bleachers. It’s just different.” Whiteman recalled a visiting coach saying how he always liked the gym because it was warm and cozy. But it had what Whiteman referred to as “death traps.” For example, a sharp flight of stairs out of the PE office. According to Whiteman, the gym’s strange anomalies

gave players the home court advantage. For Ian Gibson, long-time educator, coach and referee, the old gym’s intimate history will be missed. First off, it had a distinct smell to it, a particular cleaning product that the custodian always used. For Roger McKay, however, he’ll always smell the popcorn. What’s up with Roger and the popcorn? “It did have a great concession stand for years,” Gibson acknowledged. As a referee, he recalls the place always being very crowded. “The players were right on top of you. I’d often end up ‘wearing’ the players (after an offensive play).” Gibson’s fondest memories are those involving “Spring Fling,” a carnival-type fundraiser for the school, where they’d raise $10,000 in eight hours, he said. During one event, Gibson found himself volunteering in a police takedown demonstration. He was instructed to threaten an officer with a gun and then defend himself with a large pad before a police dog jumped him . . . more like flattened him. Gibson was on his back with this huge German Shepherd chewing on his arm. Moments after the officer called the dog off, the crowd began laughing to see the canine slinking towards Gibson again. But the officer quickly put the dog on a leash. That’s what you get for volunteering. Ron Lee stepped into the gym in 1974, the first year of his practicum at UBC. “It (the gym) was a classic. I was impressed with the built-in bleachers.” Lee was hired in 1977 and spent the next 33 years coaching, teaching and refereeing. Of course, the highlight for him was the 1986 provincial championships. The students were everywhere; on the sidelines, in front of the bleachers, even hanging off the chin-up bars, Lee recalled. “I don’t know how we played the game that way.” Lee said if the fire chief had known about the overcrowded gym, the school would have been in trouble. “But someone said the fire chief was there (cheering on the team).” Maurizio (Mo) Basso, the current coach of the senior boys team, said the gym hosted many great battles over the years. “It was a great gym when the fans packed in; the noise level rose as the garbage cans were beat and the students pounded their feet. Even the borderline unsportsmanlike chant of

Lyonel Doherty photo

Monday’s rally to say goodbye to the old east gym at SOSS attracted many past teachers and coaches, including Marty Whiteman (front left) and Roger McKay. In back from left are Ian Gibson and Ron Lee.

“warm up the bus” had a better ring in this low-ceilinged, tightly designed gym.” For the past five years the Hornets have not lost a game in the east gym, Basso said. “The old gym will be missed, her character will not be replicated but as we move on so will the memories, and hopefully soon we will hoist another banner in the new gym to start the tradition over again.

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www.valleyfirst.com www w.v .va alleeyyffiirrst.com A DIVISION OF FIRST WEST CREDIT UNION


B10 Oliver Chronicle Wednesday, February 2, 2011

COMMUNITY CLASSIFIEDS

CHRONICLE DEADLINES CLASSIFIED ADS by 9:00 a.m. Tuesdays (Must be prepaid, cash, Visa or Mastercard) Email: office@oliverchronicle.com DISPLAY ADVERTISING (boxed): 12:00 p.m. noon Fridays. NEWS COPY: 10:00 a.m. Mondays CLASSIFIED AD RATES: Up to 20 words - $6.00; 20¢ each additional word. Per column inch $5.00 plus GST NOTICES: Weddings, engagements birth announcements, cards of thanks, in memoriums, obituaries, and other notices (min. charge) $7.50 plus GST for 32 words and under. 20¢ each additional word. Business display advertising rates on application. PHONE 250.498.4416 or 250.498.3711 Fax: 250.498.3966. Email: sales@oliverchronicle.com or mail your advertisement to: OLIVER CHRONICLE, P.O. Box 880, Oliver, BC V0H 1T0 or drop in to our Main Street office (next door to the Oliver Theatre), or drop in our door letter slot. CHRONICLE OFFICE HOURS: Monday - Friday 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Advertisements must comply with the British Columbia Human Rights Act, which prohibits any advertising that discriminates against any person because of his/her race, religion, sex, colour, nationality, ancestry or place of origin or because his/her age is between 44 and 65 years unless the condition is justified by a bona fide require

NOTICES

NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS RE: The estate of Amarjit Singh Gill, also known as Amarjit Gill, deceased, formerly of 7157-332 Ave, Oliver, BC. Creditors and others having claims against the estate of Amarjit Singh Gill, also known as Amarjit Gill, deceased, are hereby notified under section 38 of the Trustee Act that particulars of their claims should be sent to the administrator at # 202-8309- Main Street. PO Box 800, Osoyoos, B.C. V0H 1V0 on or before February 24, 2011, after which date the administrator will distribute the estate among the parties entitled to it, having regard to the claims of which the administrator then has notice. Rupinder Ruby Gill, Administrator By Gordon & Young Barristers and Solicitors.

W.O.W Mainly for Woman Trade Show and Sale Feb 19, 10 am to 4 pm at Oliver Community Centre, free admission, everyone welcome. Over 50 exhibitors

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OLIVER TOURISM ASSOCIATION Annual General Meeting. 5:30 pm, Thursday, March 3rd. Handworks Gallery, Hwy 97, Oliver. new members welcome.

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EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

CANTALOUPE ANNIE’S WINTER SPECIALS Breakfast $2.99 8:30 - 11:00 Lunch $4.95 Soup and 1/2 a sandwich of the day. Supper to go - $8.95 Winter hours 8:30 am - 4:00 pm Monday to Friday.

OK LABOUR CO. LTD. Requires 4-10 F/T seasonal workers in our vineyards for the 2011 season. Our vineyards are located in Cawston, Oliver, and OK Falls BC. Workers will have 40 - 60 hours a week. $9.14 to $12.00 per hour (depending on duty & experience.) Duties include all general farm work through to picking in the vineyards. To apply Fax 250-497-5041. Call 250-490-7695 after 7 pm.

ROAD 13 VINEYARDS is looking for 3 seasonal farm workers from May thru October. 60 hrs/wk @ $9.28 hr. Resumes only to be mailed to PO BOX 501 or Faxed to 250-498-8331.

DESERT HILLS ESTATE WINERY is looking for 10 vineyard workers as of Jan. 1/11, full time, starting at $12 hr. English or Punjabi speaking. Please email info@ deserthills.ca or fax 250498-3015 Att: Randy Toor.

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GOOD SHEPHERD CHRISTIAN SCHOOL Parents interested in enrolling their child for 2010/11 school year in K-7, F/T Kindergarten Sept. 2011, Call 250-495-3549 (school), 250495-5077 (home), or email: gscs@cablerocket.com 37ctf

AUTOS

NEW PRICE! 85 DODGE WORK VAN. 6 cyl. Inside shelving. Good condition. $700. Call 250-498-7653.

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1991 DODGE camper van, AC, low km’s, over-drive, pw, new carpet, F/S, sink and porta-potty, no rust. $5300.00. Call 250-4983545 after 6pm.

NOTICES

EMPLOYMENT

Advertising Regulations: The Oliver Chronicle reserves the right to classify ads under appropriate headings and to separate therefore and to determine the page location. The Oliver Chronicle reserves the right to revise, edit, classify or reject any advertisement and to retain any answers directed to the Chronicle Box Reply Service and to repay the customer the sum paid for the advertise ment and box rental. All claims of errors to advertisements must be received by the publishers within seven days after the first publication. It is agreed by the advertiser requesting space that the liability of the Oliver Chronicle in the event of failure to publish an advertisement or in the event of an error appearing in the advertisement as published, shall be limited to the amount paid by the advertiser for only one incorrect insertion for the portion of the advertising space occupied by the incorrect or omitted item only and that there shall be no liability in any event greater than the amount paid

NOTICES

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EMPLOYMENT

S & B DHALIWAL ENT. Needs 6 vineyard workers from Jan. to the end of Oct. Seasonal, F/T. $9.50 hr, 30616-97 St. Oliver. Call 250-498-7792.

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THE DAVIES FAMILY wishes to thank the following people who showed such love, care and compassion to Anna Davies: The ambulance attendants, nursing staff, Nunes-Pottinger funeral directors, Park Drive church, family and many friends.

SEASONS BEST PRODUCE LTD, Oliver, BC. Needs farm workers. 2 for May - Oct, 2011. 1 for July - Oct, 2011. 1 for Aug - Oct. 2011. Planting, picking, packing fruits and vegetables. $9.28 hr, 40 hrs/wk. Prior experience preferred. Contact Mr. Chahal 250-4986763.

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WAREHOUSEMAN’S LIEN ACT Desert Valley Enterprises Ltd. dba Oliver-Fairview Self Storage gives notice that in accordance with the Warehouseman’s Lien Act, the goods and personal property deposited at OliverFairview Self Storage, 34577 91 St. Oliver, BC, by the persons listed below will be sold by private sale or otherwise disposed of on Feb. 9, 2011. Unit # 111 - Tara Bertrand Unit # 41 - Glen Kerfoot

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THE COAST HOTEL in Osoyoos is now hiring P/T and F/T housekeepers. Please apply in person with resume to 7702 Main St, Osoyoos.

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H&R ORCHARDS requires two full time orchard managers. 40 hrs/week. One in Creston and one in Oliver. $15 hour. One year managerial experience required. Punjabi an asset. Start immediately. Call 250-4988839.

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H&R ORCHARDS requires four full time orchard labourers. Two in Oliver and two in Creston. 40 hrs/week. Orchard maintenance, fall, winter, spring picking up pruned branches, packing orchard ladders, sorting, weighing, packing, loading, unloading, picking, planting and transferring fruit. Cleaning racks, trays and growing area. No experience required. Punjabi an asset. Start $12 hr. Call 250-4988839.

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H&R ORCHARDS requires 18 seasonal orchard labourers. Six in Oliver and twelve in Creston. March 15 to November 15, 2011. Orchard maintenance, fall, winter, spring picking up of pruned branches, packing orchard ladders, sorting, weighing, packing, loading, unloading, picking, planting and transferring fruit. Cleaning racks, trays and growing area. Punjabi an asset. No experience required. 40 hours per week. Start $9.28 hr. Call 250-498-8839.

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AUJLA FARM, Manjadh Aujla is looking for 4 F/T seasonal farm workers to work at 31085 Hwy 97, 9408 Hwy 97 in Oliver, BC. Pay rate is $9.28 hr. Piece work rate as per established by Employment Standards Branch of B.C. Ministry of Labour. Work runs from April to Oct. 2011. Please call 250-485-8617 or 250-4980537. Email: ms.aujla76@gmail.com

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PART TIME DRIVER required to deliver farm equipment. Some mechanical knowledge is an asset. Drop off resume and driver’s abstract to Gerard’s Equipment in Oliver. or fax to 250498-3288.

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S&G FARMS, Oliver, BC. Needs 4 farm workers, March 1 to Oct. 2011. 2 farm workers May 1 to Oct. 2011. 20 farm workers July 15 to Oct 2011. F/T seasonal, $9.30 hr. Must be able to lift 50 lbs. Call 250-498-7028 or fax 250-498-2164.

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COVERT FARMS in Oliver, BC needs 18 full time agricultural workers from March to October, 2011. $9.28 per hour. Call 250-498-2731.

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SUKHI ORCHARDS LTD. Oliver, BC. Needs 4 F/T seasonal farm workers 1st week of April to Nov. 25, 2011. 4 F/T seasonal farm workers June 15 to Nov 25, 2011. $9.28 hr. with piece work as per the Labour Standard Board of BC. Call 250-4986619 ask for Garry.

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SANDHILL VINEYARDS, Oliver, BC needs 12 full time seasonal farm workers from April 15 to Oct 31, 2011. $9.28 hr. Call 250-485-7399.

RICK ANTUNES ORCHARDS requires 4 F/T seasonal orchard workers for the Oliver location. Min. 40 hrs week at a rate of $9.28 hr. April 15, 2011 to Nov. 15, 2011. Duties to include general farm labour, no experience required. Please call 250-488-0716 to apply.

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OKANAGAN SUNSHINE/ Major Dhaliwal looking for 3 full time seasonal farm workers to work at 9525-324 Ave, (RD # 10), 9524 - 374 Ave, 9723 - 97 Street (Rd #7) in Oliver, BC. Pay rate $9.28 per hour. Piece work rate as per established by Employment Standards Branch of the BC Ministry of Labour. Work from April to October, 2011. Please call 250-4907198, or email okanagan_ sunshine@hotmail.com.

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SURINDER MANN FARM, Oliver, BC. Needs 4 F/T seasonal farm workers, mid March to end of Oct, 2011. 4 workers, June 1 to end of Oct, 2011. and 2 workers July 1 to end of Oct, 2011. $9.28 hr. Call 250-498-8871.

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CHURCH AND STATE WINES, needs 3 F/T seasonal farm workers, March to Oct, 2011. In Oliver, BC, $9.28 hr. Please email : info@churchandstatewines. com

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A & M ORCHARDS LTD. requires 18 F/T seasonal workers for the 2011 season. Starting in early March 2011. Workers will have 40 to 60 hours a week of work at $ 9.28 per hour. Duties include pruning, thinning, general farm work and picking of fruit when ready. The farm is located at 921 HWY 3A, Keremeos, BC, V0X 1N0. The fruit that will be picked is as follows: Apples, cherries, peaches, apricots and plums. Piece rate will be paid at the prevailing min. wage as per BC Employment Standards. To apply phone 250-499-5062 or fax 250-499-5062.

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S & J ORCHARDS in Oliver, BC needs 2 F/T seasonal farm workers. 1 for April 1 to Oct. 31, 2011 and 1 for May 1 to Oct. 31, 2011. $9.28 hr. Call 250-498-2555. KHELA ORCHARDS LTD in Oliver, BC needs 2 farm workers at end of March to October, 2011. Full time, seasonal. $9.28 hr. Call 250498-0127.

PANORAMA ORCHARDS & FRUIT STAND, Oliver, BC. Needs 3 farm workers May 1 to Oct. 30, 2011 and 1 farm worker June 1 to Oct. 30, 2011. F/T seasonal, ground crop and orchard work. $9.28 hr. Call 250-498-9089.

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CROSSWORD and SUDUKO ANSWERS

Help is available. All day. Every day.

BC Problem Gambling Help Line 1.888.795 6111 (24 hrs) For services in your ar Central Okanagan Co ea ask for unselling Services

Confidential counsellin g ser vices are offered free of charge. Funding is provided by the Province of British Columbia. www.bcresponsiblega mbling.ca

EAST 2 WEST FRUIT PACKERS, Oliver, BC. Needs 4 F/T seasonal farm workers. 2 - May 1 and 2 June 30, till the end of Oct. 2011. $9.28 hr. Fax 250-4850954.


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Wednesday, February 2, 2011 Oliver Chronicle B11

COMMUNITY CLASSIFIEDS EMPLOYMENT

FOR SALE

MANUFACTURED HOMES

RENTALS

RENTALS

RENTALS

DHALIWAL ORCHARDS, Oliver, BC needs 4 full time seasonal farm workers. Two for April to end of Oct and two for June to end of Oct. $9.28 hr. Call 250-498-9876.

ALFALFA – grass/hay on Road 18, in Oliver. $8/per bale. Call 250-498-2918.

BEAUTIFUL SRI MODULARS! Custom built homes from Canada’s largest builder include full ten year warranty and free home insurance. See for yourself why SRI should build your next home. Visit our large display now or call Lake Country Modular, located next to the SRI’s Winfield factory, 515 Beaver Lake Rd. Kelowna. Call 1-866-766-2214 www.LCMhomes.com

2 HEATED industrial bays. 850 sq. ft. each in Oliver industrial park. Call 250-4980167.

2 BDRM DAYLIGHT basement apt. Close to schools, shared laundry. $635 mth. Includes gas and power. N/S. Call 250-498-4133 after 4:00.

2 BDRM MOBILE HOME, Oliver, Rd #10. $500 mth. plus utilities. Call 250-4989845 after 5:00 pm.

32v4

SAVVIOS FAMILY RESTAURANT is looking for servers and dishwashers. Please drop resumes off at FIELDS in Oliver with Michelle. No phone calls please. 32c2

OLIVER PRODUCE needs 1 F/T seasonal farm worker. April to October, 2011. Oliver, BC. $9.28 hr. Call 250498-6438. 32v2

FOR SALE

FIREWOOD (beetle kill, orchard or other.) Call T.C.B. The Chopping Block. Call 250-498-9039. Inkaneep Rd.

1mctf

DRY FIREWOOD for sale. Spruce, pine & fir. $150 cord. Delivery now available $50 extra. Call 250-809-5285 or 250-498-8299. 31mc2

EXCELLENT horse hay, Brome, Timothy, orchard grass mix, alfalfa grass mix. $7 per bale. Call 250-4462080. Anarchist Mtn, Osoyoos. 28p13

WEAVING LOOM for sale. Excellent condition. Call 250-495-6632. 32p2

USED MAYTAG washing machine, clean and in good working order. $90.00. Call 250-498-6642. WINTER HORSE BLANKET and electric water buckets for sale. Call 250-486-6744. 32f2

LOST AND FOUND

Jul01/11

WATKINS PRODUCTS For more information or a catalogue, phone Inez & Ken 250-498-4450. 28p13

PRODUCE

FRESH FROZEN BLACKBERRIES. Spray free, 5 lbs for $15. Call 250-498-8880. 27v9

RECREATIONAL VEHICLES

1998 ARCTIC CAT snowmobile, 440, very good shape. Offers. Call 250-4984404. 32c2

32p1

30p4

MARY KAY - SKIN CARE Finally, skin care that’s made for you. Call Margaret Ogilvie at 250-498-4020. Mary Kay Independent Beauty Consultant.

40ctf

FOUND - 10 speed bike on 342 Ave. in Oliver. Call to identify. 604-808-9855. 32f2

RENTALS

MULTIPURPOSE SPACE 9000 sq/ft. plus lounge and kitchen areas, climate controlled, available April 1 to Sept. 15. Daily, weekly or monthly rentals available. Call 250-498-2789. 30p6

25ctf

FOR RENT -1 bdrm. Large suites, and 2 bdrm. suites. S/F, close to downtown, very nice, freshly redone. Starting at $600 mth + util. Call 250-498-0232. 21p18

1278 SQ. FT. Casa Rio condo, $975 per month. Call Karen Lewis RE/MAX WCR Call 250-498-6500. 23ctf

FOR RENT - 3rd. floor, 2 bdrm, 2 bath, Casa Rio Condo. Great view, 6 appliances, available Feb.1/11. $895.00 plus utilities and DD. Call 250-485-2875. 30mc4

4 BDRM, 2 bath house in downtown Osoyoos. Large fenced yard. $1250 mth plus utilities. Call 250-495-6477. 29v4

2 BDRM APT in town. ALSO 2 bdrm house. N/P, N/S. Call 250-498-0872. After 11:00 am. 30p3

30mc3

2 BDRM BASEMENT suite for rent. Close to schools and town. $850 mth includes utilities. Call 250-485-2869.

1 BDRM and den. 800 sq. ft. character home for rent. References required. NS. Small pets on approval only. Avail. Jan. 1. $850 + utilities. Call 250-498-3881.

30p4

30v3

31p2


B12 Oliver Chronicle Wednesday, February 2, 2011

COMMUNITY CLASSIFIEDS RENTALS

RENTALS

RENTALS

RENTALS

RENTALS

RENTALS

3 BDRM + DEN duplex in town. Appliances included, NP, references required. Call 250-498-2753.

1 BDRM CABIN. $450 + utilities. N/P, Call after 4:30 250-498-2143 or 250-5350046.

1 BDRM TRAILER. $550 mth. Includes utilities. Avail. immediately, rural Oliver. Call 250-498-6862.

1 BDRM SUITE. Close to town, big windows, lots of light. Laundry, storage, parking. $750 mth. includes utilities, cable, and internet. Seniors preferred. No smoking, no dogs. Avail. Feb. 15. Call 778-4392044.

1 BDRM SPACIOUS furnished suite, overlooking Tuc-el-Nuit Lake. $800 inclusive. Adults only. N/S, N/P. Call 250-498-6629.

2 BDRM HOUSE, 600 sq ft, newly renovated on a vineyard. 10 min north of Oliver. References required. $800 month plus util. N/S, N/P. Call 250-498-8815.

30p2

1400 SQ/FT, Newly renovated, 4 bdrm house. N/S, N/P, $1000 per month plus utilities. Close to schools and town. References required. Call 604-808-9855.

32p3

32p2

1 BDRM basement suite. Close to Buy-Low. Includes cable, laundry, N/P, N/S. $575 mth. Call 250-4982650.

31p2

In Remembrance

31mc4

3 BDRM APT. Main street Oliver. $680 mth. plus utilities, N/P, nicely renovated. Call 604-217-6094 or 604814-0567.

31mc2

A MUST SEE - New, large 2 bdrm apt. Lake view, walkout , pets welcome, private, N/S, small garage and fire place. $850 includes utilities. Call 250-498-3774.

Ruth Mikolas Apr. 2, 1918 - Feb. 5, 2010 Ted Mikolas Apr. 2, 1918 - Oct. 10, 1998

The morning you passed away, Our hearts were torn in two, One side filled with memories, The other died with you. Remembering you is easy, We do it every day, But missing you is heartache, That will never go away. We hold you tightly Within our hearts, And there you will remain. Life will go on without you, But it will never be the same, Till the day we meet again, How happy we will be. No matter where life takes us, Our parents you will always be. Lovingly missed by your children and their families.

In loving memory

George Edward Ellis Feb. 23, 1923 - Jan. 23, 2011

31p2

2 BDRM HOUSE. $850 mth plus utilities. Avail. Feb. 1. W/D hookups. Call 250-4983446.

31v2

1 BDRM CABIN, located near Southwinds Crossing. $400 plus utilities. Call 250488-0716.

Arrangements entrusted to Nunes-Pottinger Funeral Service & Crematorium, Oliver & Osoyoos, BC. www.nunes-pottinger.com

31mc2

SMALL 2 BDRM apt. $600 month + utilities. DD required. Call 780-498-7443.

31mc2

2 BDRM OLDER house in Oliver.. $650 plus utilities per month. Call to view 250-4952238.

31c3

RESIDENTIAL EVICTION SERVICESTerminal Bailiffs, Call 250-493-2618.

vtf

29v4

SECURE GARAGE for rent. Call 250-495-6477.

In loving memory

Oscar J. Spanier Jun. 21, 1923 - Jan. 20, 2011

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Oscar Spanier, formerly of Osoyoos, B.C., on January 20, 2011 at Qualicum Beach B.C. He is survived by his wife, Elly; children, Marianne and Robert; grandchildren, Morgane, Brian and Scott; brother and sister-in-law, John, Terry and their family, and his first wife, Truus. No service by request. In lieu of flowers, a donation may be made to the Alzheimer’s Society of B.C.

87 YEARS OLD

He was born on February 23, 1923 and entered Heaven from Oliver on January 23, 2011. After a long illness with diabetes and four years on dialysis he was released from his suffering. Predeceased by three of his four sons, Keith, David and Gary, he is survived by Bette, his wife of 66 years; his son, Richard Ian; and his three daughters, Theresa Gogolin, Mary Pierce and Cora Prosser; and his only brother, Clarence. While serving in England with the Canadian Army from 1942-1945, he met his wife Bette and married her on December 24, 1944. After the war he trained as a millwright and worked at pulp mills in Prince George, Mackenzie, Gold River, Crofton and many other places. In his later years he worked as the foreman. Wherever he was employed he would put in a hard day’s work and then spend up to six hours in building houses and barns. Nearing retirement, he was the first person to introduce and raise miniature horses in Canada. From his farm in Lumby, he travelled across Canada and into a number of the States selling his horses. One of his prized animals sold for $12,000. He and Bette were members of Valley Congregational Christian Church which serves both Oliver and Osoyoos. Then, in his early seventies, George assumed the role of organizing a Men’s Interdenominational Breakfast which grew to over 50 in attendance on the second Saturday of each month. He became very faithful to his Saviour, the Lord Jesus, and studied his Bible daily, watched Christian TV programs that had a teaching ministry, and was surrounded by faithful friends who joined him in his pursuit at his home. Bette, now residing at the Sunnybank Centre, will experience the loss of a loving husband. The funeral was taken by Rev. Dr. Ron Holden and the eulogy was delivered by Wally Bootsma. Donations in George’s name may be made to the local Gideons

32p2

32mc4

AVAILABLE IN OLIVER. There are two condo’s still available at Casa Rio. One has a view of the park and one with a view of the fountain. Great building with underground parking, exercise room, common room, intercom entrance and a elevator. Call Nita Neufield at Royal LePage South Country Property Management for more information on these rentals or properties available in Osoyoos at 250-498-6222.

29ctf

OLIVER, $950 month plus util,house, rural, 2 bdrm, 1 bath Avail immed. $800 month - util incl. - 2 bdrm house, 1 bath, Avail. to March 31. $650 month - util. incl. Basement suite, 2 bdrm. 1 bath. Avail. immed. $750 month - plus utilities. house, 2 bdrm, 1 bath, short term rental till June 30. $780 month - plus utilities - Apartment downtown, 2 bdrm, 1 bath. Avail. immed.

Amos Realty 35841-97th. St. Oliver, B.C. Phone 250-498-4844

CLEAN 2 BDRM house available March 1st in downtown area. W/D, hydro incl. N/P. $850 month. Call 250498-0646.

25ctf

32mc3

2 BDRM mobile home. W/D, F/S. $650 month. Call 250498-6844.

32p2

LARGE 2 BDRM basement suite. Close to school and shopping. Ground lovel entry. Call 250-49-8-6114 or 250-490-1997 after 4 pm.

32p4

SERVICES

ARGON ELECTRICAL SERVICES Residential - Commercial Electric Heating

DEAN MALMBERG

250-498-4506 Contractor # 43474 9336 348 Ave. Unit A www.argonelectrical.ca

ctf

HUTTON’S INTERIOR DECORATING & PAINTING SERVICES Painting, Colour Consultations, Design Services and more. Call ALLISON at 250-498-6428.

ONLINE APPLICATIONS AND UNIT PHOTOS@ www.amosrealty.com Check us out at www.stratawatch.ca

32mc2

July1/11

In loving memory

Mike Firman In loving memory

Alex Anderson

Mar. 31, 1946 - Nov. 12, 2010 Alex (AI) Anderson passed away on Nov. 12, 2010 at the age of 64 years after a very brief illness. Alex’s memory will be lovingly cherished by wife, Brenda; daughters, Andrea and Michelle; grandchildren, Ashlee, Christopher, Chantry and Cherise; greatgrandchildren; Tia, Talon, Liliana and Cashton; sister, Betty; brother, Jake; co-workers, friends and neighbours. Alex was born in Saskatchewan and spent his whole life working in the sheet metal trade. He worked on many different buildings in Western Canada. He loved to travel down south to Nevada and Arizona. You worked so hard all of your life. You fought so hard that last week and you didn’t deserve what you went through. You were cheated out of your much anticipated retirement and you will be sadly missed by all. May the road rise up to meet you. May the wind be always at your back. May the sun shine warm upon your face; the rains fall soft upon your fields and until we meet again, may God hold you in the palm of his hand.

Beannachd Dia dhuit

1931 - 2011 Mike Firman (April 12, 1931 – January 29, 2011) passed away peacefully after a short illness on Saturday, January 29, 2011 at the South Okanagan General Hospital at the age of 79 years. Mike will be sadly missed by his beloved wife, Joan; children, Robert, Deborah and Ronald; sisters, Mary, Ann (Ron) Lily, Jennie (Ralph), Patsy (Don), Joannie, Billy and Joey (Carol); predeceased by brother, John Firman and brother-in-law, Wayne Holmes. Mike was the former owner of Oliver Tele-Vue, a Third Degree Mason with the AF & AM #124 and a member of the Oliver Curling Club. He enjoyed fishing and had a great love of animals, especially feeding the birds. Donations gratefully appreciated to the Penticton SPCA, 2200 Dartmouth Drive, Penticton, B.C. V2A 3M4 or the South Okanagan General Hospital Palliative Care. Donation cards available at the funeral home. A private family service has taken place.

Arrangements entrusted to Graham Funeral Home 34616 - 99th Street, Oliver (250) 498-3833 Your messages of condolence, sharing your fond memories of Mike may be sent to: www.grahamfh.com


Wednesday, February 2, 2011 Oliver Chronicle B13

COMMUNITY CLASSIFIEDS

SERVICES

SERVICES

YARD SALES

A 1 LAWN CARE - lawns - gardens - snow removal - chimney’s - power washing - irrigation - fire wood CALL 250-485-7916.

RAY’S PAINTING 3 ROOM SPECIAL Any 3 rooms for $250. Walls, minor repairs, 2 coats, interior - exterior. Satisfaction guaranteed. 25 years experience. Call Ray at 250-487-0840.

KIWANIS MARKET

MAID IN THE OKANAGAN Home and office cleaning. Licensed, bonded, insured. Openings available now. Call Mary 250-490-5906. 31p5

July 2011

WANTED

WANTED GOLD AND SILVER www.sosbuyer.ca 778-931-0558.

ELECTROLYSIS BY MARG Get rid of unwanted hair permanently and safely with just a few treatments. Call 250-495-2782.

WANTED - Cross country ski equipment. Mens size 10.5 to 11 and ladies size 7. Call 250-485-0339.

34mctf

32f3

DON’S CARPET CLEANING All work guaranteed. Call 250-498-8310.

28p8

28v8

34782-91st Street (Sawmill Road)

Check us out. We accept clean, serviceable items. Please No clothing. Call 250-485-0242 or 250-498-0176. Drop off times: 9:00- 12:00 Wednesdays, and 9:00 - 12:00 Fridays. Open for sales: 8:30 to 12:30 Saturdays. Please leave a message, you will be answered.

Is Your Castle

Prepare to work in this fascinating industry with Okanagan College’s Floral Design Certificate. Apply today Classes start Feb. 15, 2011

ctf

250-492-4305 www.okanagan.bc.ca/cs

DISPLAY ADVERTISING DEADLINE IS FRIDAY AT NOON

The Oliver Chronicle welcomes readers’ submissions to the Fruit and Vine. Please submit your comments to: publisher@oliverchronicle.com Submissions must include your name and phone number for verification purposes, but can be published anonymously. Content may be edited for clarity.

Floral Design

OCRTP 19672

32vJan30/11

Your Home...

ShuSwap RevelStoke • NoRth okaNagaN CeNtRal okaNagaN • South okaNagaN SimilkameeN

Oliver Pharmasave will be opening soon and is now hiring for all positions including; Front Store Manager, Pharmacy Assistants and Cashiers. 2 years pharmacy retail experience required. All applicants are invited to email or fax your current resume to Joan Low: email: jlow@forewest.ca fax: 604-514-8393 Closing date February 7, 2011. Only those selected for an interview will be contacted. Ken’s Custom Pre-pruning of Grapes Call: 250.498.3687

Improve Your English For FREE • Language and Computer skills to get a Job • Learn about Canadian & Workplace culture • Free Childminding • 5 Class times to suit your For eligible participants. Schedule!

OPENING  

South Okanagan Immigrant and Community Services

NEW          LOCATION



   

 JANUARY 4, 2011

35653 - 97th Street, Oliver, B.C.

South Okanagan Immigrant & Community Services • 250-498-4900

Fun By The Numbers Like puzzles? Then you’ll love sudoku. This mind-bending puzzle will have you hooked from the moment you square off, so sharpen your pencil and put your sudoku savvy to the test!

Here’s How It Works: Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can figuree out the order in which the appear only once in each row, ow, column and box. YYou can figur numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!


B14 Oliver Chronicle Wednesday, February 2, 2011

Reminiscing about the early days of youth Jack Coates Special to the Chronicle I feel motivated to record a few words about men I have known and respected particularly during the years of my youth and when trying to get established in life. This takes me back to my youth and formative years. On school holidays at Penticton, students had the opportunity to help

the fruit growers harvest their crops. This was also an opportunity to make some money. I was 15 or 16 years old and attending Penticton High school in 1925, and welcomed the experience with several others of my school class. Picking cherries in his orchard is how I met Mr. F. H. Latimer. I did not realize at the time that he was a civil engineer and had just recently been engaged by

Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen Official Community Plan and Zoning Amendment Application Electoral Area ‘C’ Agricultural Plan All properties within Electoral Area ‘C’ currently zoned as Agricultural One (AG1) and Agricultural Two (AG2)

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING: Wednesday, February 16, 2011 – 7:00 pm Firehall Bistro Meeting Room 34881 97th Street, Oliver, BC. PURPOSE:

Proposal: amend the OCP and Zoning Bylaws to reflect the strategic recommendations contained in the Agricultural Area Plan. The significant changes are summarized as follows: Official Community Plan Amendments Create a Protection of Farming Development Permit Area adjacent to AG1 and AG2 lands. Under the Local Government Act, the RDOS may designate a development permit for ‘protection of farming’ which may include requirements for screening, landscaping, fencing, and siting of buildings or other structures, in order to provide for the buffering or separation of development from farming on adjoining or reasonably adjacent land. The Development permit would include parcels within a 150 metre ‘buffer’ surrounding lands designated as AG1 and AG2. Zoning Amendments •

Retail Space-limit all retail space to 300 m2 and to add a clause that 50% or more of the retail sales area to be devoted to the sale of farm products produced on the farm.

Winery Eating & Drinking Establishments- remove ‘restaurant’ term from current winery definition and use the term ‘food & beverage service lounge’ as used in ALC regulations.

Agri-Tourism accommodation - remove ‘agri-tourism accommodation’ as a secondary use; however, encourage it in the OCP as a value added activity. This will require a rezoning process with established criteria outlined in the OCP.

Housing for Farm Labour 1. Introduce permitting secondary suites in AG1 and AG2 zones. 2. Introduce the need for a parcel to be assessed as ‘farm’ to permit any housing for farm help. 3. Include seasonal accommodation facilities for farm help as a permitted use. 4. Introduce an option for two principal dwellings and additional farm labour housing for parcels greater than 8 ha.

Parcel Coverage 1. Distinguish between ‘farm’ and ‘residential’ use for site coverage 2. Separate coverage for greenhouses (70 %) 3. Treat parcels smaller than 0.8 ha with one size of building envelope for all buildings (800 m2) Official Community Plan and Zoning Amendment Application Electoral Area ‘C’ Agricultural Plan All properties within Electoral Area ‘C’ currently zoned as Agricultural One (AG1) and Agricultural Two (AG2 4. Increase site coverage for farm after 0.8 ha, while keeping a consistent residential footprint (3% parcel coverage for farm use, 600 m2 for residential use.) 5. Limit residential footprint where there are two principal dwellings to 1000 m2 total 6. Impose a maximum footprint for lots zoned AG1 (3600 m2) • Move a number of principal permitted uses within the AG1 and AG2 zones to permitted secondary uses. • Setbacks for agricultural buildings and structures from Domestic water supplies from 6.0 metres to 30.0 metres, in accordance with the Province’s new recommendations VIEW COPIES OF THE DRAFT BYLAWS & SUPPORTING INFORMATION AT: Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen 101 Martin Street, Penticton, BC on weekdays (excluding statutory holidays) between the hours of 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Anyone who considers themselves affected by the proposed bylaw amendments can present written information or speak at the public hearing. All correspondence for the public hearing to be addressed to: Public Hearing Bylaw Nos. 2452.06 & 2453.10, c/o Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen. No letter, report or representation from the public will be received after the conclusion of the public hearing. This public hearing has been delegated to a Director of the Regional District. FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT DEVELOPMENT SERVICES: Telephone: 250-490-4107 Fax: 250-492-0063 Email: planning@rdos.bc.ca Web: www.rdos.bc.ca Donna Butler, MCIP Manager of Development

Bill Newell Chief Administrative Officer

the John Oliver provincial government to construct the Southern Okanagan Lands Improvement Project (S.O.L.P.) This project was to change the South Okanagan desert into the productive fruit growing area that it is today. Mr. Latimer also surveyed and planned the City of Penticton, the Town of Oliver and Okanagan Falls. I enjoyed meeting this fine old gentleman and got to know and respect him. He gave me the responsibility of picking fruit in his orchard while he was about on business. I took my responsibility seriously and I admired him and appreciated his confidence. When my family moved to Oliver in 1926, Mr. Latimer asked me to work for him. He owned and was developing a rocky piece of land in a favourable location. This land later became the Albert Millar orchard. Mr. Latimer’s son also purchased land that later became the Jim Stowell orchard home. When working for Mr. Latimer I was offered and accepted work on an adjacent orchard owned by Major Harry Earle and his brother George, who resided in California. This is how I met Arley Gayton, foreman of the Earle Orchards. There were many men unemployed. The country was in the throws of the Great Depression. Men were anxiously waiting and accepting the going wage of 30 cents per hour. Arley Gayton and I became good friends. He taught me how to work and much about orcharding. We had some good hunting and fishing trips together; memorable adventures as well as supplying fish, grouse and deer, much appreciated for family consumption. Arley was a clever practical engineer. He had worked on the Kettle Valley Railway over the Coquihalla mountains. Those of us who remember the long high tressels over the canyons must have great respect and confidence in the engineers. Arley was employed in the construction and framing of many of these formidable structures. Arley was called away to war in 1914 for three years. He told me one of the great moments of his life was when he returned from war to find his sweetheart waiting for him at the Kettle Valley Summerland station. They were married and had a family of two – Raymond and Kathleen. Arley was a fine man and friend, very much respected and appreciated. I worked with Arley for two years, at which time his orchard demanded his full attention, leaving me as foreman of the Earle Orchards. I worked there until 1942. In 1931 with a small down payment I purchased Lot 249, a 12 acre orchard property adorned with a 16 by 24 foot cabin and some neglected fruit trees. Major Harry Earle was engaged in various engineering projects. He had also worked with Latimer in building S.O.L.P., the irrigation project. He arranged a joint bank account at the Bank of Commerce enabling me to do the necessary hiring. Casual help was needed during the year. As many as 20 would be working at cherry picking time. I have pleasant memories of my 10 years working for and being associated with Major Earle. He was living alone and I felt he needed a companion. Even with the big variation in our ages I think that describes our relationship. He had a small unpretentious house on his orchard and lived by himself with the necessities of life. Mrs. Earle preferred city life and had a home at Victoria. As Major Earle’s health failed she rented a house inOliver but they continued to live apart. I always addressed him as Major; no sa-

luting involved. His orchard was his pride and joy and he kept in close touch with the biologists and entomologists at the Dominion government experimental farm. His orchard was at times a small extension of the experimental farm. The Golden Delicious apple was a promising new variety just discovered in Washington about 1935. Earle managed to get one tree that I believe was the first Golden planted in the South Okanagan. It was not unusual to find rattlesnakes in the orchard. We were always aware of them. It was not unusual to find one or two a day while attending the irrigation. Normally their distinct rattle gave warning but we were always aware of the danger. Rattlers are great mousers. Two or three mice in a snake was not unusual; the bulges in their body told the story. Large bull snakes were not uncommon and were also great mousers, but harmless to people. Earle’s orchard bordered the hot dry desert area of the foothills and during the hot dry summer, snakes gravitated to the irrigated area and the irrigation ditches. They were considered dangerous to families and animals in those days, and were destroyed! Today they are considered an endangered species and protected, but still not welcome in gardens or orchards. In 1942 my orchard was demanding my attention, so reluctantly I gave up my job at Earle’s. I had married in 1938 and had a family of two children. My 10 year stint in Earle’s orchard had been my bread and butter in those early years. During my 43 years as an orchardist I owned and operated four orchard properties in the area south of Oliver. Orcharding demanded much manual work to thin, pick, spray, irrigate and handle thousands of boxes of fruit. We gradually graduated from horsepower, the four-legged ones, to tractors, mechanical ladders and sprinkler irrigation eliminating much manual labour. I sold my beautiful Foothills Orchard (that I had developed from raw land and planted in the mid 60s’) in 1974. At the age of 65 I retired and we purchased a retirement home at Vaseux Lake. At the time we, Margie and I, moved to Vaseux Lake. The land on the east side of the lake was owned by and subdivided by Blue Sky Development. Property between Highway 97 and the lake had been and mostly sold to individual homeowners. The east side of the highway was subdivided into building lots but not sold. This area was and had been for many years the prime winter range of the valuable herd of California Bighorn Sheep. Blue Sky had a good well and two storage tanks to supply the water requirements of the area. We wanted control of our water supply and also realized the importance and value of the land for a Bighorn Sheep range. Realizing that the property on the east side of the highway was surveyed for building lots the present home owners formed the Vaseux Lake Water District with the advice and consultation of the provincial water rights branch and began negotiation with Blue Sky Developments to take control of the area. A committee was elected, myself as chairman, to negotiate the takeover as well as take responsibility for the water and storage tanks and necessary upkeep and repair. Being chairman entailed being available day and night to get the water on again right now, whether it was digging through a foot of snow or going down a 20 ft. ladder in the well in the middle of the night, with a flashlight. We left Vaseux with some good friends and good memories.


Wednesday, February 2, 2011 Oliver Chronicle B15

Reading food labels important

is important to remember, that four grams of sugar equals one teaspoon. It is recommended that we do not exceed forty-eight grams (or twelve teaspoons) of added sugar per As consumers, we are constantly bombarded with ad- day. This may sound like a lot of sugar but it adds up fast. vertisements for ‘healthy’ foods. Unfortunately, we cannot One can of pop contains about ten teaspoons of sugar. always trust that the health claims on food packages acWatch for saturated and trans fat. It is important to limit curately reflect the true nutritional quality of the these fats as they can increase ‘bad’ cholesterfood. Looking past the health claims and reading ol levels. Saturated and trans fats are mostly the Nutrition Facts Table and the Ingredients List, found in fatty meats, high fat dairy products, will give you a much more accurate picture of nufried foods, pastries and doughnuts. Your daitritional value of the product. ly intake of saturated and trans fats should be In my experience many people read nutrition less than a combined total of twenty grams. labels, but they often do not know what to look Limit salt. Most packaged or canned foods for. Here are a few tips to help you choose healthy contain added salt –also known as sodium... Health foods: The recommended sodium intake is no more Matters Check the serving size. If you know the serving than 1500 milligrams per day. Look for prodsize, you can accurately compare foods to make ucts that state ‘no added salt’ and rinse canned the healthiest choice. Remember serving sizes are not foods before eating. standard. For example, some loaves of bread list the nutriChoose high fibre foods. Adults should consume twenty ents per one slice, while others list per two slices. You also five to thirty eight grams of fibre daily. Look for foods that need to compare the serving size to the amount you eat. contain at least three to four grams of fibre per serving. People often eat more than the serving size on the label. Read the ingredients list. Ingredients are listed by Look for added sugars. Many foods that appear healthy weight. Ingredients at the top of the list are those which such as cereal, granola bars and fruit flavoured yogurt are the product is primarily made of. Avoid foods that list sughigh in added sugars. Added sugars do not include natural ar or hydrogenated oils in the first three ingredients. sugars in fruit and milk products. When reading a label it Simone Jennings Special to the Chronicle

Work on core stability for back pain Most people suffer from some type of low back pain during their lifetime. However, regular core stability exercise can improve your back muscles and your posture. All of our movements are powered by the torso -- the abs and back work together to support the spine when we sit, stand and bend over, pick things up, exercise and more. Core stabilizers are a By Jorg Mardian crucial component of the torso and assist us with endurance and proper firing, to contract at low force levels for a long time, to activate prior to any arm and leg movement, stabilize the lumbo-pelvic-hip complex and efficiently transmit force from the upper and lower body and vice versa. As you can see, the torso is the body's centre of power, so the stronger each component within it is, the easier and more pain free your life will be. When we ignore core stability muscles, they become weak and the risk of lower back pain and instability greatly increases. Understanding that core stability is an important component of almost every motor activity, many experts have implicated the core musculature in the cause and treatment for a variety of injuries. In addition, core function has been evaluated as a cause for injuries in everything from the lower back to the ankle. The core is made up of two layers -- deep and superficial. Deep layer muscles are attached to the spine and pelvis;

Lifestyle Wise

providing support to them when active and contracting. The superficial layer are muscles that we can see and feel, wrapping around the lower back. Core training focuses on the deep and superficial layers. Crunches or 6-packing training only focus on one of the superficial muscles and ignores the deep muscle layer and all the other superficial muscles. For a strong and pain free core, you need to work both the deep and superficial layer muscles and no one exercise targets all these muscles. Also standing in the way of a strong back may be too much adipose tissue, which is between your skin and your abdominals. These are cells that store fat so your body has storage of energy in a time of starvation. Some people seem to store up enough of this to last an extra lifetime, so a well designed exercise and nutritional program with a knowledgeable trainer is crucial to tighten and tone the mid-section. Remember, core stability and strength is a main piece of the puzzle for a pain-free back. Achieve the formula and you achieve pain free movement for life.

• Eye Exams • Contact Lenses • Low-Vision Services

DR. Jason Bartsch, DMD Family & Cosmetic Dentistry Digital X-rays CEREC single visit crowns Dental Implants Laser Teeth Whitening

250-495-2393

www.sunvalleydental.com

Dr. Melissa Gardiner

Taking care of your children’s vision: If a child has a high prescription or a turned eye that is not detected at a young age, the area of their brain responsible for vision does not develop properly (amblyopia). This means that even when they get older it is often too late to treat and they may have a permanent lazy eye. Parents are usually unable to tell that their children have an eye problem. This is why it is recommended that children first have their eyes tested at age 3, then every year after, until they are adults.


B16 Oliver Chronicle Wednesday, February 2, 2011

SPORTS

Hornets easily take home bronze shoe again Mo Basso Special to the Chronicle The Hornets are once again in possession of the prized bronze shoe, this being the fifth year in a row that they have won the shoe from their larger arch rival from the North. The shoe has been played for the past 46 years, and since they have been keeping record of who has won it the Lakers lead the series 26-15. However, the Hornets have been making big gains in the past few years as they have won the trophy seven times in the past nine years.

The Hornets came out firing on all cylinders as they took a commanding first quarter lead 32-13, led by star players Parry Aulakh and Harey Dhaliwal. With the addition of Greet Gill in the lineup, the Hornets were healthy and ready to go for this game, and by half time they had increased the lead to 30 (66-37). The second half was much the same as the first as the Hornets cruised to a 40-point victory (103-63). All Hornets hit the score sheet with Parry Aulakh scoring 30, Harey Dhaliwal had 20, Greet Gill in his first game since the December break had 13, and Dale Polychro-

Female Hornets play tough Chris Jentsch Special to the Chronicle The Lady Hornets travelled to KSS to play in the annual “Best in the West” tournament. The Oliver girls dropped their first game 48-74, but the score doesn’t tell the tale. It was close throughout, and late in the third Chilliwack scored 20 unanswered points. Ashey McGinnis had 23 points and Jessa Kriesel ripped nine rebounds. The second game was a barn burner against Pen Hi, tied at 50 with seconds to go the Lakers drained a three and finished on top 53-50.

The girls finished the tournament beating the Jewels from Salmon Arm in another close game (44-43). Weekend players of the games were Ashley McGinnis, Keesha Chase and Jessa Kriesel. Although finishing seventh the girls were starting to gel, and with the return of Courtney Louie from a leg injury and Amanda Chyzzy rejoining the team after the fall soccer season, the team is starting its drive to the valley playoffs . With two tough league games to go, the Hornets are excited by the challenge that lies before them.

Kobau Lanes bowling results SOSO MONDAY NIGHT Male High Single: Alberto Holz Female High Single: Terri Ardiel Male High Triple: Alberto Holz Female High Triple: Terri Ardiel

222 170 504 431

THURSDAY 10AM SENIOR LEAGUE Male High Single: Abby Andreola Female High Single: Mary Greenhough Male High Triple: Abby Andreola Female High Triple: Mary Greenhough

290 254 696 647

TUESDAY 1PM SENIOR LEAGUE Male High Single: Len Wegner Female High Single: Pat Kreiger Male High Triple : Rudy Kuschel Female High Triple: Pat Kreiger

276 246 694 659

THURSDAY 1PM SENIOR LEAGUE Male High Single: John Martin Female High Single: Karen Meskas Male High Triple: Russell Moffatt Female High Triple: Karen Meskas

260 232 651 630

TUESDAY 7PM MIXED LEAGUE Male High Single: Alan Hupp Female High Single: Tina Martins Male High Triple: Alan Hupp Female High Triple: Vanessa Dixon

314 279 850 641

WEDNESDAY 1PM SENIOR LEAGUE Male High Single: Vern Allard Female High Single: Gladys Baryla Male High Triple: John Martin Female High Triple: Gladys Baryla

224 221 536 555

FRIDAY CLASSIC Male High Single: Rudy Persaud Female High Single: Anne MacWilliam Male High Triple: Rudy Persaud Female High Triple: Anne MacWilliam SATURDAY YBC LEAGUE Senior Boy: Colton Costa Girl: ? Junior Boy: Kye Cowen Girl: Bailey Toepfer Bantam Boy: Jonah George Girl: Sadi Bleiken

309 268 872 627 248 180 211 151 144

Coyotes shut out Penticton On the heels of Friday night’s 6-2 pasting of the Lakers in Penticton, the Osoyoos Coyotes dominated their opening round playoff partner for a second time just two days later with a 6-0 blanking, Sunday afternoon at the Sun Bowl Arena. Taylor House had two goals for the second straight game. Stephen Hynes also added a pair of markers for the Coyotes, who led 2-0 after one. Osoyoos struck for three more in the middle period. House tallied his second, with Steve Sasyniuk and Stefan Jensen contributing a goal apiece to make it 5-0 following 40 minutes of play. Hynes completed the rout by notching his second of the game, the only scoring of

the third period. Thierry Martine adopted the roll of playmaker on this day, chipping in three assists before a tremendous, season high Sunday crowd of 455 spectators. Kyle Laslo was perfect in the Coyotes’ net for the sixth time this season, blocking all 22 shots directed his way. Osoyoos has been nothing short of outstanding since the Christmas break, going 8-0-0-0, outscoring its opponents 50-8. The month of January ends at 7-0-0-0, the winning streak now sits at 10 and current unbeaten string is up to 14. At 37-2-2-4, the Osoyoos Coyotes continue to lead the league with 80 points.

niuo, and Baltej Gill both added 10 points. It was a great team victory for the Hornets who are gearing up for a run at another provincial title. In their second game of the weekend the Hornets faced a less experienced Kelowna Secondary B squad, and easily routed them 98-64. This was a great game because the bench was able to see a lot of playing time which is critical if the Hornets are to make a deep run at the provincials. Amit Chahal scored 14 points and Greet Gill and Parry Aulakh had 12 a piece. The Hornets are currently ranked 6th in the province, with their only two losses

to AA teams coming at the hands of #1 Sahali and # 7 Duchess Park; both games were close and this was a good sign as the Hornets lost those games without key starter Greet Gill. The Hornets played their last home game and last game in the east gym on Monday, January 31 against Summerland. It has been a great run in the east gym as the Hornets have gone undefeated over the past five years, and during that time they won two valley championships and one provincial title.

JOHN R. COOPER - LAWYER More than 30 years experience. ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

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johncooper@osoyooslaw.com Phone: 250-495-2626 250-495-2626ƒƒ||ƒƒFax Fax No: 250-495-7000 8145 Main Street (P.O. Box 100) Osoyoos, BC. V0H 1V0

or visit our website at: www.osoyooslaw.com


Online Edition - February 2nd, 2011  

Online Edition - February 2nd, 2011

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