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OLEG ASOIEV AR RCHITECTURE

PORTFOLIO OLEG.ASOIEV@GMAIL.COM +38 096 456 6669 98 KIEV I │KA KAUNA UNAS S 2015 2015


URBANISM & ARCHITECTURE

03

KINDERGARTEN

13

PRIVATE HOUSE

21

JUMPING HOUSE

26

MOTIVATION

28


URBANISM& ARCHITECTURE KIEV, UKRAINE BAC 4 1st semester DECEMBER 2012 ACADEMIC GROUP WORK TEAM:

OLEG ASOIEV ALISA OMELCHENKO

SUPERVISORS:

GEORGY HORHOT VADYM ZAPLATNIKOV garazdarch@gmail.com

ROLE:

CONCEPT, DRAWINGS, VISUALIZATION

INTRODUCTION The task was to study the relationship between urbanism and architecture through the design of a residential district. The target was one of the problematic areas of Kiev, an abandoned industrial zone. Formerly located on the outskirts of the city, today it is almost completely absorbed by it. The area is right on the banks of the river Dnepr and occupies 2 km of the city’s waterfront. The area also borders the central districts of the city and the State Botanical Garden. These facts give the site great potential

for the developing city that can be released with the creation of a multifunctional district, contributing to the image of the city and enrich its infrastructure. A parallel objective of the program was to study within the first stage, the typology of the residential district’s design, and within the second stage, the typology of multi-story social housing. The urban planning was processed in a group while the architectural portion was done individually. All drawings presented in this portfolio were done by me.

03


URBANISM site analysis:

? ??? KIEV PECHERSK LAVRA NATIONAL STADIUM

NOISE!!!

BOTANICAL GARDEN

??

GREAT WAR STATE MUSEUM

“BOLD HILL” HISTORICAL PLACE

SITE

The key problem of the site was the impact of the highways and railway from the North, West and South. They “cut” the site from the city’s infrastructure, turning the latter into an inaccessible “island”. Highways also produce unbearable noise, creating inappropriate conditions for living. Inspired by Dogma’s concepts and Anneke Vervoort drawnscapes, we wanted to create a district with an environment suitable for business and leisure that which would become an attraction for all of Kiev, maximally integrated into the city’s infrastructure.

waterfront vegetation line

city attraction spots

inspiration:

sketches:

Anneke Vervoort drawnscapes.

EL Lissitzky horizontal skyscraper

Dogma’s urban and large-scale concepts

04


concept development

NOISE!!!

NOISE!!!

Addressing the problem of site isolation and extreme noise, we covered the West & South highways with “business platforms”. These serve as noise barriers and bridges connecting the district with the rest of the city. The Public Function building (later called the Public Greenhouse Complex) blocks highway noise coming from the north. To contribute to the value of the district and to attract residents from the rest of the city, we placed the cultural, public and sport facility buildings inside. These should serve as points of attraction for a wide range of visitors. For more comfort, we developed an intensive Park zone along the waterfront penetrating to the very center of the district. To create a more intriguing atmosphere, one of the goals was to create a multi-level structure of the district. Moving in this direction and striving to create a district for pedestrians, we separated the vehicle and pedestrian levels by lifting all pedestrian walks and public activity 5m up and created a system of connected stylobates with carparks placed inside.

GREENHOUSE COMPLEX

BOTANICAL GARDEN

“BUSINESS” PLATFORM#1

CENTRAL SQUARE

PARK

SPORT FACILITIES

PA

“BUSINESS” PLATFORM#2

RK

A great contribution to the multi-level system was made by Business Platforms, the level of which is 24 meters above the top of the stylobat. A special feature is the second level of vegetation. The basic idea was to create "green bridges" transporting citizens from the Botanical Garden right in the center of the district and the waterfront. In terms of the housing component, our team split responsibility, and I was assigned the Southern part. It was a rare chance to implement a concept I was passionate about: hybrid social housing, otherwise known as the horizontal skyscraper. Specifically, I wanted to create a multifunctional building with copious public space while contributing to the multilevel aspect of the district, allowing the complex to serve as an extended system of roof gardens too. We believe that the multiple levels, stylobat structure, roof gardens, parks and waterfront fills the district with a unique atmosphere that encourages many different forms of relaxation.

05


perspective│coconcept development scheme

06


site plan|main components scheme

functional

vegetation roof level

buildings public dwelling office education sport platform vegetation stylobate level

roads │carparks

pedestrian platform

highway

stylobates-parkings

railway local road stylobate parking roads

pedestrian walks

site

N

0

250

500

1000m

vegetation pedestrian zone

07


ARCHITECTURE

general scheme

master plan fragment

roof-park zone N 0

apartments

public, office, retail

50

100

200m

The final design is a horizontal skyscraper, a multifunctional complex stretched over the southern part of the district. Geometrically, the building is a group of connected horizontal volumes forming a grid. In some places the grid intersects with the vertical cubic volumes. Functionally, the vertical volumes are social housing with public space and garden in the lower block. Horizontal volumes include housing, offices, and retail areas on the first floor level. Much attention is paid to public spaces, consisting of an extended roof garden on the top and public space areas inside the horizontal grid.

08


floor plans

N

0

5

10

20

30m

Due to the large scale of the project, for demonstration I picked a fragment in which the horizontal "net" intersects with the vertical volumes. For this piece I designed the master plan and layouts of typical floors. Since the main objective was to study the typology of residential buildings, more attention was paid to this component. 09


apartment layout|section|detail

01

02 03 04 05 06 07

16 17 18 19 20 21 22

23

08 09

24 25 26

10 11

12 13

14 15

01. VIRACON LOW RTIPLE GLAZED WINDOW

14. WEEP HOLE

02. KAWNEER 1600 CURTAIN WALL SYSTEM

15. STEEL SHELF ANGLE

03. 512 VENTRO ISO LOCK VENTILATOR

16. SURFACE FINISHING

04. ALUMINIUM SILL PLATE & FLASHING

17. REINFORCED CONCRETE FLOOR 70 mm

05. STEEL SHELF ANGEL

The complex contains eight different types of layouts: apartments and lofts containing one to three bedrooms. All apartments have a large terrace and full amenities.

detached from surrounding structures

06. SEALANT

18. CASTING PROTECTION

07. ANCHOR BOLTS WITH TIEBACKS

19. THERMAL INSULATION 50 mm

08. BRICK VENEER

20. UNDERLAYMENT AGGREGATE 20 mm

09. AIRSPACE 50 mm

21. CONCRETE FLOORING 200 mm

10. RIGID INSULATION 75 mm

22. METAL BEAM UPN 20

11. STEEL SUPPORT SYSTEM

23. VAPOR BARRIER

HIDDEN BY RIGID INSULATION

24. GASKET

12. SHEATING

25. METAL CORNER 80x80 mm

13. STEEL STUD WALL 150 mm

26. COMMUNICATION PIPES

0

5

10

20

30m

10


construction|detailing

1

Fragment 1 +125.400

bolt hole 20

A-A

+65.500

+89.100

C2

+62.200

C2

FG2

C1

FG2

FG2

FG2 -30x360 Вr

+58.900

2

1

1 FG2

bolt hole 20

FG2

bolt hole 20

C2

C2

Вr

+55.600

2

C1

+65.500

FG2

FG2

+55.600 6 000

elaborated fragment

1

4x-30x120

-30x400x700

6 000 2

3 FG2

C

FG2

+58.900

±0.000

А

B2

B2

B2

B2

B2

А

2x-30x120

FG2

B

FG2

B2

B2 FG1

B1

B2 B1

B2

FG1

B2

B1

B2

B1

FG1

6 000

B2

1-1

2

B2

B2

B2

B2

B2

FG2

FG2

6 000

6 000

B2 FG1

B1

B2 B1

B2

FG1

B2

B1

B1

B2

B2

А

Fragment 1

FG1

6 000

B2

1

2

3

-30x360

List of elements section

item sketch

1

1

level

composition

steel quality

C1

4x-30x400

ВСт3пс6

C2

4x-30x400

ВСт3пс6

FG1

270x125x6

ВСт3пс6

FG2

270x125x6

ВСт3пс6

B1

160x81x5

ВСт3пс6

B2

100x55x4,5

ВСт3пс6

Вr1

4x-30x120

ВСт3пс6

Вr2

2x-30x120

ВСт3пс6

270x125x6

Fragment 1

11


perspective view from stylobat level

12


KINDERGARTEN INTRODUCTION KIEV, UKRAINE BAC 4 2st semester ACADEMIC INDIVIDUAL GRADUATION PROJECT JUNE 2013 AUTHOR:

OLEG ASOIEV

SUPERVISORS:

GEORGY HORHOT VADYM ZAPLATNIKOV garazdarch@gmail.com

ROLE:

CONCEPT, DRAWINGS, VISUALIZATION

The task was to design a kindergarten for 60 children in a previously designed residential district. Childhood is a unique period in life, a time when people just start to grow familiar with this world. This time is full of mysteries, wonders and discoveries. It’s also full of information. Children receive the most intense amount of it in childhood, what gives this period significant potential. Kindergartens consequently take on a lot of responsibility for taking care of human development during this time. Yet the majority of kindergartens today seem more like a playground and a space for sheltering children during daytime while parents work than a space for development. Of course, the roots of the issue go far beyond architecture, yet design still plays a role. In trying to understand the role of architecture, I came across a TEDx talk by Ken Robinson, famous educationalist. He said:

1

The second principle that drives human life flourishing is curiosity. If you can light the spark of curiosity in a child, they will learn without any further assistance...Curiosity is the engine of achievement.

2

The role of a teacher is to facilitate learning.

I decided to apply these ideas in the context of architecture.

13


RESEARCH

Taking inspiration from Robinson’s theory, I analysed the most well-known child-centred educational philosophies, including the following:

Friedrich Froebel (1782-1852) created the “kindergarten” concept in 1837 to maximize human potential. His main hypotheses are: FROEBEL METHOD

MONTESSORI & REGGIO EMILIA METHODS

Humans are creative beings. True education must help children to understand this. Children learn best in atmospheres that provide stimulating and prepared environment. Play drives learning. It’s a biological imperative to discover how things work.

Froebel’s principle that teaching should always be joyful, fun and easy, latterly transformed in "Play becomes joy, joy becomes work, work becomes play" Johannes Itten’s approach to studies applied in Bauhaus.

The Montessori method was developed by Maria Montessori (1870 –1952), an Italian physician and educator. Initially she was inspired by Froebel. The physical environment of a Montessori classroom is designed with children in mind. Further building on this theory, the Reggio Emilia method, developed by a teacher, Loris Malaguzzi (1920-1994), said the classroom is considered to be the third teacher in a Reggio setting.

Both these pay a lot of attention to the physical environment of the early childhood settings.

Finally, the Waldorf-Steiner Method, originated by Rudolf Steiner (1861-1925), an Austrian philosopher, theorist and architect, also built on Froebel’s legacy. The method stresses: WALDORFSTEINER METHOD

Imagination is at the heart of learning. Steiner used architectural form, textures, shadow and light to create space that inspired the child's imagination. Steiner believed that children need to be surrounded by beauty in an aesthetically pleasing atmosphere. The Environment in which children learn should be as stimulating as the books they read or the music to which they listen. The goal of Waldorf-Steiner Method is to wake up the natural creativity that every child has within.

14


CONCLUSION Among these methods, however, little is said about the specific role of architecture, while more attention is paid to the organization of the classroom. Nevertheless, synthesizing these principles I came to the conclusion that the main goal of kindergarten design is to reach an aesthetically pleasant environment stimulating: CURIOSITY

IMAGINATION

PLAY ACTIVITY

“It is, however puzzling how littke the key educationalists from the earliest times had to say about the role of architecture and architects, except in the realm of spiritualist educational theories exemplified by Steiner kindergartens”, Mark Dudek, ”Kindergarten architecture: space for the imagination”, 1996.

CREATIVITY

BUCKMINSTER FULLER

VASSILY KANDINSKY JOSEF ALBERS

PAUL KLEE

LE CORBUSIER

CHARLES EAMES

JOHANNES ITTEN

PIET MONDRIAN

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT

ALBERT EINSTEIN

INSPIRATION During research I was deeply inspired by the Froebel Method, particularly its main instruments: Froebel gifts. The Froebel gifts are special educational toys, developed by Froebel to encourage the exploration of form and to demonstrate the geometry and natural patterns of the physical world. Froebel believed in the existence of simple laws and principles underlying nature’s apparent complexity. Twenty in number, the gifts provide a hands-on exploration of solids, surfaces, lines, rings and points.

Froebel influence scheme

These simple wooden blocks and shapes have inspired many artists, architects and scientists who were educated in early childhood using the Froebel Gifts, including Paul Klee, Vassily Kandinsky, Piet Mondrian, Buckminster Fuller, Frank Lloyd Wright, and Le Corbusier to name a few. Norman Brosterman (author of “Inventing Kindergarten”, 2014) even claimed that the visual revolution of the twentieth century can be seen as an evolutionary outgrowth of Froebel’s educational experiment. I was especially inspired by the modernist shapes

of Gift №2 – sphere, rectangle and cylinder. According to Froebel, children should not be allowed to draw nature until they had first mastered the basic forms hidden behind its appearance. Cosmic, geometric elements were what should first be made visible to the child-mind. Gift №2 was called "the children's delight" and became the symbol of Froebel’s kindergarten. I decided to apply this theory in kindergarten architecture, conceptually linking the programme task with the components of Froebel’s Gifts. 15


CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT

THE SPHERE Froebel saw the sphere as symbol of unity and as an “outward manifestation of unimpeded force, diffusing itself freely and equally in all directions”. Besides, he recognized that a ball is ofte n a first or favourite toy of infants. Since it was Froebel’s preferred shape, I transformed it into the main educational modules of the kindergarten.

THE CUBE The cube was used to represent the concept of diversity. “It was an object that had many edges, many corners, and many sides” and was thus the exact opposite of the sphere. The cube, transformed into a parallelepiped volume, served as the central block connecting various activities, including study and administration.

THE CYLINDER The cylinder represents the “dynamic equilibrium or reconciliation of opposites” because it could be stacked like a cube or rolled like a sphere. In Froebel’s philosophy, the cylinder is a connector between sphere and cube, so I used it to connect the volumes.

16


perspective

17


master plan|concept development scheme|sketches

N

0

25

50

100m

THE BOX A significant component of the Gifts concept, it evokes the child’s curiosity and provokes the question: what is inside? The “box-effect” is achieved by placing all the volumes into a rectangular depression. A canopy serves as a box top, partly revealing what’s inside.

18


facade|section|floor plans

The final design is four spherical educational modules. Two pipe-like bridges serve as an entrance, as well as connect the module to the central unit. To create more potential for action and play, I divided the spherical volumes into three levels. Directly from the module, one can go down to the playground, as well as hide on the first level in case of bad weather. All drawings presented in this portfolio done by me.

0

5

10

25

9

4

12

4

11

10

1

1

7

4

4

8

2

2

3

3

5

50m

6

'

1 2

STUDY SLEEPING

3 4

PLAYING CANOPY

5 6

ADMINISTRATIVE MEDICAL

7 8

MUSIC SPORT

9 10

KITCHEN LAUNDRY

11 12

POOL WINTER GARDEN

0

5 10

25

50m

19


interior view

One of the toys in a Waldorf classroom is a doll which has no facial expression. The appearance is intentionally simple in order to allow the child playing with it to improve or strengthen imagination and creativity. Abstract and simple components of the kindergarten work in the same way, challenging children to transform the appearance of the building using their own imagination. The three-level structure, providing a variety of places to stay, motivates children to explore and play. I believe that the final design forms an environment that significantly contributes to each child’s development.

20


PRIVATE HOUSE KAUNAS, LITHUANIA PROFESSIONAL GROUP WORK IN KANCO STUDIO NOVEMBER 2013 - TODAY TEAM:

ALGIMANTES KANCAS GUSTE KANCAITE TOMAS TANKELEVICIUS OLEG ASOIEV

ROLE:

HOUSE LAYOUT, VISUALIZATION, DETAILED DRAWINGS, AUTHOR SUPERVISION

60/36 - 0375

60/36 - 0376

60/36 - 0395

60/36 - 0396

Medinė terasa

64.29

miškas

Betoninės plokštės

1

68.82

67.60

2

kiemas

67.88

C

3

63.55

67.17

B

4

69 69 .05 .00

67 .50

68.17

69.18

5280/0010:0296

66.94

64

68 68 .80 .40

66.21

66

Trinkelės

65.22

68.56

68 68 .65 68 .40 68 .65 .60

5

64.05

66.36

DESCRIPTION

68 .00 68 .50

666.56

68

A

7 3

67.89

69.20

±0 .00= 69 .20

69.25

67.93

68.32

68.34

69 .00

1

C

69.14

69.41 69.81

kiemas

68.60

c

MG

4

70.18

70

70.06

lietaus surinkimas

A 3

70.31

70.17

68 68 .70 68 .45 68 .80 .45

69.09

2

69.80

70.10

c

69.50

70.03

kiemas

68.69

B

5280/0010:0103

69.98

70.03

66.89

69.58

MG

69.86 5280/0010:0104

5

70.30 70.02

70.00

68.93

7

68.84

69.10 69.15

70.13

c

69.99 70.14 70.08

69

69.79

6

70.21

68 .05 5280/0010:0105 68 .90 68 .95 .90

68.94

69.89

ž

68.97

69.93

69.41

69.95 70.08 70.11 70.21 70.23

69.94 70.00 70.26

kiemas

I joined this project at the proposal stage and took part in concept development. The project is a private home for a couple with two children. The site is a picturesque place with a pond and woods on the outskirts of Kaunas. A simple, one-story structure best fit the preferences of the client. Given the scenic view, the terrace and main room’s windows were placed facing northeast.

To compensate for the absence of southern sunlight, we added skylight windows throughout. In order to make interior less opened from the side of a driveway, which sits from the southwest we designed narrow windows along the corridor. A terrace with a pool is accessible from every part of the home. At the front of the building we designed a canopy for vehicles. Horizontally placed slate tiles make up the facade material.

6080150.00 503650.00

21


facades|section

4'

1'

1

2

3

3

1

1'

2'

A

4'

3'

A

C

parapet lightweight structure

B

parapet lightweight structure +4.35

black color plaster finish

black color plaster finish +3.95

dooden planks finish

+3.95 +3.50

1 300 +3.20

decorative brick finish

decorative brick finish

+2.50

larch planks equal to 120 x 28 with 5mm intervals covered with transparent oil

+1.90

wooden lumber 25 x 10

larch beams 50x70h covered with transparent oil as the boards

+1.30

metal beam UPN 120 590

concrete pile foundation ø200mm

-0.50

-0.375

-0.25

-0.125

1 500

2 030

1 530

2 030

gutters

gutters

wooden planks finish

±0.00

decorative brick finish

±0.00

±0.00

250 250

concrete coating -0.12

gutters

-0.218

-2.03

B

A

22


house layout|detailing

M3

1

2

2

4

3

5

parapet tin-plate cladding

7

6

2 layers of waterproofing welded

+4.35

parapet OSB 25 mm

OSB 10 mm

slope 2.5%

wood cladding

Water overflow tank

-0.50 alt. 69.10

1

SD 1

bearing metal structures

plaster reinforced mesh

+3.95 -0.30 -0.40 -0.20 alt. 68.90 alt. 68.80 alt. 69.00

-0.50 alt. 68.70

-0.10

-0.50 alt. 69.10

alt. 69.10

C

C

M3 Ø100 velux

±0.00=69.20

M1

+3.50

±0.00=69.20

±0.00=69.20

B

TV

B

01

Ø100 velux

05

07

09

13

15

14.77 m²

30.38 m²

6.95 m²

18.84 m²

18.84 m²

every second seam without mortar

wooden window element assembly

TV

80.50 m²

17

lintel

21.86 m²

02 13.33 m²

10 21.58 m²

*

±0.00=69.20

-0.03

08

2.33 m²

11

12.5 m²

14

8.68 m²

3.97 m²

column

+2.50

alt. 69.17

06

16 3.52 m²

M5 18 8.21 m²

A

04

12

20.69 m²

26.71 m²

A

±0.00=69.20

1

M4

-0.12 alt. 69.08 -0.24 alt. 68.96

-0.24 alt. 68.96

EXPLICATION

-0.24 alt. 68.96

-0.24 alt. 68.96

01

LIVING ROOM

80,50

02

KITCHEN 1

13,33 2

03

STORAGE ROOM

04

CLOACKROOM

20,69

05

WORKROOM

14,77

06

WC

07

MASTERBEDROOM

-0.24 alt. 68.96

5

6

-

±0.00=69.00

M2

-0.24 alt. 68.96

-0.24 alt. 68.96

Premises

-0.12 alt. 69.08

2

-0.24 alt. 68.96

Nr.

±0.00=69.20

7

-0.24 alt. 68.96

3

-0.24 alt. 68.96

4

G1

±0.00=69.00

±0.00

1,97

SAUNA

10

SPA

11

BATHROOM

12

GALLERY

26,71

13

CHILD'S ROOM

18,84

14

BATHROOM

15

CHILD'S ROOM

16

TAMBOUR

17

UTILITY ROOM

18

BOILER/LAUNDRY

8,21

TOTAL

317,1

6,95

±0.00

85

-0.218

-0.30

10,45

DRESSING ROOM

window manufacturers should install supporting detail

larch planks equal to 120 x 28 with 5mm intervals

30,38

09

gasket

larch beams 50x70h covered with transparent oil as the boards

5,72

08

column

tin-plate cladding

E

+

-0.24 alt. 68.96

EPS 100N

-0.10

metal beam UPN 120

D

21,58 8,68 8

concrete pile foundation ø200mm

9

XPS 25 cm

-0.70

XPS 10cm

XPS 10cm

3,97

concrete substrate

18,84 3,52 21,86

0

5

10

20m

Pile

23


building site

Today the project is almost finished. During the process I worked on the layout of the house, created detailed drawings and regularly took part in supervision of the project, participating in discussions and proposing solutions. All the drawings of the project presented in this portfolio were completed by me.

24


building site

25


JUMPING HOUSE LOCATION:

EVENT: TYPE: AUTHOR: CURATOR:

ROLE:

YABLUNITSKIY PEREVAL, IVANO-FRANKIVS’K REGION, CARPATHIANS, UKRAINE, AUGUST 2013 MULTIDISCIPLINARY WORKSHOP INDIVIDUAL PROJECT OLEG ASOIEV VADYM ZAPLATNIKOV LARYSA MERKULOVA garazdarch@gmail.com CONCEPT, MODEL

This project was designed during the “YUNIPERUS” architectural-literature summer school in the Carpathians in 2013. The event was a reflection on “The UnSimple,” a novel by Ukrainian contemporary writer Taras Prokhasko about the imaginary town of Yalivet’s. The “jumping house” is one of the main characters of the “Theatre of Play,” a piece I developed during the workshop.

26


concept description

Cinema picks up desirous to watch the movie

The goal of the workshop was to recreate the town of Yalivet described in the novel. The “Theatre of Architectural Play” is an attempt to bring the town to a state of existence both in reality and in the imagination.

Houses getting to the bar when there is no place left

The play was based on the idea that, in order to help people relax during vacation, all the homes can move and deliver people to various areas of the Carpathians. In case there is an obstacle on the way (rock, river or another house), the house just jumps over it. I particularly elaborated on “The House of One Actor,” a typical representative of the jumping houses “family.” Its main function is to give people joy. The character instinctively feels when people want to be entertained and instantly finds them wherever they are to satisfy their cultural needs.

-

Bunch of houses that want to see a show

Another two characters worth mentioning are the Cinema and The Bar, houses given special attention in the novel. In my conception, the Cinema was a house that can fly to people who want to watch movies and goes down to pick them up. Cinema also serves as a transfer, picking people up from all over the Carpathians and even from Kiev to deliver them to Yalivets, giving them the chance to watch a movie on the way. The Bar is the only house that cannot move physically, but the play implies that he likely just does not want to. As a result, the character has a lot of space around him for the houses that attach to him every evening. This play let me explore a concept that has guided my studies: how to bring people joy through their homes and architectural spaces.

Actor performs “Hamlet” from House of One Actor’s stage

27


THANK YOU !

OLEG ASOIEV ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO 2015  
OLEG ASOIEV ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO 2015  
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