Page 1

THE VOL. VII .

CANTUARIAN. MAY,

IQ09.

No. r4.

EDITORIAL. HAnna virumque cano. H The flood is upon us, and we wallow deep in the trough of innumerable seas; Corps, Cricket, Certifi cate Examinations, Continents of work, Captain s and Corporals in their myriads hustle and hound us to the strenuous life while the th ermometer rests inexorable at 90° in the Mint Yard, or wherever we happen to be drilling, which seems never to be in th e shade. The Mint Yard we should remark in passing has died a violent death, and from the dust has come the Parade Ground . where arm ies in miniature wheel and turn to right and left. if possible as commanded, though dissentients as to the required direction are stili legion: But for the present" As you were IJ I The story of the Corps is for a hand more skilled to write. Cricket, inspired by the desperate keenness and proved personal excellence of it s Captain, struggles gamely, an d though up to date not with its customary co nspicuous success , yet it hopes and we all hope for the change of fortune which must surely come. The batting of the side is generally a one man show, and th e bowlers have had plumb wickets to deal with and thoroughly goo d opponents j the cloud must pass and the shining lights of the team must soon appea r.


THE

CANTUARIAN .

The Boat Club is in a frenzy of energy and its members like the immortal Agag. walk and repose very delicately. very ! They rise from bed and above all bodily suffering traverse a salutary half mile before breakfast; and, all credit to them, they pretend to enjoy it; perhaps it is the novelty of securing the matuti nal worm that makes them so brisk : Good luck to theml and to the authorities of the Tennis Courts who sigh [or even a solitary shower to make the grou nd less like a high road; and finally success to the Corps. the Cricket and the Captains of them both.

RETIREMENT OF MR . PLANT, Everyone will regret that Mr. J oseph Plant has been obliged to sever his connection with the school owing to somewhat failing health and a recent seve ro illness. Originally appointed by Dr. Mitchinson on his sllccession to the school as headmaster, Mr. Plant was t he first to form the Choir and Choral Society of th o School, and though he gave up his form wo rk after a twelve month. his connection with the School has re mained unbroken till now. For 5+ years he has been a lay¡ clerk in the Cathedral and it goes withou t saying that one who has retained his voi ctl so long must have a so und knowledge of singing. His ex perience has been of grelll value to us and none will regret his departure more th an the writer of this short tribu te w him and his work. Mr. Plant's own feelings towards the School are best expressed ill a speech made by him some little while back, when he said that his dearest wish for his closi ng years was" to spend and to be spent among us." PERCY

GODJj' RH\

I

The following address has recentlY bem presmted to IlZlll : uTo Joseph Plant who as sometime T eacher of Singing and Instructor anti L eader of the School Choi r, has endeared himself to many generations of Kin K'" Scholars, this simple record of affection a nd gratitnde is offe red in the 50th year III his devoted service by the Boys and Masters of the King's School, Ca nterbury ."


THE

CANTUA RIAN.

WORK IN THE GYM NASIUM.

. The results of the Gymna~tic work during the past year have been hi ghly Unfortunately ow mg to an outbreak of sickness the Gymnastic competitI ons coul d ~ot be held as usual during the Easler term, but a com petition was arra nged to decIde on th e pair, to represent the School at the Public Schools Competition.s at Ald ers~ot, resultin g in R. M. Gent and D. H. Cowie bein g 1St and 2nd r~spectl ve ly. CowIe was somewhat handicapped by being out of School for someti me pre~ious t.o the compet i ~i on, but he just managed to pull through to 2nd place af~er tymg wIth ~ol1sd e n, 1. At Aldersho t the pair made a very creditable show belJlg brack~ted wit h Repton for 5th place, and R. M. Gent winn ing the silver Med~l a~1~ Cup given for the highest ind ividua l nu mber of marks. by half a ma rk. T he ll1dlVldual and total marks of th e pair were as follows : satIsfac~~ry.

Horizontal Bar.

Parellel Bars.

Rings.

Rope.

2n?

Ht,

2nd.

.0

>0

.0

'0

>0

5

5

5

5

5

4.

5

5

4

5

5

4

1St.

R. M . Gent

...

8

7!r

8

9.

9.

D.

...

3

6.

6.

8

8

II. Cowie

Horse.

ut.

2nd. 3rd .

4lh.

Total.

ISl. ! 2Ild. 10

10

7!

8

7.

8

90 ---- -----

77t}

65.

143

Agai nst Be,khamstead : R. st<ealfieldJamesl 7

W. N. Leak

... 6

7

9

9.

4

5

6

8

9

3

5

I :' I I I 4T'1 91: I 4.

5

8

77 } â&#x20AC;˘ 147. 70 â&#x20AC;˘

The work of.R: 1'1'. Gent thro~ gho ul lhe com peti tion was of a very high standard, he also ha,d the dIstlllctlOn of beatIng laSL year's winner in G. C. Dixon of Blundell's S~hool, TIverton, W~lO was com peti n~ again th is rea r. Too Bluch praise cannot be give n t<:, .I? H. CowIe who made a ~hp at the first exe rcise in the competition thereby only gammg 3 marks out of a possI ble 10. H e stuck to his work and did not allow


THE

34+

CANTUARIAN.

this mishap to unnerve him and finally had 65 '~ marks placed to his credit. It may be worth mentioning that th e high place occupied by the School pair in this competition was largely due to their all -round smartness especially in startin g a nd finishing. as well as by the actual perfor mance of exercises on the different apparatus. This most im po rtant poi nt must not be lost sight of by the younger members of the School, who should always try and remember that it is not the mere performance of a few trick exercises that is req uired in the Gymnasium, but smartness and activity; the main objec t of the Gymnastic work being to give the body a healthy carriage conlbined with strength and activity, And now a word for the School Competitions which were held at the beginning of the Summer Term which are just as important to the School as the all important onp. at Aldershot, :) N rnv BoYS' COMPUTITION , Parnllel Bar5.

H ori zontal Bars.

"'l '"d. ----

Rope.

------

1st.

2'ld.

10

10

Snatt'-Jst Prize " 7, . 9.

8!

"

10

8

Wood - 2nd Prize

-

Dawbnrn Berryman

..

'

.. , .. ,

10

-

10

H orse.

Rings.

Tou.!.

--- -----nt¡ 12nd. 10

:0

"

9

8

7.

----

80

-- ----68

I.

9

7

8

7!

5.

8

7.

7

59.

II.

3

6

7,

7

6

6

7

5

47.

III.

3

4

4

5

5

6

6.

4

37.

I

I V.

UNDER 16 COMPETI TION.

I Snntt~- Isl Prize ...

8,

9.

9

9.

8.

9.

7.

9

7'

Gent'--2nd l)rlze

5

8.

7,

8

8

8.

8.

8,

6,.

II.

4.

7.

8

8.

6

8.

7,

7,

58

III.

.. . 4.

8

7.

8.

7,

7

7

7

57

IV.

5.

8

7

7

5

8

7

6,

54

V.

.,. 3

5

4

6.

5.

7,

8

6.

46

VI.

H O\lsdenZ ...

Gore Lang

Baker'

... ... ...

."

The work in these two Com peLitions was above the avera ge.

I

I.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

345

In the Open Competition the pJacings are as below: Parallel Horizontal 1__~B~,,~,.~~: B~·':'·-rI 1St.

2nd.

lS I.

:;md.

R"".

H , se

Ring"

__1St.~~_I _~~~'~·~·~~·I ______ :md. ISI . :md. 3rd. 4th.

~ ~ ~~ ~..::. ~ ~ ~ ~

I

Total.

,

___'°___ 1___"_'__

Gent , i.

I.

Cowie

II.

7

III.

8,

8

IV .

7

8.

7.

V.

9

7,

7

VI.

6, 6, 8 , 8.

8

7

VII .

Woodhouse ".

.. , 4

8

7,

9

8.

8

8

9

Gottwnltz

...

7

7

9

7.

8

8.

6

8.

8

9

4,

7,

8

8,

5

Housden, i. ". Snatt, ii. Waytc,

j,

5

5 . .. 4,

5

. ' 3, 6,

8

The whole of the first five gaining their School Colours for Gymnastics. I will conclude by mentioning again that the work on the whole has been good, and that next yea r the challenge shield given for the pair that total the hi ghest number of marks will be brought back to King's School, Canterbury, is the earnest wish and hope of C. A. W. The Editors would like to add that the tha nks of all friends of the School are due to Sergeant-Major Williamson and his two assistants who so largely co ntributed to the splendid results at Aldershot. The followin g was the position of the School at Aldershot: I. Berkhamstead School--Shield If7t II. Highgate School.. 'f5! Ill. Wellington College '45 IV. Rugby School '4ft V J King's School, Canterbury 143 . l Repton School . . ..


'THE

CANTUARIAN.

OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS. When the genial Editor of the Canluaritw, towe ring above our puny six feet i,n the Mint Yard. blandly asked us to se nd a II nice long account" of the O. T. C. to hl S valuable journal, we confess that on ly a strong se nse of our dignity, and a: sort of res pect for our martial bearing prevented us from falling all of a heap before him. We had borne with an eq ual mind the te rribl e strai n of organisation and run up a te rrific stamp bill durin g the past two months, regarding this as but one morc straw for the patient,

over-worked. and under-paid camel of a school-master to bear. But to be dragooned into wielding the pen in addition to the sword seemed for the moment a burden co mpared to which the extra twope nce on unearned income with a fall ing revenue seemed as nought. However, all is for the best in this best of all worlds, and we have a certain com pensation in knowing that we shall never fall unrler the eighteenpenny scale, and thatUf. the Cadet he (i 's S anterb ury, Contingt!nl, Officers Trai nin g Cor s uni or Divisi ',.. their n gery parae eSt we shall soon be eadin our stron tw o com anies forth into the countr for Field Trainin . his is ust the oint we WI S 1 to em hasize. The n) rill, Dn a the first few , IS mere a re aration for the reali, interestin work which will come on later, and which WI e ood am wrong 1 an instrucllve In proportlOn as t re Im1l1ary has D alIen mastere. We are fortunate in possessing good friends. The hinges of the War Office door often t urn wi th great diffi culty. and but for Major Hubert !sacke (O.K.S.) of th u Staff College, we had often SLInk in despai r before this forbidding portal. Maj r Finch-Hatton, co mmanding the Buffs Depot, not only lent us two Sergeant .. Instructors for a week to lick into shape our awkward sq uads, but gives us much encouragement by his real sympathy and interest. \Ve coul d mention others, bub WI' wish particularly to record our obligation to these two officers. We are fortunate too in our Instructor. Sergea nt-Major T . Cheal, the ButTs, has a splendid reco rd. He wea rs all his ample chest the Medal for distinguished Condu t in the Field, the Medal for Long Service and Good Conduct, and the Medal f r Merito rious Service. Such a group of Medals, in the possession of one man. we aln infor med, is pe rhaps lIll ique. Besides these he possesses also the Chitral Medal and two South African Medals. Training began the first day of Term, when the newly-appointed Offi.cers and Non-Commisioned Officers fe ll in and learnt their paces. Since th en the IvI lIl t Van-I has resound ed with the short, sharp words of command. Up to date one hundn'd and seventy one Cadets say" Hear" to the m~ster roll, practically the whole of till '


THE

CANTUARIAN.

347

Senior School, with a stiffening of about half-a-dozen Parrots. The whole Corps is divided into two Companies. The establishment is naturall y not complete yet. Mr. C. W. Bell (in command), Mr. A. Latter and Mr. H. Poole, all Unattached List, T erritorial Force, are the pri ncipal Officers, with R. M. Gent and E. B. Hosking as Cadet Officers, while l-I. Townshend , C. J. Galpin, D. H. Cowie, R. W. H. Moline, W. J. S. Price, H . D. To wnend, R. C. Cumberbatch, and R. E. Martin are our Section Commanders. Vve hope to complete the f1111 establishment as the term advancesbu lers, signallers, and scouts an ;:. Hi Drum. The ublic Schools Brigade Camp (Eastern Command) is held at Aldershot at the end of July. Vve have decided to be there, and hope that a goodly Dumber will muster on the tented plain. As Camp begins on Monday, Jllly 26th, it Ius been necessary to re -arrange the dates of engagements at the end of te rm, so as to allo w the Contin ge nt to march into camp in time to ke ep the requisite nllm ber or days. Consequently Speech Day will be on Tuesday. the 27th, and the Cadets wi1l1l1arch off immed iately after the Speeches. .,.---On another page will be found the acco unt of an Address delivered last term by l\I[ajo r H . Isacke. It needs no words of ours to recommend it most heartily to our readers. We read in it the views of a very earn est man, and one who is at prese nt engaged on work of the utmost importance to the country at large. His words must not fall to the grolmd. The \Var Office is watching with the greatest interest th e work of the Officers Training Corps. Ou r duty is quite clear. Our aim is to do active and intelligent work on the parade ¡grou nd and in the field. Our privilege is to show an example worthy of our great traditions/ , C. W. B. 7'lufollowil1g is lite Llddress oj MAJOR H. I SACKE refernd 10 in IJ/earll'cle on Ihe Corps. " NIr. Galpin has done me the honour of asking me to address you on the subject of the Officers Training Co rps. .In th e fir ce I want to remind ou that we b.erS-OLthe-gtea.t.est Empire t lat the worl as ever seen. next ask you to consirlcr what succeeding gcneratlOlls Wi ll t hInk of us, d . through shee r apathy and love of case and pleasure, we are responsible for the dismemberment of the Empire and the loss of our freedo m of which we are so proud . There are two parts of the Empire to be considered. the British Isles and our oversea possessions. T hey are necessary to each other. lmaginc th ese islands without our oversea possessions, the mainstay of Ollr trade and co nsequently of our wealth, the chief SOUTce of Ollr food supply and in fact of ever),thin g which enables us to exist as a great nat ion. Imagi ne [ndia or Aust ralia with tll:e British Isles reduced to the position of a foreign dependency, with no fleet, little trade, and consequently no recuperative power to enable us to rise again in the world. 1J1en thi nk of our world¡ wide responsibilities. and how, if the balance of power


tHE CANTUARIAN. in Europe is to be maintained. it is essential that we should retajn our present position in the world." . After illustrating our responsibilities in Europe and with regard to our oversea possessions. the speaker continued:/I Is not the very fact that we arc ne C(:ssar to th e }Cace of th w~o.le w':>rld aibne su ffi ci nt cau or ever 0 ' t fit . se to defend our oSltIon l If, ever the call should be made? That position call not sabs acton y be defended .y Iplon~acy alone, o r by the Navy alone, or by our small Regula: Army,. howe~e r effiCl~nt It mlgi~ be, or by merely dl!claring that we are a peace -l~vl n g ~atl~)Il !;lth no '~l sh to. g~ war. Above all it can not be defended by periodically smgmg Rule Bnt~anma, or by devoting ourselves entirely to the eng rossin~ b.usi ncss of mon ey-makl11g, or th e plf"asures of football and cricket. Vve are too l1l CllllCd to-day to rest on the laurels which we won in the past. As regards athletics, I feel I am on delicate g roun d: but I must remind you t!lat the re can be too much of a good thing, and that \~'e should l~ever l e~ our re~ reatlO,n enslave us or blind llS to th e duties of life. There IS much stIll true 10 \Velhngton s saying rf"ga rding the playing-fields of Eton; but war ha s since then become vastly more scientific, and. in th e present day, mere courage and ~ower to comman~ call1~ot sl1cceed without training and military knowledge. The re IS ~nly one. war 111 whlch our position can be adequately defended and that is by the natIon rOl1 slllg Itself from its present dead ly state of apathy, and preparing to ba~k its diplomacy and the I.lav~! and military strength, ordinarily maintained, by the trallled manho od of the nation. After showing how, in the absence of an efficient Home Defence Army, it w Ol~ld be necessary if war arose to retain our Regula r Army at home, and how our chanccs of success mio-ht thereby be hopelessly prejudiced at th e ~utset, t~e spea.ker declarcd that we still p~s sess the right spirit. only it is nut th~ fashlOn to dlsplay It. He Lh cn pointed out that our present condition was a standlll g menace to the peace of Lhe world in spite of all our peaceful professions and showed that there was no g ua:antc ' that in the event of war, we should have tim e to improvise the. measu~es WhlC ve were too call ous <lnd too selfish to provide whilt! thert! was yet tlme . - e nex t dealt with the bogey of militari sm sho wing how a l~ati ollal army must. be the greatc !J~ guarantee of peace, seein g that all classes ar.e lIlterested, and ~ddll1g ~hat what tlh Regular Arm y wanted was the sympathy and lIltercst of the natlOn, whIch he hoped the T errito rial Army would help to secure. Every School boy also could help,. setting the right example, and there was caust! enough why we ShOlll~ ~l~ Lhlll very seriou sly over tht!se matters. He th en proceded to show how, by J?l111ng Lht' l School Corps, the present generation of King' s School boys could help theIr co untr ', "Every Army naturally requires l~~t only a sufficient numb~r of. officers but ~hm officers who are well trained. The Bntlsh Army at the present tIme lS sadly defic lclll in thi s respect. If mobilization were ordered to-morrow, a large shortage of offie'nl

b,

V


'tHE GANTUARiAN. WOUld. exist, and there is a wh olly inadequate source from which to make good the casualties. which are inevitable in war. The Officers Trai nin Cor s has been ipstituted in order that bo IS at school rna fit th cmse ves to m ' the· wish it. office rs ill the S )ecial I serve 0 the Territona Force as soon as they £TO int.o the wor . t affords them the opportunity of learning so me .- of the duties of an office r. befo re the cares of business arc upon them; and this early training should help to produce more efficient officers. The Corps mu st be regard ed by its memhers as a serious undertaking not merely as a pastllne. It is not the mere fact that a Corps ha s so many efficients in a year, and so ea rns Sl') many grants, that is important; eve n the earning of a certificate is of value, chiefly as an indication that the hold er may later on go furth er and become an officer. The true service of the Cor s to . n will ultimatel l be shown bv the num be as proviged . ~Oini n g the Corps WI mean some sli ght sac rifict! on t he par t of its mem ers ;ut' l cannot thinktnat King's School boys will be backward in sup ortin e mbers f tl e. British Em Ire. want it, the WIll ani thlllk of theIr d tIes evt1YOlllO you, who is eligible, to undertake this p.uticular duty and see if a peculiar satisfaction is not thereby gained ."

ir

After stating that drill was the foundatio n of man oeuvre and mobility. he urged th e importance of gymnastics and physical training of all kinds. H e next spoke of discipline as a wonderful force which produced cohesion in a mass and alone enabled men to do their duty in the face of great odds, an d commented on the signs of want of discipline in the nation at the present time. Passi ng on to the importance of. rifl e shooting. he expressed the hope that there would be as much keenn ess in defeating Dovcr. Felsted, and other Schools in shOali ng as there was over cricket and football. He th en referred to the importance of the Annual Camp and of an increased interest in military matters. The terrors of tht! Civil \~'ar in America showed the results of untrain ed officers. ignorance of drill and want of discipline. In that particular war, both sides were at the outset untrai ned j but in our own case we mi g ht at onCt! have to face th e well-trained and discipli ned troops of a nation in arms. Afte r declaring that he mad e no appeal to anyone to give up the idea of adopting fl nyof the great professions in civil life in order to become a prof~ssiolla l so ldier, the speaker concluded:" d however a eal to au all to fit ~Qll.[selyes for tht!-dutrof. iefending y.o.ur untr , so that use I citiz r to take our lac s if ever the call Nho me. I do eal to OU all to set an exam Ie and to sh b ' Olnlll t e oun men of all classes should . :9ms. that you ·Sllpport the inci e t 1a he so'train ed . You can still support that pri nciple in after life. I do as you a I to Icsolve to educate those with whom you come in co ntact to a sense of their duty to lhe State: to repress tht! frequent sneer at o ur citize n soldiers, who persist in doing


THE

CANTUARIAN.

the,ir ,duty to th ci,r COUl~try, however much thei r business pursuits may suffer: to IllSlst that there IS nothIng aggress ive or wished in fitti ng oneself to defend one's co untry" but ,that, on th~ cor:tr~ry, ~ is milch ill the manner of' Ild_tlW. self-sacrIfice Involved. whIch wdl Improve t lC present egenerating hysical and mora! . hIe of th e tTIiflon . J~e ar~_ perhaps ~gn s £Fiat t e natIOn 15 ver _ 5 IJviyawakening to ass, of Its clanO'er, ana~ltma et be that the cia I \ ill dawn, when all classes · ,ave t~ fit themselves . or theIr one common uty 0 t lci r country. et It 'c 't lC am)'· all. -)CGt 0 ~very (Ill S C oolOoy to do Ius utmost to ensure that tl a shiilT awn, e OfC 1 IS 00 ate. . ~ear

in mind, that the object is defen ce, not wanto n aggressive offence, and IS only by belllg str~mg and. prepar~d, that we can hope satisfactorily to fill th o posl~iOn of a great. and Just natIon, wluch we have for long occupied and mu st contmue to occupy 111 the world. ':. ,If

tha~ ~t

I

cO ll c1.u~le

by sincerely wishing this new deparlure, viz., a contingent for th !rammg Corps, as great a success as the King's School is accustomed to achIeve 111 every other branch of School life." Offi~ers

RONDELETTE. The .day was ~ot : methought a slumbro us re st iVhght poss1bly alleviate the blues. And of all thoughts the one that seemed most blest , ~Vas that which pictured cushions and canoes j TIS sweet I know to labour, but, God wot The day was hot I ~ Jound. calloe ~nd cushions and I slipped J he palllter, phed the paddle, then .... I dripped .... and sank exha usted in a shady spot; The day was hot! Th~ dar w~s hot: IJay and pondered laws I' orbldcli ng work III summer; all the while My brother soldiers, ".A." Coy., forming fo urs Were strenuously dnllIng. Did I smile To be in" B"? I think I did .... a lot, The day was hot I


THl<:

35 1

CANTUARIAN.

CRICKET. e ¡

KING'S

SCHOOL v.

ST.

LAWRENCE.

Played May 15th. This, the first match of the season, resulted i,n a~l overwhelming defeat for the School, a result not to b~ wonde red at consIdenng that previous to this there had only been two games avadable. The St. Lawrence Club, who were represented by an exceptionally stro ng team, ~atted fi:st, and tho~gh the first wicket fell at 42, the batsmen afterwards found no chfficulty m our bowlIng and put on run s at a great pace. Mr . Latter was the chief scorer making 122 in brilliant style, and soon after he was out. the innin &,s was d~cJar~d at th? large score of 3S 0 .for four wickets. The School fieldmg was fair, lVIartlll bemg eaSIly the best. On gomg in to bat the School failed miserably against Ski nner .and Clinch and were ~ll out for 74. Martin was the only o ne to play the bowling WIth any confidence, and It was unfortunate that he (Tot out when he seemed well set. Parsons made a few good shots but wa s very lucky. In the follow on with the order changed we did, if anythi ng, worse, and had scored 43 for si x wickets befo re stumps were drawn. ST.

LAWRENCE.

A. Latter, st Gent, b Cremer ... Major Stockdale, c Gent, b Cremer A. O. Snowden, c Sea brooke, b Cremer A. 1\'1. Hilton, b Cremer W. Dumall. not out Capt. Trueman, not out

F. S. PM" } Rev. H. Taylor R. C. Campbell did not bal. Skinner Clinch Extras ".

122

8

90 o 83

24

23

*350

Total (4 wickets)

*Innings dccl:ucd closed.


THE

35 2

1st Innings. H . Parsons, b Clinch ... R. L. Goltwaltz, lbw, h Clinch A. C. Fluke, c Lauer, b Clinch J. Ketlelwell , c and b Clinch ... ~ . E. :\'lartin, c Clinch, b Skinner R. E. Gordon, b Skinne r F. H. Seabrooke, b Skinner G. T. Carre. b Clinch L. G. Denne, b Skinner H. W. Cremer, c and b Cli nch R. M. Gent, not out. Extras Total

CANTUARIAN.

KI NG'S

SC HOOL.

2nd Innings.

22 a not out 4

7 4 4

lbw, b Porter

4 b Taylor 21

o

10

not out c sub, b Campbell 3 cHilton, b Stockdale ... I c Clinch, b Porter 3 o c Skinner, b Campbell 5 Extras ... I

4

6'

5

5 7

... 42

Total (6 wkts.)

74 BOWLING ANALYSIS: ST. LAWRENCE.

O.

Denne Cremer' Fluke Carre Ma rtin Gordon Parsons

KING'S

16 I~ 5 5 2

M.

a a 0

a 0

a

SCHOOL v. CHARTHAM

R.

w.

98 80 40 45 40 21 3

0

4 a a a a a

ASYLUM .

T his match, played at Chartham on Ascension Day. resulted in a draw. TII(, Asylum had first innings and ran up the excellent score of 288, to which Mr. A. FagH cont ributed a steady and almost chanceJess 94. The School bowling was mod erahlt but showed improvement on previo lls matches. The School fared bad ly at first, Parsons and Fluke succumbing in the first Ov(\1 and Gottwaltz a little later. Martin and Gordon then made a stand, scoring frc I ', Martin especially making some delightfu l shots. and it was not till the partnersh II had yielded J 10 runs that Gordon was bowl ed. Martin was almost immediah¡I)¡ afterwards well caught at wicket. The rest of the School offered no opposition 1111 at th e fall or the ninth wicket Gent and Denne came together. These two took 1111 risk~ a nd succeeded in playing out time. They were at the wickets 35 minu tl' sconng 35 runs and always appeared to have command of the bowling.


T HE

CANTUARIAN.

·353

CHARTHAM ASYLUM . A. Fagg, b Cremer2 ••• C. Cand ler, b Cremer 2 ••• H . Hill s, c Parsons, b Cremer3 W. H. Vickers, b Den ne R. F. Tait, b Denne ... D r. Topham, not out ... W. Hurst, Ibw , b Gottwaltz Rev. N. H olt, b Denne ... E. C. Wi lding, c Cremer z, b Den ne P. Davey, c Gent, b Cremcr3 .. . G. Dungey, not out ... ... . .. Extras : byes, IS j Icg· byes, I; wides,2 ..

94 7

8 32 32 49 5 12 4

20 7 18

Total (9 wickets)

*288

*Innings declared closed. K I NG'S SCHOOL.

H. R. A. R. R.

Parsons, b Hurst ... L. Gottwaltz, b Tail C. Fluke. b Hurst ... E. Martin, c Fagg, b Davey E. Gordon, b Davey F. H. Seabrooke, b Davey R. W. H . Moline, b Tait H. L. H. Cremer, b Davey H. W . Cremer, b Tait ... R. M. Gent, not out ". L. G. L. Denne, not out Ext ras: byes, II ; leg· byes, 4

a 15 4 88 41 4 4 4 5 18 14 15

Total (9 wickets)

209 .BOWLING ANALYSIS:

Denne Cremer z C remer3 Martin Fluke Gottwalt z...

CHARTHAM ASYl.UM.

..

..

M.

R.

w.

19 19

I

92 73 35 38 14 15

4 2 2 a a

I,

5 5 3

---KING'S SCHOOL v.

O.

REV.

L.

H.

2 2 a I

a

EVANS'

I

XI.

This. match was played on the St. Lnwre nce ground on Tuesd~y, May 18th. and 1!1 a defeat for the School. Parso ns and St!abrooke opened the School Innlfigs dlsastro~sly, the latter being run alit owi ng to a mi sund erstandin~. Parso ns Oo n foll.owed beIng well caught off a hard cut by Murrin at point. Fluke stayed for M n s ho~t time, but was never comfortable, while Gottwaltz did his little best, to be Npcedlly sent back by a great catch effected at mid ·on by Gelsthorpe, who was sub . ~cs l~lted


THE

354

CANTUARIAN.

fo: the scratch team., Martin alon e offered resistan ce, and he batted really well; his dnves betw~en cover and mid· off are a great feature of his battin g, whi le he made seve ral very pretty cuts past point. Moline, at th e end of the in nings , smote lustily for his 3' ; he must have a very good eye j his style is humorous. The bowlers of . the team did not come off and the innings closed for 12 9~ not vc ry good, th ough ClInch was makin g the ball swerve very nastily and took 8 wi ckets fo r 43 run S. T he scratch team d id not experience much diffi culty in kn ockin g off th e run s ; Captain

Trueman and Mr. Rashleigh hit out in great style and the School total was passed with only four wi ckets down. Huyshe kept w"ickct very fi nely fo r the scratch X L stumpin g two people and letting but two balls pass him . Appe nded are the scores :-. KING'S SCHOOl.. H. Pa rsons, c Murrin, b Clinch F. H. Seabrooke, rlln out A. C. F luke, b Latter ... R. E. Martin, c Porter, b Cli nch R. L . Gottwnltz, c sub, b Cli nch J. Kettelwell , b Clinch .. .. . R. E. Gordon, st I-Iuyshc, b Cli nch R. W. H . Moline, b Clinch ... 1-1. L. H. Cremer'l, Ibw, b Clinch L. G. L. Denne, b Clin ch I-I. W. Cremer3, not ou t Extras : byes, 7; leg-byes, 2

o o 14 So )

10 31 o o )

9

T otal

129

REV. L. Murrin, c Parson s, b Cremer' .. . 'l O. F. l-Iuyshe, c Cremer , 1) Creme r3 Rev. P. C. Joy, b Crem er' Capt. Trueman, b Fluke Martin, st Seabrooke, b Cremer z R ev_ W. Rashl eigh, b Cremer 2 F. S. Porter, not out ... C. E. II... ;, } Clinch • I'd b Rev. L. I-I. Evan s ( I not at. A. Latter Extras : byes, 15; leg-byes, I. ..

H.

EVANS'

Xl. 6

16 I; 19 16 42 9

16

T otal (6 wickets)

159 BOWJ.I NG ANALYSIS:

Martin Cremer 3 Denne Cremer 2 Fluke

•••

O.

M.

R.

5 9 9 9 4

0 0 0 0 0

25 24 3) 41 15

w_ o 2

o

3 I


'tHE

355

CANTUARiAN.

FOOTBALL.

LIST OF

ba ft.

Ground.

OpPOlltfits

---

FIR ST

1908. T h. , Oct. 15 Mr. H. Poole's xv . ..... . Tu., 20 Leicestershire Regiment Th. , 22 Dover Coll ege ... .... ." T u., 2) Wye College ........ .... .. Th. , 29 i\'Ir. A . Lat ter's x v ..... W., Nov. 4 Merchant Tay lors' Sch. Sutton Valence School SaL, ) T u., 10 Epsom College . ...... T l1. , ~"fr. G. n. Cock rem's xv. I ) T h., 19 Eastbou rnc COllege. .. .. I-Iythe F. C....... ... Sat., 21 Th. , .. 26 WyeColl ege ....... .. Sat., 28 Dover College ...... M., D'~c. 21 O.K.S. ...... .. .. .... .. ...

... . .. .. ....

MATCHES.

N tsult

---

GDtlls.

FDr.

Arainsl.

Tries. PDillts. GM{S.

-TritS· - IP-Dillts. -

XV.

Canterbury \VOIl . 3 Canterbury Lost. Canterbury 'Won. 3 Wye . .... . ' .von. I Canterbury Scmtche d. CantcrLury \~Ion. ) Sutton ..... Won. 3 Beckenllam ·Won. 2 2 Canterbury Lost. Eastbourne Lost. I Canterbury Won. 2 Canterbury Won. Dover .... .. Lost. Canterbury Won. 6(10. )

-

-

33

-

2

-21

I

8

-

5 10

50 45 13 13

6

I I

--2 6

-

II

28

-

-

5

18 5 3 29

3

38

-

2

!

-

25 - i 5

I

I

3

-

5 3 8

-

I I

I

2{I D. )

-

4 2 -

2 3 3

3 2

I

21

6

10 15 24 II

1909· Th. , Feh. 11 H ampstead Wndrs_ F . C. Canterbury Scratche d. Sat. , 13 By the F. C_ .... .. ......... Canterbury Scratche d.

..

SECOND XV.

1908·

T h. ,Oct. 22 Dover College 2nd xv ... W., 28 T oobridgc Sch. 3rd xv_ T h .• N~'v. 12 T onhridge Sch. 3rd xv. Sat. , 28 Dover College 2nd x v...

"

Al atclus Played,

..

..

1st XV, 13;

2nd

..

4;

Do\'er ...... T oobridge Caoterbu ry Canterhury

WOIl, 9 ;

..

2;

Woo. Lost . Lost. Won.

Lost, 4. 2.

.

I

(P.) I

-

I

-I

8

I

-

-

- .

I

8

2

6

I

3

POi1ltS, for, 260 ; agailzst, 13 1 • I). 55 ;

. .

.


tHE CANTUARIAN. 1S T I.

2. 3· 4· 5·

6.

7· R. 9·

10. II.

12. 13· 14· IS·

XV.

2 ND

H. Gardner ". (C(!,I.) 19OO. R. M. Gent .. ,(V.- apt.} '06. H . F. Reynolds ... '06. B. H . Matheson .. '°7· V, C. Taylor '01· H. Parsons '°7·

C. A. M. Richar~i~on B. G. Gari !Jaldi ...

R. C. Cumberbatch D. I-I. Cowie R. E ..Martin A. C. Fluke R. L. Gottwaltz. C. S. Merretl ". W. J. S. Price

...

'07·

"

'08. 'aS. '08. 'oS. '08.

'08. '08. '08.

FOOTBALL

I.

2. 3· 4· 5·

6.

7· 8. 9·

10. I .. !2.

13· ' 4· 15· 16.

XV.

C. F. Battiscombe D. V. Dunlop .. _ W. A. F. Kcrrich R. J uckes D. O. Fardc ll R. E. Gordon P. C. Snatt A. B. F. Cottrell G. O. Norton W. F. C. Palliser L. G. L. Denne ..

C. V. Snalt

1-1. A. Keyser T. D. Salt L. L. Foster

J. W, Wayte

... '907 ·

'°7· '°7· '08.

".

'oS. '08. 'oS. '08. '08. 'oS. 'oS. 'oS. '08. '08.

'oS. 'oS.

RETROSPECT.

vVith Cricket and the Corps in full swin g. it is a little difficul t to throw the mind back to Football in order to take th e usual survey of the season's players and performances. Having mad e the requi red effort, however, we find that the g~neral impression left on our mind is a favourab le o ne. Out of J 3 matc hes played. mne were won, and four lost, while points were two to one in our favour. Our defeats were at the han?s of the Leicestershire Regiment early in the seaso n, of Mr. Cockrem's. XV. whIch was a very strong one and only just won, of Eastbournc ~ollege wh o consIdered themselves much stronger than usual, and of Dover College 1D the second match when all o ur backs but two were absent. Of the victories the most satisfacto ry were those over Merchant Taylors whom we beat by 50 points to j. Epsom, Dover College, Wye College (twice), Sutton Vaienr.;e, and the O.K.S. As regard s the team, the fo rwards were ....a bustlin g lot of whom Rey nolds and Taylor were the pick, and the former's services as leader were in valuable. At half Gardne r was of course a very large host in himself, while Gottwaltz promises well for next season . The threc-quarter~ were a danger~us lot, and generally distinguish d themselves. At full back Martm fielded and kicked extrem ely well, and improved considerably in his tackl in g. Gardner captained the side admirably, and we shall watch his career at Woolwi ch with. hig h hopes of seeing him distinguish himself. We congratu late him ancl Ba~sett, o ur last two captai l~s, on having played for th e Harlequ ins in the game in whIch that club defeated L eicester, who had just lowered the colours of the strongcsL Welsh club.


'tHE CANTUAR1AN.

357

We append some short notes on members of the team :Back . R. E . MARTIN. Had no idea of tackling in the early part of the season, but made a striking im provement and should do wel l. Fields a nd kicks excellently. Tllret-quarler Backs. R. M. GENT. D oes an enormous lot of work, a nd was invaluable in defence. Has ple nty of reso urce a nd runs with determination aided by a good swerve. Did not always feed hi s wing enough . B . H. MATHESON. Always goes hard and t3.kes a lot of stopping. Has developed more resource and learned to hand off. Was alsl) more steady on hi s feet, and invariably made ground. H. PARSONS. Run s well with a good swerve, and C,l n hand off very harel. Much improved all round , but did not get a great number of chances. C. S. MERRETT. Much improved, and on his day went straight and hard, but still often inclined to stop an d do noth ing. Slow in getting o n to hi s man.

Haif Backs. H. GARDNER (Capt. ) A very good sl.1.nd-off half. His defence was magnifi'cent and his attack very bri llian t except for o ne brief period in th e season when he seemed to lose his nerve. Kicks ad mirably, and captained his side with judgment. R . L. GOTTWALTZ. A promisi ng half. Has improved very much and has plenty of resource . Dangerous near the oppo nents' line. Must still go harder while making his openings. Forwards. H . F. REYNOLDS. An excellent forward, always on the ball, tackl es magnificently, and kept the whole pack together. V. C. TAYLOR. Very strong and vigorous forward-a lways plays hard-a bit clumsy with his feet. Tackles very finely. C. A. M. RICHARDSON. Iinproved forward. Plays hard and with more method th an last yea r. Good tackl er. B. G. GARIBALDI. Very good in the open and much improved in the pack. Should be very useful. R. C. CUMBERBATCH. Honest shover and quite useful in the open loo. Good tackler. D. H. COWIE . Very slow but plays hard and tack les well. A. C. FLUKE. U ses his height to great advantage out of tou ch . Must learn to tackle lo w more consistently. W. J. S. PRICE Fair forwa rd. A little inclined still to wai t for the ball outside, but improved. Plays hard and can keep going.


tHE

THE

CANtUARIAN.

PRECINCTS .

Th e EditQrs are hoping to imc y/, from time

/0

lime, a series

of

articles on

Ille

Buildillgs it,

tlu Precincts, alld /lle life Ihal has bem lived i" them.

I.-A GENERAL SURVEY. I have been ar.ked to write th e first of a serie s of articles on the surroundin gs of ~he Kin g's S~hoo l. ~nd as such. ~ n vit~tio n s are rarc , in my ex per ience, I do not heSitate to rtI S~l mto pnnt, al thou gh It lUlght seem unnecessarily bold ou my part to at~en:pt ~nythIl1g 0,£ the sort whe n there is slich a mine of information already eXl~tln.g. 111 the HIstory of the School and previous works on the City a nd its ant~qUltles: .\¥'hat I shal! al~empt to do, wi ll be to g ive a rough SOrt of g uide to the vanous bll1ldl~gS. and ~hClr s~tes. To begin with, it must be clearly kept in mind that the sch<;>ol bUl.ldmgs, lIlcludlllg the Grange and the Junior School, are outside the Monastic Preclllcts· proper. Previously to Dr. Mitclllnson's time the sc hoo l buildin gs ra~ along wher~ th e present asphalt path leads from one gateway lO a nother. 'rh o M.mt- Yard has Its name from the fa ct that fro m early times it was the site of a Minl. Kmg Athclstan, whose date I confess I do not know, had, in Angl o-Saxon times, allowe? Canterbury se~e n minters, a greater number than g ranted to any other placl' exceptIng London, which had eight. The Grange is on the site of the G ra nary of th~ Monas tery, and the p,rese nt Master's roo ms and school buil dings are in a hou se bUIlt o n the site of the Gral~ary by Mr. Austen, the Cathedral Architect, some fortv or fifty rears ago. The T ennis Courts behind th e Grange are in the g roun ds of th~\ Archbishop's Palace, of which the old building in the Jun ior School, now used 'l ot Mr. Latter's study, was the entrance. The Gateway by Gibbs', is ancient, being tht' entrance to the Grounds. The old wall bounding the Ten nis Courts is part of tht wall of the Monastic Preci ncts and formerly continued to th e Bishop of Dovcr'g house , \~h ose gard.e n walls now enclose part of the space· wh ich was form.erly outsid,) the Preclllcts and 111 the Grounds of the Ar ch bishop's Palace. ' A house ?f some sort stood near the site of th e ] unior King's School, and tho passage from It to Palace Street was called Moonlight vValk . . In our ?w n tim~s g rea,t chan9'es have take n place, the ruins of the Old Pahu',' W.hICh ~e,matned, belllg sktlfully lllco rporated into the New Palace, built by Arc h bls h ~p I t:~np le. <J.ver the wall of the Ju nior School playgrollnd can bc SGcn th l' rem alils of the Refectory of the Monastery, which stuod behind where now is til" Bishop of Dovees ho use. The gateway in the Green Court, next to that hOllse. 1M the old Larder G,ate. and the Kitchens and their offices stood near that gate. In wh lll we call the BaptIstery Gardens were the Dormitories, one large one standing at right


THE

CANTUARIAN .

359

ang les to t he Cathedral next to th e Refectory Buildings, and the other two parall e l to the Cathedral. Two of these Dormitories were uSl!d by the Monks for slee ping purposes, the other wa s spo kt n of as the Third Dormitory or Necessarium. T he two pillars in the garden came from the o ld Church at Rec llivers, o nly one used to be erect, Dean Farrar having caused the other to be raised; pe rsonally it appeared to m~ to b~ mO.re picturesque in a rec um be nt position a nd was ce rtainly safer. The BaptIstery IS saId to have been built for purposes connected with the wate r su ppl y. Elaborate arrangements originally existed for this purpose, to collect th e rai nfa ll from the roof of the Cathedral and for the su pply of water which came from No rth Holmes, th e high er g round not very far from St. Marti n' s C hurch . I n the days of the great plague â&#x20AC;˘. in Edward the Third's re ign, the Mo naste ry escaped the ravages of th~ ph~glle oWll1g to tl~e excellence of the water supply which had not long before b e~n lIlshtuted. A very 111teresting plan of the water suppl y of the Monastery is in eXIste nce, mad e by E adwyn the Monk, in a drawing; part picture, and part plan, ?f.the Churc h and Monastery as they stood betw e~n 113 0 and 1174, The origi nal !S III the manuscript collection of Trinity College. Cambrid ge; the pri nt in question IS a co py of this made in 1755 . The prese nt houses of the Minor Canons stand on the sites of the bakery and brewery of the Monaste ry. The house over the Dark Entry ga.teway was the Prior's study; passi ng thr ough that. the re is so me plank in g to be seen III the roo fing of the passage. An old room for me rly ex isted there which was lIsed a!i a c hoir school and in it Mr. Pla nt gave his first lessons to the c hoir boys; the room was pulled down when the Library was extended. Goi ng through the e ntran ce to the left are the pillars, n'Ow m uch sllpported, of part of the Infirmary buildings. Till about the midd le of the last ce ntury ho uses were built in these pi ll ars. gloo my dark little blli ldings to al l accou nts and appearances. I have a n old photograph of them and it is difficult to imagi ne them as abod es of cheerfulness. The a rc hes and pillars op posite to Archdeacon Spooner's hOllse were part of th e Infi rma ry Chapel, and small dwe llin g hOllses were also built in among them also. having garde ns at the back. The ruins in Archdeacon Spooner's gardens are said to be the remains of the Kitchen buildings of the I nfi rmary. To the east of the i nfirmary, on the site, or near it, of Canon Moore's house, stood a building called , Me ister Hom er's' j the mea nin g of this name does not appear to be kno wn. A little furthe r on is a n old gateway near Canon Danks' house. This gate way was removed to its present position about the middle of last centu ry, wh en so many changes a nd I t formerly stood by improve ments were made in the Cathedral Precincts. St. Anselm's T o wer. close to the present entrance to the Hug uenot C hurch, a nd d ivided the Cemetery of the Cathedral in to two parts; the outer part towards the Christchurch Gateway bei ng given over to the laity and the inner to the Mo nks. ust befo re Canon Danks' hou se was th e fi sh -pond j on the sitt: of Canon Stuart' s lo use were the Plumbing works of the Cathedral. The old school hou se stood between Canon Stuart's a nd Canon Mason's j a small building which stands there and is used as a stable, is said to be part of the remai ns of the o ld school. I hope

l


'tHE

CAN'tUARIAN.

th at these very rough and incomplete notes may serve their purpose as a guide to sLlch boys as may be interested to lea rn the purposes of the buildings wh ich surround them. In a future paper of the se ri es the E ditors should ind uce someone to give a short sketch oj th e life of the people at the various times, th ~ con stant wars between the Christ Church Monks and the Cit)'. and th e struggles for supremac), between th e Monks of this Priory and that of St. Aug ustine's, and the quarrels over the relic-trad e between the various Monastic fou ndations in the Ci ty. It is curi ous to us now, to kn ow that a fair used to be held in th e Preci ncts at thp. Christchurch Gate end, and that the Nave was used as a place of business, goldsm iths having their booths th ere in times not very far remote from our own. There a re many en tri es in the Chapter minutes also which sho uld se rve as an interesting comm entary on the changes in customs and thoughts of sllccessive gene rations. For instanct:, there is one to th e effect that Minor Canon s are no longe r to go out to din ner-as wailers -M in or Canons originally being merely superior Lay-Clerks. There was terrible troubl e too over th e ri ch Store of magn ificent vestments left in possession of the Cathedral authorities after the Reform atio n. These. it appears. all va nished, in a comparatively short space of time, bei ng stolen or sold by the Cano ns of the day ; two of th ese reverend gentl emen were reprimanded by the Archbishop for fi ghting, a quarrel having arisen between them over the plu nder. Nearer ou r own ti mes we have the description by an indig nant visitor of Lord Nelson, one of the Cano ns, who used to take a foot- warmer and a copy of the " Tim es " into Cath ed ral when it was his duty to attend se rvi ce, and di sturbed th e devotions of the co ngregation by the rustlin g of his vaper as he turned over the leav es. It seem~ almost a pity he did not take hi!'! cigar too. It is not on ly that we are living over the debris of buildings and of th o waste of preceeding gene rat.io ns, bu t it is the same in our th oughts and custom s also. There is much t hat. we have gained but there is also something lost with the passage:'> of the ages, and this is eve n more evident in records of th e past life of our fore runners, than in t.h e sllldy of the old buildings whi ch they have left to us. There is an excellent collection of prints, engravin gs, and pictures, in the Dean y Institute, which boys woul d do well to visit. I append a list of topographical books, which 1 have in my possessio n, and th ir prices, in case anyone may at some day think of forming a collection . 18 16. Wooluolh . ;; I I S. A fine work; this price must not be give n except wh I) the margin s are un cut; a very important detail to be considered ill buying this class of book. 181 0. Slockdalt!. ÂŁ 1 IS. About 100 pictures of Kent, including an excellent vi w of the old sc hool; in my edition one of the pictures is cut. I havt' not seen a complete book. J 807, Wild. ÂŁ I I S. I z pictures with press matter; an excelle nt ground plan fit th e Cathedral.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

Hastings. ÂŁ, I S. 12 views .of the Cathed ral and City, with descriptior.s ; very good, but the margms should be un cut and none of th e pictures missing. 16 40 . S omner. 30/-. A good deal of this is in Latin; the price is not too 1l1uch for a good complete copy. , 82 5. Gostl/ng's \<\Talks round Canterbury; of this the re a re several edition s, of which I think this is the best. A good copy with all th e illustrations is worth from 1 0 / - to 12/-. 172 6. Dart. History of Cathedral and Monaste ry j my OW I1, a damaged copy, cost 12/ 6. A good co mpl ete ed ition will be more expensive. 1879. Brenl. A good copy, with complete set of illustrations, is worth 10/- or 12/- . My co py is th e second editi on . A very inte resting book. Other similar topographical works a re Memorials of Kent, mo de rn, 15/-. Black's Canterbury. 3/6, illustrations by Gard iner. Smith's C hronological History of the Cathed ral. Woodruffe's Hi~tory of Fordwich, a most inte resting work. Rambles ~o un? Canterbury, Crosse. Ca nterb ury, Cox. These two latte r boo ks are mu ch m~e no r to the rest. \;Yard's Canterbury Pil gri mage's is a deli ghtful book a nd so is ~~lghways and.~yeways in !<-el~t. All t.,hese books are to be had for a few shillings. r he latest adciltloll to the hst IS Old Cante rbury. Cozens, whi ch contains so me informatio n not found in oth er books. Leland and Hasted are expensive, a complete set of Hasted cos ting abou t fo ur pounds. Of all these I wou ld recomm end Brent.'s ~ook t~ the ordinary reade r, it is fu ll of the most interes ting information and IllustratIOns, and if the literary style b~ infe rior to Stanl ey's a t leas t th ere's very li ttle about Becket in it. \.\roolnoth's book is the best to get for fine illustrations of the Cath~dral, th ere is one exceedingl y fin e engraving of the old Norman T ower ; and ll astltlgs' book contains some very interesting sketches of the Ci ty walls and of St. Augustine's. Of th e modern books Ward's Cante rbury Pilgrimages, and Highways.and Bye ways of Kent a re well in everyo ne's reach , and a re char ming books a nd well dlustrated. I have given the pri ces for the various books as a rruide to some such amount as might be reasonably given. For so me reason or ot he ~ a cut margin depreciates the market price of a book ve ry g reatly. 181 I.

PERCY GODFREY.


THE

36 • -

IS

THIS

A

CANTUARIAN,

PROBLEM

SOLVED ?

" Oh have you seen the Aeroplane?" Such is th e latest t:ry ; No longer does a spinning cone Swift falling catch your eye. No longe r does the Suffragette, vVith tinfoi l sword, parade All roun d fo rbidden Dow ning St reet, Tricked out as J oan the maid. The rage fo r Jessop, Altham, Hayes, Fades desolate and dim; That Airship is the only craze T o make old E ngland swim. The Budget· moved JOh11 Bull a bi t, [ Bllt though some called it fudge], The news of Ge rms: at Pontypool Makes even Asquith budge. The L a~ our l\lember's sluggish brain No longer wants to slu g, \¥h en De utschers in an Ae roplane Startle the Engli!}h In g. 'Twas seen at Kingstown, So uth end Pier. At Norwich . Do you vote The cause is water on the brain Or whiskey down th e throat?

THE RIVER . The l30at Club sufre red like everything else at the end of last term. We had /I record mcmb ership and a record numbe r of crcws training, Sr) it was particularl \ unfartunatt.: that the .Easter races had to be scratc hed. We were hoping to pUL 011 six senior crews and fou r novices. As it is, th e lack of practice has affected th e Lw n fo urs for thi s te rm an d they have take n lon ger than usual in shaking togcLhm Fortunately we have managed to arra nge a race fo r the first crew on June 3rd ag:tilHH a local fOllr got up by E. C. Green. This will give them so me expe rience beru!! rowin g Toubridge on June 1 zth. \Ve hope th at this year the O.K.S. race will 1\01 fall th rough. \Vhen the Tonbridge race is held I I away" the School has liul


THE

CANTUAR I AN,

oppo rtunity of seei ng the crews. Another race for the second c rew would be a goo d thing if it could be managed. T hey do any amount of hard work for five or six wee ks wi th mOTe personal discomfort and self denial than is req uired to get any other School colour, and have only one occasion on which to show \~hat th ey can do. It seems a pity that so much good training sho uld not be made of more advantage. The Cambridge O.K. S. have very kindly offered a permane nt trophy to the cl ub. It has not yet, however, bee n decided what fo rm it shoul .:! take or to what it should be applied ,

HARVEY SOCIETY . The Society's annual expeditio n to the Folkestone Warren took place on Ascension Day, in magnificent weather. The Warren was reached a fter the usual number of punctures, not to mentio n " pubs." and the party then settled down to dinner. After din ner, the usual scramble down to th e beach was essayed, not witho ut seve ral unpremeditated headers into brambles and bushes, without which no doubt cenain members would have exceeded the speed limit. On the beach the party broke up, some for butterflies, others for fossils. The upward climb was even more exciting

than before, several mem bers, doubtless una ccustomed to mountai nee ring, showing a sudd en desire to reac h the bottom, to the accompani ment of miniat ure .. avala nch es. The party reassembled at tea, however, without any casua lties, and trophies in the shape of fossils and butterfl ies were handed round for inspection. The return journey commenced, afte r a most enjoyable day, the School being reached in good tim e, and as usually happens on the return journey, without further punctures.

VIRTUTE FUNCTI MORE PATRUM DUCES. (With apologies for omission in the last ullmber). II , F, REYNOLDS, - Entered the School. Sept" ' 903; VIth Form, Sept" ' 907; Mon itor, Sept" ' 907 ; Football XV" 1906-7-8-9; Boating Colours, 19°7 . 8 ; Gy m. Pair, 1908; Sports' Colours, 1908; Left, Dec., 1908. (' , A, M. RICHARDSoN,--Entered the School, Sept., ' 904 ; Football XV" 1907-8-9; Hon. Sec. Choral Society, 19°7.8; Left, Dec., 1908.


T HE

CANTUAR IAN.

SCHOOL NEWS. T he Rev. R. G. Hodgso n has added one more to his many generous gifts to the School by endowing th ree D ivi nity Prizes in the JIIll iar School.

We regret to see the announcement of the death of the Archbishop of Sydney. who preac hed the Anniversary Sermon last Speech Day.

%*%

~

Vve regret to record the death of General Russe ll whose lecture last year on the Spanish Armada will not soon be forgo tten.

THE

DAY

BOYS'

*'

~\

On Wednesday. May J 9th. tho Bishop of Dover held a Confirmation in the Cathedral at noo n, when 44 members of the School were co nfi rmed.

STEEPLECHASE.

This was run the last day of last term, and the win ner proved to be Te lfer~, who with 35 sees. start from his elder brother at scratch, beat To mki ns (2nd), Ashenden (3rd). Telfer' (4th). F. L. Goad (5 th). All these finished very close together. a great tribute to the excellence of the handi cap. Telfer beat his own time of the open Steeplechase easily: we look for records from him in future years. Miss Woodbridge very kind ly gave away the prizes, two of which were given by Mr. Price and Mr. Cape respectively. W. ] . S. Price then made a brief bu t pretty speech thanki ng Miss \Vood bridge for he r kindness and also Mr. Cape for th e continued interest he showed in the Steeplechase. The race was instituted 8 years ago by him and he continues (lS enthusiastic as ever for its success. The School in ge neral wili heartily join in this expressio n of gratitude to Mr. Cape for th extraordinary trouble he takes in the School Sports. Miss vVoodbridge then received a very fine bouquet from the day boys, and afLer W. J . S. Price had abused several male visitors who were watching for not taking part in the race, we departed, still more convinced that the Day Boys' Steeplechase is an excellent institution. L. N. K . O'Neill, we should have remarked, maintained his record by carrying off for th e fourth time the booby prize, a fine Dutch chet;:se inscribed with the School crest.


THE

CANTUARI AN .

EMPIRE DAY. Empire Day was celebrated with great verve. After prayers in the Schoo lroom . the H eadmaster gave n short address un the meani ng of Empire Day. He spoke of the advantages of the Empire to Englishmen, and pointed out two ways by which it must be maintained: by each man enrolling himself in its defence, and by a Power unknown to the Roman and other ancient Empires, namely, that spoken of in the Psalm : " H e gave them the lands of the heathen: and they took the labours of the people in possession; that they

might keep His statutes and observe H is laws." Then foll owed prayers for the King, the Nation, its Rul ers and its Church. After moving to the Mint Yard where the Junior School and other me mbers of the School had assembled. the H eadmaster caused the Flag to be unfurled amid cheers. The Union J ack was the one sent to us last year by King's School, Parramatta. A verse of Ie God Save the King " followed, and the Head ma~te r announced a half holiday in honour of the day. In the afternoon th e Corps paraded.

V ALETE . L. R. H eywood. T. E . M. Boultbee. ] . G. Stockton. T . D. Salt. T. Carlyle.

FIVES. The School has this season played four Fives Matches, out of wh ich two were won and two lost . . Of the latter, one was against th e Masters, wh en th e School Pair, R. E. Martin and B. G. Garibaldi, lost to 1\1r. Latter and Mr. Evans, after a good game. Agai nst the S.A.C. two matches were played, the first of which resulted in a win for our opponents in their own Courts, the result being the opposite in our own. TIl<: remaining match was played in ou r Court and resulted in an easy victo ry in our favour. T he second pair, R. M. Gent and D . V. Dunlop, won both their matches v. S.A.C. and v. The Masters. represented by Mr. Porter and lV(r. Everitt.


TH E

366

CANTUARIAN.

O. K. S. NEWS.

H. Gardn er has been playing cricket for Woolwich, and his sco res include an 83 and 93. A well-kn ow n London paper mentions him as a likely candidate for Essex. .;,,\

'$(.

*

In th e Sports against Woolwich, he was the best Woolwich man in putlin g the weight.

..•.

W. A. F. Kerrich is a mem ber of the Woolwich Gym. VIII.

'.'

G. H. Bellars has passed

1St

into

Dartmouth, and we a lso t..:ongratulate him

on winning so many lJrizes at Osborne.

.. In the Gym. Competition on H .M.S. oJ;

,""oTceste r,

J.

Trave rs 2nd.

11-

Byron was

1st,

and

A.

••

" been gazetted 2nd H. Mowll has LieuteIlant in the Cinque POTts F o rtress Royal Engineers. J.

*.'

G. F. Howell has been. playing cricket fo r University Collp.ge, O. B. Parsons for Keble College, and G. C. Strahan for Keble College. Oxford .

.....

R. E. R. Dalwigk has been playing cri cket for Clare College. a nd W. N.

Kempe and E. T. Gage for Corpus Christi College. Camb rid ge. The latter made 13 4 against Downing. ~*4f

The Rev. G. C . E . Ryley has been appoin ted Sacri st of Canterb ury Cathedral and Vkar of Stod marsh.

S. D. Turner. at Gavanza, California, won the hall-mile in 2 minutes 6 seconds. A. L. Thomson has passed 45th Ollt of Sandhurst and has been gazetted to the I st Battalion Royal Sussex Regime nt statio ned at Rawal Pi ll di.

*" *

"#

Bl<.EDIN .-At Cocanada, India. on May 13th. 1909. o f Malarial Fever, T homas Edward Bredin, seco nd son of Colonel and Mrs. Bredin. of Blackrock. Co D ublin. aged 36.

*

~~

*' Match

The O.K.S. has been fixed for !\fonday, J ul y 26th j any old boy wishing to play sho ul d write G. F. H owell. University College, Oxford, without delay.

*

%

" O.K.S. are rem inded that Speech Day this year has been altered t

Tuesday, July 27th.


THE

CANTUARIAN .

DINNER.

O. K. S. The Ed itors reg ret that owing to th e un fortunate circumstances which attend ed the publication of the" Cantuarian '1 last term , th ey omitted to mention that th e An nu al O.K.S. Dinner took place at the Monico Restaurant. Piccadilly Circus. on \Ved nesday, J anuary 13th. and was th e most successful ever hel d. The Chair was taken bv th e Rev. R. G. H odgso n, and it was to that fact th e record attendance of 84 was chi efly duc, while very many others wrote expressi ng their regret at bei ng unabl e to be prese nt to do honour to one who has spe nt his life and energies in the service of the School, and has endeared himself to ge nerations of O ld King's Scholars. The loya l toasts having been duly honoured, the I, F loreat Schola Regia JJ

SCHOOL

was proposed by the Rev. P. Malden . and th e Head Maste r respo nd ed, g ivi ng some accoun.t of the doi ngs of the School during the previolls year. Mr. H. E. Morice then gave" The Chairman," and admirably expressed the feelin gs of those present, and of coun tless others, to ward s Mr. Hodgson, after which Dr. Field asked leave to add somethi ng in appreciation of the deep debt of g ratitud e which the School ge nera lly. a nd successive Head Masters of th e School , owed to the Chai rman. The toa::;t hav ing been drunk with the greatest enthu siasm, Mr. H odgson briefly replied, taking th e opportunitv of thanking the O.K.S .• Oil behalf of Mrs. H odgson and himself, for the testi monials presented to them last Speech Day.

ENTERTAINMENT.

Saturday, Febmary 20th, 1909, at 8 p.m. PROGRAMME.

9.

"The Mill" I . FOLK-SONG 2 . i>. IA RCH, (or Piano H Troubadours"

3. _I.

Roubier. G. A. T OWNRNI). " There lived a King" (Gondoliers) . Sul/ivan.

SONG

r.L I~E

MltSSRS.

R. (i. HAN COCK . (A.T. B.B.) " In Absence "...

J. REID,

FRiiHl..l NGSR AUS HK N

Germall.

C. J.

10. GI.. ~;E (A.T.B.B.) "Great O rpheus" i'olP.SS RS.

J.

G. A. AlacJarrClt . R~~IIJ,

I I. 1-l usSAR~;NR I TT,

C,

COLTHA:.!, G. SUEEPWASII , W. HARVEY. for Piano. Op. 62. Mende/sso/tit.

S I'RING SONG

E. F.

6.

S CENE

H OUSDEN.

(rom "The Rivals....

S/leridall.

.. Austria" Tyrol.

S. SONG S.

COL'1"HA r.1.

SI-I~:EI'\vA S I-I ,

for Piano

Percy God.fre)'.

i\L RYA N.

~tR. ~. COI,THA~1.

14. SONG AND

C. 15. TRIO R.

MR.

G.

(Swiss) Cantoll Fribolllg. W. G. HI NDS. C H ORUS "Duke o( Plaza-Toro" (Gondoliers) Sullivan.

13. RANZ DEI VATZES

J.

MR. EVERITT AND KETTELWE LL. ,. I,'OLK-SONG "From Mountain and Valley"

COI..THAM,

12. SONG

AND

5.

S.

ANI) W. HAR VEY.

D. Buel...

S.

for Piano. 0p.3 2. NO· 3· Si1tdi1tg.

GALPIN.

L , N IGHTI NGALE,

It's clear that Medireval Art" (Patience) Sulliva}l. E. HANCOCK, C. L. NIGHTINGALE, AND .1

J. M. COURTNEY .


't HE CANTUARt AN.

368

ALGERNON

CHARLES

SWINBURNE.

stance, is really the product. of a consummate knowledge of technique. The poet appears intoxicated with the spirit of what dl's!allce ((mu /h..y loms unto mit, from so ng j for Swinburne. the artificially a far distance from Ihe ponds of love?" natural singer, was a supreme artist and Niet.zsche did not intend his words to be _ aI's est celare arlem. trite but tru t:·applied to Swin burne but as an appre- conveyed the atmosphe re of spu rio us ciatio n of the g reat Vit.:torian they are spo ntaneity by sheer craftsmanship . nearl y perfect, even introduci ng the wo rd As an example of rolling musIc the " toad s " for the benefit of those who condem n " Swul lyre! Swett lyre! n following stanza fro m "The T rium ph of Swinburne's best claim to immo rt ality is T ime" is typical of t he poet a t his best: the astonishing music of his verse; in "The pulse of war and passion of wonder, The heavens that lUurmur, the sounds that company with Edgar Allen Poe and some shine, of the g reat FrclH:hme n, he may be said that sing and the loves that thunder, to have written pri marily for sound, and TheTstars he music burning at heart Iikc wine, not fo r sense or profundity of thought. An armed archangel whose hands raise up " A Match " and" Annabel Lee " may be All senses mixe<1 in a spirit's cup bracketed together fo r haunting tuneful- Till flesh and spirit are molte n in sll nder These things are ove r !lnd no more mine." ness. As a singer he is unrivalled. as a master of tech niqu e unapproached, and And against that surging music place for sheer beaut)' of rhythm a nd exp ression the delicate beauty of th e lines : his best pieces stand alone. But while .. Like fl o wers upon flowers, they admire the richness and colour, the I n a festival way, \Vhen hours afte r' hours, strength and swee tness of his music, Shed grace on the day, some are fou nd to deplorc the absence White hlossom like bUllerflies hover and gleam of deep though t. T hey look in vain fo r through the snows of the spray." th e profundity of Browning. the hum ani ty T he twO chief objections to Swill· of Shakspere, or even the gentle meditations of Tennyson ; but "li ving song," burne have al ways been perso nal and not as He nley called it. defies c rit.icism and artistic .: it was not the occasional ex· while we are so metimes forced to admit travaga nce and fla mboyance of the poetry that Swinburnl! has not hing to sing, we but its agnosticism or real ism to which the public took exception. But the artist must agree that he si ngs it beautifully. is quite apart from the man, and a book The natural spontaneity which is so should be judged by its artistic qualiti clI beautiful in Swinburne's finest poems, alone. .. A book is well written or badly giving an impression of inspi ration which writtcn, that is all." Swi nhurne's finc~t is noticeably lacking in the work of some love-poetry as poctry has no equal, and famo us poets, Matthew A.rnold for in-

"Sweet lyre!

Sweet lyre! S wett dru,lIkm lone of loads, from what time from


'tHE CA fTUAluAN. mere dis~greement with, and objecti on to, the sentIments therein cann ot detract from its aesthetic value. The agnosticism of "Hertha" does not debar the Christian from reading and appreciating it. The fam ous li ne in " Dolores JJ

..â&#x20AC;˘ Ie

Come down and reneem

:

liS

from virtue " . ..

offended the reading public in , 865 . but no one believes Swinburne really wished to bp. redeemed fro m snch vi rtues as he possessed. To identify the poet absolutely and personall y with every sen ti me nt he uttered. would be as futile as to pronou nce Euri p ide~ abominable for havi ng written the ., Phred ra." Yet the same people who co nde mn the E nglishman revel 111 the Greek . . . . T he Republi canism of the poet too made him e nemies. " T he Songs before Sunrise" seemed unnatural and unhealthy to the law-and -ord er-lovinU' readers or , 860. ., Vie are all Sociali st~ now" but then England was shocked by slI ch lines as:

approved of all. "Atalanta in Calydon " a~d " E:e~htheus." to name only two of Ill S tragcdl~s. were the greatest achievements of the last century in dramatic poetry : "Luria" and" Colom be's Birthday " cannot dispute their position. The fam ous" Anadyome.ne" chorus is uniqu e in literature, and both that and th e dialogue or the dramas ~eproduces, as onl y a man .soaked i ~l th e Greek spiri t co uld. the mtngled wild ness and dig ni ty of H ellenic tragedy.

Swinburne's appeal to the esteem of the cultured is in no way limited. O ne is eq ually struck by the metrical adroitness and ve rbal fel icity of the " Poems and Ballads," and th e trag ic intensity of the d raf!1as, by the fervour of his Republi can str<l:ln s a nd the reve rend beauty of his vanous me morial verses, by his scholarship and his imaginative power As the poet or colou r and beauty, Swinburne stands on a pedestal alone in English .. The poor and the halt and the hlind are keen literature. And one was glad to see that and mighty and fleet: the literary papers of the country paid I..ike the noise of the blowing of wind is the sound fitling tributes to his name, though more of the noise of their feet. " than one narro w- minded speaker took it And yet Swi nb urne has done work upon hi m ~cl f to pass j udgement on th e wh ich, untouched by any of the abov~ sweetest sin ger of the last century. characte ristics, wil1 never die. and can be

"THE GOOD OLD DAYS OF FOLKSONG. " Sweet plaintive music, echo of th e days When England's heart was yo ung and free fro m care Nor had our modern life. its rush and gla re, ' Drowned her soft melodies and rustic lays. T he happy yoke l trudged along the road Whe n twilight told him that his work was done, And greeted with his song the setting sun, Nor dreamt of discontent, nor felt his load;


, 37 0

THE

CANTUARIAN.

The slight of Chloe, or the frown of J ane, 'Twas these alone that shad ed o'er his life; Not jeal ousy no r mercenary strife \ÂĽhich often constitute our c' lover's pain." Thy life, clear England, then was like a brook That gaily chatte rs down wild mountain glens \Vh ere water-wagtai ls fiit, and timid wrens, And Halcyon seeks her undiscovered nook. But now the rill a mighty stream has grown, And on its banks foul, smoky towns a re set j Its peace is marred by traffic's fevered fret, Its ragworts withered and its swallows flown!

OXFORD Dear School, Asct:nsion Day comes, and is the same as a ny other day in Oxford, save that the Chapel bell rings even morc violently than usual, while, as the poel sings:

R.

LETTER.

Seniors' match. Barber plies a g ra cefu l oar in the Keble eight. Burdett is an auth ority on Hebrew literature. The two Ropers add intellectual lustre to their respective Colleges, but arc seldom visible to the naked eye. Bax is preparing to gain fresh honours in the " .. . the vexed question racks e'en pious heads Why saints may not rej oice them in their bed s. " School s-in literature this time - but find s But Ascension Day remin ds us that we time to entertai n other O.K.S. The have promised to write of the manifold inmates of the hospital are sometim cfI cheered by the sight of Budd's face, ali doings of the O.K.S. he "walks" it (the hospital ). Spafford i, For a few hours last week M osse was a devotee of tennis. Winser and Dib bc n here, having torn himself away from the still supply us with a standard of virtu e dissecting- rOOI11. difficult of attai nm ent. Si meo n is studyin g Townend is to be seen any day Homeri c diction and finds it useful ill sunni ng him self in a canoe. Maclear golf. Brinsley-Richards makes speech '11 plays a vigorolls gam e of te nni s. S mith in opposition to M. P.'s in debates I steers a punt with dexteri ty. Adam s and historic importance; his virtues are only Aylward, mindful of an cient prowess. equalled by those of Yates. Abbott i, make large scores for the St. John's team. rowin g in th e Exeter ei g ht, and Webst r Of our Keble repre sentatives, Strahan is said to be studyi ng the arts of tenni .'l and Parsons play the national game. an d theology. The former had ve ry bad luck in the At Univ: Howell and Nelson sh ¡w


THE

CANTUARIAN .

to an admiring world how good a thing it is for brethren to dw ell together in unity. The one golfs, the other rows, with inimitable grace. Scott startles the habitues of the golf-links by the length of his drive and the restraint of his demeanour. The name of Emden is illustrious at Trinity and Lincoln. He of Trinity stee rs an eight to vi ctory. The elder (of Lincoln ) is the chief luminary of a host of societies--literary, historical. philosoph ical and anthropological. A few weeks ago the eve nin g papers contained startlin g headl ines- " Myste riou s Disappearance of Undergraduate." It was Armi tage . H e spent th e first fort-

night of term in his usual way at the Boys' Club a nd the Rifle Range. Th en suddenly he was lost to our ken. But then q uite by accident he was reported as being seen on an o utward bound Dutch steamer, en roule for Gotten burg. Mar he survive th e lager and other attractions of that famous University and return with full knowledge of the Ge rman plans of invasion. Meanwhile we at home are not idle. Am ongst others Chave is prepari ng to receive the invaders.

CAMBRIDGE May Term. Dear K.S., It is iny duty to tell you what the O.K.S. up here arc doing; but everyone seems to be working this term, which is really the term during which one should enjoy oneself out of doors, playing gam es or slacking on the River. If o nly people knew what a delightful place 'ambridge is thi s term. our numbers would certai nly exceed the dozen or fiftee n up here at present. All our Trinity members seem to be working; Deighton, Dickson and Pinsen t (¡aeh lives like a recluse , snatching an hour now and then for tennis. Williamson ro ws and plays tennis in a decidedly lazy IIl nnner, while Sellars also plays tennis,

37'

May th e School Corps flourish! The best of luck to the Xl. ! Yo urs ever, O.K.S.

OXON.

LETTER. though hi s Classical Lectures keep him bnsy. Watkins, as Corpus Boat Captain, has worked up a really excellent boat for the May ra ces, which should make many bumps provided the cares of the Tripos do not overcome its Stroke; we wish him all luck and hope that he will get a double first and make four bumps. Gage has played regularly for the Corpus Cricket team, bidding fair to get hi s colours. and Kempe pe rforms the arduoll s duties of cricket Sec retary, while he retains his place as wicket-keeper. We have seen very little of R. T. J enkin. but know that he is working hard for hi s Tripos; his brother is still teaching up he re.


37'

THE

CANT UAR I AN .

Clare have played Dalwigk once or twice in th eir 1St XL, but he ha s ceased to be a bo wler anel has developed as a bat, his best scores being 42 not o ut and 6 z not out.

Mr. Edmonds see ms to be ve ry flourishing and looks forwa rd to bringing his wife dow n to Canterbury to show he r the School.

I wish some of you would be equally enterprising, and come and see Cambridge , before you make a prejudiced a nd irrevocable decision to go to Oxford; we want to see more K.S. men up here. Yours sincerely, O.K.S . (Cambridge).

WOOLWICH LETTER. D ear Sc hool, Owing to the fact tha t there are but three of lis-Gosset, Kerrich and Ga rdn e r- ~i t behoves us to blo w o ur little trumpets as loud as we ca n. Gosset's athl etic ach ievemen ts sink into insignifica nce bes ide the fact th at he is 4th in hi s te rm and has risen to the rank of corporal. Gard ner's a thl etic achievements sink into inSignifican ce beside the fact that, after playing for th e 1St XV. and doin g doughty deeds in the Sports, he is now astoni shing the natives by hi s prodigioll s scores for the I st XI. Ke rrich is looki ng his usual hri ght and brai ny self in hi s new Gym. VII I. blazer, of which he is inordinately vain . T o

INDIAN Mt. Abu. CANTUA H.TAN, J . E . H usbands, who is now Assistant Collector in the I.C.S., writes that he is now moved to T hana, a district near Bombay. He is se nding yo u a co ntribuD EAR

sum up, true to the traditio ns of th t' Army Class, we are leadi ng the stre nU OIIH life stre nuously; S'C illlr ad aslra. E . 'vV. Hughes ca me to see us tllll other day a nd had to be forcibly co nvi nced that we did not wish to in surl' anythi ng in the Phcenix Fire Insurance '(1 , H. F. Rernolds is diligently iii! bibing kno wledge at hi s cral1lln " M , and is behaving himse lf moderate l}' w -II , exce pt when he takes a day off withOUI leave to go and see the Boat Race. Other O.K.S. news we have none. Our sincerest congratulations to tl.. Cadet Corps. O.K.S. WOOLW ICII

LETTER. tion (in kin d) for this num ber. so he "III be speaking for himself. H . V. Cobb asked me o ne day 501111 time ago why so few of our chaps \\'1' 111 in for the I.C.S. Besides hi msclf Illul Husbands r know of no other mCIIII" I


. TH E

CANTUA RI AN.

of that noble se rvice. r am sure that K.S.C. can prod uce as good I. C.S. men as other schools, so yo u had be tte r speak seriously to our chaps abo ut it. A. L. Paris has, afte r performing great strokin g deeds in the Poona Regatta, go ne ho me on leave, and will soon be hunting fo r a bes t ma n. Ma ny co ngratulations.

373

time the abode of the gods. A sort of ta bl e land -though it is difficult to desc ry a ny tab le- looking surface-spreads over the South end of the mass ; and hereo n are scattered maj estic bungalows of Maharajahs, and humb ler bungalows of the baser so rt, all mix ed with granite boulders, masses of pink roses, palmtrees H . M. J ames refllses to be drawn ; and g ree ne ry ge nerally. A polo g round lies in one holl o w, a cricket grollnd in sly old chap. anothe r. There is a golf co urse, where \\lith all due deference to you , Si rs, one suffers ri sk of death eve ry mo ment and with much gratitude to the solitary [ro m men drivi ng from the next tee across editor left in March for his great effort, your co urse. There is a biggish la ke and please all ow me to say that r feel, and nice boats, good tennis courts, a football I am sure O.K.S. feel. that they have and hockey ground, and a comfortable bee n treated bad ly. With W. G. Masse, cl ub house ove rlooking the cricket ground . r may say that we "expect " our Can¡ The hot weather is on, a nd numerous tuarians and read every word of th em; Government officials, civil and military, and that if Edd. will go Como-i ng and are now up. The club is the genera l Rome-ancin g, dep nty Edd . sho uld be rendezvous fro m 6,30 to 8.30 p.m, Several appoin ted ,I pro hac vice." Raj as are up or will be coming up next Failing O.K.S. news, I will add a week, and the ai r is buzzing with the few not es on Mt. Abu. A mass or hills sh ad ows of golf to11rnaments, tennis theatricals, rises from the plains in the South of dittos, cri cket matches, Rajputane; thi s mass, a bout twenty miles dances, concerts, polo tournaments, &c., long and five broad, is called Abu. It all to be squeezed into two months rests on the horns of the Bull of Shiva j without clashing. a lso on the toe of Brahma, whose main I don ' t kn ow what H. S. S. Parker body lies in the Hi malayas. vVhen beef will think of our cricket wh en he hears is brought up th e hill by sac ril egious that I, even r, J. H. S. go in first in our persons, the Bull gets a ngry and shakes cricket match es (and come out first, but hi s horns. As we have had a succcession you need n't print that), and go on first in of earthq uakes late ly, th ere must have bowling. Bless yo u I took 6 wickets last been much beef sent up. match a t 4 runs each, and a m goin g to All sorts of weird, ill ogical and mke more to -morrow. Yours ever, impossible legends float round the head of the hill , which was no doubt at one J. H. SM ITH .


THE

374

CANTUARIAN.

SHOP ACCOUNTS. EASTER RKCKIVF,D.

T erm's Receipts

£ .. - 145

s. d. 6 9

TERM,

1908. £ s. d. '4 3 3 4 16 9

PAin.

Brock Bunce Carr _,. Cox and SCOlt

18 10

Cul len ... FethcrSlonc Hunt .. . Robins .. .

,

Rowntrec Riley ... Wages. Gas

5

19 16 10 0 3 76 IS 15 7 I 19 - 6 6 9 9 0 9 10 17 7 10 0 I 16 9

"

...

,8

Balance

8 " --£ 145 6 9

---- -

~·II D-SUM MER

REC KIVKD.

Term 's Receipts

.

1. s. 15 1

2

TERM.

<I.

s!

£.

PA I D.

Brock ...

16

BUllce .. .

H

Carr Cox and Scott Fetherstone

Hunt

...

1'\'l arsha1 1 Rohins ...

ROlVlllrec

Riley, .. R igdcn .. Gas .. . Wages .. . Balance

II

7

'4 12

A

21

Culten .. _

-,.

s. d. 5 7 13

o 4

II

19 6 J

~ I ~ ~. 5

0 III

96 "II

In

2 10 III

,

3 I

7 10

'I

34 13 £15 1 ,

II


THE · CANTUARIAN.

375

CHRISTMAS TERM.

£

s. d.

... 166

5 4

RR CRIVED.

Term's Receipts

£ s. d.

PAID.

Brock Bunce Carr

'7 15 I "

Cox and Scott Cou rt

Cullen

o 0 16 I 3 13 14 I

...

Fetherstone H unt Robins ... Rowntree

Riley Gas

'"

Gentry ...

t

I nsu rance H orlon . Tweedie .. .

SUMM I~R TI~ RM

CHR ISTMAS T ERM .. '

18 II

---5 4 - ----

5 4

PROFITS EASTER TE R~ I

19 6 4 5 0 6 12 0 4 5 2 3 I 10 14 3

0 4 4 0 3 0 3 IS 0 8 0 0 41 3 9

Wages .. . Balance £166

g

13 '4 10 26 18 5

£ 166

FOR THE YEAR.

£28 8 "

34 ' 3 3

41 3

9

£ 10 4

- -5 -"

f)ecember IS/h, uJo8.

A.

J.

GALPIN.

The Editors regret that owing to pressure of space the following Articles have been unavoidably held over:.. A Four Days Trip in No rlh Perak," by T. S. Adams. II A first attempt at a Panth er/' by J. E . Husbands.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

NOTICES. Richards, Esq. ( 10/ 6), W. L. E . Reynolds, Esq . (7/-), T . A. Izard, Esq. (£1 1/-), B. L. Hooper, Esq. (3/6), E . Stonham, Esq. (£ 1), F . B. Kingdom, Esq. ( 3/6), Major Jones (3/6), J . E. H usbands, E sq. ( 3/b), P. G. Peacocke, Esq. (3/6), W. H. Warde, Esq. (3/6).

We beg to acknowledge with thanks the receipt of the following subscriptions :-

W. Cowper, Esq. (4/6), Capt. A. L. Paris ( I O/b), T . S. Adams, E sq. (7/ -), Rev. G. N. Finn (7/-), R. E . Brinsley-

H. D.

TOWNEND, HO ll .

Sec.

OUR CONTEMPORARIES. T he following have been receive d with many than ks :A sltjOrd/a11, Alle),llt"all, Barrovian, Blundellian, BrigMoll College IJfagazl'll£, Bromsf(roviall , Burian, Carthusian, ChigwelHau , ClIO/meHall, el'l), 0/ London School

Magazine, Dens/oman. D avar/au,

Eagle,

Eas/boltrn/au, St. Edward's School Chromele, E lizabethan (2), EpsolJlz'all, Epsom College

Natural Hislory Society R eport. Fels/ed/oll, Felles/all, H erefordian. K elley Col/tift Chronicle, K ing 's School l}fagazine, Lawrtll fiall, LallCill1? College i'lagazim, L eodicllsiflll ,

/t'orllligltlly ( 3), L on e/ollian (1). jV!aidslo!Urw, l/£alverllifw, Olavl(l1l, Ouu /, P!Y'Jlolll£a1~, Porlculft's, Radlelau, Slralld School l11agaz zlu , l'ollbn"dge SC/toollJ1agazilll,

Leys

I

rryvern.

A ll contributions f or the Jum Number should reach Ihe Ed,'lors by Thursday, Jum '7/11 .

Gibbs and Sons. Printers, Palace St reet. Can terbury.


T l-fE VOL. VII.

CANTUA RIA N. J UNE,

IQ09.

No . 15.

EDITORIAL . C' T he bright death quivered at the victim's th roat, touched . . . . " but it on ly g ra zed. Cricket, well nig h sacrificed on the altar of pat riotism, has managed tt 'mporari ly to e lude the'kn ife of the C .T.C. a nd is rewa rd ed by a g reat victory o ver Fclsted : therefo re. we are not down-hear ted i he nce appears the second Call1uarirl1l of thi s te rln to heap coals of fire upon the heads of last term's malcontents, to vind icate tiS fro111 the gentl e ( !) reproac hes of our In dian friends, and to set aright o ur reckoning with those who clamour for th eir six Canlllarians per ann um: so be it. The School rowing representatives had perforce to han g up their harps upon the hanks of the Medway , but th ey need not weep : they did their best a nd that with Ihem is not a littl e. A foreign rivt!r and an unknow n boat might even have baffled tlt e 1st XI. boat, hut that, of course, is open to question. \ÂĽhen writin g of this Ili lter cre w it is Quite possible to appear c rabbed; it is very difficult to rid ourselves III the phrase so soo n after the race: th erefo re, we draw a ve il over their struggles. rh e de feat at Tonbridge is one of th e sli ght spots and tumours that mar the smooth-


THE

CANTUARIAN.

ness of this term' s ex iste nce : the others are so very insignificant, if we may say it, so very mcasly, as not to deserve eve n a passing mention. Our little grumbl e at th e weather in our last issue has had its effect, and we now wa nd e r disconsolately in overcoats and \\ int ry cold; some enthu siasts still haunt the baths, bu t wheth er their zeal is me re ostentation and wh ether th ey ve nture from th e dressing hutch, we would not readily affi rm, uut we ha\'e o ur suspicions-from o ur own personal experience : but the n it rcall y was arctic. 'Vhen thi s num ber a ppears in print. the exeat will be o ver, and everybody will have returned to morc work (if possible), more drill (if possible), morc cri cket ( if possible) j well, we shall see!

I

}n flDemoriam. -I< PHILIP

1\1 ENZlES

SANKEY.

-I< Philip Menzies Sankey was the eldest so n of the latc Rev. Ri chard Sankey, Rector of Farnham, Surrey, and afterwards of \;Vitn ey, Oxfordshire. H e was born on April q. 1830 , and educated at Clapham and the Kin g's School, Canterbury, passin g from the latter to Corpus Christi College. Oxford, g raduati ng B.A. in 185 2, and M.A. in ,85 9. H e was a first-class cricketer (thoug h he ceased to pia)' after his ordination) bowling being his speciality. As such he represe nted College, University and County. and in , 85 ' was included in the' Gentlemen of England' XL On leaving Oxford he return ed to hi s old Sc hool as third Master, was ordai ned Deacon in , 85 3. and Priest in 1854. by the then Archbi shop of Cante rbury, and served the Curacies of Holy C ro ss

and St. Alphege . In, 859 he was appointed Rector of Hi ghcl e re, B ants, where he worked with g reat success until 1868. H e then devo ted him self to Continental work. having already orten served as Chaplain at Baveno. At Ge noa and Peg li his hi gh pe rso nal qualificatio ns e nd eared him to all : evidently he had found hi s real vocation. In 1878 he was appointed Chaplain at Montrellx, being arterwar.:ls promoted as ' Bishop' s Chaplain,' a title which with his successor has become' Rural Dea n.' At Montrcux, he worked hard and happily until 1907. wh en owing to somewhat pe rsistc llL rh eumatism he resig ned offi ce, altho ug h otherwise his activit ies were in no way a bated. He passed away at Veytaux on March 9th, in hi s 79th year.


¡

.

THE CANTUARIAN.

THE IT.-THE

379

PRECINCTS . CHAPTER

LIBRARY.

The Editor has askp.: d me to continl1 e the se ries or articles commenced in the last llulll bt: r or th e Call1uariall, and ha s suggcstf"d that I should write about the Chapter Library. I feel hi g hly ho noured, and will do my best to obl ige him, but am some what diffident as to my ability to deal at all adequate ly with so large a subject within the na rro w li mits imposed upo n me . Perhaps in this article it will be wise not to attempt any detailed account of the building itself o r of the many literary t reasureS it contains, but me rel y to confine myself to the humbler task of acting as g uid e, phi loso pher an'd friend to the casual vi sitor. \~~e will suppose then, that so me Tuesday or Friday morning, between the hours of twelve and one. a boy-fo r choice a new boy-finds him sdf near th e iron gateway beside the Bishop of Dover' s house. The gate is open and he need feel no hes itation abo ll t passi ng through. H e mounts th.e sto ne ste ps which lead to a bricked te rrace o ve rl ooking the vaults of th e great monasti c dormitory, and pauses for a moment to look at the ne wi sh looking bu ilding of white Caen stone lying parallel with the Chapter H o use. This is the Library, and, if he pleases. our yo un g scholar is at liberty to go in and have a look ro und . On entering he will see at once that th ough the windows and arches are round-h eaded , the buildi ng is only sham Norman, and not very good at that. In fact it was built in the yea r 1868, by th e late Harry Austen, th e Cathedral Surveyor and Architect , who also designed the Schoolroom over th e arches in the Mint Yard. But, alth oug h neithe r ancient, nor a good imitation of Norman work, the room is a fine one. and excell ently adapted to its purpose. Probably th e first object that will draw th e attention of ou r young scholar are the large pictures hung over th e capitals of th e pillars. These are worthy of attention fo r th ey a re facsimiles of some of the finest wall pai ntings of their period to be fou nd in thi s coun try. The picture nearest to the door, on th e north side, represents . '1. Paul shakin g off th e viper into the fire. and is a copy of a fresco in the Chapel of Sl. Anselm on the so uth side of the Choir 'of the Cathedral, while those next to it an d on the opposite wall are co pies of pai ntings in the dark Chapel of the Cry pt, popularly called St. Gabri el' s, but with more reaso n St. J o hn the Baptist's Chapel. These pictures were executed be fore the great fire which devastated the Cathedral in 1'74. The conte nt s of the glass cases, placed at the east end of the Library, should n l~ xt be inspec ted. The case nearest to th e Ol1 ter door contains a collection of seals. In th e rront row are the seals of th e Archbish ops of Canterbury fro m Anselm ( 1093 )


THE

CANTUARIAN.

to Staffo rd ( 1448). Unfortunately Becket is not represented. and the re are a few other gaps in the series. At first sigllt th ese seals look very much alike, and the tendency will be to give them merely a glance and pass on, but th ey are really worth more careful examination. i\,Tany are vcry fin e impressions, and so much individ uali ty is exp ressed in the features of the effigies that there can be little noubt that they arc real portraits. Let the young schola r notice the seal of Archbi shop Winch elsey (c. 13 00), all old Cantuari an. H e will see that the Archbi shop. in spite of his great exertions on behalf of hi s order, and the bac! treatment he had rece ived fro m the Kin g. had not g ro wn thin. To tell the truth he appears to s how a te nde ncy to cor pulen cy, Clnd t hi s is confirm ed by a contem po rary lette r, late ly fou nd amo ngst th e Cathedral MSS. in. whi ch th e wri ter says that the Archbishop is fairly well in health but valde pOllderoslls.' Another se ries worth y of careful inspection are th e co unter seals of the Archbishops on wh ich the murde r of St. Thomas of Ca nte rbury is rep resented. These are curious because they a ll g ive different versions of th e same sce ne . The n th ere are the seals of so me of th e Priors of Christ Church. notab ly a very fin e one of th e celebrated H enry of Eastry ( 1284 - 1331), who pu t li p the beautiful stone sc ree n above the Choir stalls. and bui lt the Monastic Brewcry ( now th e Choristers' School ), and whose name - as I believe-is still perpetuated by the be ll wh ich daily toll s to prayers. lvVe must not linger over the seals of the Abbots of St. Augustine's', nor over th e great seals of the Convent of Ch ri st Church, except to notice the earliest of all-a stnall one of the eleventh century. It bea rs a very rude representation of a Ch urch, and its matrix was probably e ng raved before the Saxon Cathed ral was destroyed. Passing on to the next exhibition case (th e one nearer to th e ooo r leading to the Cathedral) we find it filled with early printed Bibles. an d li turg ical books. In th e left. hand co rner of the front row is the first Common Praye r Book of Edward VI. ( rj 4c) open at the Consecration Prayer of th e Com muni o n Ser vice. It will be worth whil e to puzzle out the black letter t)'pe in o rder to see h0\\1 co nsiderable is the differe nce betwee n the form auth ori zed in the first Praye r Book and th at subseq uen tly ado pted . Next comes the second Praye r Book of Edward V I. pri nted in 1552. The form . prescribed in this book does not vary mll ch fro m that of our present use, but it will be see n that th e ordcr ror Evening Prayer comm enced with the Lord's Prayer. T ht¡ la rge fo li o volume, to which th e Great Seal or E ng land is attached, is the Prayer Book of r 66 2, and is known as the "sealed book." O ur Common Prayer UOOk M should confor m exactly to this book, but, as a matter of fact, they seldom do, s undn' pri nte r's e rrors hav in g crept in fro m ti me to time. O n the other side o f this case ili a fi ne copy 01 the Sarum Missal printer! at Par is in 1555. I t is open at the Canon or the Mass, or, in other word s, at the Const:cratio n Praye r in the H oly Eu charist. Th l' type used is very large in order that the words shou ld be casily read by the officiati ng priest. This book - printed in the reign of Q uee n Mary- may have been used in th l' Cathedral during the reaction towards th e olde r form s of worship which markt-d


.

THE

. CANTUARIAN.

Next to the Missal lies a book ~vhich made history-the Scottish Prayer Book of 1637 . It was prepared by Archb~shop Laud , and was so ill received by the people for whom 1t was. lI1ten<,led, tha~ 1tS enfo rced th e reig n of that unfort unate Q uee n.

introduction in to the Scottish K irk not only caused J eanme Geddes to fhn g her stool at Archbishop Sharpe in St. Giles' Cathedra l, but was one of the ch ief. causes of the Civil Vvar. I n the next compartment of the same case are the BIbles and New T estaments. Tyndale's New T estament, one ,of a limi~ed ~lll1nbe: whi ch escaped .t he bonfires at Paul's Cross, lies bes ide Coverdale!) t ranslatlOn Issued III I j36, th e earl.lest E n"lish Bible published by a uthority. Cran mer's, commo nly called the Grea.t B1ble ( 15~I ) comes next, with its curio us frontispiec~ representing H en ry V~II. deahng a nt Bibles to hi s subj ~cts with both han ds, wl~l l e f~om ev~ry mouth n s~s the ~r~ ,of • Viva' R ex.' He re too is a co py of the Bi ble Iss ued 111 1568, under the a~l spl c~S of Queen Elizabeth and Archbishop Par ker, an ~l ge ne rally kn~wll as the.• Bishop s Bible.' Our Prayer Book version of th e P~alm s IS taken from thIS translatlOll. T his does no t exhaust the conte nts of the case, but it is probable that the intelligent interest shown by th e youn g King' s Scholar may at this poin~ sho w some signs of !laggi ng, so I must hurry him on' to the ca~es b.etween the pillars .o n the north side of Lhe Library. The first need not deta lll hlln long. It .cont.all1s the vestmelllS taken from the tomb of Archbi shop Hubert \':'alte r, who (lied. In 12 0 5. In his lifetime Archbishop Huber t exercised a salu tary mR uence ove r K lll g J oh n. who, on hearing of his death, exclaimed, .. Now am I K ing of EI~gland for tl~e fi rst time.' Though mu ch discoloured these vestments are very beaullfully ~mbrOldere.d in gold thread. As early exam ples of need lewo rk. they have great artIstlc a~l.d antiquarian va lue, but whether it was justifiable to nRc the tomb of an ArchbIshop to obtain th em, is another matter. Passi ng on to the nex t show case we find the central position given t~ an inden· ture of ag reement between the Mon ks of \,Vestm inster, a.nd those of Chn st Church, Canterbury, whereby the latter, in return ro r a ~enefactlOn, undertak.e t? say prayers and offe r masses for the repose o f the sou l of Kll1g Henry VII. Tlus IS not a mere sheet of parchment but a volum e of man y ve llum leaves, bound. ill dark. blue. velvet with metal bosses. The leaf at whi ch the vo lum e is opened IS finely Illymlllated . The two small books of ' Hours' which are placed on eithe r side of the mdenture, are beautiful exam ples of F rench work 01 the XVth. ~entury. They are opened. so that specimens of the exquisitely painted f~111 page n~lI11ature~ may be seen . A tmy book of private prayers should also be n o tlce(~. I t IS a Latll1 book but some of. the praye rs are in E nglish, expressed in very q ua~nt lan?uage. It was pro~ably wntten carly in the XVI th century. At the back of thIS case IS part o~ a ve ry anclCnt L egtmda Satlc'ormJl, written and illustrated by a Canterb ury Monk 1Il th e early pa rt of the XlIth century. This interesting fragme nt was recove red by the late Dr. Sheppard from the lids of the Registers of the Archdeaco n's Court. But a document perhaps more interesting to a Canterbury boy, is an indulgence


THE

CANTtJARIAN.

of Pope Pau l II. (~ . 1470) gra nting five years pardon to a ll persons who sho uld visit the Chnrch of Milton next Cantprbury. on cerlain specified festival s. The indul~~n~e was granted ,fo r U n::.levrng of. th e Church," that is to !oiay. as a method oj rat S,mg mOI~ey ,for Its repai r, and thIs was the me dire va l way of getting fund s for, objects wluch 111 O Uf day are provided fo r by the procct:ds of Bazaa rs and Fancy FaIrs. ~ The case rurthe~ to the West is devo ted to autographs o f Prior Seiling, Sir 1 homas 1\1ore, Archbishops Cranmer and La ud j Queen Elizabeth and Q ueen Vic loria ~re represented here. Becket's nam e appea rs as a witness to a charter, but thi s IS,. of course , not an autograph . . So a lso the Act of CO llncil , establis hing the Pnmacy of ~he See of C:a nterbury In 1072, and attested by William the Conq ueror, q ueen Matilda, ArchblS~o'p Lallfranc and many other Bishops a nd Abbots IS. on ly a. copy. The. ongmal. h?wever. ~ontaining th e actual autographs of the witnesses IS pr~se rve? 111 a drawe r 111 the LIbra ry. One more do cum ent in this caSe demands atten~J(:m. VIZ .â&#x20AC;˘. the long narrow strip of pa rchment on th e right hand sid t.: of th e case. glvlllg a lIst of the Mayors of Ca nterbury. with a ch ronicle of SO I11 (: events of Queel~ Mary's reig n. Notice the nam e of John Twyne. the first H eadmaster ~r the KI~g's Scho?I, ~1ayor of Ca nterbury in 1554, a nd read the accounl o~ Car(hn~l. Pole s first arnval III England and hi s reception in Cante rbury. It ends with the Sllllstc r remark. "The same yere was brent VI heretykes." B~ thi s time, I fancr the ene rgi.es of the yOU~lg scholar wi ll be complete ly e~haus led, ~n~ th<lt he wl.1I very readily obey th e llnkle of th e Hall bell recall inS{ hun. fro!ll hiS literary studi es to th e H ead maste r' s dinn er ta ble, and so fo r the presl:nt I lnd hun farewell.

.!ulle 12/lt. C. E\,ELEIGH VIOODR UFF. N o/e.-The above has been written during my holidays. away from any book ~ of refe rence, so I woul d ask for lenient treatment if I have bl undered ove r a datto here and th ere.

BEETHOVEN:

HIS LIFE AND LETTERS .

Sorrow is hard to bea r, and doubt is slow to clea r, Each sufferer has his say, his scheme of th e weal and woe : BUl God has a few of us whom he whispers in the ear i The rest may renson and welcome: 'tis we musicians know. Ie

There is generally a IllOst remarkable difference between the artist a nd the man.

MOSl of th e greatest geniuses the world has kn o wn have bee n in private life Llw most un exciting individuals. It is th t¡ post hum ous publication of their acti 11" and tho ug hts by so me fait hfu l BoswlllI that show where genius min g led with 01 flashed through their social intercoli rlW, \;Yithout doubt) however. even allowiIl H


'tHE

CANTUARIAN.

for the una voidabl e miscon ceptio ns that have a ri sen about him, Beeth oven was no less remarkabl e as a man than as an artist. Vlh en the wo rld was gin:· n the dange rous .• little knowledge" that he was an eccentric individ ual , and when stories o f th e most absurd nature were promulgated co ncerning him, everyone seemed to leap at the conclusion that he was mad because he was an artist. Such a notion would asc ribe to him the origin of th e studi ed deshabille apparently esse ntial to a modern aJlla/lls. But we do not owe the immorta l C minor Symphony to the impressionism of the master's hair, nor th \! Appassionata Sonata to the abse nce of hi s collar: his art may have affected his mann ers, but his manners were not an art. All this is necessary to r~ mov e the impress ion that Bet:.!th ove n was an artistic lunatic, and. as sll ch, wo rthy of co nte mpt, whatever may have bee n th e quality of hi s work. But th e Beethoven of history rarely exhibited th e Beet hove n of art: it is co nfusion of the two th at has bee n largely responsible for misconceptions.

and lasting frie ndship with the Breuning family, and also with Count Waldstein, to whom he ded icated the well-known Sonata. By th e latter's influence he gained the appointme nt of Court pianist i and in ' 7CJ z, having been g ranted a· Iw nsion by the Electo r, he made his permane nt abode at Vien na. H e studi ed und er Haydn till ' 794. whe n the latte r k·rt for En gland, and in J 7CJ5 he co mmenced his career as composer and performer. H e died at Vienna in , 8z7 and was publicly buri ed there. His collected lette rs are, with three exceptions, entirely of the second Vi enna period, namely 1792 to 1827.

I n considering Beethoven in the li g ht of his corresponde nce th ere are two importa nt factors that we must notice. The first is the condition or li fe in which he moved. He had a pe rsonal expe rien ce of the horrors of war i fo r in 1805 Vienna was occupied by French troops, and again ill 1809 was bombarded and occupied by Napoleon. "Heaven only knows how t.h ings will go on j I shall now probably have to change my resid \! nce. 'W hat Ludw ig van Beethoven was born in a disturbin g, wild life around me, nothing ' 770 of a lllusical famill' in Bo nn . H e but drums, ca nno ns, men, misery of all received some mu sical training from so rt s." So he writes to his publishers in I n addition to thi s his own Herr Nt'efe, the Co urt organist, and at 180CJ . the age of 13 was entrusted with the post existence was most precarious j it is true of pianist in the Court Theatre Orchestra. that he had a small pension from the I n 1785 he journeyed to Vienna to ]~ I c ctor , and also gained fro m the co mpl ete hi s stlldies, and stayed there for proceeds of his own publications, and two years, wh en he was recalled to BOJlIl besides th is was sllppOl'ted by co ntribu by the death of hi s moth er. H e now hac! ti o ns from three Polish Counts ; but the to pro\'ide for the fa mil y, and was obliged g reat depression of mon ey val ue in to und ertake teaching, an occ upation Vienna, and his own ack nowledged which was always distasteful to him . It incapacity ror business left him always was at Bonn that he formed the intimate with the fear of extreme poverty. His


THE

CANTUARI AN.

leLters show in many places ho w entirely dependent he was on hi s friends. Fo r instance, he writes to von Zcmskall, on e of the three noblemen, when he wants a new looking-glass, or a watch, o r fresh

pens, or a hat changed all accoun t of a s lit in it. Coun t Zemskall al so provided him with servants, by whom Beetho ven was continually being bothered. He wa~ fo r eve r findin g o r imagining them dI shon est, and lette r after letter did he write on th eir iniquities, H e ends on e period of slich correspo ndence wi th the o utbu rst : "\ÂĽonderful chan ges have taken place at my house. Th e man, thank H eave n, has g one to th e devil, and th e wom an s(;cms on

that

account morc

determin ed to stick he re." To Frau Na ne tte Streiche r, w110 volu nteered to look a fte r his housekeeping, hi s letters are one long jeremiad a bout washi ng, blank~ts, dusters, tin spoons, s cissors, nec~tIes , ~tays, etc . "j\¡ry housekeeping" he IS obhged to confess, "i s almost a shipwreck." In anothe r le tter he de scribes it as an allegro di COllfllsione. All th ese troubles were aggravated by the utte r illegibility of his handwritin g at times : "that cursed writin g , which a ppare ntly is as often mi sund erstood as I am myself." Th e second g reat facto r which influen ced his character to so g reat a.deg ree was his ill -health, and es pecia lly his deafness. H e was a chron ic sufferer from colic, and seems al ways to have bee n the prey of in compete nt doctors o r too intelligent quack s ; he a llud es o fte n in g reat fur)' to the way they treat him . Such a disease naturall y left him q ui cktempered, and forced to a n almost lu dicrous eccentricity manne rs that were

naturally abrupt. But thi s was g reatly in creased by the failu re and eve ntual loss of hi s hearing. As earl y as 17g8 he co mplain ed o f buzzing in th e ears, wh ic h g radu ill1r g ot worse , until in 18 11 hi s attempt to co nduct in person his opera Fi delia almost end ed in di sas ter, owing to his inability to di sting ui sh th e notes of th e orchestra . Bu t at t he same tim e it mu st be remembe red tha t a ll hi s best work was produ ced afte r thi s affli ctio n had fall en upon him; in th e peri od J 800 to 1 8 23 he wrot e all th e nin e Symph o ni C's a nd a. g reat many of th e thirty five pian o SOllatas. On t hi s subj ec t hi s letters a rc particula rly touchin g a nd pathe ti c. ,. 130rn with a fie ry. acti ve te mperament, " he wri tes, " e ven susceptive to the dive rsio ns o f society, I had sou n to retire from th l" world , to li ve a so litary life . At ti mes, e ve n, I endeavoured to fo rget a ll thi s, but ho w harshly was I dri ve n back by th l' redoub led e xperi ence o f my bad hearin g. How could I declare the weakn ess of a se nse whi ch in me oug ht to be more acute than in oth ~rs ? .... My mi sforllllH.' p<t ins me doubly, in that I am ce rtain to Again , c , I have, be mi sunderstood. " in deed, often c ursed my e xi stence ; Plu tarch taught me res ig nation. If noth ing e lse is possibl e I will de fy my fa te " . . .. " Resignatio n, what a mise l abl e st ro ng hold ." . . . . . "As Autumn leaves fall and wi ther, so are my ho pcft bli ghted. How lo ng have I bee n estranged from the g ladn ess of tm e joy I Wh e n, 0 my God, whe n shall I again fee l it in the tem ple of nature and 01 Ill all ? Ne ver ? Ah! that is too hard I " As is ve ry often th e case with till' deaf, he became intensely suspi cious and ready to take offence j and it was diffi cult


T HE

CANTUARI AN .

to g et him to mix with society. H e was se nsitive o f th e small est. slight, and even imagined insults or treach e ries. "Some perso ns have played me al~ i n fam.o~s tri ck, " he wrote on one o ccaSiOn; "It IS 10 1l 0" before I shall mi'( wi th sociely agai n." It was a matter of pa rtictIl~r d iffi culty to ge l him to pl.ay, even. to hiS fri ends, as he hated to be II1 the sh g htest degree " sho wn o ff." H e felt how sacrosan ct hi s art wa s, and cou ld not bear to have it degraded , as he thought, to t~l e leve l of an amusement. "Let them wnte what th ey like about me," he once .said. of hi s critics, c , they can no more extll1gUlsh the li g ht of my genius than I can darken th e moo n." If he was wanted to play, it had to be don e by force or by a tri ck. But once establi shed at the pia no, he would go on extempo rizing for hours together, havi n g entirely forgotten the existence of an audienc e. His extem porization was al ways remarkable for its fire and extravagance, but at the s<l;me tim e he invariab ly respected musIcal form - " Anything else" he used to say c. is no !llOre than a bad joke." But howeve r violent was hi s anger, and however groundless hi s suspicio ns, he was always eq ually warm in forgiveness and repe nta nce. I~l(lee d it must n.ot be consid ered that IllS letters conSist entIrely o f outbursts and lam entations, {or at times they rise to hei ghts that are as g lorio us as those of hi s art. In particular, hi s letters to his neph ew Ca rl, for whom he fe lt so stro ng a love, and by wh om he was so di sgracefully deceived, a re sl~blime in th eir earnestness. Difficult as It was to acq uire and maintain a fr iend ship with him , those who did so were full y reward ed

by th e de pth and pu.rity .of hi ~ affection . F o r whil e he was a Tltan III ge m us, he was a child in character. His merrim ent was broad and boisterol1s, hi s temper was ever ready to burst into childi sh fits of paSSion, hi s frank sim plici ty made him the victi m of every d esig n , a nd his lo ve But was ofte n childishl y withdrawn. those fe w who were privil eged to be call ed hi s fri ends kn ew th at th ose secrets which are hid den from the wise and prud ent are revealed to sll ch child ren. Bee thoven spent, hi s life amid almost unremittin g un charitableness from the world, am id heartless treatment from the neph ew he loved, and ami d constant diffi cu lties in to which hi s fi ery temper and hi s a ffl iction led him. Wh en he d ied, he had seen all Vienna turned as id e feveri shly afte r the brilliant tin se l of Rossini's o peras. This filled to the bri~ .the cup of sorrow which the deaf mUSICJan was for ced to drink. His perso n might be reviled, but thi s blow at his art struck dee p at a nature by creation impulsive, sensitive, proud. I~ call ~~ ' fo rth hi s last g rim taun t, Pla udlle, a1Jl ZC1, comoed/a ftnda esl , before he stepped fr~m the stage of thi s world into the t rue hfe whi ch he had already kn own in th e inner san ct uary of hi s art, whe re we re no discord s, no false harmon ies, and where he had always found refuge from a purblind world, that sa.w very little and laug hed at th at. "The high that proved too high, the heroic for ea rth too hard, T he passion that left the ground to 10"" itself in the sky. Arc music sent li p La God by the lovt'r and the bard; Enough that he heard it once : we shall heal it by¡and ¡by. "


THE

CANT UARIAN.

- - --...:....------- = =

MODERN MUSIC. For the purpose of thi s article I ~hall merely give a list of a fe w of the chief works now co mma ndi ng the attelltion of th e Illu ~ ical world .

music is vcry diffi cult and a stru ggle with some of his larger work:; suggesls th t.: idea that the reall y g reat co mpose r of the ~lllure will be on e whose mu sic is q ui te IIn possible and purely uni n telligib le. Hi s T he symphonic poems, or T onesmaller works for piano arc less terrifyingPoems for o rchestra, and operas of and have considerable charm which is R ichard Strauss, a GeTman, claim the scarcely the case with those on a larg¡ first place in our list. Tod und Vcr kHirung, sca le . an orcheslral wo rk is sure ly one of the Cisar Franck, a Belgian. is th t¡ nob lest and most finished inspired in th e who le literature of mu sic. Othe r compose r o f some fine works, his mu sic similar works by this composer a re .. Til how ever, se~m s to be d esig ned les:; for E ul cnspiegel," "Don Juan, I> "Helden- the amate ur tha n for the first-rate co ncert Jebel'''; the din of this latter work is performer. I t is to be wi shed that 50111(' occasionally terrifi c a nd the safest position of these disting ui shed men wOllld have for th e hearer is at the back of the more consideration for huma n weakn es~: concert hall, as far as possible away c"'c ryone can not be a first- rate co nc ' I t His ch ief operas artist, and as it goes without saying that from the orchestra. " Salome " and ,I Elektra It have not yet mell of sllch distinctio n in their art mu"l reached En g land j for the latter work the have some qua lity in their work wh ich lifts it so far above th e a\'e rage , it he co mposer requires a n o rches tra of I I I a pity that the ordinary amateur ca n lint! performers. so little of their music which is within hi M Claude DebussC)'. a Fre nchman , is the powe r to play or to sing. For instilIH'(', composer of" L'Apri-Midi d'u ne fa un e." the cycle o f songs "Prosts Lynques" h~ a very popula r orchestral work, and of D ebusse.J' is per fl'ctl), bewildering hi "Pelleas et Mclisa nde" an opera produ ct'd ordinary mortals. In a small COUlltl) in Paris '902, but for the first tim e onh' town such as this, we are no doubt behind in England this season. . the Li mes and slo w to understa nd 11(' \\ works and new ideas. There is 110 Illax R eger, a Ge rman, is oue of the orchestri.l here or indeed in an\' but tilt' th ree composers wh ose works ex cite most verr large towns; there is no opt.:r<I 0 11 1 disc llssion and inle rl.! sL Il ow-a-days. His of Loncion, and if piano, viol in work s :1I\d


TH E ¡CANTUARIAN . songs are so difficult as to bl'; beyond th e reac h o f those amate urs for wh om m llsic is some thin g mo re than th e bl eating of ina ne glees or a bland toying wi th some musical instrum ents. modern composers have onl), themselves to thank if their wo rks are compared un favourab ly to those of the great masters of the past, whose wo rks charm and delig ht, besides the intellec tu al interes t they inspire. r append the names of a few other works, hy li vin g co mpose rs, whi ch seem the most prominent a nd fi gure most in progra mmes.

or executive musicians the fo ll o win g a rt! some o f the most prominent ; Wehlcr, Nik isch, H. J. Wood, Landon Ron:l1d. Violinists: Mischa Elman, Kreisler. Pianlsls: Paderewsk i, Pachmann, Godowsky , Madame Carreno, Busoni. Singers : Caruso, Bond, Tcltmzzini, Melba, Elena Ge rhardl, Van Rooy. Conductors:

The o nly

W<I )'

to understand mu sic is

to hea r the best, a nd that as ofte n as

possib le . T here (.Ire several first-rate orchestras in London. an d also in Manchester. and a few ot her of the large town s. The promenade co ncerts in ORClll~STRAI. WORKS: Autum n and the Sunday afternoo n .. Finlandi:l," Sibe/illS. concerts at the Q ueen's and Albert Halls in Lo nd on. offer many opportunities of " S)'IllphollY in A flat, " Elgar. heari ng the best mu sic at moderate prices. OI'ERAS ; Opera unfortu nately in this cou ntry is . "Samson ct Dalila," Saint Sa~ lI s, a very expensive lu xury. I t is cheap and " Louisc," Clul1'pelltier. good in Brussels a nd such Ge rm an towns "La T osea," "La Boh~ m c," "Madame Butterfly," as Mun ich, Dresde n a nd Frankfort, a nd PIl(rilli. th e best way to hear operas is to go " Pagliaeci," L~oJlca.val/a . abroad. PERCY GODFREY.

"Ca\'allcria RU5t ieana," il1ascagll i.

FRAGMENT OF A DREAM. . . .. . . .. , a nd as I stood there, ' alon e upon that stupendous he ight, with noth ing r01i1lt1 me save a blanket and those abysses ya wn ing an infinity below, buffettt'ci by the incessa nt wi nd, a nd d re nched by the sea rching rain , I saw, far beyo nd on the gl imme rin g horizon,

th e smoke of burning towns, an d the summ'll1S of he o f Ithaca" ran g in my ea rs. The Tartarean ghoul at my side urged me forward, a nd snatc hing lip the frog of my bayonet I for med fours. . . . no ti me fo r reason ing ... . speed .. speed ... eve rythin g flashed before my eyes ; hand s stretched II


THE

CANTVARIAN.

out to grasp me . . . . I I Pay on Saturday" I sh ri eked as 1 flew on . ... How co uld we deploy if I were late? Late . . .. late .. , . the words burned into my heart; , lucky I kn ew the th ree shortest theorems in th e book. On . . . . on . ... through the ice and rime of th e Great Shadow, nod to the verge r .. and on ever 0 11.. down the vast halls, beneath oaken roofs. till a clarion voice cried " Sit down, please." H ow could I ? \file were in r;ompany colum n already, and what 'Was th e sectio n command er doin g? He must mean" Fix bayonets," but I only ha d a Geography P rimer. Bursts of martial music and jubilant antip hons, onc vast chaotic

cataclasm of sound, from out the grey buildings-s urely I recognised the lost chords or the Rabbit H utch ... . " Mend it, or . ... " and off ran one for th e gl uepot. Fools, how could I make mu sic from six-bloc ks. And all the while my traj ecto ry. mine! was rising up before me. nearer and nea rer, strainin1{ in s nakey coils (useless to pul up th e back-sight). nea rer and slow ly neare r, twining ro un d my throat ; closer and close r - breath failing ... . hands cl utchin g, limbs writhin g .. .. " D ol t! " bell owed a voice in my ea r, " your puttees a re on upside down" ! . and I woke.

CRICKET. KING'S

SCH OOL

v.

ST.

LAW RENCE

II

A:'

Played 011 May 27th, and resulted in a ve ry even draw . St. Lawrence batted firsl a nd we re d ismi ssed for 2 08, which, considering the seco nd wicket added 1 20 . wa s credi table to th e Sc hoo l bowlers. Murrin and Po rter were the to p sco rers, the fo nn er bein g es pecially free on th e leg side, while the latter, wh o was missed in the twenti es. was partial to off-drives. Of the bowl ers, Denne was the most s ucct:ssful, but we mu st co ngratulate Marti n on hi s excellent fast bowli ng whic h was ve ry different from hi s customary half-volleys an d long-hops. F luke and Parsons made an exce ll e nt start fo r the School, running up the centu ry before bein g separated . The form er at last fo und his form a nd put toget her a very pretty 8 1, whic h included one fi ve and twelve fOllrs. [-I e was dism issed by the ete rn al bugbear of sc hool batsmen, the lob-b owler. N[artin and Gordon then added 30 befon' the latter mish it a lob and was caug ht. \Vi cke ts fell rap idl y now for the batsmen werl' afraid to go out to the lobs with so smart a stumper as Huyshe behind them . Marti n co mpleted his third half-ce ntury fo r the seaso n and was run out whil e atte mpting t force the game. C re m er~ who s ucceeded him played carefully and if there ha d been


THE

CAN'tUAR1AN .

1 h ave kllockcd off tIle Ilecessary time would most l ·k l'C Y when stumps were draw n. ST. LAWRENCE L. Rhodes, b Denne ... J. Mu rrin, c Cremer'!, b Martin O. F. Huyshe, c Denne, b Carre F. S. Porter, not out '" H. N . furl ey, st Genl, b Cremer3 N. H. Wight wick, b C ~eme r:: .... C. E. Harris, c Cremer!, b Marlin .. R. Rhodes, b C reme r ~ T. Blain, b Dennc W. Goodbnn, b Denne ... H. 1\"1. Kerry, c Cremer'!, \J Denne Extras : byes, 4 ; leg· byes, 1

10

run s which were wanting

" A."

5

81

43 50 13

o o o 7 3

5 208

Total

KING'S SC HOOL.

26

H . Parsons, b Harris H. G. Fluke, e and b Furlcy E. F. Housden, b F llrl cy R. E. Mart in, run out ... ... t{.. E. Gordon, c Huyshe , b Furley R. W. H. Moline, b Murrin G. T. Carre, b Furle), ... H. L. H. Cremel '!, nol out R. M. Genl, b Murrin .. ' ... L. G. L. Denne, Sl H uyshe, b Furley Extras: byes, I Tolal (9 wickets)

H.

81 o

58 12 2

8 7

o

3

\V: C rcmer3 ~i id not bal. BOWLI NG J\:-;'A LYS I5 : ST. LAWltRNCg .. A."

o. 9 14

Denne C reme r'! Cremcr:J Carre Martin

5 5

6· 1

KING'S

SC H OOL v. SUTTON

M.

R.

w.

o o

47

4

o o

54

2

47

35 21

2

VALENCE.

Played on June 1st, on th e Beverley, and resulted in an easy wi n for th.e S.chool. Martin once more lost the toss and Gosli ng and Sedg wi ck opelled the mnm gs for Sutto n. Sedgwick was s martly taken at wicket in. Den~ n~'s se~OI~d over. All, the Sutton batsmen found themselves in diIT"iculties l Martlll. bemg agall1 III form and Carr~


39 0

'tHE

CA NT UAll.tAN.

repc,ated l), beating the batsmen. T he School fielding was distinc tly O'ood Gent bein partl~larly smart at wicket while Martin brought off two good catch~s in'the slips. g 1\1 f hf ~chOOI mad e a bad start, losing Parso ns and Gottwaltz for single fiO'UTCS ar 111 13 _ a, lucky escape at, five but soo n se ttl ed down, and though not at· his~\e st: fvllt t~~ethcr a g?od sc~>re, hIS hook shots, being quite brilliant. Fl uke's half ccntury as C Mllceiess, lIlciudlllg t wo fives and mne fours. and is quite his best effort this ~~~sQn. H e, unfortunatel>; got, a very Ilasty knock when thoroughly set which m USL th e upse t hllll and lost hun hIS ccntury. The Sutton Valence score was passed while th esc :'~~ vem together. T he remain der of the tea m went in to hit and most of fo~,~eral e ,to do so. Delll~e ~nd Gordon both made merry for a short time. the ball . ~co ~lIlg our boundanes III seven balls and th e latte r hitti ng th ree consecutive s 111 0 t 1e ~ 1estnut t ~ee. Martin declared at 4.45 with a lead of 132 . to Ol~ res.U1mn g, Martm t.ried . experime nts. Gent being put on and later Parso ns S ~k t"~ WIckets, and Martlll t n ed to bowl lobs a nd took a wicket off a full pitch ll ton alence were So flll1S behind with fOllr wickets in hand when stum ps woro' d la wn.

d

r

1St I nnings. SU TTON H . R. Gosling, b Martin ... L. S. Sedgwick, c Genl, 0 Den nc F. F. Smythe, b Martin B. M . Tuke, Ibw, b Carre'" ... A. 1\1. T~oma", c Seabrooke, i; 'Carre z C. M. F ischel, b Cremer ... W . J. Clinch, e Marlin b Carre R. L. Kay, c Gent, b W. F. Ebcrl i b Cremer2

Carre

R. 0' Alberts~n , c Martin, b C~~rc

G.

C!.. Champion,

not oul ... E:-.;trns : byes, 8; leg·byes, I

;

.. no· balls,

1

Total

VALENCE. 2 1 b Fluke

KING'S

>.1 >7

5 c Parsons, b J\'f artin

o .1,

7 b Martin 2 b Parsons ... 7 c i\'f artin, b Gent 4

b Parsons

"

I

23

not out

7

2

9 .1 10

E xtras

94

1-1 . Parsons, c F ischcl, b T ukc G. Byron, b Tllk e ...

2nd I nnings.

(j

T Olal (6 wickets)

SC HOOL. 3

...

o

~. C. Fluke. c Champion , b Gos ling F. II. Scabroo](c, b Gosling . R. E. Gordon, e Kay, b Clineh

93 50

R E. flh rti n, b Fischel

R. L. Gottwa ll z, b Smythc G. T. Cam:!, IlOt ou t ... H. L. H. Cremcr 2 , b Tukc R . M. Gent, b Tuke ...

L. G. L. Denne, not

4

0111

Extras : byes, 8; leg·byes, T otal (9 wick ets)

o

17 27 10

16 I

• Innings dec1a~~d closed.

9


t r-iE

39 1

CANTUARrAN.

How l.I ~G ANi\ I.\' SI S :

SU 1- ro" VALENCE.

ISl Inning". 9

M. 2

12

J

O.

Dcnne .. Crcmer2 ... i\lartin Carre

8 1 1'2

3

KI NG'S

R.

2nd Innings.

â&#x20AC;˘.

o.

M.

6

2

i\1" n in Gent

2

F luhc

2

0 0 0

20 20 12

0 0

7 6

W.

22 17 10

35

5

3

P n r S;)IlS . .

2

Byron

2

SC HOOL v. DOVER

2

o

COLLEGE.

Played on Jline 8th, on th e Beve rl ey. and resulted in an easy win for Dove r College. !VIac1arcn and Munns opened th e match for DO\'e r against the bowling of Denne and Carre. The wickets were pitched on the enlrance side of th e gro und on a bumpy pitch which soon cut up badly. From th e first the bo wl ers had the upper hand and at no time did th e College see m likely t'o run up a high sco re. Hacher was top score r with 22 not out and though by no means a pre tty bat his defence was very safe. Three batsmen scored 19, the first five batsmen a ll reached double figures. After the fall o f the fifth wicket there was a collapse, four wickets falling fo r six runs. Carre and ~ NJartin were the most sllccessful bowlers, th eir co ntrasts in style bei ng vc ry puzzling to the batsmen. The School fielding was very smart, Cremer and Martin being the pick of a good lot. The School mad e a good start, the half-century being sent up for the loss of one wicket by Parsons and :\larti n. The fonne r at last showed something of his old form, but Ma rtin was not at his best a ne! was considerably upse t by a nasty kno ck on the knee. At 53, Martin was caught 'off Munns, who in th e same ove r dismissed both Gordon and Byron. These di sasters absolutely unnerved t he follo wing batsmen, who gave a wretched displ ay of fift h-rate batting, with the result that Dover sent LIS back without the total ha vi ng reached three fi g ures. Munns and Mills bot h bowled welt fo r the College and we re well backed up in the field . Dover commenced th eir second innings very steadily with Hac he I' and 1\1<1son. After some thirty minu tes play the bowlers see med to tire anel the score mounted rapidly. Without anythin g re markabl e in the ,,'a}' of hittIn g, th e total was ve ry soo n taken to 160 , wh en Stephens dec~a re d with a lead of ove r 2 00 . With only forty¡ five minutes left for play, the match was as good as ove r. Moline gave an exhibition of comic cl'icke Land ass isted by un li mited luck managed to remai n in tilt the end, though in doing so he ran out Denne vc ry badly.


j9 i

THE

1st Innings. C. ':!:. MacLaren, c Flu ke, b r-,'I arli n P. G. Munns, c Carre, b Denne

E. O.

CAN'tUAR1AN.

DOVER

j\·rnson, run out

C. ~ lcphens, c Cremer'l, h C~rrc S. Clnrkc z, c Marlin, b Carre de L. Roebuck, b Cremcr2 H. Hacker, not out D ixon, lu\\", b Carre ... ~. C. B. Foote, c l'vl nrtin, b Crcmc r% . Wat son, lbw, b Marlin G. L. l\'Jills, b Manin Extras ... . .. S, P. F. R. G.

COLLEGE. 2nd Innings. 19 st Gent , b Martin 12 not out 19 u i\'lani n 10 not out 19 c Goltwalt z, h Denne I (bd not bnt 22 c Go t! waltz, b CrCIllcr2

;}did not

20

37 42 22

'7 22

b.'\t.

'4 Extras ...

10

Tota l

.. 135

7

Total (4 wickets)

• In nings dccla red closed. 1st Innings.

KI NG'S SC IJ OOL. ... 25

l-I. ': arsons, c \-Valson, b M lInn s

L. G. L. Delllle b j\'! unns R. E. 1~lnrtill, c 'H acke r, b i\1~t'~ns

6

rlln

2nd I nnings.

out

...

2

3 [ C and h MacLa ren 5 Ilot a ll(

.-\. C. 1-!u lle, Ibw, b lHilIs ... G. ~. Carre, c Clnrke. b Mills E. Gordon, h Munns G. Byron, b Munns '" R. L. Gottwaltz, b i'dill s R. W . I-J, Moline, b Mills l-I. L. H. Cremer2 11 0 t out R. hi. Gent, b Mills _,. Extras

J:,

2J 3

o o o

9 I

not out

'S

5 2

3 Tolal

Extras ...

88

8

Totn l (2 wickets)

5'

B OWLING ANALYSIS: 1St

Denne Carre Martin Cremer': ..

Innings.

OOVRR COLLEG t~.

O.

M.

R.

w.

'0

2

36

I

'9 6'3 "

4

41

3 3

12

3

35

2

KING 'S SCHOOL. j\'f Ullns

Watson

Mills

2nd Innings.

o. 6

Marlin Cnrrc Dennc ... Gottwnltz Cremer' . . Fluke 1St I nnings.

o. '4

9

M. ,

2nd InningS- - MacLaren took one wickel.

0

R.

,

8 3 7 8

8

6

M. 0

25

2 0 0 2

w. 5 0 5

27

'5

0

0

29

R.

•,

33 24 20

33

4'

w,

,

0


THE

KING'S

GANTUARIAN.

SC HOOL v. FELSTED

39j

SCHOOL.

This matc h was played on the St. Lawrence Ground, on Friday and Saturday, June l!th a nd 12 th, and resulted in a win for th e School by five wi ckets an d seve n mns. Felsted won the toss and went in first. Denne bowled extremely we ll taking th e fi rst two wic kets with two very good balls. Byron disposed of the Captain wi th a very good catch at mid-off off Carr~, who touk three wickets. Cremer bowled best on the whole a nd had rar the greatest share in winning t he match, for he bowled rour wickets a nd played a splendid innin gs of 55 in our first innings during which he hard ly gave a chance, he also made 41 in our second innings, these sco res were the highest made in eac h innings. Their total score fo r the first in ni ngs was 172 . Vye started battin g after lunch and the first wicket fell for 24. l'vlartin th en came in, but after havin g made some fine shots especially on the leg, was un rortunately bowled at 32. Gottwaltz played a very good and careful innings of 32, during whic h he mad e some fine shots, in the second innings he made 35 of whi ch some excellent cuts co mprised the majo ri t),. Kettelwell ca me in third wicket and .made zo mostly off beautiful leg glides. Ollr innings ended a little arter 6 o'clock with a total of 19l. On Saturday, play began at 10.30. \Ve got them out for '46, Denne bowling best a nd ta kin g five wickets. Gent played splendidly at the wicket, stumping two men and catching one. In our second innings, lVIartin made 27 in pe rfect style, Baker hit the wi nn ing stroke with a bealltiful cut. Our total score second innings was 163 for five wickets. Felsted's fieldi ng was very good especially along the gro und, and they played thro ughout a very sporting game. vVe must congratulate the team ge nerally on playing so well and winning sllch an important matc h. Isl Innings.

FELSTED SC l-lOO L.

C. K. Waller, b Mart in R. H. H eath , b Denne C. de C. Hami lton, b Denne ... A. G. Thurlo w, c Martin, b Carre K . M. B. Cross, c Byron, b Carre C. C. Spooner, c Parsons, b C remer'l D . Macmillan, sl Gent, b Carre A. F. H . Round , not out M. A. R. G. F itzmaurice, Ibw, b C remer'l R. V. Routledge, c Baker, b C remer' .. . S. C. M. Archibald, c Gent, b Cremer2.. . Extras: byes, 9 .. . T otal

22

2nd Innings.

b Carre

3 b Cremer'

,

8 62

...

"

40

6 2

,

7

9

' 7'

c Byron, b Den ne c Moline, h Denne c Gent, b Denne Sl Gent, b Car re c Parsons, b Denne TIm out b Denne st Gent, b Car re not out Extras : byes, ' 7; leg¡byes, I j no¡ balls, I Total

...

'9 33 4 5

" '3 '5 1 1

24 0

'9 146


THE

39+ 151 Ilmings.

KIN G'S SC HOOL,

II Parsons, b Macmillan . . .. R. ~:. Golt~\' altz, c Rot~nd. b Routledge R. E . . ;\'l a rllll, b i"dac ll1lllan ". . ..

G. Byron, lllw, U Macmi llan ...

J.

Kcuclwcll, c Round. b Routledge

P. W. Haker, b Macmillan ... G. T . Carre, lbw, b Routledge

R. ll. L. R.

H. i\'I ol inc, SI Heath, b Routledge L. CrcIllcr2, c Spooner, h Waller G. Denne, not out ... M. Gent, c a hd b Archibald E xtras : byes, 13 ; llo·unlls, I

CANTuARJAN. 2nd Innings.

II

b Macmillan ...

32

b Waller

o

15

33 not out 2 b ROlltledge . 26 4

27

o

b Archibald ...

4

not ou t

7

~ } did S5

not bat. c Routledge, b Macmillan

I~! did

41

not bat.

El\lms : byes, 18 ; lcg.h}'~s ,

14

T ota l

T otal (5 wickets)

13j

BOWLING ANALVSIS: FKLSTRI) SCIlOOL.

Denne Carre :\ Iart in Cremer'!

o. 26 20 8 23

S C H 0 0 LAN D O. K. S.

M.

R.

6

98 84 40

3

66

5

5

\Y.

6 1

NEW S .

The Anniversary Se rm on thi s year exactly 50 years since he was appoinl od Speec h Day. will be preached by th e Headmaste r. Ri gh t Rev. Bishop Mitch inson , D.D ., ~.: ->:. D.C.L., j\lfaste r or Pembroke College, " . Oxford, and Canon or Gloucester, and W~ hea rtily co ng ratulate V. C. Tayl<' I, H~adt~laste r rrom 1859 to 1873. Bishop C. L. Nightingale. A. C. Cottrell. and lVh tc:hll1son has previo llsly preached th e '\¥. G. H inds on obtaining their 1St Bo.t! Anmversary Sermon three times, vb:: in Colo urs and H . de H. Smith. R. (' . 1873, 1878 and 1897 . but this year it will Cumbe rbatc h, "C. F . . 1\,1. N. ;Ryan alii! have a unique interest, and in all pro- R. JlI ckes on obtaining (heir sec lid bability constilutes a reco rd for it will be Boat Colours. Ol~


tHt .CANTUARtAN.

395

I

\J!le also offer our hearty congratulaC. L. Druitt has obtaine~1 his Ro.wing . R 'I G t \-1 L 1-1 Creme r'! Colou rs at the Central Techlllcal Institute, tlOn s to . N. en . . .' I . and R. L. Gottwaltz, on obtaining their So uth K t llsmgtoll. ~;. ~; 1St XI. Colours, and to G. T. Ca~~e, :'~ J. KettcllVell. H. W. Cremer on obtalll- 1 L. T. Watki ns stroked th e Corp us in g their 2nd XI. Colours. Boat in the Mays, when th ey went up ~:- .;;. ' th ree places. On Trinity SlIncl~y, Robe~t G. Coo per. NI. A., T rinity College, Cam~nd&,e. Curate G. H. S. Pinsent stroked the 1st of E lmsted , was ordai ned Pnest 1I1'Canter- Trinit)' third iloat in the Mays. bury Cathedral. He e ntered th e School ~:.~;. ~.\ in 1887. R.l~·. Jenkin 'ha$ obl~tin~~I)rc\ Clas~ G. M. \;\"ebsterand C. N. Smith have H onours in th e Nlat hematl cal ·1 npos. obtained ,I'd Class Honours in Classical Mods. '!f .;,~ J. Deighton and K. B. Dicks~n have H . P. Sparling hn.s obtained it 151 obtai ned 3rd Class H onours In tht: C lass in Part 1. of the Mathematical Natural Sciences Tripos. ~;1f.-;;' Tripos ( New Regulations).

.

*' .; , P. C. Snatt has ~':~ssed in to Sandh urst.

Vie should like to draw th e attention of the readers of this uumber, to the remarks made in the article on the Boat Cl ub respecti ng the. state ?f the Bo~ts and the absolute and lInme<halc neces~lly of providing two n~w racing fours . 1

**'.;,< MOWLL-G1LDEA .-On June 5th, at the Parish Church, St. lVIarylebollc, by the Rev. H. J. Mowll. Curate of Christ Church, "Voking, brother oj ->" .;:~ the bridegroom, assisted by th e All O.K.S. desiro us .of· attending the Rev. W. R. Mowll. Vicar of Christ Churc h. North Brixton. Uncl e or O.K.S. Suppe r, on M<;mday,. J ~dr 26th , the br'idcO'room an d by th e R ev . C. are requested to se nd 111 th en nam es as L. Thor~lton-Du esbery ) Vi ca r of soon as possible to R. !VI. Gent. Ley ton. Essex, the Rev. Edward Worsfold Mowll. to J osephin e Den-. Cante rbury Pilg rims v. U oth fie ld will ham eldest daughter of the late J ohl; Rud olph Gildea. Esq.. of take place on JJfedJlesda)', J uly 28/h.. Those O.K.S. who wish to play are Weatherfort Hall. Co : Mayo. requested to applYl as soon as possible, " to Rev. R. F. Elwyn. Felsted School. Keble " G . C . Strahan made 127 for E ssex. College, Oxford, against \¥adha~ .

,.


'tHE

THE

cAintJAR1AN.

BOAT

CL U B.

The first fixture on the card for this term was a race against a st rong local four raisl.:'d by E. C. Green (O.K.S.) A strong wind was blowing right down th e "straight" an d raising compa rati vely large waves in the middle of the course, as well as delaying the start for some minutes. The School had the back station and gained little at first, being about th eir distance away at the hurdl e. All along th st raight it was a splendid race, there bei ng never more than half a length betwe(; n the crews. Past the end of the Easter course the local crc w was collared and th School coming up with a rush won by six second s.

The piece de resistanCl of the afternoon-we feel that only the choicest journalcs can do justice to the theme-was the race between tht: 2nd crt:w and the 1St X I. The latter crew was as follows: Bow, Gordon; 2, Gent j 3, Fluke; Str., Denn u ; Cox, Gore. A spell of bad weather had driven them from the shaven sward, so th e)! took refuge from the floods and sat in boats instead of a pavilion, or basked amid the moist nettles on th e banks of the Stour. Thanks to the weather. they got Qut together a few times-hunting for shell-fish we heard someone say-nor were th O) altogether unrewarded. From a spectacular point of view th e race was rath er II failure. we had und er-rated their powers and given them too much sta rt. They row ed a thoroughly sporting race with a vigour that is sadly wasted in a mere wield inM of the willow. The 2nd rowed in quite good style, but only succeeded in gainin H about two-thirds of the handicap and were beaten by 17 sees. At the same time thft race served its chief purpose, and our best thanks are due to the crew of the 1St Xl. for giving the 2nd boat an opportunity of rowing the course under full servi '(' conditions and of showing the School who they are. 'ATe were glad to get race s fOI both crews just before goi ng to Tonbridge, the experience is of the greatest valu , and we sincerely hope for a repetition next year. The Tonbridge races were held on June 12th, mostly in the rain. The rivtll authorities in regions where those who take their pastime on the waters arc of small importance, have curious habits and customs. 'We, ourselves, have recollections of It strange monste r called a blow boat before which we flee like our fore-bears befoH' some prehistoric beast in a I< peep" of E. T. Reed. At Tonbridge, the powers w rk still more wi lily. They turn off a tap somewhere, and 10 I there is no water in tll il river-nothin g but a lUuddy. reedy bed . This was the co ndition of the Tonbrid Mll School course, so we had to row on the town one instead . It is a good, though shOll course, but quite un suited for following the race. One can only follow the last P(u t and even then the thi ek bushes on the side form an effective screen behind whi ch It crew can bucket, or screw, or sugar to its heart's content. Consequently on

I,


397

THE CANTUARIAN.

1ST BOAT.

V. C. Taylor A. C . Cottrell 2. B. G. Garibaldi 3· Stroke. C. N. Nightingale W. G. Hinds Cox.

Bow.

2ND BOAT.

C. F. M. N. Ryan R. C. Cumberbatch R. Juckes. i. 3·' Stroke. H. de H . Smith O. M. Depree. Cox.

Dow. 2.


tHE

CANTUARIAN .

WHERE TO CATCH BUTTERFLIES NEAR CANTERBURY.

Perhaps this is a somewhat ambitious title to an article whi ch mu st of necessit}' be very bri ef. and whi ch wi ll fo r th e most part be inte lli gible only to those who know something of the lie of the hnd in this district : . Generat'ly speaking-. Kent is a very good county for hutternies. and th e coast iillC is pe rh aps the hest pl:tce in Kent for them; bu t within a few mi les radius of Ca nte rbury, vcry many varie ties can be captured . Little need be said about th e.co mmo n buue rA ics which are just as likely to be found in one place as in another. My object is to enab le anyone to find ce rtain species whic h a re vcr}' COHlmon wh en once th e right spot is reached ; but of which not a sin gle speci me n will be seen anywh ere e lse. I t i ~ well kn ow n that the Marb led White is one o f these loca l butterflies and I haye found it vcry co mm o n on a c.:e rtain c.:halky hill slo pe bC'l wcen the Beve rley and Nacki ngton. This partic Lllar hillside is a good place fo r seve ral oth er kinds of butterflies, a nd . is within easy walkin g dista nce fro ll1 Can te rb ury. The best way to rCilc.: h it is to go straight along the Dover Road. past the turning that leads to the B eve rl ey, and o ve r ~h e tOlJ o f the hill, taking the first turn ing' to the right. This turn ing is opposite a ho rse pond, o n

the left sid e of the road, and cannot b~. mi stak e n. It only remains to kee p to th i~ palh until a ra ilway bn clge is reach ed . I have catlght many Marbled \;Yhites 1\ the railway e mbankment on the ri ght 01 thi s bridge. Seve ral Dark Gree n Fr itill aries have bee n caught he re, and I hI' I3rown Argur is very common . The n! i a wood a littl e fa rthe r on tow;u li lll Nac kin gton whi c h is known as Whil t' Hill ,"Vood, and it is here that I IH\\II' caug ht seve ral Duk e of Burg undy Fritill ar ies this year. Pearl Rord e red Fritill alit ¡~ are al so very abundant in the open spa l' l 'liI in th is wood . T hey ca n be foun d in alnH) ~ 1 any o pe n woods in K e nt. There are two specime ns of th e lal UI Tor toise-she ll in the School Mus UIII which a re sai d to have been caug ht I\t ' fll th is place. Most of th e trees in ..1his wooel flH ' oa ks and who know!; but that th e: Pur ph ¡ Empe ror mi g ht not be caught h e re, si ll !'! the se trees are its favo lliite hapnt~. There are one or t wo c halk pll" II th e wood which see m to collect I hi buttermes together, for they are 11111' nume ro us in these pits. Sometilill howe ver, th e re is no t tim e to go UII distan ce, and then a vcry good catc h 11111\ so me tim es be made near and 011 1111 ra ilway e mbankm e nts n ea r th e Imlll


THE

CANTUARIAN.

399

flies : there wilt be sure to be mentioned B1ean woods in K e nt . Th is is very indefinite; since Blea n woods a re very e xtensive . I think that th e place meant mu st be the north- end of these woods ; bushes near jacob's ladder. which is best reach ed by going strai ght Hollow Lan e is sure to brin g back . through Blea n, via T yler I-lill, when th e memories o f paper-chases during the woods will be found o n th e right. winter, I an) inclined to associate it with Many of the ve ry rarest Briti sh a num be r of chases after chal k hill blues, whi c h are to be fo'und on th e hill in that bu tte rflie s have been ca.ug ht il! .Kent, includin g the Camberwell Beauty and lane leading out o f ,"Vincheap. Blac k Veined Wh ite. But these we re The mention of \¡V incheap bri ngs to callg ht seve ral years ago. The last mind th e specim ens of Pal e C lo ud ed Bath ,"Vhite to be c.:aught in England Yell o ws in the School Museum whi c h was captured on the slopes be hind we re caught near Winc heap , and I believe D ove r Castle. in Holl o w Lane, Even a Swallow T ail butte rfly has Pale Clouded Ye llow buttedli ps a re bee n captu red in t he . i\lint Yard, and thi s sOin e what rare in m ost En gl ish co unti es. year too. It was see n in a ve ry d ila pida ted b ut they a re often caught o n the cli ffs co nditio n on Ascension Day. At first it near Dove r and Fo lkestone. It is be li eved was thought to be a. contin e nta l s peci men th at th ey come ove r from th e conti,n~ nt, whi ch had come ove r as th e Pa le C loud ed a nd have o fte n been caugh t a t sea .. 1 her Yellow a re supposed to do; but now it are some what comm on on the conti ne nt has been asce n ained to be a speci me n liberated out of captiv ity. togeth e r with I am told that the other s pecies of several others; ano th e r being see n in the Clouded Ye llo w can be caught in fair numb e rs on the downs near St. Margaret' s 1 Parrots' playg round.

I have caught many butterflies there thi s year includinO' Green Hairstreaks and Holly Blues. 0 The form e r were flyin g about a nd settling o n the small trees a nd

I

Bay, But I ha ve never bee n the re in August which is the best month for catchi ng them. Th e ,"Varre n at Folkeston e whi ch is well known to ma ny me mbe rs of th l! Harvey Soc iety is indee(I a very gOO(I place for man y varieties of Browns. These last places pe rhaps do not come unde r the heading of this arti cle; so it will be be tte r to co nsid e r the p laces nearer Can terbury. In nea rly all books wh ich give th e best local ities for butter-

I

I t is c.:ur iolls that, thou gh so many butterflies a re comparatively co mmon in Kent when compared wi th oth e r counties, yet the Peacoc k butte rfly is much more co mm on in many So uth e rn co unti es than it is he re , In K e nt tIll" Painted Lad)' is more co mmo n than th e Pl'acock. In r S67 th e " Comma" was abllnd a nt . but it has seldo m been caught here sin ce. There a re seve ral good butterfly spo ts to be fo und o n both sides of the road towards Li ttl e bourne and also o n th e left o f Bridge. I think that Trinley wood s and


THE

400

CANTUARIAN.

Blean woods are the best places for Fritillaries since there are so many open places where t.he trees have becn cut dow n. ~ wil~ con,el ude by saying that, with the mel of a blcycle it is possible to find a large number of places all round Canterbury. But one must go on a suita ble day. It is. abs?lutely no good tryi ng to find butterfh es If the wind is blowincr at all in a no rthe rly direction. 0

Also a knowledge of the habits of the Insects, such as can be obtained from books is not to be despised, a nd will g reatly. help towards the making of a collectlOll. I have made no mention of Moths si nce my knowledge is limited, but I am ~o n fident that there are numbers of moth s 111. Kent which . wil~ compare fa vourabl y wIth the butterflIes III thmr rarity. C. H. W.

BIRTHDAY VERSES?

'Vhen T rafalgar day comes rollnd And England's feeling gay, Every busy clerk who can Gets off for" half-a-day :" Fo r lo ng dead aunts pip-off o nce more, T o let those clerks see J essop score. Th e l~

Nelson's column's looking bright Wllh fh~gs (' . Two-three a ,\'ard,") And naVVles leave the holes with wh ich The roadway they have marrt~ d. And every T erritorial Salutes the great Memorial.

â&#x20AC;˘ In King's School yard th e re is a tree Where all the rooks make cheer' That noble lime has reached its prime ' T his is its hundredth year! But now it wears its g reenery, We a ll forget l'ls due centena ry.

/


THE

CANTUAR IAN.

Though even Suffragettes may hold Their yearly feast to glee The day, wh en first the world they told That Ilu.y would soon be free j We cannot even raise hooray T o !1erald in its natal day. But soon perhaps, with patriotic zeal, ( Note: H ere we change th e metre for we feel Such ardour), our Cadets will feel aki n To th e old British tree, benea th whose bough They now parade. and kindly usher in Two birthdays, first their own, and the n allow A tho ught or two i n or think it much a c rim e T o give their birthday wishes to our Lime.

A FOUR DAYS TRIP IN

Abo ut 10 days ago I received orders to make the Quarterly Survey of the T reas ury at Selama, a small i\Lllay village in the North of Perak , just by the K edah Boundary, and at the same time I was asked by the District Office r if I sh ould care to accornpany him on a four days trip. As his journey included Selama, I got leave and prepared to start. \<\'e sent on our boys at 9 a.m., on Friday, in a Bullock Cart, with all our baggage, beds, etc., and, at 2.30, started ourselves in a coup le of gharrics fo r Batli Kuras, our first halting place. The first four or five miles of our

NORTH PERAK.

journey lay along the North end of the Krian plain : a land of white earth and muddy pool s, where the unwea rying Chin ese dig out a very large proportion of the world's tin. An opportune stor m shut off this somewhat dreary country from our eves, and we cou ld see lillie mo re than the houses by the side of the road. Grad ually, however, the jungle began to close in o n us. In places it was still rolled back from the road , but clearings became less and less frequent as we went o n, About 7 mil es o ut we found a Chinaman very ill by the roadside, and at once commandeered a chance met g harri to carry him to the hosp ital at


THE

CANTUARIAN.

Taiping. The Tamil owner of the gharri was in a tight fix, for he had omitted the small matter of regi ste ring his car and getting a number. If he entered Tetiping he would be fin ed, and if he refusf'd the D.O. threate ned to take him back. (As this wou ld have lost us a day o f our journey th is was a n c mp ~y threat. but how co uld the Tamil know?) I-Ie consented and we went

011.

Soo n we entered the thick jungle where there is no so und except [or the noise of th e gharri wh eels, the chattering of a frighte ned monkey, and the shri ll notes o f the grassho pp er, and the trumpet of the cicada. At six o'clock we reached Batu Kuras, and. after 11 bathe, we clad ourse lves in sa ro ngs or pyjamas and received the Pe nghulu o r Headman of th e village . All the Malay villages cons ist of thatched wooden houses, nearly ah\路ays built a coup le of feet off the g round a nd supported 011 pol es, bu t MalaYfi prefer to live a littl e way off c;\I.:h olher, and so a village straggles along the road for a mile or more. When we ar rived all the bullocks a nci horses WNC being brought in for tho ni g ht, boys were beginning to fly kite:s, whil e their ciders stood abouL in the ,. streN ,. and gossi ped until th e wom e n sho ul d have l)rcpared the evenin g m eal. The hum and c latter of the village, ancl th e s inging of pantoulls or native songs, ming les with the jungle noises, which ari se at s un set and sunrise alon e cvery day, and make onc feel contented to do no thing but s it and listen . After a rath er poor d ish o f curry we soon go to bed .

I ext morning we sta rted at 9 a.lll. and drove abo ut 9 miles to the end of th e road. 1\IIy Chie f had damaged hi s foot so we were going to take a s horter walk than had bee n intended. H ere, half-a-dozen coolies. load them sel ves with our baggage and go ah ead, while we two, Ollr two boys and the assistant Pengh ulu, begin our walk. In the heat of the day one walks slowly even through the shad e of a jungle bridle pat h. As the D.O's. foot was bad we t ried to get a couple of e lephants to take us (horses cannot geL along these pmhs ) but the two tam e e lephants had been turn ed loose to feod and we sho uld have had to wait eight hours, or perhaps mo rc. for their capture. One sees and hea rs nothing in the jung ll' excep t birds, monkeys, ano jn scct~ . "Everything else is quiet and still, or moves away at one's approach. At about noon we Slopped for tiffin, and .. cup" " were manufactured out of big leav(.路x which se rved a lso as plates. One may only help oneself with one's right h ~lIId wh en food is brought, the use of th e 1\.11 is a n insult. Our food consisted of ric\'. curried chi cken and rath er stalc Ogl{ lI , but o ne docs not feel like eatin g a IUll ch of many co urses. After leaving th e CO lli parative ly dim light of the junglo WI cam e out along a path between padl 路fi elds, rcaped now and desolate and 111\1 1 II betrallJpled by buffaloes. A mile 0 1' ,UI of this bro ught us to Ulu Ijok. H er \\1 drank copi ous draughts of cocoanut 111111 and a little later went to bathe ill Ih l swifLly running stream from the 11111 I coo l as are all hill 路streams. Th en till Local Mag nate came to ca ll on th e IU I and to discllss politi cs, sca ndal, aJ~d ,III~ thing else . A loca l worker in COCOIHIIiI


THE

40 3

CANTUARI AN .

shell spoons brought some which had been ordered, and among them a spoon made of the beak of the horn bill. Later on at dinner we learnt fr om th e Peng hulu of the wond erful powers of this spoon. It mu st be made from the beak o f a bird which had d ied naturally-this is all important. Now supposing one's bitterest foe asks one to dinner and one suspects poison, take this spoon. If tI~e re: be poison in the dish the spoon w1ll melt away and the villian be d iscovered. But such cases are rare, and it is a 11l \lch Ill o re common occurrence to take too 11luch chillies with ones currv. Th e con~equent burni n g of the lllo uth is entirely cured by rubbing the SpOOI~ ov~r one's lips. "People say. 'How .IS thI S possible? It cannot be ' ,. said th e Penghulu, .. but what of that ? I kno~v it is." Our joy at the possesslOl1 of tlll~ treasure was marred later, by the Mantn in Selama, who told ti S that this particular spoon had been boi.led in wat~ r in :)f(lcr to soften it for shaplllg. and all Its e nl cacy was destroyed. So often a _slllall mi schance prevents a miracl e. Dinner thal ni O'ht we ate in Malay fashion. sitti ng on Ill ~ts on the floor. A large bowl of ricr. was placed before us, and another bowl fo r the three Malays. On a tray were many slllall dish es, each with separate ing redients - boiled eggs, salt fi sh , olachan Ca smelly paste of fish ), an almost eq ually smelly bea n, ch illies and other vegetables, etc., which I atc, ignorant, but believing. Had we not got the horn bill spoon. Of co urse we ~ secl neither spoon nor fork for actually ealmg. First, one must have one's hand wet or the rice sticks firmly to it. So at the beginni ng of the meal a bowl is brought

to dip th e right hand in: Th~n one sits down cross-legged . I tned thIS, but aftor five minu tes agony I assumed the seco~l(l rate position. leaning on.my left ann. \\'tt.h the left leg under the n ght leg whll:h IS bent as when o ne sits down. T o convr.y the ri ce to o ne's mouth one squeezes so me on the plate behl;een the first. thrc.c fin gers and the thumb. then one rai ses It wi th the back of the hand downward and uses th e thumb as a s pring to hurl it in to th e mouth. After th e cur ry the sire h leaf was brought in. This is a disl~ so m e\\'l~at like a fruit dish, but mad ~ of silve r or lin. On it a re half-a-d o zen leaves a nd so me small· silver boxes. One of th ese co ntains betel nut, whi ch one chews firs t to dry the mou th, then one bends the leaf across, and with tht! fir st or seconu fing~ r s preads lime from another bo~ 011 1 ~. Then be nd it up small and ~at 1~ . It IS not unpleasant to taste ~nd IS said to be exhilaratin g. But Il <;>th\llg. co uld have kept me awake that l11ght aiter thl.! walk. Next morning we started at eight o'clock in a dug out canoe poled .by two mOll, o ne at each e nd. In the l1nddle was our baggage, th en we sat wit.h a bundle to act as a back res t, and belHnd us our boys sat holding an umbrell.a up to s~ad c liS •. Th e river runs verr sW1ftly and IS fult of f,llIen trees and timber cutters' ra fts, but it has quite a fair al'!10llnt c:'f shade a s w.e pass through the prnn eva l Jungle j and 1t is well t hat it is so, for there was no cloud in the sky that day and .an ope n boat on water is hot. All the way d o wn we saw the briO'ht blue flash es of kin g fishers, the red glil~1pse of a broad bill, while the " buso ng menantu" or "son-in·law bird cuts wood all the way down. The Malays say that this bird was once a man, who lived U


THE

CANTUARIAN.

with a mo th e r-in-la w. a nd she sen t him ve rsation in a language still ve ry stra nge, o ut to cut wood each day. This was not looked O\'e r the hospital a nd walked back. to his taste and one day he discove red A heav), storm of rain kept us in for th e how to imit a te wood -cutting with his rest o f the day, and in th e eve n ing we lay voice, a nd so he SpCIll the day. Bu t hi s on long c hairs a n d watch ed the fir efl ies, mother-in-,Iaw ca lli e along a mazed ye t whi le o ur early s lum bers were soothed by plea sed with th e amo unt of wood he t ~le trumpeti ng of an ele phant across the ~eemed u ha ve done. St:.路ein g no cut nve r . wood s he looked so s urpr ised that th e Next day w ~ left the n:sthouse at son burst into laughte r, and so he does to thi s day, " C hop, C hop , Cho p, '-Iu-ha-ha." 10 a. m. , a nd drove about 1 2 m iles, u ntil Mea lllim e ou r boatman wa s crooning a we reac hed a Plante r's ho use, whe re Wt' song to him se lf: a simpl e qU(lvc rinO' tun e we re g ive n an exce ll e nt lunch. \Ve le ft at whi c h fits in Wilh the jungle. I t l~o k us 3路3<', and as the loca l Pe nghulu wa s aw:w abo ut se ve n honrs \0 get down to wh e re I \ve could not see him an d found ourseiv(' !oj the gha rries were waiting to ta ke us to , with 40 minutes to waste at the h ttlt路 Selama, a nd we H.路ached Selama withollt statio n of Al o r P ongsu . Ju st by it rUHt' one of th e bi gge r ca nals of the drai na ~w mi shap at about 5.30 p.m . scheme, wh ich practically assures a good Th e ne xt mo rning I spent in th e crop o f pad i each yea r. Fo rmerly ontO office coun ting stamp s, bank n otes. and good c rop in three o r fo ur bad one~ WaK doi ng my leve l best to add up th e C lerk's the ave rage. As a result of thi s securlt )' account s . Afte r seve ral ineffectual efforts the people are beg innin g to extend tlwi! I cam e to th e conclusion that the Cl er k cu lti vatio n. All th e vi llage was at tllll statio n o r standin g by the leve l crossi nH was a morc acc urate mathe m atician than I wa s, and with his assistall ce I soo n to see the dow n mai l train whirl throu gh .tl 25 or 30 milcs a n hour. A narrow gall ~fi' fini shed. rail way ca nn ot manage a big speed , bUI In the aftt.:rnoo n the i\ l a nt ri came I he ca rri ages arc yc ry co m fortable. rOll nel to ta l k busi ness, an cl in cicl e ntall v he di sc li ssed me and Ill )' ma trimoni al \,Ve reac hed Taipin g sho rtly bcff)H' po ssibilities so me what ca ndidly , and then six to find th e lI snal day's rain contill ll in KI I stro ll ed do wn with hi m to the rive r, a nd so e nd ed on e of the pleasantest [rip" wh ich sepa rates Pe tak from K edah. I have yet e njoyed. ma kin g va lia nt efforts to sustain a COI1 T. S. ADA ~ I S,


THE

CANTUAR IAN.

A FIRST ATTEMPT

I had never Seen a pan ther outsid e a ju ~t bee n tran sfe rred to a di st ric t whe re the fcli ne tr ibe arc the staple of !->hikar. I h ad no rifle but a toy, a n d my acquaintan ce with this sport i<; con fin ed to re mini sce nces o f othe r me n' s yarn s . But one is e xp ected t o want to shoot and I had only a week or so left for th e jun o-Ies. I was due on the sea coast and s h~lIld have no othe r chance of tryin g thi s year. M y host, th e o wne r of the village, told me the re was always a panther to be had, a nd offe red bea te rs , and got me th e loan of a '5 00 Express, a nd a day was fixed.

cage, bu t I have

Behold me then o n my pony brin g in g up th e rear o f a p rocession of some I zo me n , mostly clothed in the minimum , as th ey belon g to a jungle tribe, and ar med wit h bows and ar rows. Th ey spoke of co urse a co rrupt form of th e local hlllg uage, whi ch I had learned som e thing o f in E n g land, but had neve r spo ke n, and had spe nt fi ve years in forge tting. Th ey purported to un derstand the la ng uage 1 spoke, but we communicated through o ne of my own me n, who b elieved he knew H in d ustani, wh ich I knew enough of to make me think h e was a li ttle mi staken . Our conversation und e r the circumstances was li ttle e no ugh, but it would have made a purist's hair turn grey to liste n to it,

AT A PANTHER.

My host was there to s.ee me off, a nd I lean:ed fr om him th at I t waS not the custom to get up i nto a tree, which was ha rdl y comfortable i nfor ~~ati o n for a novice o n his first ex pech uon. But he c hee red me with a yarn about the last shoot he had run, whe n the sp ortsma n lost hi s head on the appeara nce of th e panth e r and forgot his rifle altogeth er, and blazed away seven rounds o f a n .o ld n~ l1zzle loading revolve r he had provld ed him sel f with. I th ought I co ul d a t least do better than t hat. Well, at a convenient tree we left the pony a nd th e ti ffin , and I was led to a .;addl e betwee n two hills; th e re was a small clea ring on 111" right, a nd on my left I could see dO\~J1 the slopc , while faci no- me was the side of the main hill. T he beat started away o n my left. The panthe r was expected to try to get ~o the ne xt hill across the saddle , but he cli d not turn lip at al l. vVe tri ed ag:ai n on th.e lH!xt hill, but drew b la nk agalll. By thiS ti me it was after ele ve n, so I we nt a nd had breakfast. Afte r break fast we moved off to a hill a mil e or two awa,", and tri ed agai n. T his ti me I did sec somethi ng. Just as the beat was coming u p [ saw a ye llow th in fY with a rin g ma rked tail c reep alo ng . But it was not a panthe r, o nly some thing


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CANTUARIAN.

of the stoat or weasel kind. I had to look twice th ough, because the man with me tried to make me shoot it, apparently for the pot! Another man who had an old muzzl e loader and was posted a little away did take a shot. Then the beat came up, and as we started to move on I heard an excited jabber, whic h I founel meant that the shot had frightened a small panther which was creeping away

and had dropped at the sound and re main ed in the forest. The man had caught sight of it as he fired. It was only a small one, but I decide d to go bac k and t ry for it; uniuckiiy, as soo n as I got back to my station some of the beaters reported that it had take n the opportunity to go on. Then ca me the beal of the day. Th ere was a sho rter ridge with steep sides rllnning up to joi n the main ridge we had just left at an angle of say 60 degrees. The beat started at th e tail, and I was posted about fifty yards down th e outside slo pe at the edge of a liltle clear space. The man with the spare gun, to my disgust, wen t to the top: I was told he had gone to drive alVay so me cattle, bu t he sto pped away. The old muzzl e loader went to th e bottom under a fold of the gro un d that kept him safe. \~r e w<lited so me time, th en tl~e sipahi with me clutched at my should er and pointed to the front. H e was very excited, and while he told me there was a huge panther there I stood up to look over a bush in front of me. t could see Ilothing t but he told me it had seen me and gone back towards the beat, and swore it was lying on the ground not morc than fifty yards from me in that direction.

Of course I could not have fired, especia lly as the beat was coming up, but I could not even see it. However, we expected it to come back again, so I took anoth e r look round to survey the situation. To my horror the cattle that should have been driven away had returned and now stretched in loose array from my le ft right down th o slope, while the right wing of the beaters had swun g up, having come faster through th e easier ground below, and had nearly reached them , and the left flank Wfl S beginning to appear on the top of Lh ll ridge. I began to realize that if th o panther came he would probably COlllll straight for me and fast, with a background of beaters. and I should almost certainl y be maul ed if I shot and did not stop him dead. Then the yellow little beast tUrIl('(\ up again , chased like mad by the beatelloj from the right wing, who succeeded ill killing it with sticks behind me, and tilt' mi ddle of the beat came into sight and no panther. The beat was over, and tilt' sipahi immediately ru shed out at tlw heaters with a tvrrent of .words whidl I recognized as bad lang uage, but luckil ' could not understand. They deserved It for letting the flanks up into danger lik!1 that, so I did not. interfere. As soo n 11 M the now quieted a little, a beater wn ~ produced with a scratched thigh. Tlwll I ga th ered the explanation, When til.¡ beaters see an animal in front of th lllil they are supposed to stop shouting III once, so that he may sli nk out ql1ieLly alld give a shot, instead of going past th e gUIi M at a gallop as he would if hu sth. d I Imagine this rule would not apply if tl il l panther is obviously trying to break bal I , but the beaters did stop shouting a nd Ih l panther had gone up to them, shoved Ill i.


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CANTUARIAN .

man out of the way, and was off. No one seemed to th ink anything of it. An animated colloquy ensued as to his size. The sipahi brushed aside th e remarks as to his h~ight wi th thestatemen~. .. I tell you he was a m o n s~er: 1 saw.IH,~ head as he looked at us, and 1L was so big, somethin g like a soccer ball by th e way he held his hand s. The beaters thought he had stayed in the jungle, so we tri ed ~gai~1. I .wenl along the top to th~ .tad 01 the nd ge, where I had a bad posItio n. Wc ex pected him to slink over the ri dge betwee n me and the beaters, but I was worried by seei nl"r beaters continually appearing on the t;p. in the direction I expected to nrc. a nd having to senn to keep th em off. To see that way I had to keep two yards off the edge, and it. was . . so s~~ cp that I could not see down It. Even II 1 could have, it was so covered with young trees that I could not sec tifty yards, and I could not have fired at over ten with

I any hope of hitting. as the bullet was sure to glance off a tree, !'o that I felt that

there was quite a possibility that 1 s h ~tild catch my first gl impscof a pa nth er through him poking his head over the edge at a range or two yards. Perhaps. und e r the d rcuillstanl:es. it was as well that he slunk round th e ridge. The day ended with a hearty laugh. The leade r of the beaters who had been

e ntrusted with th e muzzle-load er posted himsdf right at the tail of the ridge, so that he caught sight of the panther. H e lhought it ought to be shot at, so he cocked the left hamm er anel pulled hard at the right trigger ! When we gathered after the beat, he described this achievement with stich obviolls pride t hat we all roared CIt him, and he joined in himself. So it happens that I can still say that L have never scen a panther outside a cage. Probably it i'i just as wcll for me that I have nolo


408

THE

CA NTUARIAN.

NOTICES.

The gratefully

following Subscriptions ackno wl edged: -

are

H. L. Dibben, Esq. (,/6), W. R.

01011'11, Esq . () / 6), B. S. Colla rd , Esq. (3/ 6), W. Temple, Esq . ( 7/-), D. H . i-lam mo nds, Esq. (10/6), Major H . V. Isackc (5/-). H. D . TOWN END, H on. Sec.

OUR CONTElVIPORARIES .

The following have been received

wit h ma llY thanks ;AIIV'ldall, Carllms/rnt,

I Epsomi01l,

Leys Forilliglll(y. L orre/loJlt"nll ,

P(Y1llolill{l1l, Radldau.

Clio/meN{w,

All (olllribul/oIlS fo r the july l'lutIlber should read Ihe Edtlo~'S b), l'hursda)'. Ju(y 15th .

Gibbs and Sons, Print ers, Palace St reet, Cante rbury.


THE

CANT UARIA N . J ULY,

VO L. VII.

1909.

No . 16,

EDITORIA, L . Oh fo r an origi nal thought!

\ÂĽearied with the labours of two Can/llancl1ls, th e

brain and hand of the Ed itors fi nd no repose, and with the re luctance o f incapacity

the task is resumed. An original remark-even for an Editorial. Some time back we saw in a Daily Paper a discussion on th is very subject. and if we remem ber rightly the solution was .. T wo pipes to an original thought," bu t alas, by the inexorable laws of our ancient foundation all pistols, airguns, catapults-and pi pes are forbidden ; so th at is useless. What is originality? An expert has divided it into two classes, the first unable to be acqui red, and the second when acq uired diffic ult to discard. A geni us alone can possess the fi rst, while anyone with moderate " OV ~ may acq uire the second. But this is not an article on origi nali ty- would that one had been contributed, for that would have saved us much labour- and our readers may wonder at the disser tation. But originality is pleasing and even the Editors-wit h th e much bitten, much chewed, ancient Editorial pen-- sti ll seek afte r it. Originality however requires


4 10

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delicate handling-ours is swamped by the flood of memories which arc awakened as we wie ld this relic of antiqu ity for the last time. This is the annual "hash II number when the remains of the delicate morscl ~ which we have offered to our readers for the past twelvemonth must be judiciously mixed for their weak digestions. The old complaint-the nightly wail of every Editor-is th e lack of contributions. How jauntily did we don the editorial mantle a year ago, our imagi nation rife with the thought of piles of manuscripts from wh ich to make our selection. No longer should lurk the suspicion that even a School magazine lIIa)' be dull. Instead imagine the descent- we have had to rack OUT brains and to use Ollr persuasive eloquence to th e utm ost to secure a co ntriblltion. Our readers sho ul d remember that even the Editor with his versatile brain cannot produce six CallhtariallS off hi l; own bat-perhaps now we ought to say gun - ¡and his most successful efforts arc not often received with mu ch applause. Now all this is very sad, and if O.K.S. an d members of th e School would each send one contribution, however small, tiw Editorial brain would have a chance of re coverin g its brilliance and vivacity. T ilu Secretary also is occasioned many a wea ry hour by the apparen t shynl!ss of sonw subscribers in sendin g in th eir su bscription s at th e proper tim e. The past term has bee n the occasion of milch lamentation, chiefly on acco un t of the weather which has consistently shewn that patience is a virtue and impatient'I' (perhaps) not a vice, Cricket has suffered, despite the unremitting exertions of il s captai n. ]\lTany matches have had to be abandoned and oth ers drawn on acco ll!)1 of th e weather. Th e T C'nnis Club has ex isted for the most part in name only. and its officials are generally occupied in mark ing out the courts afresh. The Co r PH, althou gh it has advanced with slich persistence, has been disap pointed of it s hop" 1( of proceeding to camp, and the Boat Club alone, to wh om the elements arc' II matter of indifference, has pushed forward with flying Colours. To some of us also there is the additional gloom from having reached th e j¡nd , and though our memories do not go as far back in the ann als o f th e School as th ill of our Anniversary preacher, yet we ca n recollect many happy yea rs here. It was in the remote ages of our yo uth that we first r.amc under th e Shado\\ , Perhaps then we th ought the atm os phere dull, mon otonous, and even slee py; it mil) be that th e hand of time has reduced us to th e same condition . But it is a mc lancl HJ I) task now to pull tip the deepl y rooted anchor and to sail from the familiar har\)oul out into the unknown.


THE

THE

CANTUARJAN.

4"

PRECINCTS.

III.- MONKISTORIES. In a previous article in the Cantuariau an attempt was macle to give a rou gh idea of the various mon asti c bui ldings and th eir sites, not however with mu ch success, illustrations being really necessary for the purpose. There is really not a great deal left of interes t for the ordinary visitors to see, who have no opportunity of seeing the beautiful surroundings of th e Dean ery and other private houses, and wh o have not th e privilege of dozing in the Baptistery Gardens where from the site of the Great Dormitory th ere is a fine view of the li t'" of th e buildings towards and including the Infirmary Chapel. The destruction in Reformation days was very great, and much damage must have been caused in the allocation of the various buildings among the members of the new order. Opinions as to the merits and demeri ts of monasteri es and monks will necessarily vary j many regret th e destru ction of th eir buildings if only for resthetic reasons, few however in this country have much regret for th e passing away of the monastic system itself. It should be remernbered th al the building of these vast edifices led to abuses, country livings were suppressed and severed from the monastery, in order that thei r incomes might be devoted to the building fund of the Abbey, and too often th e estates of the monastery were sta rved and rackrented on account of this or similar extravagances, Archb.ishop Courtney was especially detested for his brutal rapacity as a landlord, and in the parti cular case of the Christchurch estates, the change of ow nership seems to have caused anything but regret to the tenants in the Romney Marsh. The best that can be said for the monastic system probably is this; that it served as a refuge to man)' in the middle ages who had no desire to earn a precarious living by killing other folk, and that it did unqnestionably encourage arts and crafts, and offer a peaceful and undi sturbed leisure to man)' a clever worker in those troubled days. The famous dock in Wells Cathedral was made by one of these old craftsmen, and in Cologne CathC'dral there is still to be seen the original plan of that building, as fin e a piece of dranghtmanship as one could wish to see j the ecclesiastical art of designing and illuminating missals too was brought to great perfection, No doubt, also , as a modern writer remarks, the poor would have preferred the alms of the monastery to th e brutal charity of the modern workhouse, but ill spite of these merits th ere must have been a strong and bitter feeling against monasticism, as a system, to provoke such general destruction. As far as one may judge from books on the subject the monal;tcry seemed to be run, as a business, very much on the lines of a g reat advertizing magazi ne or store of to-day. The monks


T I-IE CANTUARI AN. fo ught and squabbl ed over relics like dogs ov.er ~ bonc, and no tri ck wa~ too I ~w wh ich conld obtain for a mona stery some reile likely to attract the publIc and Il S money. The squabbl es between Christ ChU.fCh, Ca n terb~lry, and Glastonbury.Abbey. or betwee n Christ Church and St. Augusttne's, are eV Id ence e l:ou~h o~ tlll~; on e of the most interesting facts in the history of the Becket. assassinatIO n 15 th iS, that the four kni ghts who kill ed Becket, called first b)' appOll1tmen t on the Abbot of St. Au gustine's before proceed in g to th e work Lh ey had III hancl. and by some t~l c Abbot has bee n thought worthy of censure on th Is ilccount. <?n.a cool and .chs passionate examination of th e circumstances of the case, at thiS (hstance of i l1l1 f' , the proper course fo r the Abbot to h~ve purs~l ed, \~01l 1 c1 perhaps .have b:e n as follows: he might have invited Becket to a fnen dly dlScll sfoi lon of th e p01 ~ts at Iss ue, ~n d th en when th e fo ur kni ghts called, quite by chance of course, he migh t h ~vc Wlth draw.n politely, leaving the party to talk over matters, and, la~er on, sent 111 such ? f. his monks, as could best be spared, to rescue the Archbishop from the sacreh glO uR ru ffia ns. The di sti nction, and the g·lo ry. and the conseq uent profit o.f the martyrci.om might then have been St, Augustine's, and the Abbey might have contlllued to flo uri sh, the fortu nate and envi ed rival of the Ch ri st Chu rch monastery. Let us not. howeve r. be too hard on the unfortu nate Abbot, fe w of us know how to rise to the measure of our opportunities. The monks of Christ Church did fl ourish, and . wax fat. enormously by the Martyrd om of St. Thomas, and great were. th e preparatI?lls mack fo r the celebration of the 50th an niversary of the T ranslation of the Sall1t: ~or three years previous did they prepare sto res of foocl and wine for I'~l e hosts of pIlgrim s who were to come, and did come, to bring offerings to the shnn e, and whom they did entice , aftt:r the mann er of a certain great mod e rn store, by th e prospec~ of wha t then corresponded to free lunches and free teas . T,he .feasts at s u cl~ func tIOns WC~(' enormous. the bill for th e banquet at the enthrolllzatlOn of ArchbIshop Robert In 1 2 95 came to £573, a large sum for those days ; a simi lar ba nq uet in 150+ co~t £5 1 3 and the 'day chosen for the latter functio n was Passion Sunda}' . . In th~ ~11 1 of fare we fi nd butts and casks of wine, and barrels of beer galore; a nd III add ltl :: to dainties more familiar to th e modern palate suc h as "7 barrels of salted salmon. "20 casks of herri ngs red" and <I of whelkes 8000,11 we find U lampronys. sealefl. porpuss " and "pophylls II' in goodly quantities ; " 2 barrels of rape oil,n a "pipe of verj uicc " and also " sub leties in suga r an d wax.'} T hose w.ho ~req u ent ?lly dinners of to-day musfindeed regret that a degenerate and effete digestive:: orgall izit tion should forbid C'mulali on of the prowess of these heroes of old . It IS tr ue thnl we read occasionally of fata l results, a friend of Voltaire, ;u~d a phil osopher, on('(' eat the whol e of a pie consisting of eagle. and stuffed With pork a1~ d .Iard: but he perished in th e attempt. It is also chronicled of a ven ~ rab l e and dlstlllgUlsh('11 personage among co ntin ental Royaltit:s of the last generation that he went out In afternooll tea on one occasion and mad e a meal of poached eggs, potted mea tH, various German dishe s, many cups of tea, foitrawberries. ices, and swe 7t champagne to follow, and this wh en he was over 70 yea rs of age and was und ergo mg a cure; bul,


t HE

CANTUARIAN.

+'3

eve n among Royalty, few now-a-da>'s probably would care to tackle" porpuss)' or ., seale 'J or "pophyn," nor do "rape-oil " and "verjuice JJ seem to be very cheery add itions to the bi ll of fa re. As has bee n said before, the See of Canterb ury, at times, was greatly impoveri shed by the vast sum s squande red on festivities, the debts incurred by Langton. in r 220, we re hardly paid off by his fourth successor; similar instances of reckless ex travagance occur fro m time to time in the history of the Monaste ry. and for this no do ub t the estates with the tenantry and ti llers of the soil had to pay dea rly. In , " D ~ r L's" ~ppe n d ix th ere is a list of re lics, belonging to the Cathed ral, occ upymg etght rOllO pages, and amon g th ese treas ures we re to be foun d" part of the clay out of wh ich Ada m was moulded/' "Aaron's R od," and "part of the oak un der which Abraha m stood" on one special occasio n, also .. some of the ston es with which St. Stephen was stoned ." T here would be little difficlIltv in getting a . fresh supply of these in case a ny were lost or stolen. It is painful to refl ect that we too shall be dead and buried and therefore unable to explai n our own apparent inco nsistencies to a doubtin g, and perhaps scoffing, posterity some three or four hundred years hence. I n the course of a speech made by the prese nt. Archbishop some little tim e back in the I-louse of Lords, he referred to th e fact that he had once won a cup for pigeon shooting. It is a n interesting coincidence lhat one of his predecessors was also a marksma n, Archbishop Abbott, J () 1 I, shot at his gamekeeper by accident wit.h a c rossbow. and kill ed him on th e spot. The bes t way to read this article will be to begin with the last paragraph and go on to " \Vard's Canterbury Pi lg rimage ," a charming book; "The I ngoldsby Country,'J by H arper, ~s also interest ing, the chapters on R omney Ma rsh containing many refe rences to the Great Churc h and its owners at Canterbll ry. PERCY GODFREY.

OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS . A special parade of th e Corps took place on J une 25th on the occasion of the l{ing's Birthday. T he re were a few absentees, but we paraded at fairly good stren g th. IVIost of the Cadets were in uniform a nd some 70 bore arms. Th e delay in the delivery of un iforms and arms is mu ch reg retted. The Contingem formed up in


THE

CANTUARIAN .

quarte r column, four co mpani es stro ng. and saluted th e flag be fore leavin g th e Min t Yard . Headed by the band of the R.A. M. C. (T. ), lent us by the ki nd ness o f Major H enchley, th e Co ntingen t ma rch ed to Bla re' s Piece. CO iOIl<:: i H egan, wh o had kindly prom ised to take the salute, was received in li ne. a nd inspected the ra nks. The four companies th en ma rched past in column of double co mpanies, a fte rward s re-forming and advan cing in rev ie w o rd er. At the comm and o f the Comm and in g Officer, head -dresses were removed , a nd three chee rs for th e Kin g we re hea rtil y g iven . Colo nel H egan th en addresse d th e Continge nt, d raw n up in three sid es o f a sq uare He congratulated Officers, Cad et Office rs, No n-co mmi ssio ned Officers a nd Cadets on their satis factory perfo rm ance, g ivin g it as hi s o pi nion th at co nside rin g that th e C ontingent had bee n in trainin g fo r o nly eight weeks , it sho wed itsel f rema lkab ly effici ent and profi cient in th e ha ndlin g o f arm s, J\¡Jarching past was not th e onl y form of military training , but it was a ve ry im po rta nt part inasm uch as it k ntled to produce sound disciplin e and stead in ess. [-I e fur ther add ed that he was ve ry pleased to be prese nt on t hat occasion a nd most ki ndl y p ro mi sed his inte rest a nd he lp .to lh u best of hi s ability. A fe w Compa ny move ments followed, and the Contin ge nt marched back to th e School afte r a somewhat tirin g but quite satisfac tory two hours' parade . Luckily th e weathe r proved fairly kind. Th e parade was witn essed by a few frien d s of the Sc hoo l, among wh om we no ticed Mrs. \~T a ce (the Dea n was unavoidably absent), Miss Schmitz, Ge neral \'Vc myss , Miss \Ve myss , Colo nel Bromhead, Ca ptain T om linso n. i\frs. Spooner, ?\frs. Danks, i\ lajor Goga rty, Dr. a nd Miss 1\1oore, Rev, G. C. E. Ryley, the M isses Plummer, Mrs, Hi che ns, th e i\I isses Horsley, Mr. J o hn Plumme r, r\'Ir. N oe l Plumm er. 'We are living in the earnest hope th a t befo re th ese lines appear in prin t Llw remainder of th e carbines and the unifo rm s will be deli ve red. Vve a re to ld that til(' pressure on outfitti ng firm s has been abnorma l, owin g to the satisfactory a rd o ur tha t is animating the T erritoria l F o rce. '\Te must therefore end ure th p. de lay with joy an d patience, The list of Non- commiss io ned Office rs is publi shed fo r informati on. Se'l{l!fllJls: Townshend, Galpin, Cowie, Townend L ; Corporals .' Mo lin e\, Price, Cumberbatc h. Martin j L ana -Corporals : Battisco mbe, Flu ke , F oster, Sidebotha m l , H a ncoc k, Ryll n, Nightingale, C l aypol e~ Harke r, Taylor, Cottrell, Lush, FardelJL, \Vood s, Gariba ld i, Squire, J erram, Smi th'l.

The Edito rs fec i sure th at the Scho ol woul d like them to take this oppo rtun it>' of expressing to Capta in Bell , the Commi ssio ned Officers a nd th e Se rgean t- iVf,ijul the thanks of all fo r th eir unti rin g effo rts to make th e Corps a Sll ccess.


TH E

CANTUARtAN.

THE YELLOW HORROR. This is the so ng of th e Belt ; This is the son g of th e Be lt; Th e lay o f th e T empe r-mac hin e. The cry o f th e to ilin g Cadet, It's lissom a nd lith e. Wh o thinks he's " en tog" And rOllnd yo u will wri the; But he's left otT lh e " frog," But YOli can' t get th e buckl e-end in. A thin g o ne s ho uld neve r forget. This is th e so ng of the Belt; Thi s is the song o f th e Belt ; Th e Belt with a capita l B. Th e bu ckl e the strap won't go throug h. A number o f s traps, Th oug h if it does thi s, And pl enty of flap s; I t's never mllch bli ss And that' s abo ut all you can see. To kno w it'll never und o. This is the song of th e IVian ; vVho lun acy' s burd ens has felt. Go on: persevere; And pray drop a tear For the man d riven mad by a Belt.

A PARAE LE. A llegro Capn 'cioso, Th ere was on ce upo n a tim e a Service Rifle whi ch c hatted with a Po p-gun. Th e Rifl e , thou g h quie t and unass umin g in appeara nce, was possessed of infinite perspicacity a nd ac ume n, whil e the Popgu n, fair and varnished to th e outward view, had po ints in common with the sep ulchres of old, being in tru th a showy fe llow but an use less. .. Why," said the Rifle, with a n earn estness of purpose which could not 'be mi sinterpreted, "why do YOll ape my powers? "

., Go od heavcns sir," thc Po p-gun re pli ed with an a ffected mom, "may not a ta bby cast a rovin g g lance o n a mo narch? a nd is the re 110 good in a goo d thing imi tated, thou gh indifferen t well ? Not every bullet can impin ge upo n t he ce ntri c portion of the targe t yet peradventure may it ricochet: ' "Thoug h loth to d isag ree with you," sa id the Rifl e. resting co mfo rta hl y on its bac k-sig ht, " and fllil y a ppreciating the Oriental subtilit)' o f your las t remark, I ca n but say that your suggestion s are fa llacious. Imitation , th ough I believe the since rest


THE

CANTUARIAN.

form of flattery, is intensely ann oyin g an.d useless withal. Moreover the lubnc g urgle consequent on the emission of your cork on a string. is only very remotely comparable to th e eager bark of my bullet fl ying to its billet. Furth e rm ~)re the c?rk Stlsdil, after travelling approxlm~telr nllle inches, is abruptly hallt:d by the ImportUl~­ in gs of the string. wher~as th e bullet IS only at rest in th e receptive bulk of the mark after a lengthy voyage: th e form er accomplishin g nothi~ g, th e latter, unl ess dispatched by a startlin gly bad marksman, achieving its end. I th erefore assert that you are undeniably fu ti le • .. .. .. . tho ug h amusing peul eire," You are insulting." said thePop-gun fidgetin g with its co rk, "I am th\! bear~r of a heaven-sent message, an unappre ciated prophet." II

Ie Oh tut," said the grim instrum.ent of destru ction, now rai sed to the. zelllth of infuriation, "you are only a Sill y makebelieve-a child's toy-- and as utterly 1I useless as it is possi ble to co nceive . IC No, and again no, in fact I might even say a hundred times. ~ o," yapp~d the Pop-gun wi th assumed mili ta ry obstmacy, " I and T only-with mayhap yo ur helpcan save a decadent nation."

" \\'ell well" said th e RiA e, "perhaps you a re ri gllt, b~tt. . '-ell denke u/clzt . .. , .. " And the t\\'o conversatiollalists parted , ruffled indeed as to the tem per but finn as

to the principles. l\1 0RAL.-Things that a re equal to th e same thing are not a lways equal to one another.

THE TERRITORIALS AT WINDSOR. When one reads the inte resting letters provided by O,K.S, from all. parts of th e lobe it makes one doubtful if the modest d wellers il~ London can prOV ide any news ~f sufficient interest to merit 11 place in the Ca IIIUanall,. . However, in view of·th e ardent military ~nthusiasm '~hlCh , now "~clgns arot1l~1 t~~1 old School lime tree, wh ose praises are sung III last month s. Ca.nlll,all~1l{ I am Ite ~t~( to see if the Editors will let me give an account of the T ernto n als rt::( etter (ay w.l~11 I had the honour of representin g my Battalion, and J suppose I ~lllght adJd my ~I( School at the presentati on of Colours by H is !vlajesty the }(1I.'g, ~n uncrr 9 I , During'the few w\!eks before th e g'reat even t, l be&an for ~h e firsl·t \lIn e f~1)i II ?I .II~ f I m ath with th e gentle sex in the all absorbmg tOPI C of c ~l les. ee s ~ tl r:~:~b~r toYthe end of my days the anxiety as to \\:hethe.r my tl1111.C would be a,l1 ythl:1 H like a fit and if it would be do ne in tim e and, be It wlllspered, If tht ra~~lty \,\ nk going to do its d uty and fill out the weak spots, It was wIth g reat re ~e t 1,1 l'ill\'

III


THE

CANTUARIAN .

the pa rcel waiting for me on my return from work on the evening of the 18th; so my aIlxiety was not com pletely unjustifiable, Fro m 'lfter di nner that day till well afte r bed-tim e ca me such a polishin g and c leanin g of button s, sword and boots, as would raise e nvy in th e soul of the most hi ghly trained military servant. I mar incidentally mention here that for so me extraordinary reaso n wh ich can o nly be att ribu ted to the contrari 1less of human nature I live an hour' s journey away from the headquarters of my Battalion, t he 5th East Surrey, at Wimb ledon. I shall probably have many sympathisers then when I break the ne ws that the Colour party had to parade at headquarters, punctually at nin e o'clock, Lo be photographed be fore stal ting to ' ¡Vindso r. I will not d well upon th e horrors of the restless nig ht and subsequent don nin g o f my finery and then the sC',id hour's journey. Suffice it to say that I did arrive in time feeling about a s plain as it is possible for a human bei ng to fee l. T he ordeal of photographi ng bein g over, the part)', cl)llsisting of the Colour party proper, two Suba lterns, myself and a cousi n, to carry the Colours and three Colour-Sergeants to g uard them, a nd o ur representative detachme nt of 20, which each of the Battalions co nce rn ed was allowed to send to watch th e Presentation, marched off to the station with cased Colours and looking as if th e world belonged to us. Th e journey to \Vind so r was un eventful except for the attcli tions of one of the Colour-Sergeants , who had a g reat idea of hi s respon si bili ties and fle w to our carriage whenever the train stopped to see if all was well. Consideri ng th e size of th e Colours, which just fitted diagonally across the carriage from rack to r;tck, we co ul d not very well run off with t hem without creating some comment. Our sense of importance diminished somewhat on our arrival at \Vind sor where we fo und many such parties as ourselves though our spirits rose again when we left th e station to the mu sic of the pipes of th e Argyll a nd Sutherland H igh lande rs who were just behind us, From the stati on we ma rched to the Rest Camp, whi ch was at th e foot of the hill up to the Castle, H ere o ur creature comforts were attended to a nel we were ab le to enjoy a good lunch in com parative comfort as we were among the ca rl yarrivals. It was between 11.3° a nd J 2 by this time; we we re o nl), just in tim e. As we came out of the luncheon tent a seethin g mass of hum ani ty was struggling for food, let us hope with passable success. Vle prese nted quite a gay sig ht as there mu st have been about two thousand o f us about the Camp in all sorts of unifo rms. Eve rythi ng was a rranged with the mos t clockwork precision, and bugles to ld li S how th e time was goin g on, Towards one o'clock we tig hte ned our belts and do nned o ur helmets and got kind friends to "pull us down straight behind" and after gcttin g our Colours from their place in what looked like a large umbrella stand we sorted ourselves o ut into our respective parties and slowly wended our way up th e slope to the place of Assem bly whi ch adjoined the East lawn of the Castle wh ere the presentation wa s to take place , Nothing particular was done at th e place of Assembly except that we were arranged in order by stalwart Guards' Office rs acordi ng to mystic numbers and letters wh ic h had been all otted to us earl ier in th e day. Up to this time eac h Colour party


THE CANTUARIAN. and its representative detachm ent had moved about as onc party, but now we were separated prior to our moving on to the 'East Lawn which was arranged as follo ws :A square about one hundred yards across was lined by the representative detachm ents upon two sides, each deta chment having a frontage of three. In th e centre of one of the remaining sides stood the Ki ng' s Canop)', supported on four silver poles, the last remaining side opposite th e canopy being occupi ed at its two end s by representat ive detachments with a space left in the middle which was later occupied by the massed Bands of the Guards. The inside of the square was occ upied before the Consecration, which was the first parl of the ceremon),. something in the following mann er. Close in front of the King' s Canopy was an altar of drums, and on either side of this and facin g it were N.C.O's of the Guards, called the N.C.O's for Colours, one to each Colour party. In the middle stood the massed bands and on either side of the bands stood the 10 8 Colour parties di\'ided into two bod ies faci ng the canopy. Vie were all in position by half- past two a nd the n came a wea ry though interesting wait of' an hour till 3.3°, when the Royal party was clue. The wait was enlivened by a rehearsal before the Duke of Con naught who came to see that all was ready. The first three' "Guidon parties" of the Yeomanry and the first three" Colour Parties " of thl' Infantry went up with their cased Colours and went through the form of presentation with the Duke of Con naught acting as the King. As we were th e thi rd of th e Infantry parties we had the benefit of the rehearsal. Shortly before 3.3 0 a com mand was given for us to in case Ollr Colours, and upon a further word of command th" N.C.O's for Colours moved ant to take the Colours from us and resumed th eir positions. Punctually at half-past three the Royal Party left the Castle. I t was an impressive moment whe n the Union Jack went up on th e flag-staff by the ca nopy and the Kin g leadi ng the Quecn by th e hand came down the steps followed by the Prin('I' and Princes,; of 'Vales and many othe r mp.mbcrs of th e Royal Family. There \\11 " a silence that could almost be felt. Then came a general sal ute. The proceedinK~ started withou t any delay, th e Chaplain Ge neral of th e Forces readin g the consecration prayers, after which came " th e old hund redth" whi ch was sun g rather timidh', However, there was no shyn ess wh en it came to the second hymn . " 0 God our Iwlp in ages past," wh ich was sun g with g reat power. The blessing ended th e SIHHI Consecration Service and then the altar was removed and the Bands moved back In th e space left for them on the side of the square opposite th e King. On the command, "N .C.O's for Colours outwards move," the N .C.O's look up lIwil position on either side of the ca nopy in single file facing the King. lmmeciialC' ly lin" was done the actua l prese ntation comm enced. As each party marr:h cd up th e), \\ I ' ll ' halted five paces in front of the King, and the Omceni, one in th e ca~;c of Veolllan" and two in the case of fnfantry parties, for the form er have onc flag or "Guidon" IIIHI th e latter carry two II Colours, " stepped out one pace a nd saluted. 'fh e Oa g~ WI ' II then handed, by the N ,C.O's in charge, to Gua rd s' Otricers, who mad e t:VC Il me wilh 111 \


THE CANTUARIAN. 6 ft. lit in. feel small ,I . tl . ards . right hand on them.' \T\~eIGu~~:I~,to~ held t~hen1 to\d the Ki ng who placed his qmcers waiting to receive th e:n wh o t1Jcers t lc n ~anb et the Colours to the Territorial le n s eppe ac a pace, were turned to the n ght or left, accordin to whe dtl in front o f th eir resp~ctive r;pre~:Y ~~~l to go, ~c1 marched off to take up a position naive ~ttac ments. Wh en all the parties had received their Colours the co .!;alnte their Colours. Upon th~srn:ndtl~,'a~gtcn to t?e R epresentative Detachment to we re saluted. Then came th e fi~al sc e 0 ~~rl partIes hturned abou~ and t~e Colours onl ookers At a . ene w lIC 1 must ave been nnpresslve to the the Kin o.' wh ,gwen comm and all the Colours dipped to the ground as a salute to nati onal ~ntheOm ste~~~~ t~~~t a~l~~ Creturillcd ~hc salute while the bands played the ri nging chee rs f~r the Kin g \~'h¡c!l orilla enc\JI1 g to the proceedings was given by three we all ma rch ed down to the Re~t lelO one w,lO was present will ever forget. T hen from a shower of rain which kindl alm)dagfl~lt"l la l,ld sClra~bl ed for tea and sheltered , y le 0 I Just t 1e rIght mom ent. After tca we moved ofT graduall y t II1e- t f b' way hy more of the ever useful 1) s a l~n, fi etng managed in a marvellous I c~rs w 10 n?lly got us into our .trains. no doubt with many sighs of relief. \V;(~ as we reached '¼imbledon and marc! _de~am: llnportnlt. III our O\~n eyes agam as soon to th e admiration of the town's folk 1C Jac f to lonr nil hall With un cased Colours, '. man y 0 w 10m turned out to see us. So ended a day which I . I ~m sure th~~Y \~~: ~eo:~~: ~:~~~e ~~I~,:gll~a~~~l~ris~~CI~~%~ :n1 ~ntensely ti:il~F' and q'lll.ckhly as P?sslble and ate a hearty supp er before 'Yoi ng ton bedecfame a cl~l dlan as w llC we Wi ll draw a veil. . .,) or a Pt:!T10 over

Gua OfT

COLIN H . M URRAY.

~~~;l'~~~~;ie~t:~~n ~!r~tq~::: ~~;11 stand up fo~ i:::' a~~ s~~~ha~ ~1~~u~~UI;t \f~:~ r;;; P If ever this finds its way into the Calt/II ,. '

d

I

.

Class which had bl' courtesy to be Im rolvement on my lamentable efforts in the Army cal Iec essays.

C. H. M.

CRI CKET. KING'S SCI-100L

v.

M.C.C.

first~~~=s l\~~'~~5~~~~fh~:'~I\:~~ anoe~c,epttional lfY strlon g side this yea r, including three winninrY tl I ' n} wo 0 W 10m, however, were needed On eq ually"d';; t~~\t ler put the School ill 0 11 all extremely difficult wicket to fac; some wicket f~r ~~IS l e~\~ lI1 g Br~und could not have been supplied with a more suitable k dbemoralised thle School batsmen, while Young, the other e-n~eacoSnti~uedC~~l~~~tletll' , 1 lC atsmen on t 1e chest and fin ge rs with


THE

CANTUARIAN.

monotono us regu larity. H aving dismissed us for the modest t?tai o.r 34. tl~e ~1.C·F· went in . D espite the fact that thf':y had a vcry strong batlJ.,~g. sld~ a~l t la; t lC wicket had improved co nsiderably. they we re all o ut for , 8 2. J Ill S \\ as d ciCf?ld?od erfor mance on the part of the School bowlers, backed up by really goo Ie mg. 's pleasing to he able to note that every side agai nst whom the School has played thi~ yea; has remarked on the excelle nce of the fie ldi ng. Gent, as llsual, w~J gr~ft beh ind the stumps, and Du n lop and D~lln e bo\\: lcd well. It has const era y !'ilrengthcncd the side having the fonner with us agalll. I

it

K I NG'S SC HOOL. 3

R. L . Gottwnltz, c Weston, b Bra\lnd

o

H. Parsons, c Rev. Leigh, b Young G. Byron , c Metcalfe. b Braund ... R. E. M:l.rlin, c nnd b Braund T. Ketlelwell , Ibw Brau nd 'H . L. Cremer. b Braund P. D. Baker, c Rev. Leigh. b Young D . V. Du nlop. h Braund G. T. Ca rre, nol oul... . .. L. G. L. Denne. c ~f etca l fe, b Braund R. M. Gent, c and b Braund Extras : no· ball , I

o

5

2

3 4

o w

o 6

34

Total

M.e.c. 5 7

Rev. J. R. Leigh, c j\'larlin , b Den ne R. D. Danger, c Goll waltz, h Dennc A. \V. Rammcll . b Cremer Captain Weston, c Gcnl, b Cremer ... '!N. D. A' n eane, st Genl, b Dunlop E. J. Melcal fe, c and b Denne W. B. Mason, c Gent , b Dun lop C. Hulton, noloul Gecson , c and b Oun lop Young, c Pa rson~, b Du nlop Braund , c Gotl waltz, b Denne Exl rns ."

27

13

15

45

8 4

o

22 20

16

Total BOWLING A NALYS IS: M. C.C.

L. G. L. Denne H . L. Cremer ' D. V. Du nlop R. E. Martin

O. 12 16

S

3

M.

R.

W.

2

59 59

4

0 0 0

2

38

4

16

0


TH E KI NG'S

CANT UA RI AN.

SCHOOL

v. R. M.L .r.

Played at \Valmer, Jli ne 20th, and res ulted in a defeat for the School by 60 runs. The Ma ri nes batting first o n a rather difficu lt wicket, which q uickly improved, started badly, losing th ree wickets fo r 48 runs, but Herford and Maxwell played well a nd bro ught the score up to I/ O befo re IUllc h without being sepa rated. Afterwards, how· ever, Max well, in mak ing a big d rive, was we ll taken by Gordon Oil the bo unda ry; he had batted well fo r hi s run s. Dunlop now assumed t he uppe r hand, combin ing accuracy of pitc h wi th ba lls tempti ng lhe batsmen to hit out, many catches thus res ul tin g . In the wh ole innings he took six wickets fo r 52 and he was backed up by sp le ndid fie ldi ng. a ll the mem bers of the team doing excellent work in thi s res pect.

The Sc hool los t Gent fo r fo ur run s, bu t then i'v[a rti n a nd Gottwal tz, who made tw o g ra nd squa re cuts for fo ur, played ca refully an d had 22 on the board befo re Go ttwa ltz was caug ht. \¥ickets now fell rap idly an d six we re down fo r 50 runs, but at thi s poi nt Cremer2 a nd Du nl op came together and made by far th (" best stan d of th e innings ; they had exactly doubled the score when Cremert was o ut for a we ll played 28 , which incl uded some good drive s and leg hi ts. D unlop seemed well set for many more but was foo lishly run out by his partner ; his inni ngs was chie Ay c ha racteri zed by fine off-drives and pulls. No one else offered mu ch resistance and the in nings closed for 1 22 . T he School ba tting, with the exceptio n o f these two, was decid edly disappo inti ng and they had no exc use for failing in the way they di d. R. 1\1. L. I. I Sl I n ning ~.

2nd I nnings.

i'. lajor Godfrey, c Moli ne, b Du nlop Pte. Will iams, run out L iCHt. r est ing, b Dun lop ... Licul. l lerford , b Crelller;! Lieut. ~'la x w e ll , c Gordon, b Dunlop . Rev. Royse, c K cltclwcll, b Dun lop ... l\'1ajor H utchinson, b Crcmcr 3 l\'fajor Wray, c i\'lartin, b Dunlop Lieut. ·Col. Mercer, c ;\'f;ulin, b Du nlop Ple. Dibley , c l)un lop, b Martin PlC. DalVsoll, nOl OU l Extras: hyes, 8; leg-byes, 5; no· balls, I ...

Total

5

6 30

Ibw, h Fl uke

35 45 2

/5 7

19

b Kcltelwell b F luke

12

not

/1

s l Gent, b Martin ...

20

OUl

5

~

o c Gordon , b Marlin 14

•. 182

Ext ras: byes, 4

4

T otal (for 5;\\,ickets)

62

/


â&#x20AC;˘

THE

CANTUARIAN.

KIN(;'S SCHOOL. 15

R. L. Gotlwaltz. c Godfrer. h Dible}' R. M. Gent, b Williams R. E. !'o'1artin, c and L Dibley

I

19

6

A. C. Fluke, c and b Williams Kettelwell, c Maxwell, b Dible)' H . L. Cremer, c Mereer, b Royse .. . R. E . Gordon, c Ihllchi nson . b Dibley D. V. Dunlop, [un oul ... G. T. Carre, b Williams R. W. H. Moline, h Dible}' H. W. Cremer, not out... Extras: byes,3. leg- byes, 4

2

J.

28 o

30 3 II

o 7 122

Total BOWLING ANALYSIS :

IS' R. E. i\'l artin D . V. Dunlop }-1. W. Cremer3 ."

11 . L. Crcmer G. T. Carre

1

o. 10 21 13

6

4

M. 0 5 3 0 0

2nd In nings.

R.M.L. I .

Innings. R.

48 52 2' 23 17

W. I

6 2 0 0

KING'S SC HOOL

R. E. io.'larli n A. C. Fluke

o.

l\I.

R.

4

0

33 21

W. 2 2

4

o

4

R. 1\1. Gent

J.

Kcttelwell

v. ST.

'1

I

o 0

o

LAWRENCE.

St. Lawrence gained an easy victory by nine wickets in thi s return match whi ch was played on the Beverley, 0 11 Ju ly 3rd . Martin won the los~ and sent in Pa rso ns and Gottwaltz on a plumb wicket to face the bowling of Snowden and Gay. The start was disastrolls for off' the first ball sent down Parsons was di sposed of, Martin did not stay long, and, afte r pushing the left-hander for eight runs in his first five balls, was easily caught by Latter an over or two later. Gottwaltz, who had mis-hit Gay through the slips (or a maximum, see med to be feeling and was inclined to nibble at the ,short ones. At 4+ he succumbed to seco nd slip, Fluke was playing Gay with care, and Cre mer never looked very safe, the next six overs yieldin g 10 run s. At 57 Hilton relieved Gay, who up to this point had sent down seven overs and four maidens for seventeen run s and one wicket. and his second over had Cremer caught behind the wicket. D unlop now assisted Fl uke La put on thirty-four ru ns, the fo nn cr driving with some power, reaching the rails three times. Clinch now changed ends.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

~\:h ere he !lad gone 0~1 for S nowc~e ~, and soon had . Dunlop ca ught and bowled. r he uSl~~ 1 lot n.o\\' s~t Ill, th e re~nall.llng batsmen only putting all ' I runs between tI~elll, Clinch cilspoSJl1g o f thre e 1Il hiS last two overs fo'r no runs. Fluke who carried

hiS bat ~l1t, p~aye~ a ~lse[l1l and .vigorolls innings ; he seemed to see th~1ll we ll from L;)e slart. HIS eRo rt lIlci uded Illne fours, and he proved that there was no reason for t 1e strange collapse o f the last five, except bad baLtin g.

Latter. a nd Ho\\'el.1 opened the innings for St. Lawre nce. The former gave little Snowden no w replaced Latter an .. bot h batsm~11 we re s?o n Ol? lOp of the bowling. The fo rme r relied chiefly lIPOI~ dr.lvlll g and CllLtlllg for hiS sco rin g st rokes, while H owell deliO'hted us ,\ith pretty leg 0 ghdes and push shots LO th e off. tro~lb l e, bel1lg soo n disposed of be hind the wicket.

Se~e ral c~a ll ges WCI:C tried separ<~tl?n t~kIng place till til.e)' Crel~er bo\\ led the best, while off h1l11, one an easy cha~)ce to

with no success and our score was soo n passed, no had put on , 89 . Of the Schoo l bowling Martin and Dunlop had bad luck in having both batsmen missed Carre, who sti ll is verr uncertain i Lh e field and the ~~hF~ ~ :ha:~ce o f ~tlll~PlJlg by Martin. The batting o~ the team, \\:ith the ~xception . I u e, \\as sca,rcel} lip to the average, but th e bowling and flelcling were very fair Wit 1 some exceptIOns. KING 'S SC IIOOL.

o

II. Pn rsons, c I-li llon, b S nowden , .. , R. ~. Gott\~' nltz, C Snowden, b Gay R. E. l\ lnrtlll, c Latt er, b S nowden }\. C. Fluk~, not out ,.. . .. I I. L. Cremer, c I-Iuysl]c. b Hilton V. Dunlop, c I-I uyshc, b Gay .. . h.. E. Gordon, b Clinch .. . J. Kellclwelt, c Snowden b Clinch

16 13

49 10

I?

P. D. Baker, b Clinch .. ' G. T. Carre, c and b Clinch 1-1. W. Cremer, b Gay

16 I

o o

...

o 7

Extras ...

11 3

Tota l

ST. A. Latter, c Fluke, b :\ iarlin G. F . H owell , not out ' .. A. O. Snowden, b Crcmer2 S. E. Gar, not oll l Extras. Total

LAIVR I;NCE. 9 100

102

o 10 221


THE

4~4

CANT UAR IAN.

B OWLING A~AL \' S I S ;

ST. LA W RENC E.

R. E. Martin

H . W. Cremer; H . L. Cremer z D. V, Dun lop

5

0 0 0

33

,

46

0 0

35 25

2

3

A. C. Fluke R. L. Gottwalt z

R.

M.

L

G. T. Carre

,

O. 7

2

36 20

,6

,

\\'.

,

0

0 0 0 0

KI NG'S SCH OOL v. COS, 1S T XI. T his matc h, whi ch pro ved such an in teres tin g enco unte r ia5t yea r, ,,:a5 unfo rtu nately spoiled by rai n . St. Edmund' s WOIl the l oss and dec ided La put us Ill . Seab rooke an d Gotlwaltz o pened the in ni ngs fo r th e Schoo l, faci ng the b,o wlil.l g of Bell and 'William s. The fi rst wicket fell a t fi ve, when SC;"lbroo ke had hi S bail s removed by Bell. Parso ns rep laced Seabrookc. but with zo on th e b ~ard h ~ was dismissed by a fizzer from Williams. Fluke now joined Go ttwaltz and l1lH:l cchate!y drove th e same bo wler for a maxi mum. RUlls, howe ver, callle slo wl y, for Flu ke (lid not see m to t ime them well, tho ugh Go ttwaltz, howeve r, was seeing Ihe ball wclllO the midd le of his bat. At 88 he fe ll a victim to H utchin son who had come on for Wi ll iams. H is twenty-three was a marvel of patience, fo r I~e was a t th e wi.ckcts fi ftY,-fi vc min utes. Martin no w join cd Fluke a nd o ff-drove i-i utciu llson t~ the r~ il s three limes in his first fo ur ba lls. H e the n se ttled down and played steach ly. l' lukt:, ho we ver, left him at 11 8, being bowled in trying at one fro m H utchin so n. His fi fty~onc wa s an' excellent ex am ple of steady cricket and included sO~l1 e veq' good dn ves . Cremer replaced Fluke and he a nd 1\Iartin stayed together till lun ch. Afte r l un ~ h Cremer (8) a nd Ma rti n ( 19) resum ed a nd qui ckl y inc reased .the ~core . before ram stopped play. Martin a t t his point see med very we ll set, hiS thlrty-mn e not out. including no less tha n eig ht fo urs. KI N(;'S R. L . Gottwaltz, b H utchi nson F. H. Scabrooke, b Bell 1-1 . Parsons, h Wi ll iams A. C. Fl uke, h l i lltchi _.lson R. E. i\'l artin, not out H . L . Cremer, no t out .. . D. V. Dunlop R. E. GOrdon } J. Kettclwcll did n0 t bat. K. H awkins C . T . Carre E xtras ...

T otal (for 4 wickcts)

SC I¡IOO L.

2.1 4 3

5' 39 22

,6


T HE

CRICKET AS

CANTUA RT AN.

OTHERS SEE IT.

H elas ! I come fro m p laying at ze cricket- I viII n e~ e r play more . It amu se me not by any mea ns-it inspire to me ma ny fcars. I am but new co me to the village and 'l,~ Sq ui re dem and s o f me to play for ze-team, you call it, Illest-ce-pas ? l\'Ta fO I ! I was not knowin g that whi ch [ was accomplishi n o- when I gave to him th e acceptation with a smile. 'E lent 10 me som e pan talon s~pants, you call them wh ite and a chemi se of ze like colo ur, for 'e said it to be necessaire t hat I was all white. As soon as I was cloth ed myse lf, we voyage d toge th er to the field of play. T here 1 saw many pe rsons with cl ubs of woo d giving the kn ock to small balls red a nd of leather. The game commenced itself when al l were come, 1.0 Sq uire dema nding to-go ill , n'est-ce- pas ?- firsl, a fter 'avi ng spi nned in the breezes ze coi n and excl a imed OJ 'eads." Ze butch er ane! zc Sq uire entered them selves before a ll, each going to three sticks of wood whe re zey co nve rsed vi th o ne in a par-dessus all white, who was stand ing to th e fro nt of th em. After apply in g the cl ub wi th vigour to ze g rass, the Squire ga ve the defia nt co untena nce to o ne wh o stood afar with one of ze balls rouges. T he whi ch caused much fury to ze monsieur, zat he was preci pitati ng limself with a ll lis speeds u po n mo n ami and was lurlin g ze bal with all 'is forces.- - u Ma n di eu ! II e st mort ," r cried mourn ing much for lim. Mais non! Mon ami raised up ' is gOllrdin and beat at ze bal with mu ch energ ie, zat a ll cried " Fou r II and claqued th ~ hands. 'W hich donc, ze Sq uire was prepari ng 'imself de nouvea u fo r ze seconde a ffai re . These thin gs al! of the village we re th ey doi ng, crossing a l \Vay~ from one sticks to ze other when zey lit ze bal. But many times ze bal was beatin g ze c l1d gell er o n ze 'cad and legs and arms and so metimes was reve rsing ze sti cks of wood , at which ze st riker by inte ntion 'ad ze custom of retirin g ' imself. Afte r mu ch tim e, ze Sq uire ca rri ed 'im self to me and demand ed zat I bind myself as to ze legs wi th ze guards and take to myself a cudgel and go for to be cast at. .. Bien " ! said I, th oug h in verity I l ov ~ d not to go. I voyaged myself to my three sti cks of wood an d sa w 'illl of ze white pa r-dess lls before me. I put down my cudgel into ze 'ole of my com rades a nd Ie sho ute d 'Ilu self IIl to my ear: I I I see yo ur leg." ., Yo u do not speak t rue," 1 a nswe red to ' im , fo r I 'ave o n my leg ze guard." " Nmf you're covering your middle," sa id 'e.

" VOllS a ve z rai so n, mo n ami ," 1 replied to 'i m, " for to speak true zat is ze positi on in th e whic h I 'ave 1.C mos t little desi re to be 'iL" Ah vo ila! ze ' ml e r ru shed 'j mself towa rd me and ejected ze bal- - Ach ! Sapri sti ! --'ow it \r as strikin g me at the back! C'est asse z ! I was putti ng myself


THE

CANTUARIAN.

to quit ze fi eld o f play with haste . Mats non!! Ze Squire desired of me much to retain myself, zat [ waS complll scd. Ze next time when ze 'urlcr come to me I ,,:a5 swin gin g q uick zc cudge l a nd was permi ttin g ' im to fly. zat 'c struck 11:0 11. adve rsaJre au mil ie u. T en minu tes passed. we replIt ourselves to play agai n and ZI S tUll es ze bal struck tn me th e leg it gau che wi th mu ch 'urt. All th e worl d cri ed they: "'Ow'S tha t" ? 1 a nswe red to them zal it wa s at ze moment of mu ch 'urt to me but zat I ' oped to reco ver myse lf presently. Again zc bal was ca!>t a t me and it was reversin g zo sti cks of wood :1.11 derrie re. I was prepa rin g myse lf well for ze n.ext cast wh en onc b~hind of my slicks said it vas necessairl' fo r me to go. "Mals mo n ! I 'ave 110t 'ad enoug h," I sa id, II ze Squire desires that I leave not my sti cks," 'owever I was com pulsed so to do, and for to speak true, I 'ad not too mu ch so rrow at which! Ze village no w took up 70C positio ns of th eir adversairies and two of ze latters took of ze cud gels a nd approached th emselv es to ze stick s. " T ak e , extra-co\' e r.~ ' said to me ma n ami: " Nrai s o ui! I will take for myself all pOSSible cover, Je vou s remercie bien," sa id I to ' im with ze assenting nod of ze 'cad. Ze Squire 'urlcd 7,C bal-Ciel! 'ow 'e ' urled it! I t stru ck ze sti cke r at ze foot at ze which Ie made many speechcs and ' opped mu ch, Latcr ze. Squire again. ej e~t ed ze bal. Ze strike r ' it at it with all ' is resources, 70at it pushed It self many Iml es lIlto ze air. "Catch it," 70C vill agers to me yelled zey, I leaped myself into ze air fo r to do ze comma nd s of th em, but I was beforehand, zat ze bal was co min g after and was precipitating 'imself upon Ill y ' cad! ! I find myse lf in ze bed with much suffe rin g with ze bump on ze 'cad of zc eggsize , Zey are tre s dr6les, th ese An g lais! Zey fear much a small lead bal ejected at a mile of di stance from th em but zey fear not a large, 'ard bal de cuivre 'urled at them from ze twe nty ya rd s. Mo i! I love not 7,e cricket- permit me to go to ze war: it is of ze two ze mu ch more safer.

TUSC AN ART. To th e mind s of many who read t he title of thi s articl e visions will be ,call ed ,HI' of endl ess rooms fill ed with N[adonnas and children of all shapes and Sizes, wll 1 every possible expressio n on their fa ces e xcept a natural o nc, A desc ription o f all of these or even a few of th em wou ld not onl y be impossible in th e small amo unt o f space at my di sposal, but wo ul d a lso be a bore to th e reade r ] shall the re fo re ~Io my best as fa r as possible to desc ribe th e stages by wh ic h Tusca n Art rea ched l i S


THE

CANT UAR I AN.

perfection, and to indicate th e characte ri st ics of some of the individual masters so th at wh en nex~ the Nat~ona l Gall ery or so me other art collecti on is vi sited the re;der may n o ~ be qmte so unll1terested as for merl y a nd may possibly care to amuse himself by loo klll g o ut for one or two of the names o r c haracteri stics which are mentioned , 'Wh ereve r one looks, the sam e subj ects are ,endlessly repeated i in fa ct originality seemed , to r.on ce rn th ~ old ~1 asters very httle. They besto wed labour on th eir pro ductl ? ~ S ; tho ugh t, I11genlllty, and. th ~ . gr~ates t ge nius, but the same old subjects, Th ~ C re<l tJ~J1 , the Mad onn,a. th e Chnst, J obms and t he Angel. are seen again and agalll, ThiS may be puzzhng at first ye t it mu st be remembered that the interests of the wO:ld were narrower in those clays than now, th ough possibly they were proportIOnately deeper. Byzantit~m, was the birth place of Christi a n Art, and th ere developed in that citv a purely CI~nstlan architecture with its appendant styl es of ornament conventional in for:11 a,nd nchl y symbol ical in spir!t .. Christia n truths wcre taught by symbols in the cia) s \\ hen bo o ~ s were scarce, until , 1Il the seventh century, a cou ncil at Bvzantium enco urag:ed a dtrec~ repre~entatio n of sacred thin gs, H e nce cam e the m'ixture of nature With symb?h~ m , wInch by constan t reproduction, sank into traditional forms, ~n example of tillS I,S the .represe ntatio n of the Trinity in Unity, in which God the Father hol ds a ~rn c tfix wlnle th e D ove ho,/e rs between th e Two, This was handed d?'.vn from. cen,tury to century, and th o ugh ~reate d with endless modification s by (hft ere n~ ~rtlst ~ It always prese rved ,tl~e esse~ltta l elements, Another diffi culty to the cas ual VISitor IS th e wealth of tradltt on whic h a rose ro und the Biblical cha racters and the n;unerous Minor Saints who had g reat vog ue in the first few centuries, The R~ fon~~tlOn broug ht to a timely end many ? f the se lege nds, familia r knowledge WIth ,dnch.was once,the .property of ,eve ry palllter, Often, too, one is apt to forget that th e pa1l1ter had III mind a symboli cal rath er than an actual represe ntation of the scene , Ve ry oftel~ i.n a P?rtrayal of the C r,ucifixi on, it is regard ed merely as the symb ol of the C,hnsttan F,alth a nd : eprese ntatIve Sai nts of all ages are groupe'd round the cross, each 111 th e attItude which he adopted toward s that F ai th . Then too it mu st ll<;>t. be forgott~n that the orig inal se tting had often much to do with the com posltIOIl of the pIcture, and an altarpi ece is often en hanced by th e series of small panE'ls, th e predel la, whi ch were placed un dern eath it. Th~ painters of old con cep~lOn ?f ~ver~r scene

time were no l g reat travellers as we moderns and their had as ~ bac kg-roun d the beautiful Umbrian scenery and sky whI ch It IS dIfficult for us 1Il E ng land to imagine, As th e centuri es had prowessed,. art had degcll erateq and it g rew more and more wooden and lifeless until .t~e m,lddle o f the thirteenth ce ntury, At that tim e an arti st by name Cimablle was iIvlll g" 1~1 Florence, He w<:s an exce ll ent painte r in th e old style and th e people were so dehghted wh en he palllted th e " Ru cellai Mado nna" that the\' carried it in triumph from hi s studio to the Church . I t is now in Ste Maria Novella, Floren'ce,


THE

CANTUAR IAN.

and looks exceedin gly woo den. Some critics now ~ay it was, paintc(~ by I? l1 ccio o f Siena, and the sa me story is related of a Madon na pam ted by hlln for hi s native tOWIl. Ci mabuc d iscove red in the co unt ry a sheph erd boy na med Gio tt () eli Bondonc (comm only kn own as Giatto) wh o had j ust d raw n upon a roc k a life¡ like pi cture of

a wh ite curl y- horn ed shee p.

He edu cated th e boy, wh o was to co mmence th e

revival of pain ting, by breaking with the t!acl i li~)Jlal fo rm s and c1.r a wi~l g ,from nature. Unfortunately Gialto ( 12 76- 1.136) has sufle rcd ,m ,two ways. I-lis pa l11t lll gs \~ e re a ll frescoes, i.e., sce nes portrayed o n a wall by pallltlng whd e the plaste r wa s still wet, a nd in conseq uence they have suo-c red i ~ l the . co urse o f time by d~ 1llp ~ ncl li g ht. Ma ny pictures have bC('n attrib uted to hlln which were the work of h,IS p~lpll ~. ca l.led th e Gi ottesquc pain ters, the most Il ota ble of wh o m was T ad deo Gad(h. 1 he ca rh es~ and best o f Giotto's paintin gs arc at Assisi th e ho me o f St. Fra ncis .Lhe fo u n ~ler of th e g reat Francisca n Ord er of i\'ronks H ere you ca n sec St. F ra nCIS preac hing to th e birds who would not go away ti ll he had given them his bless in g. About fifty years a fter the death of Gi otto a monk spra ng into fam e for h i~ painting-a m aster of iclealisn1 whose pictures seem to posse8s an " un earthly His name was Fra Giova nni da F iesole but he i ~ better know n a~ radiance" Fra An ge li co ( 1387- 14°5). At the age of t wen t)' he ente red the D omi nica n co n ~e n t at F iesole i and immured with in th e m onas tery o f Co rton a ( for th ere he was driven by persecutio n ), he remain ed un to uched by t he prog ressive spi rit o f the age , whil e oth er Flo ren ti ne pai n te rs were tryin g new mixtures o f co lours and experim e nting in anatomy and pe rspective. H e ret urn ed to the Con vent of San Marce in F lorence, where Sa vonaro la th e patro n o f F ra Ba rto loll1m eo was pri o r, a nd the re he re main ed for nearly thi rty years. Cosim a de' Medi ci o ffered h im th e Arch bis ho p ric of Flo rence but he decli ned fo r fear of its world l), attractions. T he Co nve nt ce ll s arc full o f his paintings, the most no tabl e of wh ich is "The Crucifix io n," rC ll1drkab le for th e subli nw expressions o n th e faces o f C hr ist and th e Sain ts gath e red ro un d. Th e coro nati on o f the Virg in, now in the Uniz i Gall ery, Flore ncc. is a lso fam ous wi th its" go lden g lory," a differe n t expressio n on the face o f each of the atte ndan t Ange ls; a nd so i ~ the Last Jud g ment in the Dell a Arti , Flo rence, a pi cture d i\'i ded into three pa rLs, I t is easy to see how di stas teful t. he portrayal o f r-] ell has bee n to th e pa inte r and how hi s wh o le so ul is wrapped lip in thc Pa rad ise. All h is pictm es have a backg ro un d of gold, a s urviva l o f the goJ'dsmith in a rt, whi c h makes them part icul a rly not iceabk'. Giotto had bee n th e first to bn'a k with th is id ea with his ~ k ics of clo udl css blu e s llc h as are often see n in Italy an hour before sun set. I n Sh:Hp ('ont ' a~t wit h Fra An ge lico is Luca Sig nore ll i bo rn in ' 44 1, who was a Re,t1 i ~ t as An gel ico a n Idealist. Th is iii most noti cea ble in his H Last Judg ment" wh ic h is no dream land represen tation 0 1 th e Judg men t of So ul s, but is in ve ry tnl th the res urrecti on of the bod)'. H e sce nl <{ to try and get back to th e o ld Greek I dea l, C< pure fo rm na ked l), di splared, a nd all thin gs exqui sitely madc." All spi ritu al ~ig nifi ca li olls arc laid as ide an d the wh0h' picture tee ms with thews an d s ine ws in wh ic h ac ti o n is pa ramoun t.


'tHE

CANT U ARI AN .

Fra Angelico had 0~1e notab le pupil Benozzo Gozzoli ( 142 0- 1496). wh o, thou g h I~ot so w~ll k nQ\~ ll as hiS maste r, pai nted many fin e pictures. Most fa molls a re hi s fr:sc~es 10 the. Cam~o. Sant? ~r burying gro und at Pisa. H is devotional pic tures a re ~s an imated Wi th reilglO u? t~e IIHS: as th ose o r 11 Bea to Angelico, but the pupil, livin g III the wo rld, had a true r In Sig ht lIUO nature than th e monk wh o lived in the cl oiste r with hi s mind fixe d o n hea ve n, . .Fra !'¡ ilippo. Li ppi, ( 14 12- 1469) o wi ng to pover ty was made a mo nk a nd spe nt hiS tune III dra Win g pi ctures to e nr ic h his monaste ry. \~' hil e painting a Ma don na for a ndunn ejry nea r, he ra n o n' wi t h his mode l, Lli crezia BlI ti, o ne of the n un s, and so COI~ C l U ~d li S ~ o nasti c life. I-l is, J:lictures attrac t o ne by th eir o utward p rettiness w!l ~ c h .hld es, th ~l r lack of real religIOUS fecl in g. (-Ji ~ pupil o r as some think hi s son Fl l ~ppll10 LIPPI ( 1460- 15° 5) was a rapid and often a GlI't:iess painter and his work v~n es \le ry muc h. He was very fo nd of a nti q ui ties of all ki nds, an d in trodu ce d in to hl ~ wo rk Ro man a rm o ur a nd class ica l fi g ures in pl aces to whi ch they are not always ~Ui te ~. . Ve ry re w artists adm ire G hirlan daio ( 1449- 14( 4) beca use he had little llnag lll fltlOll . But is work .i s always ~are fully done , th e co lOlir rich and every detail, howe.ve r small, exactly coplCd. In IllS fa molls " L ast S Li p per " in F lo rence hi s use of anlln als as symbol s shou ld be noticed j the cat fo r treachery at the fee t o f ] udas wh,o. alone has not a ha lo j th e dove comin g in thro ug h a window representing the Spmt and the peacock , I mmo rta lity, goin g out. E ve ry one ~n o\Vs th e fa molls pictures o f Sandra Botticelli ( 1446- 15 10), who had bee n ~ go ldsllll t!l before he wa s taught to pa int by F ilippo L ip pi , H is da inty drap~ n es and, de h c~lte traces o f hi s fonner art make his pa intin gs noteworthy and pl easillg. I-its" Blrth of Ve nus, ,... Spnllg)l and " Madonna o f th e Mag nifi cat)l are pro bab ly th e most fa mo lls. Pc rugil1? ( 1 ~46- 15 2+) ca n a lways be recognized by hi s backgro un ds of Umbrian scel:ery, HIS skies are gene rally clear a nd a few trees are nearly always silh ouetted a~all1 &t them: R apl! ~e l was his pllpil and it is in teresting to no te ho w he pe rfec ts hiS m~ste r's Ideas. I he pup il starts fro m the point at wh ich the maste r has left off. Perug JI10 is vc ry q uain t in th e mann er in wh ich he tri es to rea lise the mystica l and heavenly on the same can vas with th c ea rth ly. This is show n in sllc h a subject as th e l~esurre<:tlO n and the E mp ty T omb. Th cre h is celes ti a l fig ures sla nd in the sky '?,n ,lIttle sLn ps of ~ IOll d an d it is left fo r Raphae l to perfec t in h is Madon na da 110hgno what Peru g lll o has attempted to realise . "Here she rests on a n immeasurablt: de pth of <: Io ud , the ideas of bracket and scaffo ldin g a re q uite left behind, the who le depth of the atmosp he re is at her disposal wi thin wh ich s he reSlS and has the a ppea rance of repose," While spea kin g or Rap hael, no ti ce s hould be d irected to a co mm ~n habit o f Tusc~n pai nters of c.; o nvey in g much meanin g by th e wreath or band whi ch surro un ds th ei r picture. This o ften co ntai ns pa ne ls of sO llle subsid ia ry scene which gi ves mea nin g a nd forms the key to th e whole.


4jo

THE

CANTU ARtAN.

Raphael and MichehmgeJo were both em ployed by the Pope to paint the Sistine C hapel. T he seven scenes of the Creation have been painterl on the roof by the latter who here shows as much as anywhere his supe riority to other artists. On the East Wall also is his" Last J udg ment " much defaced. T he unerri ng audacity with which fi gure and group alike art: th rown into every conceivable attitude and movement, of necessity command a m ute and amazed attention. It is a pity that the J udge is so muscular. ' Vith these two giants one always associates Leonardo da Vi nci whose most famous picture "The Last Suppe r" is in Milan. Th is fresco unfortunately also has suffered m uch but what remai ns shows its immeasureable superiority to every other portrayal of that sce ne. There is only room fo r a bare mentio n of And rea del Sarto, called" the faultl.ess painter" by Ruskin. H e brought. to pe rfection the art of exquisitely blendlllg colours in which Tuscan artists always excell ed. H e was degraded however by an unworthy wife, and whether he paints Nladonna or Saint, Lucrezia always appea rs as his model till one gets tired of the faultless painting and her insipid pre ttiness. After these Titans, Art degenerated rapid ly, "sou l " see ms to hav p. almost departed from the painti ngs. Two Schools of importance arose, the Naturalist, the chief of which was Caravaggio ( 1569- 1609). and thus in turn was supplanted by the Eclectic with Carracci, Domenichino, Guercino and Guido Re ni as its chief exponents. T he latter in many of his paintings shows a powe r unequalled by many of the older masters. No mention has of course been made of the Ve netian School by whom colour and lig ht we re developed to perfection as form had been by the Tuscans. The Venetians, the best known of wh o m are Vivarini, Titian, Giovanni Bellini, Paolo Veronese a nd Ti ntoretto, excelled in portraiture. Their canvases glow with light, and are magnificent in architecture of the riches t, and draperies the most superb. T he reader should also remember the sculpture which went hand in hand with painti ng. This culm inated in Donatell o's .r St. George" and lVIiche langelo's " D avid" and " Moses " and his Medici Tombs, while Ghiberti in his Baptistery Gates at Florence showed perfection in the art of pictorial representations in bro nze , For those who are interested the Parry contains seve ral interesti ng books on th e subject incl uding those by H ope R ca and Albinia Wherry.


tHE

CANTUARiAN .

EXTRACTS FROM A

43 i

DIAR~

Wed n esday, Ap ril 29th.

... . .... .. I have become a phi losopher and incidentall y a vegeta rian. Never mo re sha ll I Laste the s weets of s uckling pig nor crave the coarse r joys of roast bed. Beans a re more to me than baco n. and min t·sauce than the fat of lambs. ~-I e reafter one odour will assail my nostri ls, nauseating. irretiistible, putrescent, the ~ Il nate arom~t of the stoc kyards, a square-mile of reeking cattle-pens, It was 10.30 til the mornl11g when we reached the yards and the clay's work in the packing houses had. as yet harci ly begun . "Buyers" and commission merchants were still busy sortlllg cattle fo r their sevcral firms. T ogether wi th "drivers" and ,. ranchers" hooting and cracking long whips they galloped about fro m pen to pen, pausi ng he re and there to lowe r their whips and tOllch so me animal in token of a bargain. To O!le co rn e r of th e yarcis a. stream. of cattl e, gentle cows, little calves, and mighty 1 cxas stee rs moved slowly lit the dnection of the meat factories. To· night th is vast area or pens ~\:ill be Clll pty, a l~d to-morrow will be fill ed agai n and the same tragedy re- cnacted. 1 hey go so trLIst1l1gly these blameless cattle. In the d istance a herd of pigs is jus.t visible I~ounti ~lg t hrough a ch ute to the s um mit of a far slaughter-house, where theIr uwn weight WIll ca rry them dow n wa rds thro ugh every process necessary to turn t~lem into ~acon .. Cattle ~re dealt with differently. T hey are driven into trucks WIth goads IInpartlllg" e lectrIC s hocks and are the n shu nted as required into th e ground fl oo r of the beef ~laugl?te.ri n g-hou s~ ,. to whi ch our g uide presently COI~d ll cted li S . At one end of tillS buIldlllg the VISitor mounts by mean s of a spiral s t,tlI·c~sc .LO a .g~ l1 ery frol.11 which ~ view of the whole interior may be obtained , By thiS tllne kdllllg was III full SWing. Nothing can describe the bestiality of the sce ne. ROUl~d the wh o le hall ran s~eel rails so me J 0 feet from the gro und o n whic h Il umb (~rs of httl . .~ wh eeb were contIllllolisly revolv inO", Attached to each whee l and below il h ung a hook 011 everyone of which a car~ass was suspended by the feet. Frtsh call ie arc killed as rF!qllired by 10werinO" trap-doors into the trucks at tIlE' ent rance to the building. thus penni ng two b;asts in each truck. One blow with a sledge- hammer in th e centre of the forehead by th e "knocker" or "butcher" is ge nerally sufficient to kill though so mcti mes old steers die hard . As each animal falls three negroes rush forward to drag the carcass from the truck, shackle the leO"s a nd by a jerk of a lever swing it aloft o n its hoole I n a few minutes as lIl any ~s fifteen or twenty cattle would be thus" knocked," shot o ut into the ., killing beds)l and hooked ready for skin ning. Four or five hundred head or cattle are killed and sk inned in an ho ur. Never in my life h;w c I seen a nything so utterly revolting. Below us hundreds of half-naked negroes wallowed ankle deep in blood and entrails. When splashed wit h go re and brains thdr ev il countenances 190ked ir possible more


THE

CANTUARIA N.

villainous than in their natural co nditi on. Down the whol e line of sleaming ca rcasses gove rnm ent inspectors in white ove ra lls pass. slowly examining each an imal, stamping many but rejecting some as tubercular. It is im possible ~o r~cognise a tube rcul a r co w or pig un til the ani mal has bee n ope ned. As may be lInag-med the loss of mu ch stock in this way is a se rious matte r to th e Packers and so ... a to dollar note? we ll i inspec tors arc human after a ll. No matter what process one watches: we can not he lp bein g stru ck by the extreme ski ll displarcd. Each ell1 ploy~ here 15 an expert in hi s ow n line earnin g a fabulous wage, whether in killing, cleaning. or skinnin g animals. Ca ttl e a rc skinned mu ch as one wou ld peal pota loes, thoug:h the process is more elaborate. first co mes a man wh o slits the hide dow n th e mIddle, then a second who skin s the uppl: r portion, and a third who ,skins th e lo,,:er ~orti?n of the beas t. A fourth disembowels and cleans th e wh ole alllmal by spray1l1g It with jets of boiling water. \Vhe n th e hid e has been stripped dow n to th e sl\Qulders one sweep of the kni fe will free the head, whi ch falls fro m the neck as from a tube o f ski.n. Lastly comes the butcher who se vers the feet and trims the carcass ge nerally. All this tim e so me men are shovelli ng bl ood , feet, and skin cuttin gs down holes in th e floor where they desce nd to a boili ng departm ent and are tran sformed into suc h seeming ly incongruous products as : gela tin s, phosphorus buttons, shoe-horns, amber mouthpieces for pipes, blac kin g, a nd "Peerless F ertiliser," There is a hair- curlin g factory for the tails of cattle, and a .. wool-pulling" for shee p skin, while pepsin is made from the stomachs of pigs, and violi n strings from the entrai ls.

Once passed the slaughter¡¡house the animal is placed in cold sto rage. These store-houses are really-giga nti c re frige rators where one may wander th rough cavern s of freezing flesh in all stages o f dismemberment. Hams a nd othe r meals for ex portation are stored in cellars th e tem perature or which is as low as 1 0 0 below freezing point. Passing to anoth er part of the establishme nt we werc shown the justly famoll s extract of Pure Beef Lard in process of manu fac ture. I ts prin ciple ingredient was a crumblin g snow-white sub stance obtained by the repeated boilin g of the refu se from all parts of the packing house not used in othe r ways, a nd those an ima ls condem ned by a too conscientio us gove rnm ent inspector. It is al most impossi ble to real ise that the two pa,ckin g factories in Kansas City consu mes 10 thousand head of cattle, as ma ny pigs a nd half as ma n)' sheep a day. We next passed to whe re ee Imperial " H ams and ct Golden Bran d )' Bacons we re bein g prepared. Hams a re smoked in what appear to be enormo us gridiron ::. arranged in tiers one above th e other, and e nclosed by steel doo rs. The smok(' ascends from th e gro und floor and ca n be co ntrolled by levers from the floor 011 which we stood. When smoked the hams are placed in a travelling belt whi ch carries the m from th e smoking departme nt to storage once more. A row 01 IC stampers II affix a coloured label to eac h ha m as it passes.


tHE

CANTUARlA N.

433

.From the En~inee rs' point of vi ew pe rhaps the most inte res ti ng are 'the sausagemaking a nd Cal).lllOg depart ments. It is here th at .. Ca nn ed Beef," .. Exctlsior Sausages," '.' Potted ~am s," a n~1 " Devilled Chi cken" are man ufac tured, Nearlv the wh?l e of thiS .work IS mecha lllcai. s.ausage- meat is mixed, Beef" ca nn ed ,,' and ChI cken .• ?e~ llled " by machinery. , Sa usage making alone in voives any man ual l~bour. The l1~prov,ed sausage machin e wo rk s 0 11 th e principle of th e cylinde r and ~I ston . . The mll1 ce IS forced through a holl ow steel tube over th l;: mouth of whi c h little skill bags are he ld by ha nd till fill ed with sausage- meat. Employ~s in th is depa rtment we re large ly J a ~an es e. No t the leas t wo nde rflll portion of th ese e,nor~ot\ s wor~s , the lar~es t , III th e world, was the Eng ine- house, and the elec tri c hg htlllg es tablishm en t With Its three e norm ous dyna mos an d th e Boil er-room eve ry I furnace of which is fired by oil. By t his tim e our lOlir of i~l spectio n had come to an encl. The manage r a nd staff of the Company had ,entertallled us to IU~lcheon in the middl e of the day but stran,ge ly enoug h we ~hd not see,tlI to ca re for foo d, It was 3.30 when we left the packln g- h,o use and Its nauseatlllg odours j sin ce that ho ur I have not ta sted Resh ... . . . .. .

AFTER

Tl-l.)UGHTS.

: .. . . , . To t'?e hea rt of YtJuth th e world is a hig hway·side," Start young O~l that h~gh\\:ay a nd ltght~h?artedly a nd its pleas ures will be truer, its so rrows less bltt~r. 1 0 Ius vagabon d pllliosophy Stevenson brought th e instin ct of a child and the lllte llect of a man a nd th e rein Ja}' his charm . Youthrul impressions touch the tend erest a nd truest chords of the hea rt, wh ile age rath e r than repetiti on vitiate the senses., In th e freed? m of a gipsy life our mi nds soo n lose their intellectual swaddhng-ba,nds,. It IS ~lways the recollection of a first voyage as or a first day.at School ~hat lives III a man 5 memory. One se~s once more the laughin g chatteri ng mo~ley cro wd surge unto tJ~e wharf, a nd th e sillp herself loom up a gaunt blac k mass ag~lI1st the bl,lIe s~y. A~alll she fId es phalltom-like in the ha rbour mouth a nd we walt the evenlllg tide wilich sha ll ca rr}; 11 5 ove r the bar and out to sea. , Ni ght com ~s . The throb, throb, of Ihe e ngin es a nd the answerillg swish of th e tl~e tell of mo t~on . On ?eck the da rknc~s is railing fast a nd the twinkling lights of ',Llve rpoo! fade mto the distance as we slip away do wn the l\1ersey channel and out IIlto t~e Ivory·grey shades of the Irish sea. Most of the Compa ny on board are Amencan~ of .whom the w~men .a.re the Illost i nte resting, They are always we lldressed, VivacIOUS and amusll1 g , I he men, back ward, lantern-jawed fellows, whose


434-

'tHE

CANTUARIAN .

only topic of conversation is the slock-market, arc less attractive. 'vVt:; reac hed Queenstown next mornin g at I I o'clock, wht!Te, as is th eir custo m, the Irish peasantwomen come 011 board. Barc¡ footed and with plaid shawls wound tightly round their head s th ey bring with th em th eir baskets of hand-mad e lace and little curios carved of bog- oak to tempt thl'! ri ch Americans. A few hours later we were abreast of Daunt's Rock Lighthouse, Ireland's most so uth ern promontory and the point from whi ch our passage is officially measured. The breeze had stiffen ed co nside rably since leaving Q ueen5town and the sea Cleepeni ng in colour was flec ked with a net- work of white foam. Gathering clouds heralded a rough ni ght .... There are moments in the life of man, and seasickness is one of them, too painful to recount and too humiliating for remembrance. The plight of th e emi gran ts in the fore part of the ship was most pitiful. Spray blows in cloud s over th e bows of the vessel in a heavy sea and to the mise ry of seasickness is added the discomfort of the cro wd ed third class quarters. In oreler to in spect th e " stee rage," as thi s part of the boat- is ca lled, we must descend throu gh the shi p's ki tchens and sto re-roo ms. To say that thi s porti on of th e boat stank would be to state the tru th too mild ly, it literally ree ked, no r could the smell be traced to an y si ngle cause, it was it com posite essence of oran ge -peel, empty casks ane! . s welterin g humanity. Even the worst sto rm s mu st cease sooner or later a nd with the advent of th ' sll n once mo re, thin gs wo rc a brig hter aspect. A few of the women with chil d r n had ventured on deck and while their husband s smoked, stood or leaned over th . bulwa rks in quaintly in congr uo us g roups. H ere and th ere a Hungarian or a Germ an would play hi s fiddle to cheer the sufferers an d brig hten the tedium of the long voyage. R ussians and Po les with J ews formed the largest number of the emigra nts, so me hopeful , so me th oug htful, some me rely wretched. Fair-haired, blue-eyed Norwegians and swarthy brown¡skin ned Italia ns form ed a striking contrast. and w O marvelled a t the hope of a nation whi ch shall harmonise such jarring elements. All are eage r to J;"cach th eir destination and to-morrow if fair weather pre vails we shall be in Ne w Yo rk. This last eve llin g is glorious, and there is noth ing 80 se rene ly beautiful as an evenin g at sea. Pale greens and ye ll ows deepening in softest gradations to ora nge and crim so n purple. Before sll ch g rand eur the ocean se 111 14 awed to silence. As a s pirit emerging from the "valley of the shadow toward f4 th e light," steal s the ship in a clo ud ed sea of go ld ; and on as twilig ht succe eds sun sot, and as a " mi lk-white rise in a silver mirror" the moon rises in the heavens. Natu m calls us in this hour as she calls all vagabon ds. I nto the sluggish and unrespo nsivu soul <.:reeps an echo of the spirit of the gypsy and the wanderer, th e spirit of Thoreau and of Stevenson.


'tH E

CANTUARtA N.

4.15

"Give to me the life T lo ve Let the la ne go by me, Give the jolly heave n above And th e hi ghway ni g h me .

. . . . . . ..

.. , '

Wea lth J ask no t: 'l;o~~ ' l~~ ~ 'l'~v'e, N or a frie nd to know me, All I ask th e heaven above And the road be low me."

S AMU EL

PEPYS.

Sa mu el Pepys ( p~onoun ced peeps) was born on Fe bruary 23rd, 1633. H is father, J oh n Peg ys: wa~, a cillze n of Lond on, where he fo ll owed the trade of a ta ilor. Hi s fam ous. Diary te lls us that he first we nt to sc hool near L o ndon (at Huntin o-don) pr~~eed lll g fr om th e re to. ~~ . .Pa ul's School. Early in 1650 his nam e was enteOretl a~ a sizar on the boards of I flIlIty College, Cambridge. Before go in o- into reSIde nce he remov~d to Magdalene, where he became a pensi o ner, after\\'~rd s obtaining ~ schol~rsll1p, How.l ong he contined at Cambridge and what we re hi s academical purSUIts we are .not 1I1 fo r.med . H e imp!,udently made an ea rly marriage, but Si r Edward Montag u~ befn end ed 1~lm and gave hun a home in hi s family, Montagu e after ward s became Earl of Sa ndwi ch; hi s mo ther had married Pepys' g randfat he r. . The E~ r1 Of.. Sandwich obtained e mpl oymen t fo r him in th e Army Pay Office. T.'lIS was hiS pos iti o n, al~d a ,Poo r one, wh en he commenced to keep hi s del ightful diary ( 1659 ). It was wn tten III cypher or a pec uliar form of s horth and of hi s own.

I~ l\'[arch, 1660, he was promoted to th t: : post of Sec retary to the Gen era ls at sea ; 11; June, Montague sec ured fo r him th e office of clerk of t he Acts of th e Navy. A mon~h latcr ~e became cle rk of the Privy Seal, and with the e mol umenl s therefrom proceeded to Ius degree of M.A. at Ca mb rid ge. In September he was made a Justice of the Peace .anel sec ~l1'ed other offices through the goodw ill of the Duke of York, the~ I..ord High ~dlmral. The Duke rea lly cared abo ut th e Navy a nd found in Pepys a faIthful and effi CIent servant. . In March, 1805, he was Treasure r to the Tang ier Commi ssion, and later on

d~nng the plague, was the ~m ly man in t~ c Navy o ffi ce who re main ed in London b; hIS work.

Weakness of sight caused

hl111

to cease keeping hi s

fj

Diary " on the

3 1st May, 1669 . Three years later he obtained his highest honour, when he became


tHE

4J6

CANtUARIAN .

Secretary to the Admiralt),. In 1673 he e nlered Parl iament as member fo r Castl e R isin g ; an d in 1679 he wa s re turn ed as member fo r Ha r\\'i ch.

As a frie nd of th e Duke of Yo rk's he beca me in volved in .. Th e Popish Plot" and was accused of secret cor respo nd ence wit h France. The abse nce not only of evidence, but eve n o f gro und of sUSfJicion . did not. preven t him from bei ng comm itted to th e T o wer ( l\Iay 167<). a nd fo r a tim e he was remo ved fr om the Navy Board . But th e evide nce broke down and he was rel eased in the followin g F ebruary; by the specia l co mm an d o f Charlc:. I I. he wa s reinstated at the Ad miralLy where he remai ned till the Revo lution. Upon the accessio n of William and i\ Jar)' he retir ed into pri vate li fe witho ut being followed e ithe r by pe rseclltion or ill -will. He died May 26th, q 0 3, and was buried in th e Church of St. Ola ve, Ha rt Street, Pe p)'s had an extensive knowl edge o f naval a ffa irs. He unde rstood an d practised music, and was a judge of painting. sculpture. a nd archi tec ture, In 168+ he was e\cctC'rl president of the Royal Society and he ld t hat office for two years. He bequeathed to his old College an mval uable collection of manuscript na val memoirs, prints and anci ent English poetry, which has often been consulted by critics and commentators. O ne of its most sin gular curiosi ties is a collection of English ballads in fiv e large folio volumes, begun by Selden, and carri ed down to th e year J 700 . Pepys published " Memoirs re lati ng tO,the State of the,Royal Navy .for / 0 years, detcrmin('d Decembe r, 1688," and th e re IS al so a book III the Pep},sJaIi library, e ntitled : .. A relation of the Troubles in the Court o f Portugal in 1667 ami ) 668, by S. p" E sq.," wh ich Walt, in his" Bibliotheca Brittannica," ascribes to Pe pys. The unguarded small talk of the " Diary" whi ch serves to illustrate the man n r N and hab its of th e age, shoul d not mak e us forget th at Pepys was a se nsible and actiVtl public st rvanL The li vt.:liest impression of th e Fire of London is that given us in his Diary" from Sunday. Se pt. 2nd, when a mai d call ed :rvfr. a nd \\,1rs. P epys up fll three in the Illorning- ,. to te ll us of a great fi.re th ey saw in th e city; so I rose nllil slipped on Ill)' ni ght-go,wn and we nt to her window and thou ght it to be at the bnck side of Mark Lane at fa rth es t." lhrou gh all the confusion of the week, to th e 11 ' X' I Sund ay, when at Church th ey had , I a bad, poor serm on, thou gh proper fo r the ti m : nor eloquent, in sayi ng at thi s tim e, that the city is reduced from a large folio t n deci mo -tertio." The Plague, the Dutch War, an d th e fall of Clare ndo n are vividly noted in thi M amusin g" Diary." The f\J. SS. of the diary whi ch now lie in the Pepysia n Library a t Magdalene Wi lli first deciphered by th e Rev. J oh n Smith. The first edition ( with a selection frOlI! Ij


THE

CANTUARIAN.

437

Pe pys' co rrespond ence) by Ri cha rd, Lord Braybrooke brother o f th e th en :rvTaste r of Magda lene appea red in 1825. ' Ma.n)' co mill e n ta t o r~ cO I~l plain that n'l ll ch perso na l se lf-revelation was omitted from th IS book., Some of thIS has been add ed b), a late r l'ditor, Rev i\ lynors Bright ( 1875-:-1879)! ~llloth e r Magda lene man. who has favo ured us wilh informa tion about th e pn vate aftaHs of Pcpys.Sun. Ist Marcil. " All to bed without praye rs, it bein g wa~ hin O" -d ar to- morrow" and on Rth Seple,mbe r, wh e n he din ed at home with his wife. it b~ in g washi ng-da)', we h.ad a good pie ba ked of a leg of mUllon ; and the n to l\foxon's, a nd the.re bought a p,nr of globes, cos t n~ e ÂŁ 3 l OS., with whi ch I am well pleased. I .

. I n a rash m?o~I , !~ e foun~ ~,Iea s lll e I II I .fi nd It of It."

',l e c ~t off his b e~ rd . whi c,h l~ad taken ma ny years to g row; but shavlll g and pohshlll g IllS lace and head with a pumice ston e. he says. "very easy, speedy and dea niy. and s hall co ntinue the practi ce

C. G. IV.

AUTOTHANATOGRAPH~

Autobiographi es are bad; YO li can neVN te ll wh ether th e author Jived ha ppilv eve r a fte: or fell down a coa.1 hole the morn ing afte r th e history was written. Of course a pl eface or a n a ~ pe l~d l x may sup ply. the e nquirin g mind with thi s interesting detail , hut th en no one III hi S senses reads e ith er a prcface o r an ap pendix I flatter myse lf ~hat a n a ntoth anatog raphy comes neare r to th e mark, t ho ugh of co urse cve n in it t he re IS ~ doubt as to th e uitllnate end of th e a uth or; but th e penulti mate and th e prope n¡ ul tllllat e and pro etc. they have told th em. 1 started ,lifc as a qu iet gel~ t l e m an l)' Ml'gathe riam, but was nipped in the bud by ~rk breakl~ g my back whIle I was arguing with a rabid Ic th )'osa urus ove r a Pt e l od~c tyl whi ch we both wanted for an cntrC::e. Th l!1l th ere is a ga p \\'hich I cann ot as ye~ ~ll 1l1, but I am st.lre it will come so me da)" a nd so I haunt th e British Muse um

t he

waltm g for a telepathI C message from some prehis toric kindred bones. But of my third existenc.c I am quite ce rtain; I was U lysses, and in thi s character I soon c,a~e before th e pubhc eye and ga i.n ~ d mu ch reputation and wealth by selling the CO P) fight of my travels to an enterpflslIlg poe t callee! Homer, who had already come to the front as an ab le war co rres pond ent. I died-tho ugh I am "glad to see


THE

CANT UARIAN .

that the sad details have bee n hushed up, of over-eating in my halls at I thaka. 1 wot' puni shed for th is by be ing a horse-Oy in my Ile xt existence and though history has n o ~ chronicled my ad ventures I acquitted myself nobly in this hum ble capacity. Th tl next exi stence bro ught me to the ze nith of 111 )' fam e, I was Themistocles and 1 am proud of it thou gh some hi storian s have tri ed to befoul my honourable name. I fenlly had a hectic ti me, J modelled Ath ens on mod ern principles with free trade and a L\, " power naval standard, polished off the Persian s a nd then enjoyed myself at Ihl' T foo led th em to th e t op o f my be nt. but was compell ed , by 1111'

e xpe nse of Greece.

land becoming too hot lo hold me, to betakc myselt to Pe rsia. J died full of yenn, mon ey and good livin g as tyrant of Magnesia, I di ed, I say. of laughin g at the W,l T had fooled the Pe rsian s. Next I was forced to beco me a h umble cha rcoal- burn I , but managed to put an cnd to that du ll existence by going to sleep in the charconl . But here is my great diffi cli lly. in spite of all research, J really can ' t rem cIllhl11 wheth er I was Al exand er th e Great or his horse ! Now, at last. I am be ing drive n lu acce pt the humbl er position as my own , as someone has bee n sitting on me e ve r HilH' and I do all the work whil e a nother gets the glory. I n Rome I was Agrippa, buI WII badly cut out by Alexa nd e r as Octa \¡ian. In th e middl e ages I lay dozing or Ifi ll I'l l with philoso phers as th e missing link, hoping to dodge Alexander thi s LIII II ' I popped up not lon g ago ,Hi a poet, but found Alexander established as T cnn 'Hu ll , and so I chucked the sponge up and reti red for a sho n rest after my disappoinlllll'lIl And now I go ca ntiollsly t.hrough life. ready to disappear like a rabbit into its hlll/ UW , if 1 see Alexander Oclavian T e nnyso n agai n pushi ng hi msp.lf forward, but t ill th n

C.

HART H A~I I A. S . V.

TENNIS TIES . SINGLES .

Cumberbal ch} Cla)' pole } H osking Keyserl

C~II\\b('rhatch

Trehane

Cumberbatch

I,.,,'

Srratched

Norri!; } Slratlhed Smith 2 G ordon Chappell H arker Way tel Byes : Kettelwell

}

Il osking

}

G ordon

}

Burk eT

} :I.

bye

Keltelwcl l

}

Il nrker


THE

CANT UARIAN.

439

DounL I~ S.

CInYPOlc { Chappell

}

{Clayvole Ch a ppell

GClH 2

{

Mow11'

{ Smilh

2

Hou ~dcn l

}

{ :)llli, h2

JlIckes l { Williams Garibaldi { Courtney Rarber { Gent l

}

{~1~~1~~2

}

lllo\l sd ~ nL

{Garibaldi Courtnc)'

Dcnne

Juckes 2

I

{ Denne Ryan JlIckes { Powell CUmberllatch} { H ughes {Cumberbatch II ugh cs TOwnCnd l { Norris Keyserl } ' { KeYSer' { Jerram Smythe Je rram Srratdu d { Latter

SeabmOk , { McCicland

}

\ VaYIC l

l{

{ SCabrOoke McC leland

Cilmberhatch Hughes

J Cumbcrha lch

t H L1ghcs

{I

C um b«b." h H ughes

a hye

{ Harker

SCH OLARSHIPS , The followin g elections were made after the J uly Exam inatio n :JUNIOR . H . SPENCE.

C. cR. R. .

TO F OUNDATION SCHOLAR SHIPS. PROBATIO NER , R. A. F. WIII STI .RR. · R. J. j\·lOWLL 4•

I

L. W. II. IlKS1'.· B. W. GAI.I' ) l\"2.

CDAWBARN . ROSSE.

T. 11. TO

TO ENT RANCE SCHOLAR SHIPS.

J.

L . W. II. Bfo:ST.·

• Not yet

1mll/bers

of

Ille

G. K. LA \\I SO N. ·

D. COC KRDI. ·

HOU SE SCHO LAR SHI PS.

D.

B. G. K I NG .· R. A. F. W HI STL~R.·

KEBI.F.• •

School.

COC KR~: M. ·

L. L. JOH NSTO N.·


THE

CANTUARJAN.

S C H 0 0 LAN D O. K. S. '¥e hearti ly congratulate th e Rev. ~ . S. :Moxon on th e birth of a so n and h e ir on July 1St.

\Ve cO llcrratuiate E. B. Nelso n on bein O' electel to a n Exhibitio n for Classics at vto rcester College, Oxford .

*",,<;.-xThe prizes for th e Gymna sli t.: Competiti ons, Fi ves, Stee plec hase and Scu ll,s. were distributed by the Headm aster 111 the Schoolroom afte r Praye rs, o n Monday,

Jlily

12th.

\"'e o ffer our hearty congratulations to G. T. Carr~. R. E. Gordon and J. Kettei wel\, on obtaining the ir 1S t Xl. colours, a nd also to G. Byron, P. D. Baker, K. E. Hawkin s, F. H . Seabroo kc, J. R. Ree ve, C. A.lVest. r:. 1~ . ll o ll sden, D. H.

THE

NEW S.

Cowie and H. S. \¥acher, on obtaining their 2nd XL Colours. ~.

'x.

*

W. Telf~r has obtained 2nd Cl,ass Hon ours in th e Cambridge Theological Tripos, Part ll . ·X·

,y.

-J(.

R. B. \\'inser obta ined 3rd Class H onours i ll the National Sciences Tripos at Oxford.

'x. ,yo.J;.

A. R. BeHars has been elected to an Exhibition for Classics at Pembrok· College, Camhridge. %1f..~.

\Ve wo uld remind O.K.S. and olhor6 th at Speec hes thi s year, will take place at a qua rter-to-two in th e Chapte r I-Tawil', instead of two o'clock as formerl y.

BOAT

CLUB.

\Ve have two races . to chronicle si nce t he last issue. ~he first wa.s ag:ti~I;1 T onbridO'c T ow n Boat C lu b, on Saturday, Jun e 27th, at Fo rdw lch. Ve ry .\~~~I~\I~~~I::

~~id rlbhte rr,acl·,ct'tos<~~~c ~\~(~It illt~~y~~in:~'~! ,~~~~ c~~~il~~yW~e~~~I~~ l~~~ile

of

he 0le elle\ ll w was III (O U g . . . I I tl I loved ou t . -ht b'lt a deslJerate fini sh brought us 111 Just a leae , w rong 1 y r , . s t raJ 0 , < g The other onc e nli ve ned the monoton y of some mod erate sclullin on th e claYllo! "h ·ff Races C G 'W illiamson had got togeth er a scratc 1 crew t 0 row III \ t I1e .\ I . " • • I Cottrell two 11111 ~dW:o~r~g~~~h bO,,!~h~~~f~11:ec~\~~ki;~'n e~Vl~;a~1~~01~ta~~~s b~:r~I~~ sc ratc h cre w 'Pill Iii


THE

CAN'tUARIAN .

a lot of work al ong the strai ght. They tired to ward s the end and th e second pulling up, still more, won fairly comfortably. The resul ts of the semi-finals and finals of the scullin g were as follows;SEMI-FINALS .

Se1I lOr. JUlllor.

H eat 5. H eat 6. H eat 7. Heat 8.

c.

L. Nightingale beat V. C. T aylor. A. F. B. Cottre ll beat R . Juckes. Keyse rZ beat Pa te rso n. Keyse rl beat F ishbourn e. F I N }\ LS .

Semor. C. L. Nightingale beat A. F. B. Cottrel l. junior. Keyse r2 beat K ey~e r l.

CLASSICAL RESEARCH. (Bet'Jlg a pre-Irallslatt'oll from tile on'gt'llal E speranto.)

" Modern Excavations in the British Isles It; by P ress PubllcalioJl . 6 dollars.

PKO~'ESSOR ENUONYA~I A.

i!.speran/o

or all the fascina tin g paths in the maze of archreo logy, that whi ch ap peals most strongly to the ge neral reade r, is the study of the civilizations of those nations whic h once ru led the world, and whi ch left th ei r slamp on th e ge nerations that have followed them. For over ten years Professo r Engonyama has been engaged in research among the re lics and ruin s of those islands in the North-West of Europe whi ch were once so fainolls, but arc now 110 mo rc tha n bleak dese rted hills and c halk-d owns. The great mi grations of sixteen hundred years ago havc left masses of twisted and charred ru ins, whe re once nourished enormous towns, lonely he.aths where had been glad harv est fields, black morasses in p lace of swarmin g docks or busy mines. I t is to such a country that the P rofessor has devoted the chief work of his great life . The aspect of the City of Londinium (London ), the metropolis of these islands and the chief sce ne of th e Pro fessor's labo urs, is tha t of a hete rogeneous mass of apparently disordered ruins. But after mu ch excavation a nd research, Professor Engonyama has come to the conclusion that this appearan ce o f chaos is due solely to th e quantity and dense c rowding of the buildings and not to lack of an orderly scheme. Thus he points out that th e templ es of the British gods are congregated almost exactly in the centre of the City. Many inscriptions have been unearthed in


THE

CANTUARiA N.

this quarter, a ll apparf'll tiy bearing the title of the divinity to whol11 the l~ m p l e belol1o-cd a nd in some cases the name o f the chief priest also :-tI1l1S-" Gaiety." "Lyric ( Lewis Wall e r)," " 1 o.admittallce-excel?l.on.bl~si lle~s ,( By ~rder) :.' The excavators also found a small meta l fra gme nt with the Ill scnptlOll : Sa pollo gives pe~l ce and qttie t." This, th e Professo r conside rs to be a portion o f ~ prayer <:,1' dedi cato ry address to so me god wh o was knOl~n by that ,l1<l:me, anel hi S th~orr IS suppo rted by the di scove ry of a potshe rd , eV idently a slInilar p raye r, beg tnlllng H

0, 0 Antonio .... " An e norm OllS le mple has beel! almost ent irely ex posed . in the \Ves,l part of th is

City. It is bui lt in a fantastic and del icate mann er of whIte ston e,. Wit h c~un.t1 e5s fin el)-cut minarets of twi sted tracery. The preci nct:; enclose a quant!ty of ~l1lldlllgs , and in the ce ntre is a long strip of wate r with stone prome nades on eithe r side .. Bllt the most interestin cr [catmes of this monstrous ed ifice a re two eno rm OliS machm es. One consists of tw~ ctrlllS, of latti ced steelwo rk and of prodi gious length, both pivoted at one extremity and arranged so as to oscillate vertically between position? of r~st on th e groun d on eithe r side; th e other is a long un dulallng t~ac k of stee~ rmls, Wit h steep gradients a nd exceedin g ly sharp curves. The th eo ry o ( Profess? r l.ngonyam <l with res pec t to these t\\'o devit.:cs is a triumph of inge nuity. H e consl:le rs that bot h machines were constructed for the same end - nam ely, huma n sacnfice. By th first cnO'inc th e un happy vi ctims would be waved violentl y to and fro in the cages suspended from the steel arms, until dead; and on th e rails of the latter we c.an picture to ourselves heavi ly we ighted wheel ed cars plunging ove r the bound bod\ ~s of their un fortu nate sacrifices. An insc rip tion: .. T o the Flip-Fla p and Sceni C Railway," has bee n discovered . Professo r Engonyama considers th e ~rs ~ of thes(' titl es to be an onomatopaeic o r illustrative word, suggested by the dnpplll g of th o suspended victims' blood, but he has no th eory to account for the second n al~l(1 . The number of victims has been co mputed at 572,000 every year-a ca1cul atl n based on a fragme nt of a newspaper called II Dai ly Mai~," in whi ch appea~s t~1 legend I< Lord Eshcr's appeal. I 1,000 men wanted withm the week. T e.rntorw l l"orces." Tor/lor/a! is probab ly an adjective de rived from ! 'errilo!J' (called 111 5 1111' M.SS. "Terror" or " T outon Scare "), a well-known deity, a nd was a ppa ren tl y derisively applied to those who le- hearted fa natics that devoted t hemselves to tll tl calise of th eir coun try. But the whole subj ect is depl orably loathsome. Of the social life of the in habitants, unfortun ately, l i t tlt~ remains. Vvc have tw t) wall-insc riptions; from one, "No Grat uities," t!~ e critics argue that. s l (~v e ry \\'.\" probably rife, and th e oth e r, "Votes for 'Vomen, seems to support th iS view. . nul th e Professor quotes in oppositio n to this theory a line from one of the g rea t B~ ' ll h h poe ts, a certain Keir Hardic, to th e. e~ect that "~rit01~s. I~ever sha ll. be S~ !ly~S!' nlld a lso the co nstantly rccurri ng refram III the anCIent Bntl sh. comeclies- I hiS. "h, 1 tell VOU, is a frce country." Another interesting discovery IS a number of pinellllh., evidently posted in the streets, a nd bearing various religious or proverbial snyiuKlI,


't HE

CANTtJARIAN.

such as-I< A li tt le Hudson's goes a long way" ; " Keep to the left"; "Are we d owll-hea~ tcd ?" I f Osoeezi" a nd "Grape-nu ts" (th ese two last are conclud ed to be local.or tnbal heroes), "A.B.C,'¡ j . , Stand ing Room Only"; a nd" l\'Iotorga rage" ( possibl y a reference to the wrath of so me minor demigod). f the literatur~ .of this period we luckily possess an ab undant supply, fr tlm the maSSl\le plays of ' VJ!!Jam Shak espea r, wh o writes (if his works are orio-i nal and not a c,?lI ecti~n of the.lays of itine rant bards) under the pseudonym of Bacoon o'r Barke r, to tne delicate Iyncs of one G. R. Sims, wh ose tcnder ode to his mistress Tatcho we.1l rc\~a.r~s ca reful study. Comic writers are legion; Shaw. Lord Marie Corelli, Pnme- l\J ln lstres~, Pa nkhurst, ~Ild Sh~ck l etOl~ (better kno wn as l\ Iu llchallse n) are a f~ w ~ am es. I he . more se n OllS ~atlOn al hte rature seems to be enti rely on one ~?PICJ ~Iewed from dln:ere nt st~~ dpOi nts, a nd ~on 5 i sts c hi efly of g la ring head-linesGra~t: Danger. NattOl.lal Cn sIs. 'Vake up, Engla nd . Ge rm an Peril." We can not co nceive ,,:hat exactly thIS peril. was, bu t Pr?fessor Engonyama concludes that it has some. relatIOn to another head-hne he has dtscovered-" Indisposi ti on of Mr. J essop. InfutI?ted crowds gemand th eir money back. Riotolls Scenes. 3,000 kilJ ecl. lI Intestllle f~l1ds of th iS so rt wou ld naturally leave the coulltfll at the mercy of ex te rnal foes, especIally th ose of snch known fe roci ty an d avidity as th e North ern T cuto lls.

9

. A pleasant .relief from thoughts so dol eful is arrorded by the discovery of .some pnvate Ic tters 1Il o.ne of the ~o ll ses of Lond.on. One of these epistles Profcssor Engonyama quote~ 111 fu~ l , and It seems only n ght to incorporate it in an a rticle that purports to deSC rIbe IllS book. It is wri tten by a boy at school at Cantabrium (Canterbury), a small hamlet in the South -East of Britain. to his mother in Londo n. <c Dear Mother" hc writes" Thank you for th e vests. I was sixth in form this week but nothing else important has happened. The Corps is getting along alright: I nearly lost !1~y frog and bayonet on fhll rsday, but they were found in the Armoury. The ammu llltIOIl. waggon has broken down agai n. Please send me some morc m ot~~.Y' Your.lovmg son~ Geo rge: P.~. - Onl.r thirty-o ne. morc ~Iays to th e holidays." A n:l v.~ letter . a nd we ~<lll w~ 1I Imagi ne the )0)' of th~ little child o.f long ago, when some;: kllld master or.lovJl1g fn ? nd. bro uph t . agalll to hIm the pet aIlIllla l he evidell tly loved so ~l ear1y. It IS a pathetiC little SidelI g ht on the vague mists of this ill-defined part of hIstory, In conc~usion, we can unh esitatingly recomm end Professo r E ngonyama's book ~o all w.ho WIsh to read not only an a uthoritative and accu rate, but also a c harmingly

l~lte rest l11g. and .thoroughly enjoyable. description of those remote daysJ and of the !:fe. that ~xlste~ III tl~ese !ands. lJdes~nbed so well by one of th eir own hymns as th e n~ht httl ~, tight little Island. 1 he tout ensemble of the book is excellent, a nd the IllustratIOns by Co unt Ha~a-kiri and th e photographs ta ken by the excavators ~hef!1s.e.lve s, add to the especial charm o f the book, quite apart from their own mtnnslC value.


444

T HE

CANTUARIAN .

THE THOUGHTS OF THE THOUGHTLESS. T he world is jLlst begi nnin g to grasp the tremendou s tt uth that the re is, a s~ience. in Tho ught and that laws go verni ng it can be kn ow n and to so n~ e extent SCIentIfically applied. I have 11 0 intentio n of writing a sc ie ntific pa per, e ~ en ,If I c,Qu ld. I so ~ l1 cl.1 pre fe r to bri ng forwar d the practical rather tha n th e SCientIfic SIde of a subject. If thO li o-h lS arc La be tho ug hts one li kes anyh ow fo r a ti me to forget the laws that gove rn the m. as onc li kes to forget the holdfast that keeps in check a aap t~ ve ballo~m ! The kind Edi to rs of th e COIl/uar/an have as ked me to wnle a pape r fo r their magazlIl c, and l feel 1 ~ h ollid like to com ply with their request, and, if ther \~i ll g ranLmc space, to wri te fro m ti me to tim c on th e subject of Thought <i nd all It Involves. I ca nnot clai m to be in auy way orig inal, and my remar ks will be for the most p~rt gathe red fro m substance that 1 have ab so rbed ill my (somewhat desultory) read ll1 g of such books as are writte n on th e subject of th e mind by Professo r \¥. James, H enry \Vood, D r. Schoe fi eld and othe rs. To t hin k abo ut tho ug ht is full of fascination, it gives one such a large scope - .i t is lik~ standing o n a high clin' with no th ing but ~ea and , sky aroun d, wh~n ?nc IS conscious of infi nite space a nd the refore inflll ite poss ibilities. It is on ly 1Il lIl tro ~ spection that onc feel s ,O,IlI.·'s l i m itatiOl~s to return th~ m. Tho~l~hts w h~t are tl~ey ~--: and whithe r go they? 1 0 these q uestIo ns 1 am not III the pOSItiOn to gIve a sCIent lfi ans wer, bu t ca n only lay clow n a fe w axioms ·- Fi rst, o ur thoughts are part of o ursel ~ 'S .. our life is what our thoughts make it "- some g reat write r remarks. W~ cahnot hv..: wit hou t thinki ng, th ough wo are not conscious of th e process. Some peo ple say that we thin k while we slee p. We a re at once pro ud , and asha med of o ur tho ug hts, Wh o has not felt the colo ur ri se at it hasty q uestion from an elder . < a penny fo r yo ur thoughts "-and one ha s felt not fo r a millio n pen nies would one have dared to try and express what Oll e was thinking! Yet to be called th ou~h tless we great,ly rcsc ~l l, yet no onc (o r vcry few) can in ~ ny way ade9 ua tely express Iu s t~lOl1g hts, or If he ,lEI !~ to utter some, o the rs Ill us t bl! hid den away III the recesses of hnllself fo r eve r. ] III Ii would scem to be q uite natura l an d rig ht, and o nc is glad th e r~ is alt.)' sort of rcs~r Vtl in this age, whe re it is so little known, and when cve,n onc s Ill.enta l an d phySi cal health furnish conversation fo r the d in ner table. But Without ta lkmg about o m wn thoughts, or layin g them ba re to ~e g loated over by, the pub lic, it is ~ f~sci natill H subject to speculate about, and to let our fa ncy plar WI,th them, and yet It IS a sound th ing for us to remember that our tho ughts, are of ~ltal Importa nce. both to o urs Ivt'" and othe rs , That brings us to another pOI nt -whIther go ou r tho ughts? the a115"'111 to this is, wh at is so wonderful and inspiri ng-our thoughts a,re everyw here-SOIl Ill hovering abo ut place s li ke dise mbodied spirits and others takl11 g hu man fo rm ,Il llt! walkin g amongst us. Our thoug hts mark our faces, heads and eyes and are partlt\lIy


THE

CANTUARIAN .

445

disce rnab le to th ose who study such things, T houghts, I repeat, hang about places and are perceived by some natures, who are perha ps more l'cceptive than o the rs-the re have bee n sensitive so uls who have been inspi red by the love of som e art merely beca llse th ey happe ned to live in the same hOllse in which some g rea t artist (unknow n to th em) lived and died , I n a less degree, who is so obtuse that has no t felt the atmosphere of religion ' and worshi p that cli ngs rou nd the Cat hed ral, both inside and o ut ? I kne w a little London street arab once who as far as I co uld find out had no highe r ideals than ease and food fo r hi s pu ny pe rso n or reverence for anyone but a " Bobby," yet when I too k him into the nave of the Cathed ral he too k his hat off without being told and remai ned speec hless an d awesLru(' k a nd could only ejac ulate" I\ITy" H! ' ÂĽhen we came out into the sun sh ine I don't think it wa s th e beauty of the architecture, or th e wo nde rful effect of light an d shad e that ove rawed that ve ry primitive child mi nd, bu t he perce ived in some dim way th e religious thought that constructed and now has fill ed an d is filling our Cathedral, and for a time, a ve ry short time, he felt awed, If t hat is felt by an inse nsi tive uncultivated mind one can unde rstand how an over sensitive, high ly wrough t mind, can ' perceive th e e ffect of thoug ht in a mu ch mo re sub tle manne r, and o ne hea rs of people who if they pass a place where a traged y has been com mitted perceive it and sh udde r and in some instanc es eve n see a vision o f the victi m, H ence many of o ur best authe nticated ghost stori es or ig inate. From places affected by thoughts we think of thoughts anel their effect on people. What a vista this o pens up ! ' :\,The n we were youn g Ollr nurse woul d tc ll us If the right ea r b urnt it was because somebody wa s think ing well of li S, if th e left was red, then somebody was thin king badly of us. In this age of progress we are :)11 ta ught the signi fica nce of the cereb ral or nervo ns disturban ce that causes th e redn ess of th e ea r. If yo u wi sh to test t his fo r yourselves, remark th e colour of the ca rs of the people writing an impo rta nt examination pa per, their faces wear an exp ress io n of nonc hala nce but th eir ea rs tell a di ffere nt tale , Si mila rly, when YOll have something VeI)1 impo rtan t to co mmu nicate to a person and you long fo r thei r attenti on, don't be put off by the ind iffe rl!nt expression, a downcas t eye, but look at her cars ! But thi s is a digression and alter all there is a world of truth in the old nurse's f>ayin g, a nd good a nd ba d tho ughts do affect o ur mental a nd ph ysical condition eve n tho ug h our ears may not indicate it. This opens up a ve ry wide a nd interesti ng subj ec t, l'.e. th at of thoug ht reading, thought transfere nce, mp. ntal th erape uti cs and the like ,- but more of thi s ano n.


THE

CANTUARIAN .

A FEW BI R DS OF E AST KE NT.

Th e di stri ct just about Canterbury is n ot a pa rticul a~l y good one for birds, yet there are several grand spots within a radius of a fe w mtlcs. It may be take n ,that a di st ri ct conta inin g a ma rsh, cliffs, pl enty of wood s anncl copses" and a. nv~r , is the idea\. As mi gh t he ex pe cted, th e greatest n umbe r of birds buil d III h ecl gerows, shaves or shaws as they are named in Dorsetshirc. Among,these ,may be mentioned th e two spccir.s o f '<\' hite Lhroat. the Blackeap, th e long- tailed Tltm o ll se and the Red-back ed Shrike; th e amorous Turtle-dove may also be named a hedgebird.

The \·V hitethroats and th e Blackcap, which arc all of th e famil y of Warble rs, are mu ch alike in habits. They nest in low herbage or shrubs, and th e form e r have a predilectio n for nettl es. The grea~er species o f Whitet.hroat lays four or five eg~s, which are white in colour b lotched With brown and ash, 1I1 a rath er more substantial nest than either of its cong-eners. This is composed of bents an d small tw igs with a linin g of horsehair.

T he lesser 'Vh ilelh roat has two distin ct types of eggs, which are conside red by many to vary according to the locality. One of th ese .is a small er co unterpart o f l.h o-reate r \Vhitethroat, wh ile the o ther is g ree n -yello w 1Il ground co iour freckled with o g rey. Th e B1ackcap lays from fo ur to si x eggs in a nest similar to those of th Vl hitethroats. Th ey are brow n (occasionally purple- red ) s uffused wit h bla ck, so me· what after the manll e r of a Ch ilffi ll ch' s egg. Th e Ion no-tailed Titm o ll s'e or Bottle Tit makes a beautiful d omed nest of lichen lined with fe~th e rs at a heigh t va rying from four to forty feet from the g rou nd .. It i!l, h owever, o-c nc ra ll y built in a stout blackthorn h edge or go rse- bllsh, and co nt allls up to six tee n°l ittl e eggs, wh ich a re wh ite, s pec kled wi th pink . T wo femal es will somt' tim es lay in the same nes t. Th e ne:)t of th e Red- ba cked Shrike is generally betrayed by t~l e la!dc,: f,11 blue- bottles, moth s, &c., whi ch are impaled on the tho rn s o f th e bush til \Vh.leh II I situated. Th is Shrike is o ur o nl y trul y Brit ish rep resen tati ve and is a fin e bird wll h


THE

CANTUARIAN.

447

hooked bill, ch estnut back and grey unde rparts. It lays from fou r to six pal e crearncolo ured eggs, spotted in a zon e at the larger end with lilac. The nest is large and thick, and is composed of woo l. fi bre , moss, twi gs, &c. The Turtle , which is quite d istin ct from any o th er British D ove, is a mi grant, a nd is grey- brown in colour with a white ring on its tail. It deposits two small creamy-w h ite eggs on a platform of twi gs and roots, at no g reat di s~ ance from th e gro nnd . Let LI S now see what birds may be fo un d maki ng a cliff and its snrrol1ndi ngs th eir abode. A few of these are: t he Rock Pi pit a nd \Vh eatear, whi ch nest abo ve th e cliff; th e Rock Dove wh ich breed :) in th e cliO' itself: and th e Oyster-catch er, whic h in habits the shingle below. A ll th ese may be found in th eir respective ha un ts nea r Rec ulver. Th e R ock Dove is perhaps th e most interesting o f these, for in very few pl aces does the true wild species nes t, inte r-breed in g as it does wi th esca ped tam e speci mens. I t is smaller than th e \¼ood -pi geo n or R ing-dove, and c.o llects but fe w sc rap s o f straw or twi gs rou nd its eggs, whi ch, like oth er membe rs of the same gen us, are white and two in number. I t has a gene ral grey hue with patch es of blac k. Rump white. The O yster-catch er is an ext reme ly handsome bird, wi th its red bill and pi ed black and white plumage. I t lays three to four eggs on th e bare shing le. Th ese are sa ndy-drab in colour with black markin gs. Th e Rock- Pipit may be called deci ded ly loca l, if not actually rare. Tt is a littl e b row n bird , somet hin g rese mblin g a lark, but ill rea lity related to the Wagtails. I t lays four to s ix eggs, g rey in g round co lour, thic kly mark ed with purpl e- bro wn. Th e nest is placed in so me clump of h erbage or c ran ny of a rock on th e shore. The Whea tear may be fOll nd in nu mbers in the vicinity o f a ¡rock), coast. H e re I n co lo ur it is ch ie fl y black and white a nd has t he habit o f fre que ntly flicki ng its tai l, and the re by sho win g its wh ite ru m p. H ence come many of its loca l na mes.

it breeds in a hole in a bank or in a rock.

Under the headin g of Marsh-b ird s we Ill ay desc ribe the L apwin g , th e Redsha nk, and the Yell ow Wagtail (the latte r s in ce it is ofte n fo und c esting in the sid es of dy kes o r o n the water-meadows). Th e Lapwin g, G ree n rl over o r Peewit, mllst be a familiar bird to n ea rly everyone, both fro m its cry and mann er of nig ht. It is a bird whic h is suppose d to be "Protected " , bu t in very few pla cc!s arc the men who co llec t its eggs for the market


----~

THE

CANTUARIAN.

prosec uted. I ts plumage, when viewed closely, is v~ry handsome, being golden-green above, snowy-white beneath, and rufous on the tall cove rts ; the face and ~reast. are a g lossy black. Four eggs arc lai d in a small nest com posed of bents ~n a httle hollow . These are brown or brown-green in colo ur, vanously marked With black. Occasionall y the O'found cclom is pale blue. N umbers of eggs of th e BI~ck-headed Gull arc sold in the market for" Plovers' eggs" since th ey ne,st in calomcs a nd a~e th erefore less trouble to take. There are v!J.riolis ways of findll1g the egsrs when .1a~d on a Hat marsh. One of these is to place a stick in the gro und , and walk round It 1Il ever-in c reasing circles; thus going over e ve ry inch o f grollnd IS ensured, Anothe r way is to foll ow the na rro\\' trenches which inte rsect manY,marshes, . Nea,rlyall the nests ;Ire placed wi thi n a few feet of these, as th ey are Just the Ti ght size for th e sitting bird to hath e in. The Red shan k is not so Ilume rou s, and its nes t is harder to find, as it is &e nerally placed in a thick tuft of grass, whi ch is bent ~round the ~ggs by th e parent, bird, It ~ name is derived from its long sca rl et legs. 1 he eggs. pOll1ted like a plove r s, a r~ fOlll in llumber, placed with the small end s inwa rd. They .a re ve ry large for the Size ~f the bird, being nearly th e si7.c of th ose of the La pwlIlg. The ground colour IS crea my- brown blotc hed \\'ith black. The Ye llow Wagtail is a bird which, o.n a drea rr day on the wind-swept ma.rshc.s, conside rablv lightens lip the land scape. as It l:ll~ S s \~lftly. over the grass. Its br.~as t I ~ a brilliant );ellow, and it is ortCIl hard to cilStlllgll1sh It fron~ the so-called Gre) Wagtai l ". A co mpa ratively ,Inrgc number ca n. be see n dUTIng the seaso n, o n .~h.(' marshes between Ash and Min ster; but lucky IS I~e who finds th e nest, so \\ ell IS It co ncealed . The eggs are fOllr to six in numbe r, hav1l1g a dull grey-b rown appear,m cc. Other birds to be found in th e distri ct are \Vr),necks, Reed-buntings, Kestrels and Sparrow-hawks, and it must afford spo rt to sea rch for th ese. the nest a nd 'ware kee pers !

M oo rh c n ~ .

But span'


~------------------------------,-

tHE

CANTUAR IA N.

ROM E.

Eve ry schoolboy knows that Balbus buill a wa ll-Balbus aed ificavit muruill-and their memories must be ve ry bad if they do not rem ember in toili ng throu g h Place wh ere, whither and when ce Juvenal's "Quid Romae Facia m ? " The same thought often exercises the mind of th e traveller who approac hes Rom e ror the first time. It is not long, however, before one more unpalatable obtrudes its notice" \Vh at shall I have to leave out?" for in whate ver directi on one's incli nati on may turn, there is more than sufficient to satisfy it. All visitors, 1 suppose, first wend th eir way in the direction of St. Peter's, and cran e their nec ks to catch the first ~I impse of the dom e of the chief Churc h ill C hriste nd om. Truly a marvellous sight it is, when St. Peter's first bursts upon the eye as one CO mes out into th e" huge stone-paved square from one of the little narrow streets which surround it.

St. Pete r's is so vast that the west front obsc ures the dome co mpletely and one only gets a vision of the two smaller domes 0 11 each side. In th e mIddle of the sq uare is a large col umn, first erected over th e sitl;: of the Martyrdom of 51. Pete r ; on each side are two large fountain s whi ch play conti nuollsly. A broad flig ht or steps leads up to th e Church and the sq uare is flanked on both sides by huge colonnades of arches four deep, eac h a hundred feet hig h. surmounted by fi gures of Saints and Apostles. T he C hurch oppresses one by its vastness ; down the floo r of the Nave a re marks which show its relative length to other large Churches in th e world. The structure is cruciform with massive pillars dividing the Nave into aisles. In the centre is the High Altar under a golden canopy, a nd up above it the lofty dome ri ses to what appears an inconceivabl e height. Ye t, although the building is so vast, not an inch of space appea rs to have been wasted. Unlimited money must have been expended on it, but the best of everything- whethe r material or workm en-h as been employed and th e result is not tawdry. At the east end is th e grotesque thron e in bronze, supported by th e four great doctors of the Church and near the Hi g h Altar is the ancient bronze image of


THE

CANTUARIA N.

St. Pete r. To ki ss the toe of his right foot is th e desire of eve ry good the result th at. the foot has been greatly worn a way.

Ca t.holi~ .

with

In th e Confessio-wh ich is a kind of c rypt si tuated in front and below the High Altar-are prese rved th e bodies of St. Peter anrl St. Paul, but ~heir heads are kept at St. J ohn Lateran; here also is the life- like fi gure of Pope MartIn V . The lover of pi ctures is at first disappoinlC? by th e. Altar p i e~es. which are merely copies, bu t on doseT inspection the ir aclmlr~tJ on will he excIted b~' t~ e fact th at eac h is co mposed e ntire ly o,r mosaics 5,0 cunn,lIlgly put togethe r that I t IS only possi ble to di sco ver th em by locltlng at the Pl cturt: Sid e ways.

Space does not per mit th e mentio n, of. the num erous monuments---:-many of ,great beauty- whi ch ado rn the Churc h, NotI ce IS always besto wed on th e Pleta by Michelange lo, the monument of l\Iatild a of Tuscany, wl~o fo und ed the ,tel~ poral power of the Popes by bequeath ing to them her vast posseSSIOns, and Canova s hons at the base of th e Statne of Clement XIII. As there arc said to be 365 Churches in Rume, it is man ifes tly impossibl,e even to mentio n their names, St. J ohn Lateran is probably the best kllo,wn: ul1t~1 1870 the Coro nation of the Popes used to take place there; the P~pal. klll gdom IS l1;)\V limited to thc Vatican and thc Pope has ccased evc r to go outSide It~ confines,. 11~e Navc of St. J oh n La teran has a wonderful mosaic floor and 0 11 both Sides are gIgantic figures of the Apostles. San Paolo Fuori Ie M ura-onc of the five patriarchal Churches-dese rves more than passing notice. It is reputed to be the co~tli~st C,hu rch in the world . In th e Choir is th e portrait of Christ, th~ largest mosaI c. 1Il ,exIstence, and round the walls are portraits of the Popes in mosaIC, each ten feet 11l dIame ter. The Forum next engages Ollr attention a nd impresses one by it,S comparati~e sma llness. Only th e foundati ons of the buildings whid~ once adorned ~t now remam ami here and thc re an arch or group of pillars stand like forlorn sentin els over the relics of anothe r age. It is on ly comparatively recently that its explo ration has been att~mpted .. O~ one side it is bounded by the Capitol, wh e re stood .the T emple of JupIter Ca~ltohnus; on another by the Palatine. on which the ruined palac,es of the Em perors stIll stand i on a third by th e Colosseum and the arc h of Co n st~ntll1c j and on the fo urth by a row of more modern buildings erected from the materIals of th e Senate House, and the T emples of Antoninus and Faustina, a nd thei r son Romulus, He re may be seen the


'fHE

CANTVARIAi'I.

4.1 1

ruined Tem ples of Saturn and of Con co rd. the Temple of the T welve Gods, and of Castor and Pollux. the Arch of Septim ills Severlls and of 'T'itus. on which is the famoll s bas-relief of the Golden Candlestick as it was taken from j eru salem. The Basilica Julia and the Basilica Aemilia faced one anolher. In the inner ha ll business was conducted . while the idle rs lIsed to lounge unde r the colon nade outside a nd the marks on the pavement arc still visib le whi ch tht:!Y made for playing their games of dice. The tomb of Rom ulu s is near, covered with the fa mous black stone, and th e Go lden Millstone, once the cen tre of th e Roman Empire. Perhaps most noticeable of all is tho amount of space g iven up to the lise o f th e Ves tal Vi rgi ns, Their ga rden is ,quite a large one and their housc has numbe rl ess roo ms, all of which we re heated wit h hot air which passed be t wecn a doubl e floor. Near it is the small round T empl e of Vesta where the sacred fire was a lways kept burning, The Sacred \-Vay can still be traced in many places, a narrow footpath whi ch winds in and out among the co ngested bui ldi ngs. [t is almost perfectly prese rved by the T empl e of Saturn. at the basc of the Capitol, where the Triumphal Procession halted, While the Conqueror proceeded to the T emple of ju piter Capitolinus, the captives were led away to be sla ughtered nea r the Tullianum, or e lse to be incarce rated in one of its dun geons. In the lowest of these, in half a foot of water an d without light of any description, jugurth a languished. his food be ing pushed down from a small hole in the floor of th e cell above. Here also absurd legend says St, Pete r and St. Paul we re imprisoned and the stone is marked wh ere the former humped his head, leaving a n im print behind. There is mu ch to see on a visit to th e Palatine; the wall of Romu lus, with its solid masonry, still encircles the top, and round the sides eac h Empe ror buil t his palace, The Palacc of Augustu s is still excellentl y preserved a nd the view mllst have been magnificent. Interestin g also is th e house of Livia, wife of Augustus, which gives one an excellent idea of what a Roma n hOllse must have been like, t he rOOI11S all round opening out in to a co urt whi ch is open to the sky. Succeeding Emperors we re not contcnt with the small Palace of Augustus and added to it. Only a few a rches remain of the Palace of Tiberius and the Golde n H0115e of Nero was destroyed as soon as he was dead. Three stories remain of the seven-floored edifice of Septimius Severus. From the top a good panorama of


45 2

t HE

CANTUARI AN.

th e city may be see n. J ust in front is th e C hurch of San G regorio Magno fro m whi ch Grego ry dispa tc hed Aug ustine and his mi ssion to ¡ E ngland. T he mudd y, slu gg ish Tiber winds in and out be lo w, an d in a bend near by. H o ratill s kept th e bridge. T he l sla nd of T ibe rina also is worthy of notice- founded it is alleged on Tarquin corn . It is con nec ted with th e wo rship of Aesculapius who rescued th e ci ty from a plague in 293 B.C., and is in the form of a boat. It is co nnected with the shore by two genuine old bridges, the Pons Fabrici us and Pon s Cestius wh ich have stood the test of ti me an d the risings of the Tiber, while more mode rn br idges have bee n swe pt a way. It shows the wi sdom of the old Romans tha l th ey neve r pa id the co ntractors un t il the hridge ha d stood for 4o~years . T o retu rn to th e Pa latine, the spot is sho wn where th e ca ve was situated in whi ch ROlllulu s and Remus were suckled br the wolf. T he Palaces of Caligula a nd th e F la\"ian E mpe rors are well worth a vi sit, the fo rm er in a Ill Ost rema rkable position bu ilt ri g ht an t over th e Fo ru m. An unde rgrollnd passage--th e cryptoportic us-Ied down from the Pa laces to th e Fo ru m and in it Calig ula was murdered wh ile watching some dancing.

The Colossu um of course is most rema rkab le a nd perhaps the most striking relic th a t mod ern Rome possesses. Inside one ca n al most sec the wi ld beasts let out ill l the arena . The latter was o nl y se pa rated by a low palisad e and a broad ditch from the lo west seat s on which sat the Empero r, the Vestal Virgins, an d the Senato rs. T hen tier rises above tier whic h were occup ied by the tho usands of common peopl who regularly asse mbled and co uld easily be accomm odated. The num ero us sta ircases leadi ng to thu var ious stages sti ll remain and the cell s below in whic h the Christians were impriso ned. A day is req uired for th e exped itio n al ong the App ia n way which is said to be the most wond erful drive in the wo rl d. Proceeding a lo ng th e Circus Maxi mus. the Baths of Caracalla a re seen, towering up against the sky. H ere baths were th e g reatest lux ur y possible and th e visitor can see the T epidari ulll Frigidari um an d Caldariu m, th e Emperor o r E mp ress' private baths ; the fl oors of nil these vast spaces are covered with mosaics. At each e nd there is a large gymnasiu ll1 with the Imperial Boxes.

Then passing through the Porta St. Sebastiano one comes upon a stretch f" absolutel y straight road , whic h, without de viati ll g an inch, proceeds right to th e blt l\) Alban Mountains, 16 miles distan t. On e ither side are the tombs of a ncient Ro man" and over th e flat Campag na comes the maj estic aqued uct of Claud ius, carryin g th water over a se ri es o f arches from the Alban hi lls to Rome . The Catacom bs St. Se bastian al ong thi s road a re generally visited, but far mo re interesti ng are lh 08tl under the church of St. Agnlb c. H ere a re many tombs which have never yet b<'t' li opened and thro ugh a cra<.: k the skeleton can be seen inside. flea rin g a li ght d trljl! I down 1..he dark na rrow passages, t he visito r comes to a fam ily chapel o r to th ' ti m (~11

or


THE

CANT UA RIAN.

453

recess for the bod y of a child. Tn one of these we saw a crude woode n doll - its mist.ress had died in the second century. All love rs o f picture s or sc ul pture will find plenty to occ upy th eir attentio n . Of pictures. the mag nifi ce nt coll ec ti o n of the Vati ca n is proba bl \' the best in the wo rl d a n~ contai ns amon gst othe r gems Raphae l's T ra nsfig urati on . Ne xt co mes th e natIOna l collection in th e Vi ll a Borg hese wh ich is reac hed bv th e P incia n Gard ens. th e H yde Park of Rome. an d incl ud es sll ch gems as Rap hae l's' D eposition a nd Tit.ia n's Amor sagro e profano . T he pic ture ga ll ery on th e Capitol and th e Barberini a nd D oria collections all contain ge ms as do ma ny of th e churche::;. Guido R eni 's masterpiece, Mi chael an d the Devil, is to be fo und in th e Ca pu o:hin Church. fam o n::; for its collection of Cap uchin ::;kull s, and on no account oug ht to be missed. M?st noteworthy of all is the Sistine Chapel- the pri v~te Chapel of the Popeson which were employed the most skilled artists of th e t ime . Michelano-e o lo and Raphael, Botticelli and Perugino, are here all represented, the fo nner by his maste rpiece, "The Last Ju dgment." As to Scul pture, the Vatican Gallery, at the back of S1. Pete r's, has a wonderful collection . Many of th e models in O UT 'Parry Library have their o ri ginals th l~re . The Capitol, Villa Borghese. and Museum of th e Baths of Diocletia n, a ll contain treasures a nd o ne must visit them to di scove r to what g rea t subli mity sculptors can attain . Canova's Pauli ne Bo naparte as Venus, the Dying Gladia tor, the Birth of Venu s, a nd the Riga , or two¡ llOrsed chariot, will not easily be fo rgotten. Mic hela ngelo'::; masterpiece, II Moses," will be foun d in the littl e Church of St. Pietro in Vi ncoli. Space for bids a mo re adeq uate desc ription. No me ntion has been made of th e Pantheon, the F orum of Trajan, the Column of Marc lls Aurelius, the castle of 51. Angelo, a nd other wonde rs, for which t he reader is referred to Mari on Crawford's excellent book, " Ave Roma I mmortalis," but if the wr iter has fired the imaginati on of anyone with a desire to vi sit th e most wond e rful treas ure hO llse in th e wo rl d, his object will be accompl ished. No onc can lea ve Ro me without d roppin g a soldo in to th e T re" i Foun tain and prayin g that th e Ge nill s Loci wi ll ensure him a speedy return .


454

Tl-lE

CANTUARIA N.

INDIAN

P.S.-Sincc writing the above I have had the good forllln ~ of meetin g an O.K.S. whom 1 have known well fr om your pages, but till the 28th had not me t in the flesh , na mely, B. C. Covell. I had no idea that he wa s the O. K .S. till h is Ab u ho st ca me up to me under the

"Cricket Tree" (there's one in Abu as there was on th e Be verley ) and said" May I introd uce you to an olel school-fell ow of your!":." Th rm we let loose about Mr. Mason, A. Latter, Rev . L. I-I. Evans,

lHr. Hodgsoll, A. L. Pari s, Col. Trueman and many oth e rs ; and kept it li p till I was sent off into the fie ld. The match was th e great match of the Abu seaso n, Col. Pi nker's team of th ose fro m the Rajputana States. and the rest of Abu. It was a fi ne match, a two -day-wala. Betwee n 3 and 6.30 on the first day 319 runs we re scored, Cove ll hitting up 25 (a single and six bou.Jldaries)-pe rhaps some of YOll reca ll hi s style. I begged him to let me lake hi s wick e t for the

LETTE R.

honour of the School 11lil me ; he preferred the honour of th e School vid him sel f. Anyhow I got the best a na lysis of our bowlers. 4 for 68. On the second day play laste d for S~¡ hours and 564 runs w~re booke d ; n ot so bad, but some boun dancs were rather cheap. The sco res were as foll ows: Rest of Ab u, 25' ; Agency, 366 (Smith '7) ; Rest. IQ6. This left th e Age ncy to get ~2 run s in 2S minutes ~o\'e d id our best, but by vigo rous touch1l1 g cou ld on ly put up 70 (Smi th, 0). Res ll ~l, a draw in Agency's favour. Covell, III the Rest's 2nd innin gs , knocked up ?5. in abo Ul '5 minutes, showing great partIality for my bowling, whi.c h was unkin d.

1 may add that Cove ll is statjo~\ ed at Ajmere, not far from Sirohi, and I Intend to run a n O.K.S. shoot or someth ing fo r h im, Trueman of Erinpezza, a n d myself before long. Yours ever,

J.

H . SM IT H.


THE

CANTUARJAN.

455

CORRESPONDENCE.

N. B. -TIlt Editol's declilU to accept an)' respon.sibilit)1 (onJlected 'lviliz tIle o/Jillious oj 'heir Correspon' dellts. Name alld address IIl11st ai1lJa)'s lit .eivell, /lot nutss(".il)' for pub/iration, but as (J ./!ua,anlee oJ good faith. Personalities 1I)il/ ill1Jo/t1e certain rtjedion. LeI/en should /J( 'lvritlen on olle side of tIle paper 011/;'.

To fil e Ed/lors o/·e

THE CANTUAR I AN ."

D ear Si.rs, I shall be very g rateful if you can spare me space for a lin e to back up th e Boat C lub appeal for new racin g fours . Most o f llS a re not ri c h, but we ca n a ll afford a m ite to thi s dese rving object, and if all se nd as mu ch as they can at o nce, not on ly wi ll it she w the kt!e n interest that we O.K.S. sti ll take in th e old School, bu t will also e nable th e School Boat C lub to star t a new year untrammelled by difficulty. Seeing how the Belgians beat England at H e nl ey, it is o nl y rig lH to e ncourage th e buddin g oa r. Yours, etc.,

To Ilu Edilorso/ "THI<: CANTUAR I.4.N . " Dear Sirs , Might I ask if t he re co ul d not be an improvement in the way c ri cket an d football reports are given in the Canluarialt? Some of late have displaye d total ignorance of tht:! gam e co ncerned Oil the part of th e writer, lO say noth in g of a pi ece of surpri sin g ly bad ta ste on the pan of the re porter in olle o f our rece lll c ri c ket matc hes. Surely it might be arran ge d that t he Ca ptai ns o f Ihe respective teams s houl.d be responsib le for these reports; then we should have mo re o r less t ru stworthy reports a nd no mention of sli c h things as .. co mic t: ri c ket," as appli e d to a mem be r of a Public School 1st XI.

I re main,

O.K.S. CANTAB . [We nrc asked to s tat~ that the cost of Ihc new racing fo urs will he n liule QVC I" £70. Sevcrnl O. K.S. are being asked to receive sulJs~ r iption s , but meanwhile the Captain of the Boat Club and ~lr. Reay will be deligillcd to receive su b· scri ptions and send receipts fo r them- EoD.]

Yours truly,

? [Vuur suggestion is a good olle anti we should be ve r}' glad if in ftlture the Football or Cricket

Ca ptain would entirely underlake the report ing of thei r

resp~cli\'e

malches.- EoD.]


THE

CANTUARIAN.

NOTICES. \~re t~le

beg to acknowledge with thanks receipt of the. following Subscrip-

tiOn s :-

H. E . A. H orn. Esq . (3/6). H. V.

Cobb. Esq. (£ , ).

H. D.

TOWNIi:ND , H Oll.

Sec.

OUR CONTEMPORARIES. The following have bee n received with many thanks :AII~Ylliall, Blue, .Dromsgroman, CarIll1Is((11I, ClIO/mehall, Cuthbert/all, l!.aslbullmiall, St. Edward 's S chool Chrmicle,

G.hrom'cle, /ohl~iall. Lancing College AIagaZtllt, Ll'o(ileuSl(ln, L eys For/nighl!y (2), L ,?,J', L orrelloniall, Olavian, Ouset, Ply_ mouth/a1l, R eplonia71, Shli'burian, TOllbridge Schoolll1agaziue, Vigorlliall .

Epsomiall, Fe/stul/o1l, GlmalmoJld Col/ege

The Editors have been reqll es ted to inse rt that Bank of Montrea l, Montreal. ,

\VANTED: The

Call/uan(l1I, NO.3,

J.

Mackinnon's present addrec;s is th e

Vol. VI. (June, 1903 ) clean and perfect. W. J. Mercer. Margale.

A /I cOll/1'Ilmtiolls / 01' tIlt Udober Plumber should readJ the Ed/tors b)1 Thursda)" Oel. 14th.

Gibbs and Sons, Printe rs. Palace St reet, Ca nt erbury.


-'

TI-fE VOL . VII.

CANTUA RIAN. NOVEMBER.

'Qo9 .

No . '7.

EDITORIAL. ' :Vhen relurns the exeat-goer, pallid with feasting and querulous with revelry, flourishing in one hand his playbills and in the other ~is menus, al~d begins with instant clamourings to demand his Cauluurian; when w1th meek vOice or demure postcard the subscriber, candid friend, ec hoes the same cry; then. it is that pal~ -faced Editors, worn with wea ry watchings, rise in a last effort of despaIr, to cope WIth that flood of ar ticles and r.orresponde nce wh ich hems them in on e very hand . No dramas have we seen, save those fashioned by the fli ckering shadows of our own bemused brains; no feastings have beer;, ours, but for one long protracted debauch fro m. tlte hinde r end of our ow n pen ; to no praise may we look forward, from no censure can we hope to conceal our misprints-but all the while outside the window grows apace the thunder of an unfed multitude. Even as the Free Trader's prediction of the Protectionist's breakfast leaf, and not less the Tariff Reformer's conception of the present fare of the Free Trader, so is our present Cll7ztuan'(l1J of less pretentiolls size than those of last term-diminished, may be, by some invisible and vaporous export. ':Ve bitterly lament that OU T pages must be confined within the inexorable decrees of that Omnipotent Octopus, the Post Office. Unti l the tyrant of its machinations extends the half-penny post, we


THE

CANTUARIAN.

must chafe beneath his ruthless hand: the Muse soars upward, but with a rope on her propeller. Not that this should dete r contributors from contin uin,g to P?ur ,in that lavish stream of dalliance and wit that invariably chokes the burstlllg Echtonal

box. Thus we lead the avicious reader to our principal theme-" the old order changeth." It has been said for so many centuries at the begin n in~ of each, school year. that we bow befo re it, prostrating ourselves when it comes to c1mm the c1uef seat at our feast. Behind it stalk the Mantle and the Pen. whom we may not leave unsung: down upon us drops the Mantle. between our fingers thrusts .itsel~ the ~en, and 10 ! we arc edi tors. Then insidiollsly creep Mantle and Pe~. whIspen ng wmged w~rcls, and praying for mention in this script. No: we are Bntons; more, we are soldIe rs. khaki-cl ad and hayonet-bedight; more still , we are Editors-sternly w.e wave back Pen and IVlantle. But O ld Order still sits trium phant-nor may we entIrely trust to words our th oughts abo ut it. True, a little prickin g grief smarted within us whe~ we saw the ancient places filled by othe rs than we knew and revered of old : tlungs ste pped one step nearer to our selves. Chan ge-and decay? Football is our chie f occupation this term ; that is. when we are free from pens and puttees. Let its praise be sung on other pages by more experienced bards: we confine ourselves to lamenting the loss of the laure ls at Dover-we will beat them some day, let us hope, on our own water (which is no metaphor. this season). Meanwhile, we 5ee all day and every day the indefatigable captain, V. C. Taylor, mustering his forces for the fight, and putting fresh stamina into th eir already si.newy th ews. The Corps needs little comment : it speaks for itself, but less hyperbolIcally than of yore. 'Winte r fare consists of lec tures for Certificate A., and Rifle Drills; though before we finall y reti red into hibernation we und erwent all the rigours of an inspection. The Debati ng Society has swooped a loft into the empyrean of c~:m­ temporary economics, th rough a little reft in the gray storm-cl ouds of scholarsht ps. It was U storm-cl ouds II that reminds us that the School buildings have fortunately escaped the floods that have devastated this ancient city; one room, however, was flooded out-by an irony o f Fate, the H drying room." Ho weve r, we must not anticipate th e res t of the modest contents of this number. Space even prevents us from la unching forth into the usual peroration-that wild morass, jagged with s'plit infinitives. rank with the sludge of mixed metaph ors. glimmering in a creamthi ck fog of hyperbole, and stagnant with the sickly sweetn ess of sentimentality. Such we pass over with pleasure: however much it may appeal to some. There is, thank goodness, only one man besides ourselves that reads the Editorials word for word, with zeal and avidity-and that is Mr. Gibbs.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

459

SPEECH DAY .

Speech Day was this year ce.l e~rated on Tuesday. July 27th, and unfortunately was not favoured by the usual bnlliant weather. The Ho ly Communion Service at 7·45 a.tn. was at~enderl by large numb ers; whi le at the Commemoration Service at 10 a.m. the ChOi r was al most filled. The Anniversary Sermon was preached by the Very Rev. Dr. Mitchinson. D,D., Master of Pe mbroke College, Oxford, who was H ead master from J859 to 1873. At 2 p.m. the Speeches were delivered in the Chapter H ouse, among those present bemg th~ De~n of Cante rbury, the Mayor" the Bishop of Dover, the Archdeacon of Mmdstone, Canol) Stuart and Canon Danks, besides many O.K.S. and

other friends of the School.

The If T ragic English" Speech was re~i ntrodl1 ced and we venture to think it was a decided improvement upon the programme of last ye~r. I.-Scenes from the" Rudens" Labrax (ille slav, dealer) Daemones (mz old man)

Plesidippus (/"s

S01l)

Two Slaves with clubs Am pelisca Palaestra

I f

.

two gtds stolen ~ Labra.:l.·

Scene:

A Templ e o( Venu s.

Piau/us. E. B. Hosking. G. H. Claypole. C. J. Galpin. I D. J. N. Lee. t K. C. McCleland. I E. A. Squire. t F. L. Sideboth.ln. Su ppliants at the Altar.

Two girls have heen sold by a sla,ve.dca lcr ~o a young man. But afi er receiving the purchasemoney, I~e slav.e.dealcr stcals thcm and Salls away wlih them secretly. The ship, however, is wrecked, and the, girls being washed ashore tak~ refuge in a teml>le o( Venus. Hcre, the slave·dealer, who was also savcd, by chan~e finds them; hill Just as hc dmg~ t lem away by (orce the young man's aged (ather enters, ~·l esends. I!ls two slavcs (or clubs nne! posts tllem on guard over the slavc· dealer, while he goes to ~elch IllS so~ , ~ hc slave·dealer,. now left alone, firsl lric!> to get nearer to the girl s bit by bit, but is whlppcd (or IllS pmns, He ~hen tnes to add rcss them , with thc same result. A(ter that he attempts to deJ?:lrl . but the slaves beat hlln back and .k~ep him prisoncr.u ntil their )'oung master appea rs. When he arrlvcs, he sends (or a rope and has the Vilhan bound, who IS then dragged off calling loudly (or help.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

I.-Scenes from the H Frogs" Dionysus (the Got!) Xanthias (llis slavf) AeaCllS (lilt porler) I nn Kee pe r .. Plathane (servant at bm) Maidse rvant to Persephone

.â&#x20AC;˘ Arislopllanes. R. M . Gent. C. J. Galpin. W. J . S. Price. E . B. Nelson . R. W. H . Moline. J. B. Sidebotham.

Scene: The Under-World. Outside the house of Pluto. The God Dionysus, di!'.guiscd as H ercules, descends with a ~Iave to the under-world. After many difficuhies they eventually arrive at the house of Plmo, T}re door IS answered by Aeacus , \~ho thunders at the supposed H ercules and abuses him for his former theft o~ the dog Cerberus. Wh!lc h~ goes to felch torturers the coward Dionysus persuades his slave Xanlluas l,O change costumes With hun. No sooner is the c'hange effected than a maid.servant. rushes in and ~akmg Ih,e slave fo r ~-lercules warmly invites him in on her mistress' behalf. Xanthms accepts and IS follOWing the manl.se,,:ant when Dionysus indignantly demands his costume again. The slave gives it back, but then an m~keeper, whom Hercules had formerly cheated, rushes on. an~ belabours Uionysys. They ch~nge agmn; and Aeacus on his return is unable to find out which IS the real g~, Since both c!alill the honour. Accordingly he tests them by whipping, saying th~t t~e real g?d wJiI not f~el theJ'aln. As .the blows fall, they bot h try to avoid flinchi ng and turn off their cnes of pain .to quotatIOns an exclamatIOns a,bout other things. Now it is soldiers scen in the distance; now n. t~lOrn In the foot; now the .smell of omons. At last, unable to discover the god, Aeacus takes them IIld oors for Pluto t~ (~eelq~ the matter. " Good! II S<.'\ys Dionysus" but I wish you had thought of that before I had my whlppmg.

3.-Scenes from" Le Voyage de M. Perrichon" M. Perrichon Mme. Perrichon . . L e Commandant Mathieu Armand Daniel .. Henriette (Perriclloll'S daug/ller) Majorin Jean (a blliler)

Lahirlu. W. J. S. Price. D . Cowie. C. F . N. Ryan. J . Kettelwell. R . C. Cumberbatch. J . B. Sidebotham. H. Townshend . R. E. Martin.

Scene: M. Perrichon's Garden. M. Perrichon, a Paris coachbui lder, had, during his holi~lay in Switzer1~nd with. his wife and daughter unfortu nn.tcly insulted a n ex¡ major of Zouaves, Matilleu, by correctmg a slight error of orthography made by the latt er in the hotel visitors' book . The inevitable challenge was the result. The duel wus fixed for twelve o'clock, but Perrichon, thinking discretion the better part of valour, l~nd taken good care to warn the police. The same course had been adopted by Madame, who had got wlIld of the affair; and Daniel ana Armand, both suitors for H enriette's I.land, had als\~ tak:n steps to preserve Perr ichon from disaster. Armand indeed had caused the maJo~ to he ~hut 111. Chchy . . Bul when Perrichon had tak en lerwc of his wife and daughter, who show but httle anx}ety or Inte ~est m t.he proceedings, and is about to leave for the lerrain, sudde,n l}' Mathieu appears. fhe ~lusten~g.mnJor SOOI1 terrifies Perrichon into thinking it beller to ap?loglse than to shed b.ioo?-especlally as It IS now 2 p.m., and the police will ha ve left before the prinCipals can reach the duellmg grou nd j and all emls with mutual sat isfact ion-and embraces.


THE

CANTUARIAN .

4.-" Strafford" Act iv., Sc. v. and Act'v., Sc. ii . Charles I. Wentworth, Earl of Strafford John Pym H ollis Balfour, Constable of the Tower Sir Harry Vane .. John Hampden .. 'V'entworth's young Sons Lady Carlisle 1st Scene:

Charles' Palace, Whitehall.

Broumi1'g. J . Kettelwell. E. B. Hosking. R . M. Gent. C. F . Battiscombe. R. C. Cumberbatch . R. E. Martin. R. W. H. Moline. K. C. McCleland. F. L. Goad. H. D. Townend.

I 2nd Scene:

The Tower.

Pym, as Leader of the Commons, persuades Charles to consent to St rafford's attainder and death. St rafford . in the T ower, refu ses to heli eve Charles has deserted him; but, when assured of it, declines an offered chance of escape, wishing to stand by the King. Realizing that he can serve him best by flight he consents to go, but is prevented by an unexpected meeting. [The early friendship between Pym and Strafford on which th is scene depends has little historica l warra.nt, though some probability]. The I talian song is from Rerli's "Bacco," and the melody is by Rev. G. C. E. Ryley, M.A.) Mus. Bac.

The Latin Speech was decidedly thin as regards plot. The three leading characters were obliged to manufacture hum our and the. result was slightly tedious. It requi res a stretch of imagination tQ call the scene comedy. lÂĽe sympathised with the two maid ens; th e attitude of a suppl iant must have been distinctly trying. T he scene from Ari stophanes went with great gusto. Gent was an ideal Dionysus, who always monopolised the situation : a reference of his to the prevalent military mania provoked wild enthusiasm. The other parts were necessarily in the shade, but Nelson had a very good idea of what an inn-keeper should be; his voice was most amusing. It is to be feared that many of the exq uisite jests in the chastisement scene were lost on the majority of th e audience. The French Speech gave one the same impression as the Latin; the re was a want of vitality and the humour had very little edge. The acting also was far too pompous ; H enrielte might have been a maiden aunt. The scene from .. Strafrord was an innovation. \~'e have never seen Browning before in the Chapter H ouse. Mr. Evans is to be warmly congratulated on the result of the experiment. The acti ng throughout reached a standard we have not seen for several years. An air of tragedy enwrapped the wh ole speech, and the song introd uced real pathos. As King Charles, Kettelwell combined dignity with outbursts of restrai ned passion as well as an)' one could wi!-ih. But we have an idea that the r6le of the Merry Monarch would have suited him better. Gent and Hosking both had very heavy parts to fulfil) the latter as pater-familias and imperious royalist) the former as the fervid patriot, sacrificing closest fri endsh ip to save his fatherland. Vt.'e hope the I)


THE

CANTUARIAN.

expe rim ent will be repeated j the tragic English speech was a delightful antidote to the nauseating effects of three foreign co medies. At the conclusion of the speeches the Headmaster gave an acco unt of the school year. He was sure all would join with him in giving a hearty vote of thanks to the Masters who had had chargo of the preparation of the speeches-to Mr. Moxon for the Greek and Latin, to Afr. Bell for the French and to Mr. Evans for the English. He alluded to the very impressive sermon preached by Dr. Mitchinsoll and referred to his spfendid work as Headmaster durin g a crisis in the School's history. During the past year the School has reaped some of the rewards of previous work, both in work and play. After touching on the progress made by music of late years, under the very able teaching of Mr. Godfrey, he went on to speak of the great gymnastic success gained for the School at Aldershot in April by R. lVI. Gent, who secured the first place in the competition. At this point the Dean presented Gent with the cup and the silver medal he had won . Continuing, 1\1r. Galpin said that the most engrossing attraction for the last few months had been their newly formed contingent of the Officers Training Corps. Very great keenness had been shown by all concerned, but above all he wished to thank 1\1r. Bell, the captain of the corps, for the untiring energy and skill which he had put into that work. The Headmaster next all uded to the History of the 5.chool, ff Schola Regia Cantuariensis," written by the Rev. C. E. Woodru ff, an O.K.S. and Mr. Cape, one of the present staff. They had put on record a most valuable and interesting account of the life, curriculum, and methods of the School, throughout its long history. He hoped the book would receive th e success it most certainly deserved. The Headmaster then distributed the prizes adjudged during the past year. After this the Dea n read th ~ list of School Distinctions gained since last Speech Day. He personally congratul ated R. M. Gent,on behalf orthe Governing Body, for his very distinguished services to the School; both in the classRroom and on the playingfields. 'Vith respect to the work of the School he remarked that the annual successes were really becoming a little monotonous, but he was very pleased to notice the one new feature, the Otncers Training Corps. It meant that there was a class of boys in the King's School who had a defi nite place in the scheme for national defe nce. He thought it was a most distin ct advance in our National History to know that in that school, and in every public sc hool in the country. there were a number of boys who realized their duty to their country, and accepted the responsibilities of defending it. H e was very pleased to note a large r view of ed ucation existing at the present day. A school, as Dr. Mitchinson had aptly remarked, a mere thinking shop, or a gym nasium for attaining at.hletic distinction. The great object of a school was to train boys up in those capacities, moral, physical and intellectual which would enable them hereafter to serve their cou ntry. It was evident that, here at any rate, no undue stress was laid on anyone subject; the successes gained at the universities, at 'Voolwich and Sandhurst and at th e great engineering competitions showed a high


THE

CANTUARIAN.

standard of all round excellence whic!> could only have been produced by the high tone pervading the School at large. He wished to thank all the masters for the fine example they set, an~ esp~cially the Head~aste ~ for his able and generous devotion . Last term Mr. Galplll wlth very great IIberahty had provided the Corps with an armoury .. Dr.. ~Vace in concluding wishe.d all a very happy vacation, a nd those going to the Umversities and other spheres of hfe, every possible success. The principal guests were cheered, according to custom, on coming out of the Chapter House ; the Garden Party given subsequently by the Headmaster and Mrs. Galpm on the Green Court was sad ly spoilt by rain.

PRIZES ADJUDGED DURING THE Classics (Milchillson) Mathematics ( Alitc/limon) French ( AfÂŁtchimcJ1I) German (Gr~aves) ... Natural Science (Mitddllsolt ) Greek and Latin ( B)'Qughtoll) English Literatu re (Str~aifeild) Classical Composition ( Dean. Farrar) ... Private Study (Edward Blore) Latin Prose ... Lalin Verse Greek Prose Greek Verse ... .. Geography (Henniker H~aton) English Essays (Henniker H eatolt) Cathedral Annals ( Horsley) ... Natl}ml History (Head Master) Archreo!ogy (Head Alaster) .. . Shorthand (Lady Stuart) ... History, VI. Form (Stanley) ... " Va Form (Smeschal) JO Vb Form (Smeschal) " IVa Form... . .. " IV b Form ...

YEAR 1908- 1909. R. M. Gent. II. Townshend. { ... R. W. H. Moline, i. D. H. Cowie. ... { A. F. Cott rell (prize). ... J. T. Fleming-Sandes. H. Townshend. ." { C. F. N. Ryan (price ) . R. M. Gent. R. M. Gent. { D. J. N. Lee. E. B. Hosk ing. E. B. Hosking. { D. J. N. Lee. E. B. H osking. C. J. Galpin, i. E. B. Hosking. R. M. Gent, i. J. H. Woods. C. J. Galpin, i. ... D. Hussey. C. H . Woodhouse. R. H , Goodsall. G. H. Clay pole. ...

G. H. Claypolc. R. J. N. Norris. G. E. Hargreaves. G. W. A. Todd. E. D. Fishbournc.


THE

CANT UARIAN. F. C. Gentry.

French, IVa to II Ie Forms (Greaves )

... { R. Crowley, ii.

R.

'M athematics, Div. II. ( Han-lsolt) .. Div. III. (Hat'risou) 11 Div. I V. (Harrison)

C. J. Galpin, i. R. J. N. Norris. C. A. West, i . C. W. Kidson. R. J. N. Norris. 1\. E. Carpenter. H. de II. Smith, ii . \\'. H . G. Dunbar. A . J. Partridge. G. A. Tow nend. C. Orpin , A. J. Pnrtridge.

Va and Vb Forms (EI1IJ)IIt ) ... I Va and IVb Forms (Ehu)'II J.. ... I Va Form (Archdeacon of Alaidstone) .. ' I Vb Form (Head /lfos!er) I lIa Form ( Head A1ast,r; lIIb Form ( H ead /lfas!er) IIIc Form ( Head /I'Ia.sler} Lower School (Lady Stuart)

.. " " "

FORM

PR IZES.

VI. Form (Ch ristmas) Va Form (Christmas) " (Midsummer, Gordon) Composit ion (Prose) ". . .. II COIllp?sition (Verse) ... " English E ssay ( Humi!.'cr Healou) Army Class (Christ mas) " (Midsummer) ... ... . .. II Geometrical Drnwing ( Heltlliker Heatoll) Vb Form (Christmas) ... ... ... 1I (Midsummer) ... .. . ,. English Essay ( Henlliker Hea/olt) I Va Form (Christmas) ... ... .. (Midsu mmer) I Vb Form lChristm:u) " (Midsumme r) IlIa Form (C hristmns) " (Midsummer) IIlb F orm (Christmas) )) (Midsummer) IIle Form (Ch ristmas) " ( Midsummer)

LOWER Mathematics (Christ mas)

..

(Midsumme r)

Natu ral Science ( Afi/ehiusolt) H istory

Beardsworth , ii.

A. R. Braddell.

Divinity, VI. Form (Brough/OIl ) II Va F orm (/l'fn. rsha// H-ild).. . .. .. A rmy Class (Archdeacon of Afaidstolle) Vb Form (Marshall Wild)

" "

J.

R. E. C. Smith, i.

C. J. Galpin, i. F. L. Sidebotham , ii. H. ~pence . C. B. Jerram.

J.

C. Pa~e . G. T . Carre. W. S. Barroll. A. F. Cuttrell . C. H. Woodhouse. J. C. Page. A. Seymour. L. C. Sargent, i. A. Seymour. E. J. Gent, ii. \.. Byron . C. E. W. Chapman. . ,. F. C. Gentry. ... A. J. Partridge. ... °v. R. Heywood. E. G. Merrett. ... J. D. Trevitt. C. C. Smythe.

SCH OOL PRIZES. ,..

V. R. Heywood. V. R. Heywood. ... { E. R. Pilgrim (prif,e) . V. R. Heywood. So J. Maiden. ... { A. G. Keyser, ii. (prize) .


THE

CANTUARIAN.

French Dictation ... Geography (HemuRer Hea/oft ) Music ... ... .. Drawing

...

D. Gurney. A. J. Partridge. F. F. Finn. A. J. Partridge. W. G. H inds.

JUNIOR SCHOOL PR IZES. IIa Form (Christmas) " p1idsummer) lIb Form (Christmas) II (Midsummer) lIe Form (Christmas) .. . (M idsummer) I. Form (Ch ristmas) .. (Midsummer) Mathematics (Christmas) " (Midsummer) Divinity ( Hodgson)- . lIa Form lIb Form lIe Form I. Form EnglishlIa F orm lIb Form lIe Form I. Form Drawing D ictation Music ...

...

...

P. S. Barber, iS. W. Galpin. A. G. D. West, ii . T . R. Moore. C. Dale. W. T . Champion. R. V. H. Isacke. W. L. B. Pal mer. P. S . Barber. A. G. D. West, ii.

F. R. Latter, ii. R.

J. V.

Dunbar, ii.

W. G. Fluke, ii. C. Boyle.

R. "B. S. H enning. C. Dale. W. T. Champion. A. W. G. Lambert.

B. W. Galpin, ii. R. W. Brothers. C. H. Clayton.

Anniversary Preacher. M ITCHINSON, D .O. T he L ist of Anni versary Preachers goes back to 171 4 . TH E RIGHT REV. DISHOI'

Exhibitioners. R. i\1. GENT, (Rose) Classical Scholar of Trini ty College, Ox ford . { H . T OWNSHEND, (Rose) Mathematica l Scholar of T rinity College, Cambridge. E. B. NELSON, (Parker Elect) Corpu. Christi College, Cambridge.

The Gilbert Gift. E. B. HOSKING, Classica l Scholar of Wadham College, Oxford.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

The O.K.S. Gift. 'W. A. F . KERRICH, Royal Military Academy, Woolwich,

The Waddington Gift. R. W. H. MOLINE, Mathematical Scholar of Emmanuel College, Cambridge.

Exhibitioners now at the Universities. R. H. G. W. C. A.

H. BRINSLEy-RI CHAR DS, (Rose) Scholar of Hertford Coll f'gc , Oxford . P. V. TOW NENO, (Bunce) Scholar of 81. John's Coll ege, Oxford. }-I. S. PINSENT, (Rose) Maj or Scholar of Trinity College, Cambridge. N. KE~IPE, (Parker) Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. J. N. ADAMS, (Rose) Exhihitioner at St. J ohn's College , Oxford. R . BELLARS, (Slnnh6pe) Exhibi~ i o n er of Pembroke Coll ege, Cambridge.

Scholars. ELided December, 1908. KING'S SCHOLARS . PROIlATJONEH S .

J UNIORS.

C. J. N. Norr is. D. H . G. Northcotc. H. C. Powell. R, ] lIckcs.

E.

J.

Gent. K. C. Lillingston. G. D. '""atkins. C . !-5. Pitlis. P. S. Bnrbc l". ENTRANCE SCHOLARS .

School House. E. J. Gent. C. E. W. Chnpman . E. F. Smart. HOUSE SCHOLAR .

School H ouse. D. F. Kelly.

lIfr. Evans' HOllse.

K. C. Lillingston.

HEYMAN SCHOLAR.

Opm, pro lure vice.

F. C. Gentry.


T HE

CANTUARIAN.

Elec/td · Jui)', ' 909 . KINGS' SOIOLAHS . SENIOKS .

H . D. Townend. C. F. N. Ryan . K. C. McCleland. G. H. Claypole. E. F. Housden .

J UNIOR S.

P ROBATIONE R S.

H . Spe ]~ cc. G. R. Daw bnrn. R. G. Crosse.

R. A. F. Whistler. L. W. H. Best. B. W. Galpin. R. J. i\·lowll. T. H. Keble. G. K. Lawson. D. Cockrern.

ENTRANCE SC HOLARS .

School Home.

R. A. F . W hisll er.

B. G. K ing. L. W. H. Best. HOUS E SCHOLARS.

School House.

D. Cockrem.

J. L. L. Johnston .

Academical and other Distinctions gained during the year 1908-9. R. M. GENT

E. B.

HOSKIN G H. TOWN SHE1\D ... R. \\1. H. MOLINE E. D. NELSON W. A. F. KERIU CH I I. GARDNER 13. 1-1. MATHESON

A. N .

P. C. I-I.

r.

LILLEY.

SNA1I

P . SPARLING

A. de U. HAMILTON \Y. TV.LFER

A. R. T. S.

BELLARS ADAMS

E. A.

GRATY

... Open Classical t;cholnrship, Trin ity College, Oxrord. Open Cbssical Schola rship, Wadham College, Oxford. Open Mathematicn l Scholarship (Minor), Trinity Coll ege,Cambridge. Open i\lathemntica l Scholarship, Emmanuel College, Cambridge. Open Classical Ex hihition , Worcester College, Oxford. 46th Admission int o Royal Militaq' Academy, Woolwich. 51St A(!mission int o Royal 1\filitary Academy, Woolwich. 14th Admission into Royal Military College, Sandburst. 19th Adm ission inlO Royal Military College, Sandh urst. June Adm ission into Royal Military College, Sandhurst . Scholar of Queen's College, Cambridge; 1St Class, Mathematical Tripos (New regu lat ions). ... Scholar of Corpu s Christi College, Cambridge; 2nd Class, (Division 11.), Classical Tripos (july). Scholar of J esus College, Cambridge; 2nd Class, Theological Tripos, Pnrt J I . Classica l Exhibiti on, Pembroke College, Cambridge. B.A., All Soul's Coll ege, Oxford; Ciyi l Service Cadetship, F edera ted 1\'ln ll\)' S tales. Passed 5th for Junior Appointments in Admiralty, &c.


THE P. P. HU5BANOS ..

G. H. BELLA~S

W. R. N. LESLIE

C. M.

i\'IoRRIS

CANTUARIAN .

... 2nd Class H onours, n.Se. (Engineering), London University; Engineering Diplollll'l, Cent ral Technical College. Passed 1St out of Royal Naval College . Oshorne; Mey rick llickcs Exhibition dnrni ng his naval training at D:utmoulh. 23rd Admission intu Royal Military College, Sa ndhursl. ' 50th Admission into Royal l\'Iilit::try College, Sandhurst .

THE

PRECINCTS.

IV.-CHILLE NDEN

CHAMBERS.

As we wander through the Green Court, and our eyes reast themselves 011 Bell Harry T ower, risi ng from the pile of the Cathedral buil dings in all th e pride of its beauty . and majesty. perhaps we may scarcely notice t he long. low-lying house in the south west corner of the Court; more particularly as nea rly half its le ngt h is now obscured by a modern wall runnin g parallel with the Pentise or cove red way which origi nally connected this building with the outer Gateway; but our lack of interest was certainly not shared by the weary Pilgrim of medireval times, wh o, his toilsome journey at last end ed, the goal of his hopes now almost withi n sight, found a rest for his travel-stained feet within the wa ll s of th is "Guesten" H ouse. before, on the morrow, paying his devotions at the sh rine of St. Thomas of Ca nterbury. The history of the quaint old house whi ch stands before us may be divided roughly-eve ry rough ly, for much patching and rebuilding has gone on)- into three periods. When Lanfranc planned and built his Monastery here he placed the Gate Hall which admitted from the outer precincts into the more secl uded parts reserved for the use of the Monks. His Norman arches, with their zigzag ornamentat ion. still stand strong and sturdy, with the Vice, or Slair Turret which led to the uppe r story, and also probably gave access to the Cellarer's Hall. This earlit:!st building. howev er, was almost com pletely concealed by the next addi tion, when in the Fourteenth Century, under Prior Chi llende ll, many alterations were made. Evide ntly there was not room for the lavish hospitali ty, which was one of the first laws of monas ti c ¡life. though this particular building was by no means the only one devoted to its exercise. My Lord Prior himself lodged Pilgri ms of Royal Blood, and Moist Omers, beyo nd the Infirmary Chapel, received those of nob le rank, so that Chillendcn's new accommodation was pro bably provided for those who were of sufficient importance to claim shelter withiu th e IVlonastery itself, and were not obliged, like Chau ce r' s famolls company to seek the hospitality of" mine I-l ost of the Chequers." Thus we find long gucst chambers being added. The whole second fl oo r of lhe house, whic h was at this time ex tended to its present length, was devoted to this


THE

CANTUAR IAN .

purpose; and in order to secure greater space the original seco nd floor of the Gate H~ lI was ruthlessly shorn of its gables and the present timbered front add ed. In thiS war two chamb ers were substituted fo r th e single Nor man one, and we know even _th~ year when the work was fini shed, for the obituary of the Monastery in menttoillng the death of 'William 'ÂĽoghope, Treasurer, in 1397 tells-as of his proudest achievement -that" he builded the chamber called H even," which name, t~gether with that of the tower room-Parad ise-clings yet to the quaint old room, with open roof and painted King Post whi ch is still one of th e principal Guest Chambers in the hO llse. . ~he third period of alteration, in post. Reformation tim es was mainly occupied wIth lll ternal arrangements, converting the monastic buildings into a Prebendal hOllse, adding a staircase, dividing- th e greal dormitories into many smaller rooms and gene rally adaptin g the old to the new state of things. From the southern side. in the space which is now occupied by the Bishop of Dover's garden, but which used to contain kitchen and kitchen court, larders, and rrater or great refectory, we lTIay stand and read the history of the building written 1Il the fabric of its walls. . At the west end Lanfranc's Norman work, with a buttress jutting out towa rd s the k~tchen and a curious arched recess, said by some to be the very chim ney of that kltch~n .. The!, Chil1~nden's flint work, with larders for basement, and the long ~o n11l tones wIth SIOplllg floors, and gabled roofs above; and eastward again t he tImbered and pebble-splashed add itions of post-Reformation times. From the othe r-the north e rn side-for something like five hu ndred years the old house has presented mu ch the same appearance that it does now. with the exce ption of the small tower whi ch breaks th e strai ghtness of its length, and which was added to " make an Oriel for the Great Drawing-room." Alld so it stands in its quiet corner of the quiet Court bearing its silent witness to the hos pitality which welcomed all wh o wou ld visit this ancient City and worship at the shrine wh ich was once its chiefest glory.

CRICKET. KING'S

SCHOOL v . O.K.S.

It was a great pity that this match, the last of the season, should have been so

spoilt by rain. The O.K.S. brought down a strong batting side, and it was a good achievement for th e School to dismiss th cm for no larger score than 145. The first two wickets fell for J 5, but Adams and r¡]uyshe put on 63, wh ich proved to be much


THE

47 0

CANTUARIAN.

the longest stand in thei r inn ings. Wickets fe ll fairly frequentl y after H uyshe had been dismissed by a grand catch on the boun dary by Gordon off Carre. Adams made some good shots in his 4 r and alone seemed really at home ~v ith th e Sch?ol bowl ers, all of whom did well. The fielding was good and Gent's wicket-keepmg faultl ess. The School batting opened wi th Kettelwell a nd Gottwaltz ; the fo rmer was smartly stllmped by Hu)'she, and soon after Martin' s arri val, rain stopped further play. O.K, S. 9 o

O. B. Parsons, c Parsons, b Denne E. T . Gage. b Denne ... C. J. N. Adams, nm out ... 0. F. Huyshe, c Gordon, b Carre ... H. E. M. Prest. sl Gent, b Carre ... R. F. Elwyn, b Denne ... H. Gardne r, c Kettelwell, b Dunlop B. S. Collard, 51 Gent, b D unlop G. F. H owell, c Dunlop, b Carre ... C. M. Sk inner, not out. .. B. H . Matheson, c Cremer, b Denne Extras ...

4'

29 o

'7 '7

20

o 3 o 9

'45

Total

KING'S

Se[-[QO L.

'5

R. L. Gottwaltz, not out H. Parsons R. E . Martin, not out ... A. C. Fluke H. L. Cremer D. V. Dunlop J. Kettelwell, sl Huyshc, b Skinne r R. E. Gordon G. T. Carre L. G. L. Denne R. M . Gent Extras ...

6

Tota l (I wicket)

39

4

BOWLING ANALYSIS :

O.K.S .

Denne Cremer'l Carre Martin Dunlop

9 9 6

0 2 0

5 7

0

5~

4

28 20

3

33

0 0 2


THE

CRICKET Season's record :

CANTUARIAN.

47'

RETROSPECT ,

Matches played,

1 2;

\Von,

2;

1909.

Lost 6 i Drawn, 4¡

Not a fla ttering record ob vi ously. The redeem ing feature was a well-earned victory ove r Ft>lsted, while the fielding all through th e seaso n was good. The chief weak ness, unlik e recent yea rs, was th e batting, in wh ich depa rtment Martin alo ne \vas co nsistent, though Fluke, Cremer and Gottwaltz alJ played some good innings. T he rest began very tamely and never go t over it. There is no doubt, of course, th at the new- born energies of the Corps did to some extent detract from the energies usua lly ap plied to Cricket, though we fancy that in some quarters more blame was laid at that door than was altoge ther justified bv facts. "Ve were, however, struggli ng to put a year's work into a term - a nd that a' sum mer term-so it is not surpri sing that some other interest shou ld have suffered. The bowling was gene rally steady, but the absence of Dunlop during more than the fi rst half of the season was unfortu na te, for his very slow balls are always likely to get wicke ts, and Carre, his substitute, does not keep an accurate enough length. Gent's wi cket-keeplng de serves a word of praise. If onl y he had kept at it fro m . th e time he first cam e to th e School, wh en he showed disti nct promise, he would have been a lmost fi rst class th is year; as it was, he was distinctly good . Martin's batti ng was always good to watch a nd he captained the team with judgment. (Capt.)-Batted consiSlently well. Watches the ball well and has a good free style with plen ty of slrokes, a nd sho wed much greater power than last year. Very good field and er ratic fast bowler. l\1ight develop into a first-class playe r if he gets th e chance. A. C. FLuKE.-Not so consistent as last year. Has a bad habit of playing rather wi ldly at the pitch of balls on th e off. l\'l ust learn to watch th e ball bette r. Good and improved field. D. V . DUNLoF.-Improved both in bowling an d batting , but was only he re for less than hal f the season. 'Wants more life. L. G. L. DENNE.-At times bowled well, but very uncertain in pitch. Poor bat. Improved field . H . PARSoNs.-Very disappointing bu t di stinctl y un lucky bat. Does not play with sufficiently straight bat. Good field. R. E ,

MARTIN


THE

CANTUARIAN .

H. L. H. CREMER .-Promisin g cricketer both as bats man and bowler, and has the advantage of not being at all nervous. Bowls a good length and can last. Has plenty of strokes, watches the ball very fairly a nd plays straight. Good field . R. L. GOTTwALTz.-Improved bat with greater power. T oo fond of getting his legs in fr ont. Should do well with care. Vc ry fair fie ld. R. IV1. GENT.-Kept wi cket remarkably well for a first season. Very quick with his hands. Mig ht perhaps have made a bat if he had ta ken that department of the game more senou sly. G. T, CARRE.-Fair slow bowle r, but bowled too large a pe rcentage of very bad balls, especially very slo w lon g hops. Poor bat. R. E . GORDON .- Disappointi ng as a bat. H as a good eye but s\::!e med to ha ve no con fid ence, and got out either by hitting a t a badly-chosen ball or by playing too tame ly. Good fi eld . J. KETTELWEL L.-Poor bat though keen . Too fo nd of getting in front of his wicket, an d sacrificed effec tiveness to beauty of style. Fair fi eld, but constitutionally slow. 1ST

Name.

R. E. Martin A. C. Fluke H. L. H. Cremer R. L. Gottwaltz D. V. Dunlop R. E. Gord on H . Parso ns R. 1Vl. Ge nt L. G. L. Denn e G. T. Carre J. Keltelwell

Xl.

BAITING Innings.

14 II 1I

12 3 9

D. V. D unlop G. T . Carre L. G. L. Den ne H . L. H. Cremer' R. E. Martin

Highest Score.

3 2 3

93 81 55 35 30 41 26 18 16 10 26

0

II

9 10 9 9 BOWLI NG

Name.

AVERAGES.

Tim(.'s not ont.

"3 , 0 Maidens.

Runs.

42'1

9

169 337 49 1 4'4 380

1'3

Average.

5 13 27 1

46.7

17 b

214 46 91 93 5' 47 40 48

30 ' I

22 18·6 15·3 JI'Z

9·3 7"3 6·7 5"7 S"3

AVERAGES.

Overs.

112

5 10

12 5 ' 2

If

83 ·3

8

J

Rum.

Wickets.

12 18 23 20 16

Average. 14' 1

18·7 2J' 3 21'3

23"7


THE

CANTUARIAN.

473

FOOTBALL .

LIST Date.

OF

Opponents.

FI RST Thursday, Th ursday, T uesday, Sa turday,

1909. October

~ IAT C HE S.

"

SECO N D Thu rsday, :t8th Saturday , II 30th ... Wednesday, Novembe r 17th ..... Thursday , II 25 th ..

Result.

XV.

Mr. A. Latter 's x v.. WyeCollege.. ... .. ............... Epsom College ..... ............... Dover College .... ................... Merchant Taylor's School ......... Mr. H. Poolc's xv ................... Mr. G. B. Cockrcm's xv... ........ rl ythe F.e........................... Leicestcr R c~ im c nt.. .. . .... .. Eastbourne College............ Wye College .. .... ......... ... .... ..... Dove r College.. . ...................

14th .... .. 21 st ..... . 28th ... .. " 30th ... .. W~dnesday, November 3rd ..... . Tuesday, 9th ... ... Thursday, 1 uh .. " . " Saturday, 13 th .... .. Tuesday, 16th .. .. .. T hursday, " 18th .... .. Tuesday, " 23 rd .. .. .. Thursday, .. 25th ..... . Tu esday, December 21 st ... .. O.K.::;. ........... ... ... ...... . 1910. Wednesday, February 2nd ... .. Isle of ThnnCl R. F.C.... ..... ... .. Thursday , 10lh ... . .. Hythe F.C. " !:iaturday, 12th ..... . H ampstead Wandcrers F.C .. 1909· October

Ground.

H ome .......... H ome ...... .... Away ......... .. Away ........... A way .. ........ .. H ome .... ... . ... H ome .. .. ....... lIolne .......... H ome.. .. .... .. H ome.. .... . ... Away ........ . ... H ome .......... . l·lollle ...... .. .. .

\Von .......... .. Won .......... .. Won .......... .. Lo!;l .......... .. Lost ........... . Won ..... .. .... . LOsl ....... .... .. \Von ......... . .. Lost . ... .. .... .. Won ... ... .. . .. \VOIl ....... ... ..

H ome ......... .. H ome H ome .. ..

XV.

T onhridgc School 3rd xv. Dover Collel{c 21ld xv .. Tonhridge Sch oo l 3rd xv .. ....... . D over Collcl{e 2nd xv ... ........ . ..

LOSl ...... .... ... Home ...... .. \Von .. ........ .. Home ...... .. Away .... ... .. Away .. ......... .


THE

474 KING'S

SCHOOL

CANTUARIAN. v.

MR .

LATTER'S

XV.

This, the first match of the season, was pl ay~d on September 14th in almost perfect football weather. The g round, Blore's Piece, was in admirable condition . The School won the toss and good following up by the forward s caused play to settle down in their o ppo nent:;.' twenty-five, and afte r 'rayla r had al most fo rced himself over, Gottwaltz, who is always da ngero us ncar the goal- lin e, scored the first try : Taylor failed to con vert. Immediately a fte r the d rop out th e scratc h side threes look th e ball right do wn the field but C row ley tackl ed hb man well and th e game was soon back at th e IJth er end of the g ro und. and Smith sco red a ftl: r a good run and some quick passing. This time Fluke failed with the kick. After Snatt had spoil t a good chance by being too far up fo r his pass, in qui ck. successio n, Cremer i. and Snatt scored tries, but again both kicks failed. Gottwaltz then made an admirable o pening whi cn onry just failed to lead to a score, but he got o ne himse lf far OLlt i'mmediate ly afterwards and still no goal resulted . The Schoo l kept up the pressure, an d after Cottrell had been pushed into to uch in goal, at leng th a goal was kicked by Fluke fro m a try by Snalt under the goal posts. Mr. Poole's half-way kk k took the game right on to the School goa l-line but ha lf-time arri ved immediately afterwards with the score 2 0 to nil in the School favo ur. The run of the play in the first ha lf had show n that the loose play of the School forward s was too good for the oppos itio n wh o were a bit wea k in de fence beh ind th e sc rum, a nd almost from the start of th e seco nd hal f the School forward s quite overran their oppone nts and the play needs lit tl e desc ription. Tries were sco red in s uccession by 'Farde Jl, Gelsthorpe, Gottwaltz. Cremer. Gott walt7., Taylor, Smi th, Cottrell and Gelsthorpe, the try by Taylor being th e res ult of admirable fo ll owin g up of a kick, by Cottrell and him self. In spite of the large sco re - 5 1 to nil-the School thre es did not play well, th ere being fa r too mu ch)lesitation a bo ut the play ; the forwa rds s ho w promise of developing well.

KING'S

SC HOOL

v. WYE

COLLEGE.

This match. played on Blare's Pi ece, October 21 St, res ul ted in a victory for th e by 2 goals, 5 tri es ( 25 points) to nil. Wye kicked off again st the SUIl and wind and after the ball had been returned into th eir twe nty-five , Gottwaltz got possession from a scrllm and runnin g round the blin d sid e scored in a good pos ition. Taylor converted. A fe w minutes late r the sco re was further in c/"csed by a fine ru sh of th e forwards up the field, .. resulting in a try by FardeJl , the major points bein g a dded by Taylor. The play after th is wa s chi efly confined to the 'Wye twenty-five. where, through some faulty pass ing among th e backs, several good chances of scoring were thrown away. Two more conv erted tri es were however added, and the score at halftime was 16 points in our favour. After the interval, though the Vi/ye forward s Sc~ool


THE

CANTUARIAN.

+75

occasionally broke away, th e play was ,ge ne rally ce ntred in th e \~Tye half and so me good work among the f:)fward s w.as w~tll essed, FI~ke bei.ng especially noticeable out of touch. Gottwalt.z tned the blll~c1 SId e se veral tlllles WI thout mu ch success. th..ollgh he managed to o btall~ two mo~e tnes a nd th e whi stl e blew just after Snatt had got in for th e .Sc~ool: It. Will be n olt~ed t hat o nly the first t\\"o t.ri es were converted, the place-kIckm g III th.l s matcl.} be ing very weak. The forward s clearly won th e ma tch, but they gave th e ImpreSSi o n of not do ing more than see med ahsolutely necessary: we h;:l\~e seen them do better. T ay lo r, Fl uke, Juck e::s a nd Fos ter we re the pick. Th e less saId ~bOlit the three-quarters the bette r : they seemed devo id of all kn o wl edge of how to g ive or take passes . Crp mer mad e an excelle nt in di vidual rlln bu t o therwi se wa.s ve ry faulLy in hi s pass ing. Gottwaltz played well and got fOllr t;ies, the othe rs bell1g sco red by FardelJ, Snatt, Cre mer. Th, School :- .R . C rowl ey (back ) ; A. Il. Cottrell , C. V. Snatt. H . A. K eyse r, I;' de H . Smith (three ¡quartors) ; R. L. Gottwaltz. H. L. H .. Cre me r (halves) : \. C. Tayl or. R. C. C umberbatc h, D. 1-1. Cowie, A. C. Fl uke, R. Juckes, J. W. lVayte, D. O . Fardell, L. L. Foster ( forwa rds).

KING'S

SC HOOL

v.

EPSOM

COLLEGE.

This rn a~ch w~s played in pourin g rai n o n Beckeil ham g round, on October 26th, and resulted In a Wl11 for th e Sc hool by two tri es to one. Th e SChool sta rted o ff with a. ru sh and afte r five minutes' play Gottwalt~ sco red o n the extreme right on the blind Side of the st:rum. Epso m pressed us at tlln es but were unablp. to score till the end of th e first hair. T he forward s practicall y controll ed th e game, the state of the g round preve ntlllg t~w three-quarters fro m ge tting ho ld o f the ball. Our opponents \\-ere stro nge r. certainly faste r than us beh ind the serum; this was shown by th e fact that ground gained b}' our forwards. was los t when the ball got to the Epso m backs. Kcysf!r had a good attempt at droPPlllg. a goal fro m the touch -line but failed by a foot. The n we we re pressert hard for some t~m c and afte r one atte mpt to dro p a goal our o pponents sc?red far out on the left wing. In the second half th e School forward s played ~ mu ch harder game and seve ral Limes pushed th eir opponents off their feet. In the Ime out Juckes and F luke we re co nspicuous. Snatt at this period fought hi s way ~hrou~h several men and scored i thi s try was also not converted. The play remalll ed III our opponents' half of th e g ro und till the end of the game. TI" School :-A. B. Forsyth ( bac k); A. B. Cottrell, H. A. Keyser, C . V. Snatt, H. de H. Smith (three-quarlers) ; R . L . Gollw.ltz, H . L. H . Cremer (halves) ; V. C. Taylor. R. C. Cumberbatch, A. C. Fluke, R. Ju ckes, J. W. Wayte, D. O. Fardell, L. L. Foster, K. V , Dodgson (forward s).


THE KING'S

CANTUARIAN.

SCHOOL

v.

DOVER

COLLEGE.

This match was playt!d at Dover, on Ocwber 30th, and resulted in a win for Dove r College by 17 points to nil. For the first. ten minntes the game was morc or less in the Cp.lllre 01 the field, ne ither side gaining any decided advantage. Soon. however, the Dover lhree~qllarters gOt in mallon, and alter so me good passlllg sco red twice in rapid succession . Forsyth tackled grandly, but. Beardsworth did not attempt to bring down his man. Both kicks failed. After this the School forwards rushed the ball up the tidd, and unul half-time the School were pressing, only being kept out by th e wonderful kicking of the Dover backs, and L,he lIlability of the Sc~o.ol threequarters La gel on the m ove with the ball. At half- tune the score w~ s 6 1111 l~l. favo~r of Dover . At t.h e resumption of play t.he School began well, the lorwards lmmedlat.ely showing their supl::riority, but an ex..:cllcllL 0pp0rLun ity of scoril?g .was lost by K eyser, who did not seem to know when and how to pass. At thiS JU~l. c ture all. unlortunate accident happened which considerably lessened our chances of success. A Dover forward, whom nobody considered it his duty to mark, broke away from a line out, and in attempting La jump Forsyth stun ned him, so Lhat he was unable to lake any lurther part in the game. Cowie thcn went back from the scru m, and although the play was very even, Dover scon::d three Lim e~ before the whistle blew. Their three-quarters showed a marked superiority Over ours, although th e latter, who were quite hopelf;ss in attack, played a good defensive game. The School forwards proved themselves the superior pack, but they did not take a~vantage of th~ s fact to a sufficient extent. forsyth played a good game aL back, and It was very un(ortunate that he was put hors de combal at such a crincal moment of the game. The Sc;'ool :-A. B. Forsyth ( back ) ; A. F. B. Cottrell, C. V. Snatt, 1-1 . A. Keyser, R. E. L. lhmrdswonh (th ree-quarters) j IC L. S;0ttwaltz, E. F. Housden ( halves) ; V. C. Taylor, K C. Cumberbatch, D. 1-1. COIne, A. C. Fluke, R. Jucke" J. W. Wayte, D. O. Fardell, L. L. F oster (forwards). Dover College:- H . M. McWatters ( back ) ; 0. Uixon, 1'. G. Munns, C. J. Macharen, T . L. Mills (three-quarters ) j P. S. Clarke, R. C. ll . Foote (halves) j T. G. .Evall~, G. .i\l. Hradley, IC H. Owen, L. F. Puelma, L. C. Winslow, G. Watson, H. L. Vale nti (forwards ).

KING'S

SCHOOL

v.

MR.

POOLE'S

XV.

This match, delayed from October 19th, was played on November 9th and resulted in a win for the School by 4 goals, 5 tries ( 35 points) to nil. At the start, the forwards played their best, pressing their opponents to such an extent that they were able to score themselves very early in the game; Taylor converted. Cremer was the next to score, all. the extreme left, by running round the


THE

CANTUARIAN.

477

Opposing three-quarter, the kick failin g. Afte r this the forwards let th e ball out more t? the threes an d play settled down near our opponents' twenty-five line, and at haJftllue lh e score had increased to 2/ points. In the second half the game became more even and our opponents were in o ur half of the field a greater part of the tim e. Keyse r, sho wing more go than usual, m~l1age d to get away and pass to Cremer who scored his fourth try, leav ing liS the Winners by 35 - o.

. The day .was. ~ sp lendid .one fo: the three-quarters and they showed distinct Improvement 111 glvlIlg and taklllg thelc passcs on the move. The outsides used Lheir pa~e. well. The halves, Gottwaltz and Ho usde n, combi ned excellently at times, gaming a lot of ground, while the forward s, who we re a far heavier pack than the ?pponents, regularly got possession of the ball in th e se rum, thoug h the v did not let It out enough to the three-quarters. Taylor, who played in his miUal !1ard-working manner, Snatt, Gottwaltz ( 2), and Cremer (4) were the scorers. The Sc;'ool :-A. D. Forsyth ( back); H. L. 1-1. Creme r, H. A. Keyser, C. V. Snatt, R. L. Gottll'a lt., Eo F. Housden (halves ) ; V. C. laylor, D. H. COlI'le, R . Ju cke., J. W. Wayte, D. O. Fardell, L. L. Foster, K. V. Dodgson, P. B. Cottrell (forward s).

!':. M. Gelsthorpe (three-quar.!ers ) ;

K. S.C.

TYPES.

TYPE As we came down the stairs from the Hall , he was standin g by the wall close to the bottom step, and th e big Monitor (now a padre, and Reverend, pace Edd. who ca lled him "Mr. " recently ) was questioning him with the ferocious frown and fierce visage under which he usua lly masked his quest of fun . Upright, perhaps a bit alarmed, stood the small shrimp: small round face, longish neck, ch in somewhat reced ed, hair a straight bunch of bristles, clear blue eyes, freckled face and tilted nose.

1. el Do you seriously mean to state ,; said the big Monitor, in the tones of a cross-exa mining Q.C., .. that you ca n reach that further gas without touching the ground _ .I should say the floor-with with your feet- or shoes-or socks?"

" Yes, sir, I can." This with a little g ulp. " Then do so." Down went hi s hands, up went his feet. Skinny ankles shot out of sagging trouser ends; skinny wrists shot forth


THE

CANTUARIAN.

from tight - stretched leathe r coloured jacket sleeves. The distance was traversed quickly. Pa using as he was unde r th e gas jet. whi ch lighted bed¡goers past Mr. Evans' sil ent and un ca nn y'" door, he threw this question to th e Mon itor and his attendant group. " \lVollld YOli like me to come back

aga in? .. " No; that will duo

Now you may

go to bed." Throwing a quiet and demure little s mil e back at hi s audience. up he skip ped , three steps at a time, with a loud cl icking in his mouth. H e felt he had made a good start. He was popular at o nce. Big boys called him up and made fun out of him: he answ("red seriously <.nd soberly, throwing in a modest ch uckl e no w and again. Little fellows privately a~kcd him to make tamasha for th t: m : and he was not ave rse to doing it, unless lhey began to trad e upon it and to claim undu e fa miliarily. Then he would ~peak ser iously to them. ., I'll jolly we ll clout your hean." Fellows of his own size, at first a bit jealolls 01 hi s rapid SUCCp.ss in gaining notice wh ere th ey ha d so far fai led to reac h it , held aloof, or s poke sarcastically. But as they were treated in return with quietness or coolness, and as their sneers did'nt check Type 1. 's popularity, they soon began to veer round and sought to become his friends . In Preparation Hours, the Monitor vai nly striving to master his D emosthenes and to keep 50 boys in order at the same time, would hear chuckles of laughter

from one corner of the Hall. With severi ty writ large on his prematurely wrinkled brow, his eyes would traverse space like lightning. He always knew in which directio n to look. It was towards the pl ace where th e T ype held his circle of coadj uto rs-four men each lookin g out by lot in Lidd ell and Scott's (smaller emu lsio n) a word o f th e "Frogs"; and each rapidly constructi ng a meaning fo r the line, Type himself un dertaking to keep an eye all the Notes. As his glance fdl on th e group, earnest heads, hand s sc ratchinghair,wrinkled foreheads, mutters of "What the printer's boy does Aristophan es mean? " -nothing could be more inn ocent. If th e Monitor was not a fool, he would remai n gazing at this innocent g roup, Sure enough, Type 1.' s right eyebrow was being cautiously lifted, higher and hi gher. till the tip of the pupil could re flect the Mon itor' s august glance. Monito r leisurely arises: walks slowly ove r to the group, 0> You seem in difficulty?" "Yes, we are,H says Type I. .. Do you generally read your Greek up sid e down?" Type hangs his head g uiltily. His left eye is Will king to his neig hbour to signify that someth ing is showin g. Neig hbour tri es innocen tly to s hove it a way inside his L. and S. Monitor says : "Which word is th o diffi culty? " " That one/' says Typ e. pointing to (tJ,8pW1TOS.

Mouitor takes up the L. and S. und ," suspicion, though Type I. cordially on: 'r8


THE ¡CANTUARIAN. hi s own. Monitor happens to turn to a . page were a quaint ca ricature o f him se lf being collared by an unpopular master in foo tball costume has bee n admirably executed, the faces cut from photos. the bodies depicted in coloured chalks aud quaint attitudes, Monito r co nfi scates it, says nothing, and goes back to hi s Dem osthenes. Type I. was rather g reat at unoffi cial chemi stry: he liked conve rtin g so li ds into gases without unn ecessary de lay: and the more noi se the operatioll caused th e mo re was he pleased. One even in g in Prep., he asked leave to go out: soon return ed and paused by the lower fireplace, As Monitor was deep in L . and S" he dropped something unn oticed into the fire and returned to hi s place and was rapidly absorb ed in Horace-something about" otium." Prese nt!\, an enormOllS ex plosion occurred in th e J!ower fireplace, Monitor went down to count casualties: luckily there were none: but the bette r part of a g lass ink-pot ( Id, sort: no t zd,) with cork well rammed home told its tale. T ype had to "bend over here. 1t This was one of the fe w cases in which T ype L mi sj ud ged hi s man. H e studi ed l\'I onilors, their physiogs, bumps, proclivities and indecisions, better lhan the Latin Verse prize-winner studi es his Grad us ad Parnassum. He knew prett~' well how far he could go with each. The worst was that all of us liked him: he was so straight and owned up at once: life wo ul d not have been half th e pl eas ure that it was to us with out seei ng Type 1.'s perky face and hi s thi n wiry arms and legs roun d every corner, and without

hearing his ch uckles and se rious little jokey stori es. I sai d his ch in was not prominent. So me phy!)iognomists say this is a sign o f weakness of character, They have not st udied Type L If th e re was a lark a nd a dangerous lark to be done, there was no ind ecision about Type 1. H e was in it heart and sou l, and wo ul d sta nd by the co n sequl~l1ces, however painful. I-I e \\'a s an excellent gymn ast, and as le ngthen in g years brought lengthening arms and legs. he became an Octopus like half¡back, who did not hesitate to goat his prey and drag him down. Engaged in many an exploit whi ch had to fall und er the Inquisition, he was loya l to th e cure : never answered more lhan was necessary, and never gave away a friend. Wh e n a certain new arrival disp layed a ge niu s for fire-arm ery, T ype I. became hi s firm partisan and fri end. T ogether th ey vi sited the \Vhitstable Tunn e! sand-pit and trained th emselves unofficially to become worthy mem be rs of th e a,T.C:. (not yet above the horizon) Or skilful assassins. Wh en Monitors said they s me lt powd er, Type r. and hi s friend were the first to hand ove r their illicit \Jnrkcrs- in a most frnnk and ingenlloll s wny : for th ey had no desire to do any thing ull ca nonicai. Next half, off the.y wellt to the sa nd-pit again with th e ir .. second stri ng," Type 1. came from a country parsonage. He was intended, I believe, to beco me a Professo r or Padre, to cullivate Howeve r, me n' s minds and so ul s. T ype r. was not quite so kee n on th~


THE

CANTUARIAN'

idea. He wa s always fonder of a mode of livelihoorl. in which you could see the results with yo ur eyes . To him it was belter to bore a hole in a bulls-eye than to know by what parabole of trajectory it might be accomplished. He wen t out into the world to feed not men's mind s so much as their bodies: in other word s he went Ollt to round up cattle or to grow sheep. Possibly you are to-day eating a bit of a cow that has been rou nded up by our beloved friend-Type I.

ON "UNCANNY."-Mr. Evans is one of my hest fri ends, and I am sure he is dino to yourselves. I cast no aspersion on Mr. Evans by calling his door "uncanny." I 'use the term because the door was so awkwardly placed that YOll could never tell whether i\'lr. Evans could hear your citizen ly conve rsation or not. I trust the door has been abolished or converted. I mean, it is no good fellows going and standing outside in the passage near that door and discussing Browning's Poems or other Phil osophies if Mr. Evans (or his successor) is not in hi s room to hear them.

NOTE

VIRTUTE FUNCTI MORE PATRUM DUCES. R. M. GENT.-King's Scholar; Entered the School, Jan., '904; VI. Form, Sept., 1905; Monitor, Sept., 1907; Captain of School, 1<)08-<); Secretary of Call/llarian, Oct., /<)06; Editor, Sept., 1908 j President of Debating Society, Sept., 1908; Sports' Committee, Sept., 1908 ; 1St. XV., 1<)06- 7-8-Q; Captain of Football, ' <)0<); Captain of Games. '909; 1St XI., 1909 ; Gymnasium Pair, 1908-9; Sports' Colours, 1908 ; Cadet Officer, O.T.C., ' 909; Rose Exhibitioner and Scholar, Trinity College. Oxford. E. B. H OSKING .-King's Scholar; Entered the School, Jan. , 1<)03; VI. Form, Sept., 1<)06; Monitor, Sept, 1907; I-l ouse Monitor, Sept., -<Jqo8 j Cadet Officer, ' 909 j Vice-President, Debating Society, 1907; Scholar of Wad ham College, Oxford. H. TOWNSHHND.-Kjng's Scholar; Entered the School, 1904 j VI. Form, Sept., 1906; Monitor, Se pt., 19°9; Sergeant, O.T.C., 1909; Rose Exhibitioner and Scholar of Trinity College, Cambridge. H. W. K . MOWLL.-King's Scholar; Entered the School. 19°3; VI. Form, Jan., 1907 j Monitor, Jan ., 1908; Secretary of Catl/uaria1J, Sept., '907; Editor, Sept., 1908 ; Secretary, Debating Society, Sept., 1907. R. W. H. MOLINl<.-E ntered the School. Sept., ' 90J: ·VL Form, Sept, '907; Monitor, May, '908; Scho[:u, Emmanuel College, Cambridge, Dec., 1908.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

R. E. MARTIN.-Entered the School, Sept" '905; VI. Form, May, 1<)0<); 1st XL, , <)oi-8-<); 1St XV., , IC)08- 9; Fives' Pair, 1909; Captain of Fives, 1<)0<); Captain of Cricket, [909. J. W. S. PRlcE.-Entered the School. Sept .. 1899; VI. Form, Sept., '907; Monitor, Sept. , 1908; 1St XV., 1908. E. B. NELSoN.-King's Scholar j Entered the School, Se pt., 19°4; VI. Form , jan., 1908 . H. PARsoNs.-King's Scholar; Entered the Sc hool, Sept., '904; VI. Form ., Sept., 1908 j 1st XL, 1907-8-9; 1st XV, ' 907-8-9; Sports' Committee, 1908 . J. KRTTELwELL.-Entered th e School, Sept., ' 904: VI. Form, Sept., 1908: , st Xl., 19°9· L. N. K. O'NEILr..-Entered the School, Sept., 1900; VI. Form, Sept., '908. G. GARIBALDJ.-Entered th e School, May, [904; 1st XV., 1905-Q; Fives' Pair, 1<)09; 1st Boat, 1<)08 - 9; Ca ptain of Boats, Jan., '909; Sport!';' Committee, 1909. D . V. DUNLoP.-Entered the School, Sept., 1<)05 ; L. G . L. DENNE.-Entered th e School, Sept., [904; 1st XL, 1908-9 .

-n.

VALETE. B. C. MOII'II, R. C. G. Hancock. C. H . Woodhouse, P. C. Snatt, A. P. D. Ive)" V. J. Austi n, R. H . Goods.lI, M. A. Chappell, G. E. L. Hargreaves, J. Reeve. A. E. Carpenter, C. IVIaxted. C. H. Crowley, W. 1-1. Dunba r, E . F Smart , E. D. Fishbourne, G. O. Norton, C. H. Houghton, W. H . Sw inford, L. Birks, W. Briggs, A. H. Low.

DEBATING SOCIETY. A j\IIeeting of this Society was held on Thursday, October 28th, at 6.20 p.m., in the Parry Libra ry, when th e motion before the House was: "That Tariff Reform would be more beneficial to the

com munity than the prese nt system of Free Trade," On the whole the Society must be congratulated on a most successful mee ting; th e number of speakers from among


THE

CANTUARIAN.

the· School at large testifies to the great interest whi ch th e debate inspired, yet from an outsider's point of view the speeches were disappointing. Stories of unprofitabl e shoe-makers and provid en t carpenters afC doubtless estimable as ill ustrations of the ,e modus ope randi n of Economic Law; bnt wh en, as the sole excus€ fo r e ngaging th e attention of the House for ten whol e minutes. the story of the cobbler is told without a mention of the E cono mi c Law he illustrates, such a speec h, if not borin g in th e making. is lu dicrons as an argument. Intellect uaily, both sides had far too mu ch respec t for one another; particularly was this so in the case of the Protectionists who, in reverence for their opponents' powers of analytical dissection omitted many telli ng arguments against o ur present F iscal System . The s trom~'es t pica for a policy of Retaliation is the imper ialistic argument, yet thi s was overlooked ill together.

only the benefits of a protective policy had enab led her to meet this enormous taxation. H. n. T oumend, the Vice-President, speakin g against the motion, asked the prev ious s pea ke r whether he had mistaken the subj ec t of his speec h, as his pleasant little resum6 of current European gossip had very little to do with T ariff Reform . H e then showed how an increase in pri ce of raw mate ri a l wo uld ruin our trade and lose us our neutral and foreign markets, but the t:hief te nour of hi s speech lay in attributing absurd statements to hi s opponents, and when th ey rose to justify th emselves, he declared that they were TIot Protectionists. He also gave us the parabl e of the cobbler.

D . j.N.Lee, Tariff Refo rme r, suffered fro m nervousness j he was mu ch heckled by the Oppos ition durin g hi s s peech, but strangely enough seemed more at home in parrying repartee than in reporting economic c1rgullle nts. He was not qu ite sure wh ether some of hi s conclusions were in favour of Protection or of Free Trade, but he was quite certain of hi s st01"Y of th e Scotch carpenter. who. unabl e to suppo rt a family on an English wage, emigrated to America. where he was paid eighty shillings a wee k, and from whence he sent hom e to his wife double his former ea rnin gs ( Canny Mon I).

C. J. Galpill opened the proceedings on behalf of th(': motion with a pleasant ry on the weather. The Opposition were duped, he said , by the spuriolls benefit s of Free Tmdc ; the want of em ployment all over th e co untry at the present time and the squ alor of our g reat c ities we re of themselves the st ron gest a rr. um ents in favour of a ch'lIl ge in Fiscal policy. Eve n Cobden, th e promoter of -th e Free Import system , had so little faith in th e prosperity of the co nditions he had produced, that L. C. Sargent, Free Trader, next when Manchester ga ve him £80,000 in addressed the audience . His speech was gratitude for hi s life's work. he invested so mewhat lacking in argum ent, but most it in Protection ist Ameri ca. Passing to am using a nd wt:1l delivered . At the outthe question of Germany, he pointed out set he objec ted on principle to the that her expenditure 011 a rmam ents is " Protection ist pen of si xty years ago" already double that of Great Britain; w,ith which, th e pr,evious speaker seemed


THE

CANTUARIAN .

to have written his notes. H e drew a pathetic picture of the beach at il"Iuddletown-on-Sea. "There go the Ships" he said and the audience wept-because they were EngJish and not Ger man. With a gesture of his hand he summarily dismissed the remark s of the two previous Tariff Reformers as mere vanity. .D, O. Farddl was soon on his feet to correct the impression created by the previous speaker. He too suffered from nervousness, and, speaking too lo w, failed to give his a rguments tht:ir full force. He pointed out the primary necessity of securing to British Colonies the foocl trade with the Moth er-Country. It is of little use to possess a preponderant Navy if in time of war yo ur enemies can withhold all provender from the men who keep that Navy going. He was the first Tariff Reformer Lo introduce arguments for Tariff Reform.

G. H. Claypqle, Free Trade r, hac! intended to de vote himself solely to the piece meal destruction of every thread bare argument brought forward by the mm'ers, but discovered much to his surprise that he had heard nothin g worth criticizing. Tariff Reform, he .collsidered, entirely contemp lible ; it was started merely as a self-advertisement by Mr. Chamberlain. He disclosed the g rowing support of Free Trade in all protection ist countries and especially in America, and asserted that the modern Tariff Reform movement in England was the result of a panic at the enormous indu strial advance of Germany. C, F. Balliscombe demurely remarked that he was going to voice a few of his

own OpinIOns. He then proceeded to read copious extracts from speeches of eminent politicians. Nevertheless his speech was quite the best for the motion. Germany and France. though at one time F ree Trading countries, had bee n compelled to adopt protection : he quoted Bismarck's words to emphasize German prosperty under the present syste m. He objected also to hi s opponents' argument that British commerce under Free conditions had quadrup led since 1846; so had trade increased betwee n the Stone Age an d the Plantage net times. H e refused to believe the bribe of Economists, a nd deluged the House with statisti cs to prove hi s assertion . C. N. Ryall followed with the best elTort of the evening. The prese nt Fiscal system should not be changed unless there were proofs of the superiority of its substitute. He pointed out that it was mu ch better to concent rate the capital of the country on producing an article whi ch would defy competition, which wou ld sell in all the markets of the world than to spread it over the productions of dive rs kinds of mediocre man ufactures. To prove this he gave a di ssertation on ["renc h bicycle pumps and cameras, remarki ng that th e latter product was a cross between a ca rdboard -box and a mic roscope. Out of Rosy th granite he carved a fine case for o ur present policy and ended by quoting the unanimou s views of economic professo rs, in favour of Free Trade, the only exception being the paid Sec retary of the Tariff Reform League. The Debate was then adjourned till 6,30 on the following evening, and, on its resumption,


THE

CANTUARIAN.

G. C. W. H arker rambled happily for

Kzr/son, also spoke for the Opposition,

five or ten minutes in a labyrinth o f figures and c rea ted g reat amuse ment by ad mi tting th at his knowledge of the subject was ve ry imperfect. He voted

H . Spellct, of the other denomination, apparentl y an ep icure in under-clothing, wou ld s upport a motion which prohibited Peruvian pyjamas , th e bane of Free

G. T. Carr/'s speech mi g ht have been a good one, but he

for Free Trade.

seemed a tri(] e bored

with the wh ole

busin ess. His remarks \y(; rt;: blandly contradicted by G. C. de l11allos (F.T. ) who imagin ed that Co lonial Pre ference would on ly benefit th e few, him self excluded. A . G. Keyser showed that the present preponde ran ce of Imports over Exports was a sign o f prosperity. S. I lI:faidett, D. II. G. N or/llCole, and C. W.

Trad e. lI/r. Cape, in a fe w terse remarks, mentio ned three vital points hitherto omitted by the Opposition . . His speech was greeted with g reat applause.

C.

J. Gatpill

the n closed the Debate.

On a show of hands voti ng was eq ual ( 39 ) and the Presid ent gave his casting vote in favour of Free Trade, which ce rtainly

had had the best of the Debate.

SCHOOL N E WS . We congralulate D. J. N. Lee, G. H. Claypole, J . B. Sidebotham, C. F. Batiscombe, C. L. Nightingal e, on bein g made Monitors thi s term.

.;;.

..

.;,~

T he follo wing were promoted into the Sixth Form a t th e end of las t term :

H. Spence, R. J. N. Norris, C. B. Jerram, D. H ussey, C. W. Kid son, C. K. 1VI0wll, H. A. Lush, R. E. L . Beards worth, E. F . H ousden, D. O. Fardel!.

â&#x20AC;˘...

Officers, escorted us to the Old Park where , after the March Past, Section and Company Commanders displayed their skill in the handling of their respective units . *<--.\ We learnt with regret at the beginnin g of th e term that Sergt.-Major Wi lliamson, who coach~d the Gym . Pair 50 success-

fu lly for Aldershot last year, had retired from the Service.

~

On Thursday, Sept. 30th, the Corps

was officially inspected by Capt. Wright, V.C. The band of lhe 21st Lancers, by ki nd

permission of

the Colonel

and

We

offer

our

congratulations

to

R. Juckes, J. W. Wayte and D . O. Fardell on receivin g thei r I st XV . Colours, also to A, B , Forsyth, E . F. Housden,


T HE

CANTUARIAN.

R. Crowley, K. V. Dodgson. P. B. Cottrell, , 1\1 iss Kempe is the fi rst lady who ha s ever G. A. Townend, T . S. Cave, H. L. H. lectured at the Schoo!. Cremer on

receiving

their

2nd

XV .

Colours. Mr. Godfrey has set to pianoforte On October 15th. Miss Kempe gave

mu sic several of hi s fo lk -songs, give n by th e Choral at rece nt concerts. They are pub lished by Messrs. Wickin s. H e has al so co mposed four ma rc hing-songs, which we hope will im prove the step o f the

us a most interesting lecture on "China," and on November l oth, Canon Venn gave a 'talk' on " the Nile as seen throug h a Kodak." Both lectures were ve ry hea rl ily n~ ceived, the first more especially as

Corps.

THE SCHOOL . C. J. GALPIN. A. C. FLUKE. V. C. TAYLOR. A. C. FLUKE.

Captain Captain of Cricket " Captain of Football • • Captain of Games

"

MONT1'ORS :

C. J . Galpi n, D . H . Cowie, C. N. Ryan, H. D. Townend, R. C. Cumberbatc h, D. J . N. Lee, G. H . Claypole. J. B. Sidebotham, C. F. Battiscombe, C. L. Nighlingale. EDITORS

OF

I' T HE

CANTUAR IAN : "

C. J . Galpin, H. D. Townend, G. H . Claypole. H aN. SECRETARY

01-'

If

TH I~

CANTUARIAN : "

F . L. Sidebotham. SPORTS' COl\IMI1'TEE:

V. C. T aylor, R. C. Cumberbatch, D. H. Cowie, A. C. Fluke, C. J. Galpin, R . L. Gottw,ltz, A. P. B. Coltrell.


THE CANTUARIAN.

FIELD-DA Y

AT

SHORNCLIFFE .

On Tuesday, October 12t h, th e Corp s had its first expe rience of a" Field-Day." \,Ve paraded at 9.15 a. m., in the Mint Yard, and rorm ed a Company 1 1 4 stro ng, but to everybody's regret Capt. Bell was un able to be present owing to ill health. Ha ving march ed to the Station , the entraining was carried out smartly and quietiy. and on arriving at Shorncliffc we wc re drawn up in th e Station Yard along with co ntingents fro m Dover College, St. Lawrence College, Ramsgate. St. Ed mund's School, Maidston e Gramma r School and Sand wich Grammar School. There we were inspected by Gene ral Stuart-\Vortley, in command of the District, a nd then marched off to Dane l'~arm whence the attack was to open . Captain Fisher, of Dover College, was in com mand, a nd we had a Troop of Hussars, two guns of the 23rd Brigade, R.F.A., and a Company of the Leicestershire Regiment. The' march to Dane Farin up Cresar's Camp was 'very hot and was perhaps the most trying part of the whole day. T he .1 idea" was to carry out a reconnaissance in force and seige the Coldham Rifle (north of the "Valiant Sailor," a hostelry well kn own to mem bers of th e Harvey Society). On a rrival at Dane Farm, sco uts reported that the Coldham position was held by the enemy. Ou r Company form ed part of the rese rve, and afte r being held back for some tim e was eve ntua lly lau nched against the ce ntre o f the main position, which, however, was a very st rong one a nd held by some regulars (infa ntry ) with guns. '~Te were sent across a deep open valley at th e foot of the position, whe re the re was no cover and where we we re exposed to an enfil ade fire, and wh en th e Cease Fire so unded th ero could not have been very many of us alive except a portion of No. I. Section who had inadve rten tly been left behind a nd were only just reaching th e firing line. The Officers we re then called up and heard the c ri ticisms of the Gene ral and of the various Regular OfHce rs who had been watching the cou rse of the fight. We do not thi nk we did as badly as' our I I rawness" might have led us to expect. Certainly the Section Commanders seemed to be doing their work well in the matt r


THE CANTUARIAN. of directing and controlling the fire, and were not less efficient than their comrades from other Schools. All the Cadets then had some Battalion Drill under Captain Fisher, our strength enabling us to form two out of the six Co mpanics co ncerned . The return journey was then made and from the Station to the School the Corps did the best piece of marchi ng that they have yet donc, thus bringing an enjoyable day to a satisfactory close.

PENNY READING.

Saturday, October 80th.

7.

CIIORUS .. . "

The Maid of the Fleur de Lys" Sydeu/lalll .

PROGRAMME: "Shall I tell you"

J.

C HORUS

2.

PIANO SOLO

<I

Maypole

E. F. '~'

3 . SONG...

5.

C HORUS

<I

8.

PIANO SOLO ...

C. L.

S1II i(ll.

"Moment Musica l " Reger. NIGHTINGALE.

lIedg(o(/.:.

MR. EVERET'r.

NIGHTI NGA LE.

The Long Day Closes" Sill/ivan .

10.

SONG ... <lOver

the

Sea to Skye"

... Scotcll.

W. G. HI NDS.

RI~A DING

C. F.

6.

Wesle)',

H OUSDRN.

D rake's Dru m"

C. L. 4.

Dance"

BATTlsc9MllE.

I I.

C II ORUS

12.

n UET ...

II

Far

Away"

Lindsay.

PIANO DUET-

5th Symphony, Andante can mota Bee(hovm.

C. J.

GALPI N ANL>

C.

M. N. RYAN.

C.

"Tenor amI Baritone"

L. NIGHTINGALE AND

J.

"Vi/son.

l\L COURTNEY.


+88

THE

CANTUARIAN.

BUNKUM.

I t was a budding journalist gazed with bulging eyes, With startl ed air an d glassy stare And look of fixed surprise. He did not see upon his plate His washer woman's bill ; I-I e did not read II Your sister dead, Your fath er mo rtal ill;" He had not heard his villa-home Was swept away by flood, That swelled the Stom above its banks, And stirred the Medway's mud; His news was not that Winston's cheek H ad su!Tered a rebull', No r that that yo uth had ceased to speak, Though that were shock <::nough . H e read the words that made him dumb ; H e shook in every limb; A ,publisher had read his verse And sent a cheque to him ! \~Th o

P. S.-We beg to Slate we are not responsible for this poem.-Edd.


THE

CANTUARIA N.

HARVEY ¡SOCIETY. There are not quite so many members this year as there are usually, th e numbers only amounting to eighty.one. If we are to judge from thIS, it wo uld appear that interest in entomology, geology and such subj ects is on the wane; no one rises to the occasion to read papers, and consequently no one particularly desires to pay their subscription s. Nlembers should not be unwilling to read papers because they think that the subject has not gene ral interest. It is quite impossible to please some hundred people at once, when talking of a particular hobb)'. For thi s reason papers are in great req uest on varied subjects, for which volunteers are wanted.

Four interestin g lectures have been arranged for this term. The Rev. VI{. Rashleigh has very kindly consented to

O. K. S. We hearti ly congratulate R. M. Gent all being chosen to play in the Oxford

Freshers' match, and as heartily condone with him on being so unfortunate as La brea k his wrist after the first five minutes.

..

oJt. ,yo

111arn"age. - On September

7th, at St. Katharine's, South borne, by the Rev. H . Brooke, assisted by the Rev. J. E .

read a paper on the H Rearing of Lepidoptera." It is some time since anyone outside the School has given a paper, an d it is to be' hoped that t here will be a good attendance. The prog ramm e for this term is appended:Nov. 13.

"Hints on the rearing of Lepidoptem, " R ev. W. RASH LEIGH .

Nov.

"Browning,"

20.

lJec. 4.

C.

J.

L. C. Dec.

G ALPIN.

"The Evolution of th!;! Bird," ...

11.

"N\)rway," F. S.

SARGENT.

PORTER, E SQ.

O.K.S. and anyothe:r friends of the School are warmly invi ted to send papers on any interesting subject j and it will be a great advantage, if they can or care to send slides or specimens, which will be treated with the greatest care, and return ed as soon as possible to thei r owners.

NEWS.

â&#x20AC;˘

Ke lsal and Rev. E. L. A. Hertslet, Captain A. L. Paris, R.E., eldest so n of A. Paris. Esq., of Beeton House, New J\IIilton, to Ge raldine, daughter of the late Captdin G. M. Brooke, R. N., and of Mrs. Gerard Brooke, of Avondale, South borne .

..

% 'if

R. E. Brinsley-Richards has been lransferred fro m a zud Class Assistant


THE

49 0

CANTUARIAN.

Surveyorship in the General Post Office, to a znd Class Clerkship in th e Board of T rade. ~

.

%

The Rev. E. L. A. Hertslet has bee n appointed Resident Chaplain to the Archbishop of Cante rbury. Mr. H ertslet has been for five yea rs Curate at St. Mary, Redclilfe, Bristol, and was formerly Curate at Whitwell, Derbyshire. ';{.-x.* H. Gardner has been play ing foot ball for the Harleq uins and O. 13. Parso ns hockey for Oxford. R. C. J erram lVas last heard of at Vladi vostok, A. R. Dowte n at Sydney.

THE

G. H. S. Pinsent had a perilous adventure on the Matterhorn last holidays, his party being overcome by a snowstorm and having to spe nd the nigh t in th e open. They were finally resc ued by a

search¡ party. This version is authentic.

We congratulate B. H . Matheson on ge tting his colours for Sandhnr~t . H e is now pla)lin g forward . ~

â&#x20AC;˘..

J. 1-1. D . Watson is playing for Edinburgh Academicals on tour; they met:and were beaten by Cambridge.

BOA T

CL UB .

We should like to repeat th e appeal that we made in the last issue fo r subscriptions towards new rac ing fours. The respo nse hitherto has not been great-certain ly nOl suffi cie nt to justi fy us plac ing the order for th e boats. They will take sometime to build, the beginning of the year is a busy ti me for the builders, and 'they shoul d be ready fo r th e begin nin g of the Sllmm er term. The expenditure is of co urse quite excepti onal and far beyond the ordinary inco me of the club. \\'e are obliged th erefore to make this appeal, and especially to those O.K..S. who have been members of the Boat Clu b. Subsc riptions may be sen t to T. S. Nelson, Esq. , U nive rsity College, Oxford, as well as to the President or the Captain of the cl ub.


THE

SPORTS

FUND

CANTUARIAN .

49 1

ACCOUNT,

RECE IPTS. £ s. d. Balance in hand, Sept., 1908... 29 19 5 Boys' Subscriptions- £ s. d. 1st T erm 62 0 0 2nd Term 62 15 0 3rt! Term 64 0 0 - - - 188 15 0 i\'!aste rii' DonlltionsRev. A, J. Galpin . . 5 0 C I 0 0 i\'ir, Rosenherg I 0 :..I r. Goss Mr. Purton . 1 00 8 I 0 Clln(uariall Subscriptions 25 5 6; 12 0 0 Rent for Pasturage (Blore's Piece) Shop Profits 67 9 0 z 0 3 Sale of Ca rds ... I I, 3 Tennis Subscriptions

1908-9. £

s. d.

20

0 0

0 0

010 0 6

6 6

.. 316 9 19 IS

4

EX PENDITU RE.

F()()IballRent of Grounds lI ut for Cull en's Gent ry

6 3

K.C.R.F.U.

,

,

.I

Expenses RUllce (Balls) 7 I CrjrkelRent of Beverley So 0 0 Professionnl nnd Goods 7' 0 0 0 10 6 Insura nce of Professional. Marsh (\\ ork on ground) 3 18 3 Marsh (repa irs) ... 0 6 8 0 Umpire and Scorer (Fares) 3 5 0 10 II E:..:penses of t\hlches I rogbcn (Catering) ... 7 0 6, Cridtel &> F()()IballAusten (Wages and help) .. 36 6 6 16 9 0 Lilley (Rolling) Burton (Traps) 3 '5 0 Rates and Ta:..:es 5 2 I 2 Z 0 Rights·or-Way T ruck for Austen 5 0 0 2 0 0 Austen Sporls, 9 8 Prizes ... ... Murrin (work on ground) I 5 0 C(lIIluariml1 Gihhs (Pri nting) 4 15 3 ilfisrellmu()rts12 9 0 Chambers Gibbs (General Printing) . 3 5 0 2 19 0 A[rlershot E xpenses 200 Tennis Pri1'.es ... I 10 1 Statione ry and Fi ves lh lls (Shop) , 2 0 Gas and Waler Co. Cheque_hooks 0 6 3 o 14 6 Su ndries Total... ... . .. Ralance, Sept., H)09 .

1~

£336 4 5; Examined and found correct: A. T. GALPIN, Oct. nlll, I909.

F.

S.

PORTER, H ()II.

Treasurer.


49 2

THE

CANTUAR IAN.

NOTICES.

\¥e beg to acknowledge with thanks the receipt of the following Subscriptions :-

B. C. Mowll, Esq. ( 3/b), E. C. Li nton, Esq. (3/6), R. C. G. Hancock, Esq. (3/6), R. C. Jerralll, Esq . (3/6) , Rev. E. W. Norris (3/ 6), S. D. Turner. Esq. (4/-), C. H. Murray. Esq. (3/ 6), F. S. Porter, Esq. (3 / 6), G. A. PurtOl), Esq. (3/6), L. N. K. O'Neill. Esq. (3/6), W. N. Goss. Esq. ( 3/6). G. J. F. Rosenberg. Esq. (3/ 6),

H . J. Cape, Esq. (3/6) , M. Ware, Esq. (3/6), E. P. Guest, Esq. (3/ 6), H. Poole, Esq (3/b) , Rev. L. H. Evans (J/ 6), C. W. Bell, Esq. (3/6), B. G. Garibaldi, Esq. (3/6), J. E . Husbands, (3/6), Rev. R. S. Moxo n (7/--), Rev. L. G. Mason U / 6), L. E. Real', Esq. (3/6), Mrs. Walsh (,/6), Rev. Dr. Field (£ 2/ 2), Miss Woodb ridge (3/6), F. T. Emery, Esq . (3/6), H. E. W. Hayes, Esq. (3/6), P. Godfrey, Esq . (7/-)· F. L. SIDEBOT HAi\I, H OIl . Sec.

OUR CONTEMPORARIES.

'Ve beg to ackn owledge the receipt of the foll owing:As/ljorrl/rw , A/I~J'lIi(l1l> Blue, Bmdfield College Chron ic/I'. Brif,;hloll College /}fa,Ro2':lIe, BroJIIsgroviall, ' BUl"1oll, Carlll1lsiall, CIJigwelliall, ClIO/me/ian, D ovorial1 , Easlbourmcl1l. SI. /!.'dward's School ChromCie,

Eliza/Jelhall, Epsomitl1l, Fdsledian, FeileslOU, Glma/moJld College Cltron/cle, Ke!!q College Chroll1C1e, Kl'lIg'S SclJool J1!1agazhu, Lawrenlial1, Laucing Collegt M agaz"ne, L fodit/mim . Lt)'s ForlnightlY, L oretloJlifl1l, Prelerile, Replomim, Shz'rbu1/l'tl1/., 5,'ul/OIl Va/m et ScI1oo/ Aifagazine, J¥yvert1l(w, Illa/Vern laU,

A It conlribltlllmS Jor Ihe nerember fllum ber should nae;" Ilu! Ed,'/ors

Gibbs and Sons, Print ers, Palace Streel, Canterbury.

qy

Decemher ISlh,


THE VOL . VII.

CANTUA RIA N. DECEMBE R,

1909.

No. 18.

EDITORIAL.

How very pleasant it must be to be a Fool i not, that is to say, a born fool, but a Fool by profession, The Jester has a li cense of language which far transcends all the limitations of modern free speech i he may poke fun at Monarchs; he may ridicule Dukes and Bishops i he may deride all the Barons of th e realm-and his head is safe, because he is supposed to have lo~t it long ago. His chainmail is the Motley and his sword a Punchinelto i his to ng ue is his fortu ne, and, were that to cease wagging, his livelihood is go ne, We have all , in our time, envied the Fool; he may, at all events, tell the truth-w hich we may not always; he is not bounded by the laws of tact or the. rules of dipl~macy , He is a monarch without a kingdom,


494

THE

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whose errors and follies only seem to endear him among surrounding nations. This liberty of his makes every man endeavour to copy him . All would take shelter beneath his standard, all would enjoy his privilege of open speech. You may see them any day deriding Dukes and Peers, and even Monarchs. in their Motley, with

the Punchinello of the brandished fist. All honour to them, great Fools! But the contagion does not stop here. It has crept into literature, into art, into politics, into our very homes - we are all amateur Jesters: there arc a very few simple enough and honest enough to be dull. The Land of Fogs and Roast Beef has begotten a plebs of jokers-unhappily, of licensed jokers. Very few people ascend to a real joke: some content themselves with a mere jest; some with only a jibe. Humour in a man is like the sky. it just happens to be. You cannot evolve humour as the tinman evolves a saucepan; you cannot create humour: you have to take humour as it comes, The Confraternity of Humourists is not so universal as we think; membership is hard to win, as in any other artistic society, For 'Wit is an 'Art as much as Music or Painting; it tickles the sixth sense of man, his non-sense-a sense so indefinable, so evanescent that by our very term for it we admit that it baffles description, Anyone can be serious, but it takes a genius to be a wit: for this reason everybody tries to be a wit, and forgets to be serious. There are three great Fools, who have had their Folly thrust upon them. They are compelled to masquerade and go through grotesque antics twice a term: they are the butt of all, whether known by name or not ; they are bound by the iron fetters of the ridiculous. They have to search th rough their weary brains fo r new extravagances and unparalleled contortions, they must be past masters in the art of writing flimsy taradidd les. If the joke proceeds not; if Billiken, whom they invoke, answers not; then comes the wrath and satire of many. because the School Magazine is late. So these poor wights toil away in their dungeon, striving after a muse they can never reach (for by nature all th ree are staid and sober individuals), and seeing Wit and Joy and Pleasure passing by, heedless, outside the bars, Tradition the grayhooded demands humour-Rooseveldt demands lions-whence arc they to come? Failing the wild, turn out the jaded circus beasts, and stand aside from Hercules' line of fire . Habet I he has it! Lion lies prone-ah I what a monster: ah I how brave: ah! what a skin : ah I .. . ... ha 1 ha! Life nowadays is not much more than a laboured practical joke. We, who would be or who must be Fools, journey on our th orny path, along with a vast multitude-¡poor fools.


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+95

3n OOemortam. >1< RALPH THOMAS DENNE.

>1<

We regret to record the death of Mr. R. T. Denne, J.P., of the Grange, L)'dd, who passed away at Folkestone on December Mh, aL the age of 55 years. The dt!ceased was born at Hythe, his falher, the late Mr. Thomas Denne, J.P., D.L., residing at the Dene, Hythe. tIe was educated, first at King's School, Canterbury, and later at Cooper's Hill College. After finishing his ed ucation he went to I ndia where he stayed for '7 years, holding appointments at Shillong and Nagpur. He returned to H)'the in ,894, having broken down in health, and removed later to Lydd, H e was an enth usiastic cricketer. St~~ling in his school days under the tmtIOn of ., Hilly II Goodhew, the old Kent professional, he contin ued his

interest in th e game in India where he made several centuries. He played for the H yth e Club for 36 years, and reckoned the hat trick among other distinctions. He was the heart and soul of the cricket club at Lydd during the last few years of his life. A lefthanded bowler with an easy delivery, he made the ball do a lot 011 a suitable wicket; as a bats man he showed very str~ng defence, with any amount of pauence. Vve quote from Debrett:"The Dennes are stated to have been established in Kent, antecedent to the Conquest. by a Norman-Robert de Dellne-described as the possessor of large e~tates in Sussex and Kent, as well as 111 the Duchy, and â&#x20AC;˘ Pinc(;rna' or Butler to Edward the Confessor,lI

FOOTBALL. K ING'S SCHOOL v. MERCHANT TAYLORS. at Bellingham on Nov. 3rd, and resulted in a win for the home team by 18 POInts to 5 (J goals and I try 10 a goal). The School pressed hard at first and Juckes ,got over from a line out, but the try was not allowed, Our forwards rul ed the game ull the fi~st try was sco red, by Cumberbatch, after a good dash down between the posts. ThIS w~s converted by Juckes. After this the honours were divided in the ~cruml tho~gh 10 the loose our forwards were far superior to their opponents, Agam and .agam we had the, ball out, almost on their line, only for our threes to bun gle theIr passes and allow It to go nght back again. ~layed


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In the second half the home team had the best of matters, though their forwards were still outclassed in the loose. We pressed fairly often; Taylor was held up over th e line and Foster scored from a forward pass. Beardsworth quite lost his head on several occasions; once especially. when he only had to pick up the ball and run five yards to get a try, he preferred to kick it dead over their line . Their backs were heavier and faster than our own, but this is no excuse for the slackness and want of decision which our halves and threes foihowed all through the game. Towards the end the forwards showed signs of tiring after th eir superhuman efforts. all in vain, to atone for the deficiencies behind, with the result that the home side was pressing when the whistle blew. Juckes was the best of a good pack. The School team was as follows :R. Crowl ey (back) ; R. E. L. Beardsworth, H . A. Keyser, C. V. Snatt, H . L. H . Cremer (three-quarters); R. L. Gottwaltz, E. F. Housden (halves); V. C. Taylor, R. C. Cumberbatch, A. C. Finke, R. Juckes, J. W. Wayte, D. O. Fardell, L. L. Foster, P. B. Cottrell (forwa rds).

KING'S SCHOOL v. MR. G. B. COCKREM'S XV. This match was played on Thursday, Nov. I I th, and resulted in a win for th e visitors by 3 goals and 7 tries to niL This scratch Guy's Hospital XV. was, as usual, very strong, especially in th e back division. Vie kicked ofT up the field and for the first few minutes the ball stayed about the centre of the ground , lh!! School pack getting slightly the bette r of their opponents. After a quarter of an hour the visitors opened th e scoring through a mi ~la ke of Keyser' s, but fai led to convert. Almost immediately afterwards Keyser again failed to tackle his man and a goal resulted. Cockrem next scored after a long dribble dow n the field, accompanied by two School threes to whom it did not occur to sit on the ball. After the interval play was again even for some time. the School backs kicki ng well. The Hospital sc rum then got the upper hand, an d owi ng to smart heeli ng, eighteen points were added in a very short time. The School forwards then pulled thcmselves together. and took the game into their opponents' "25," and for t he last few minutes th e ball came out regularly from our side of the sc rum. More than one try would have bee n obtained but for th e complete inability of the backs to make use o f their opportunities. On t he whole the game was far more toughly contested t han the score indicates, owing to the even nature of the forward play, though the balance was slightly in favou r of the home pack. Behind, th e School played for the most part a good defensive ga me, Forsyth especially kicking very well, but at times the tackling failed miserably. Stringer's speed and Roe's wonderful dodging may perhaps account for this. As usual the attacking power of the backs was conspicuous by its


THE

CANTUARIAN.

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absence. Housden occasionally made good openings, but never seemed to know when to pass. Gelsthorpe alone showed any dash or ability to run straight The School team was as follows : . A. B. Forsyth '(back) ; H. L. H . Cremer, H. A. Keyser, C. V. Snatt, A. M. Gel~thorpe (three-quarters); R. L. Gottwaltz, E. F. Housden (halves); V. C. Taylor, K. C. Cumbe rbatch , D. H. Cowie, R. Juckes, J. W. Wayte, D. O. Fardell, L . L. Foster, K. V. Dodgson (forward s). K ING'S SCHOOL v. HYTHE F .C. . This match was played 011 Saturday, Nov. 13th, on Cullen's and resulted in a Wl~l for the School by 1 2 points to 3. The School forwards start~d off in brilliant fas hIOn .and. SOO~l proved the mselves superi or to their opponents, getti ng the ball out, a!ld dn bbh,ng 111 fi~l e st~ l e. Nothing important happened for some time, until, C rem ~r h av~ng on ly Jt1S~ failed to get over the li ne, Juckes scored from the line out. The kick faIled. Noth lflg further happened for about 20 minutes; the School still pressed, but were tl na hle to score owing to th e inability of the three-quarters to play ~ three-.quar.ter ga me. The latte r excelled themselves in missing their passes, ami III passlllg. lIlto the hands of their oppo nents, while they seldom appeared at all dangerous 1ll attack. For once in a way th e ball got out as far as Gelsthorpe, who pass;d to Ke~ser ; .the latt~r not o~ly suc~ee d e d in taking his pass, but also in scoring a tr}. The kIck faIled agaIn, and ImmedIately afterwards it was half-lime. . A~ the resllm~tion o~ play, the School again pressed, but co uld not score for ?- con~ilde ra.ble penod of ttme ; at last, however, a fine rush by the forwards resul ted In a try by f~ylo r. wh o. dribbled over and touched down. Once more the kick fai led. Soon a.ft er thIS a fr~e kick w?-s given for th e School, and Taylor obtained a placed goal WIth a good kI ck. DU~l11g th~ last few minutes of the game the play was more eve n,. a nd .Hythe succeeded In SCO~tng a try from an intercepted pass from Housde n, who lllva!'Iably J.llaced the ball Wi th great accu racy in the hands of an opponent. ~y.the faIled to conve rt. On the whol e th e School forwards played a sound game, \\hlle Forsyth was very safe at back ; but of the three-quarters it can only be said tha t the re was room for improvement. The School team was as follows: A. B. Forsyth (back) ; H. A. Keyser, C: V. Snatt, A. M. Gelsthorpe, H. L. H. Cremer (three-quarters); R. L. Gottwaltz, E. F. Housden (halves) ; V. C. Taylor, D. H . COWie, R. C. Cumberbatch, R . Juckes, J. W. Wayte, D. O. ~'ard e ll, L. L. Foster, K. V. Dodgson (forwards). K I NG'S SCHOOL v. LEICESTER REGIMENT This match was played on Cullen's on Nov. 16th, in half-a-gale: The School lost the toss and kIcked off against the wind, with the result that the ball was blown


THE

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back over the line, and a re-kick made necessary. For a few minutes t here was fairly even play, but then the vi sitors scored and continued to do so at regular intervals till half-time (28-nil). In the second half the School woke up to a certain extent and we manage~ to keep our opponents Qut for a considerable time. but towards the end the wllld dropped. and three more tries were added. each being converted. Perhaps the most remarkable fact of the match was the absolute inability of our backs to profit by tl~e wind in the second half. in spite of the excellent exam ple our opponents gave us \0 the first. The School play before half-time was disgraceful; though the Leicesters were the better team at all points, that is no excuse for the forwards to saunle r abo~t the field, whilst of the <I threes" it can only be said that Byron was worse than hIS fellows. Score 43-nil (7 goals (I dr. ) and 3 tries). The School team was as follows:A. B. F.orsyth (back) ; H. A. Keyser. A. M. Gelsthorpe. G. !lyran. H. L. H. Cremer (three-quarters); R. L. Gottwaltz. R. E. Gordon (halves ) ; V. C. Taylor. R. C. Cumberbatch. D. H . Cowie. A. C. Fluke. R. Juckes. D. O. Fardell. L. L. Foster. K. V. Dodgson (forwards ). KING'S

SCHOOL

v.

EASTBOURNE

COLLEGE .

This match was played on Cullen's on Nov. 18th, It was an excellent though windy day, and the game was very fast and exciting, The School won th~ toss, and played with the wind towards the . 1 pavilion If end. The play was mostly In our half for the first ten minutes, as the School forward s were quite put Ollt by the Eastbourne formatio n, and allowed them to get possession frequently, Eastbourne had several good chances, but their" threes" dropped their passes, and their right centre and wing were incline-d to run too much across. The School defe nce was good, but, with the exception of Gordon and Gelsthorpe, there was far too much hesitation among our backs, th ough they played much better than in previous matches. , It was also gratifying to see a lot of good tackling among th e forwards-partI cularly Taylor-who fell back a nd helped their f< threcs" very well. We had much the heavie r pack, and soo n began to control the serum; on several occasions, too, Juckes and Fluke g'ained ground from th e line-out. Eventually Gordon g<:>t th e ball in their twenty-five, and, wri ggli ng cleve rly through th eir serum, beat theIr defence and ran over. Taylor converted (5-ni l). After this the game became faster; the Eastbourne forward s, though very smart in the open, were over-weighted, with the result that we got the ball wit.h some regularity. The Eastbourne try was the next incident, and followed on one of the best bits of play in th e match , From a scrum on the half~way line one of th eir halves broke clean through, avoided Gelsthorpe. was tackl ed by Fors)¡th. but managed to get rid of the ball. Their extra


THE

CANTUARIAN.

499

back, who was very fast, rushed up 'and taking the ball magnificently inches from the

~,:~und, touched down be~ween the posts, The try was converted, and the Scores e equal., Soon .after thIS the School pressed, and Cremer, running strongly was very nearly III on th,e left fr<:>m a good opening by Gottwaltz, but dropped the b~lI in the last yard , ~hetr capt~1I1 then got kicked in the eye, and just before half-time T ay lor got hurt tn atLemptlIlg to make a mark .

~

After re-starting the heavy School forwards ruled the se rum, though the

#astbo~rne forwards shove? gamely to th e end, and played very smartly in the open.

greate;, pa,rt of thIS half we ~lever looked like scori ng owing to hesitation ?/I or~veth th~ e threes ; fact for a short time about the middle it seemed very doubtful should keep them out, as their left win g and sta nd-off half were very dangero us III

a n ra n strongly on getting the ball. After a good run by one of their backs their ~orwards dribbled ,the ball right over our li,ne, but unfortunately th e man, who to~ched It d,OWll, w~s off~ ~lde, On another occaSI')n there was a certain try for them, but their left wmg. WIth a clear run, knocked Oil tcn yards from th e line. And again the same three made a good run and got clean away, but Gelsthorpe coming across at ~ fin e ,rate, brought off a splendid tackle, It was a tremendous 'struggle till about ve minutes from the end, ane,' then there was a sudden change. From a serum on the left, near the half-way lIne, the ball came right down the line very well to Gelsthorpe, who had ,changed places with Snatt and gone inside. He made splendid use of ,Jus pace and SI I1~ply raced for the line, a nd scored in the corner amidst g reat F~thuslas~. Taylor falle~ to convert from a difficult angle against the wind (8-5) , om n~:m t~ the e,nd, whlch came very soon , the School were right on top, and play en~Irely m thelT twenty~five . Gelsthorpe was nearly in again after a good run an tWIce t,h~ ball was forced over their line on ly to be held up, I n the last minut~ ~everal excltmg scrums took place right on their line, ann from the last of these an I astbourne forward got a nasty kick on the head. There was no further scori ng ' lOwever, and the School won a great game by 8 points to 5.

waJ

The School team was as follows:,

A. B. Forsyth (back) ; A. M. Gelsthorpe, C. V. Snatt. H A Keyser H L H

ner, (three-quarters); R. L. Gott"altz. R. E. Gordon ( h~l v~s); V. ·C. TaYlo." i(eb ' V· DCumberbatch. A. C. Fluke. R. Juckes. J. W. Wayte, D. O. Fardell. L. L. Foster'

I{ .

.

odgson (fo rward s).

KING'S

SCHOOL v. WYE

COLLEGE.

This matc1~ was played at vVye OIl Nov. 23 rd, and resulted in a win for the School by 1,9 pomts to 5 (two goals and three tries to a goal). Once more our forwards proved theIr worth by completely controlling the serum, and alt hough they did not


tHE CANTUARIAN. shove thei r opponents, yet they had the ball out almost every time. For a lon g time the game was very even, but eventually Cowie opened the scoring from a line out. H alf-time was reached with the score 3-nii in our favouT. At the beginning of the second hal f, with the slope of the groun d in their favour, the School "threes" began to use what pace they possessed. Gelsthorpe scored and was foll owed soon afterwards by GOltwaltz. Wye then replied, and onc of their th ree-quarters broke clean through the School backs, not one of whom attempted to tackle him, and scored a try bet ween the posts, which was converted. The score was then 9-5 in our favour, but before the finis h Ge isthorpe and Snatt scored again, an d Taylor and Fluke converted. The final score was 19- 5. The play of the School was very disappoi nting; the forwards played a sound game. but the three-quarters, as usual, dropped thei r passes, and never used th eir pace at all until the second half. Gelsthorpe was, perhaps, the on ly exce ptio n, but even he at times was affl icted with the fonn er complaint. Gottwaltz at half got t he ball away well, and had bad luck with his numerous attempts at a dropped goal.

BRITONS

AWAKE I

Shall we madly cast away this heritage of ours, Shall we smile the smile of pride an d cry to neighbouring powers, "Lo, we are th e Mistress of the mighty restless deep." Then fold our hands for sl umber and bow our heads in slee p? Dreamin g of Drake, or Raleigh, or Nelson of the Nile,And the nations stare in wonder j but build their fleets the wh ile. F riends, have ye heard th e whisper that sweeps from shore to shore? Thei r great dominion crumbles, thei r years of peace are o'er." Men point to Rome and Carthage and th e van ished wealth of Spain, " Such is the fate of E mpires. Kin gdoms must wax and wane." ,j

No time is this my country, to rest in placid ease; Th y flag is feared in many lands and floats on countless seas. Wake! lest thy distant brethren should fail thee at th e last, Oh strive to make the future as glorious as the past!

B.E.M.


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50 1

DEBATING SOCIETY. CONSCRIPTION. A meeting of the Debating Society was held in the Parry Library at 6.30 p.m , on Thursday. Dec. znd. The subject chose n was rather an un fortunate one since the <C patri otic" side naturall" appea led more to the HOllse in generaL The meeting was very lively and successful how ever, a nd Ryan must be particularly complimented on the able way in which he carried out the duties of President. Gal pin being abse nt owing to the stress of work.

M. N. RYa1J

out their inefficiency. OpllllI1g the fact that it was not their fa ult but th eir misfortun e would not save the co un t ryin her hour of need (ap plause). The speaker wisely refrained from harpi ng on the subject of patriotism, statin g th c c¡ollntry's need clearly and well.

G. H. Claypole, vacating the sub-vicepresidenti al chair. replied to the previo us speake r. H eat once struck at the root of th e matter by stating that the Briton coul d ¡not be forced to do anything he did not wish. Britain had so long been up held as the seat of all patriotism, was she now to become her form er antithesis?

Consc ription was a relic of barbarism, indeed King Saul himself had deli cately hinted by means of a cut up bullock that he wished Israelites all to be con scriplionists ! H e closed by saying that as long as England had the largest and best navy, so lon g would she be unneedful of a cce rced army.

R. C. CuftzberbalcJl, speaking for the 1ll0ti011, wished to enlighte n the previous speaker as to the age of conscription. Far fro m being a patriarch it was as yet but an infant in arm s. He then went on to express the dange r with which Russia threatens India. If there were to be trouble in that quarter, India would need all the troops ,vhich England could provide. and then what an opportu nity for the invader ! A good speech but somewhat inaudible.

I

H. Spence began an extremely amusing effort by quoting Lord Kitchener upon th e In diati crisis. thereby allaying th e fcars of his hearers after the alarms of the former speaker. H e then went on to th e subject of the trade of Great Britain . He argued that conscription would ruin the co mmerce of this coun try by taking away men at the time_ when they were most needed. The speaker was inclined to be heckl ed ou the subj ect of Japan and her military system, but was wily in ignoring the g reate r parts of these I comments. D. O. Fardell (Conscriptionist) may well have entrapped the unwary among


THE

502

CANTUARIAN.

his hearers by the many promises he made. England under his system of conscription would be a paradise. He dealt capitally, however, . with th~ main points of the previous speaker's argument, What would be the use of trade to England if there was no England to utilize it?" (applause). H e mentioned that although Russia and Germany are not at present on good terms, they would . hasten to combine against Britain were they given the opportunity. L. C. Sargent, considering that he had nothing to say, was as good as olle could expect. He started by saying th at conscription was an unoiled bicycle; at least that is what we gathered from his remarks. After a heated discussion with a supporte r of the motion, he proceeded to note the inefficiency of officers under a system of conscription. He still seemed to labour under the impression that one Englishman was worth six Germans, and hin ted that his opponents were unpatriotic because they differed from his view. The debate being opened to the audience, after some hesitation , .D. H. G. NortJtcole, supportin g the motion, started with a good poin t about the ine fficiency of the British Army in the Doer '\Tar, bu t then degenerated into the style of a Hyde Park orator. C. B. jerram, also supporting, soliloquised aloud, and though personally f(

we could not understand much, he seemed to have a sheaf of arguments (conclusive ?) . His best argument was that a voluntary system had always failed, and that the cost is increasing in England day by day. G. C. dt Maflos, with touching impartia li ty, wished to know if the matter in hand would be made into a party question .

C. J. Galpill refuted almost every argum ent of the <I Antis." He apologised for not being able to take the chai r (did we hear' No, no? ' ), and th eIl sw un g into R stream of di scussion.

C. TV. K/dso1/. then caught the presi dential eye. Rome at its bes t had no conscripti on. t herefore it was imperative that E ngland should have it-- this see med the draft of his remarks and one or two even seemed to be convinced. C. F. M. N. R)la1l then closed th e Debate : when he finis hed his stirring speec h he had not left a leg for his opposers to stand on. H e pointed out that conscriptionist Germany was bankrupt, as one speaker had menti oned, but then she had been bankrupt for six years withou t appearin g to notice it I The votes we re then tak en, those for the motion numbering 53, those agai nst it, 9.


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K. S. C.

50 3

TYPES .

TYPE II. No judge pronouncing sentence of H e preferred to sit with his back towards death could be more solemn. No rose- the monitor. His straw grew rapidly leaf on snow could show a clearer com- shabby : being conspicuolls, he tried to plexion; no pre-Cam brian mass of rock make himself inconspicuous and like his could be more solid; no express engine fellows. His sad and repentant face at co uld fill th e range of sight in lenoth week's places when he marched out near a nd ' breadth more rapidly; no hydra;li c th e tail was eno ugh to make the Masters press could squeeze a bale of cotton more feel that he was a hard-working and tightly than he would squeeze the hand honest fellow who would climb if he of a friend. could. He came to t he School, big for his age, shy and nervous. He was uncertain of what a public school might be: had heard of bullying. caning and so forth: and. though big. he had not realized th e valu e. of his bigness and strength. He gazed with awe at the pen-in-mouthed Head Monitor sauntering to his study ' he soufrht to hide his awkward bigness b}: slouchin g and by reducing himself to the size of his fellow benchers. His brow was broad: his eyes clear as a hill stream with dark brown depth s below. Through his eyes you could see the red granite rocks of the river bed. He made his little jokes among the little fellows round him. but drew himself up in awe when the Sixth Form swell passed by. Frightened of himself, he stutte red and stammered in Form. Place after place he sunk. for his memories of meanings were not long. In Prep. he worked hard-or as he thought hard-but he was often caught gazing round the room.

You wou ldn't have thought that as Soon as he got round the corner with his pals, he would be ('huckling and laughing over the way the H ead had pulled his bea rd. or the way he had got let off an impot by old " ---ks." He grew: he went up the school steadily and solidly: no one quite knew how- unless it was his sober solemn face and clear guileless eyes that raised his reputation . For he was as solid and real a fe llow as one could ever meet. It was " My father says this: my father does that "-and we who knew his father could foresee what the son would be-a grand man . He was great friends as time went on with a little tiny chap: one extremely clever. It used to be quaint to see Type II. and his diminutive friend walking up Palace Road to Otfredi's. How co uld so huge a fellow be pals with so small a mite? But they were. Huge Type II. stooping his huge broad


THE

CANTUARIAN.

shoulders so as to be as equal to his small friend as possible : small friend walking along erect with easy disdaiI~, arguing and showing Type II. wh ere .Ius theories were wrong: bIg fellow taklllg his chastisement with pleasant little chuckles. He had a keen scent for a true fellow, and also for one wh,o was not quite straight. If you told hIm th at X. was a first-rate chap, he would shake his head wisely and say : "No, I know him better than yo u do. He is not. Take my word: don't tru st him." And usually he was right. Earnestly reli gious, without parading it he would speak soberly a nd quietly to f~llows whom he thought to be treadi ng on dangerous ground: and would silently weep if he couldn't convince them. One of his dearest friends-and wherever he went and may go he will make dear friends-was Type I. Between

them there was always some innocent mischief afoot, Type l. urging the magnification of the mischief into danger. Type II. restraining. hut bent on getting his little joke out of some excitable monitor -or possibly the Chinese master. He expanded into the Cricket XI. of I8q!. Being by nature of too big a build and not quite so active with his arms and hands as a CO llnty wi cket keeper is, co uld any man have done more than he did to make him:sdf efficient? He got his father to train him to it at home : he struck the right positions : his kee n clear eye watched eve ry ball to S(!e how it was going to come: he blocked every ball he could with his chest or arms or legs or so mehow-anythin g so that his School might win th e match. And if they failed, there was no smile or fun to be had from Type II. that evening nor the next. Right good gold :-. Type II ., God bless YO ll .

OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS. On another page will be found a summary of the Accounts of the .Contingent up to October, IQ 09 . A fe~v further items c~n nm~ be adde?, which really belong to a later period in the financIal year, but whIch w.Ill b~ of lIlterest to readers of th e Call1uaria?l. Subscriptions and entrance fees received III respec t of the Summer and Michaelmas Terms amount to over £200. The Outfitter's Account co mes to something like £255, of which £150 has already been paid on account. The Capitation Grant has not yet been rece'ived from the Army Accountant, but as the War Office


THE

CANTUARIAN. ·

SoS

has granted 15/- a head on every Cadet who has completed 30 drills and over during the months from May to September, a considerable sum is still due to us. We have been relieved of the heavy expense of building and e-quipping th e Armonry through the generosity of the Head Master, who has kindly undertaken th e entire cost. The Inspection of th e Conti ngent took place on September 30th, on the Old Park. We acknowledge with many thanks th e kindness of Colonel Kenna, V.C., and Officers of the XXIst (E. of 1.) Lancers, in sending th eir full band to play us to a nd from the ground and past the Inspecting Officer. Captain W. D. WrighI, V.C .. of the General Staff, was the Inspecting Office r, and his report was - Very Fair. Vle have not the least doubt that next year the report will be-Venl Good. The sensible vigour and devoti on which all ranks are putting into th eir work cannot but produce good results. Already since the Inspectio n we have improved' one weakness. The other weaknesses will be taken in turn and co rrected. Drill is all· important, but is not everything. Musketry and scoutin g- less showy acco mplishm ents-must be closely attended to, and smart work in th e fie ld must always be the great object of our training. It is not loo mu ch to say that the War Office and Army ,generally expect great thin gs of the Officers Training Corps, a nd we must see that they are not disappointed . The chief duty of Ihe O.T.C. is to supply Officers for the Special Reserve of Officers (details of which have been given to all the Cadets in the Contingent), and th e Territorial Force. It is to be hoped that a steady stream of Officers may flow from the K.S. Contingent. . On F~iday, December znd, the Archbishop inspected th e Contingent on B1ore's PIece. HIS Grace was received by the Cad ets in line, and the two companies marched past in column and afterwards advanced in review ord e r. A few battalion movements followed, after which th e Cad ets were formed up in three sides of a square and addressed by HIS Grace. wh o co mplimented them on thei r turn out. The band of the R.A.M.C. (T.F.) attended by the kin d permission of Major [·[ enchley. As a ceremonial parade it was most satisfactory.

VIRTUTE FUNCTI MORE PATRUM DUCES. D.

v. DUNLop.-Entered

the School Sept., '905; 1st XI., 1907-9.


THE

506

CANTUARIAN.

SCHOOL NEWS.

We

heartily congratulate

Battiscombe

0 11

F.

On November 15th, Rev. Theodore

being elected to an

C.

Wood gave us a very interesting Natural Hi sto ry Lecture on a "Country Walk."

Open Scholarsh ip of ÂŁ80 for History at Lincoln College, Oxford.

*,," Electric light has now been instaJled

in the School House Studies. Also C. J. Galpin on obtaining an Open Classical Scholarship of ÂŁ80 at S. John's, Oxford.

A. J . Lush was made a School Monitor after half-term.

The following received their I st XV. colours after the Eastbourne Match:R. E. Gordon. L. L. Foster, A. B. Forsyth, A. M. Gelsthorpe. H. A. Keyser, C. V. Snatt, A. F. B. Cottrell. Second XV. colours have been awarded to :- A. H. Crowther, H. de H.

Smith, R. E. L. Beardsworth, G. H. ClaJ'Pole, G. Byron, A. J. Lush. C. L. Nightingale, R. B. Saunderson.

King's Scholars eluted in D ettmber: .1tmiors-R. S. F. Cooper, R. F. Mason""', H . G. Kain"; Prooaliomrs.-W. J. Potts, G. H. Crosse, T . R. Juckes, J . G. L.

Poulter, E. F. Hyde". El1/rana Scholars eleded: L. W. Goldsmith, W. J. Potts, G. B. Pratt, R. 5. F. Cooper, R. V. G. Tasker, A. B. Cowley, A. N. Venning, E. F. Hyde". House Scholars: R. A. Rossborough.

J. G. R. Poulter, P. L. Frampton, A. H. Shalswell. Asterisks denote members of the School.

* .. *

By a regrettable error, A. F . B. Cottrell was omittt!d from the list, ill, our la st number, o f those who had been

promoted into the Vlth Form.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

PENNY READING. Saturday, November 27th.

I.

GLEE ... " Come, let us join"

2.

SONG

... " Nancy Lee"

J. 3·

PIANO SOLO

GLEE ...

PIANO SOLO

II

C.

Flea/e.

8.

GI.EE..

Adams,

PIANO SOLO Woodland

10.

0 hills, 0 vales"

C. L. II.

"Aufschung"

Selmmamt.

L. NIGHTJ NGAI.E.

RECITATION

O. K. S. Kennedy-Horsley.

SONGS (Trebles)

"M}' Love's an Arbutus" ... Irish. "There is nae luck about the hOllse" Scolel,.

REV. L. H. EVANS.

On Thursday,

December 2nd, at St. Stephen's Parish Church, Canterbury, Lieut. l\'Ii chael C.

Kennedy, R.N., to Alice, dau ghter of W. H. Horsley, Esq., the Lodge, 51. Stephen's.

PIANO SOLO

NIGHTINGALE.

C. F. M. N. RYAN. 12.

6.

II

MARCHING SONG

Afende/ssohu .

L.o. W. NO.4 . .. . Afendelssohn .

Barnu),.

Sketches E.lJ1cDo'Well. At a Trysting Place " " To a Wild Rose" W. C. F, PALJ.lSRR,

L.o. W. No. 27 .. Afendelsso}m, SMITH.

"Sweet and Low"

NO.3. No. I.

M. COURl'NKY.

R. C. 4·

PIANO DUET Symphony, B minor, Allegro

Sell1Ihert. C. F. IH. N. RYA N and MR. GODFRRY.

PROGRAM ME.

"•~

The Dean and Chapter of Rochester have appointed the Rev. R. F. Elwyn, Housemaster at Felsted School and son

NEWS. of the late Canon Elwyn, form erly Master of Charterhollse, to be Headmaster of

Rochester Cathedral King's School.

At the combined Sports' Meeting of

St. Catherin e's College and Magdal ene College on December 3rd, C. G. Williamson won four events, 100 yard s ( lIt sees.), Putting the Weight (28' 3"),


THE

508

CANTUARIAN.

Throwi ng the Hammer (49' 7"), and High Ju mp (5 ' ot"), and was se.cond in the Quarter Mi le.

•••

H. Gardner was unfortunately prevented by an injury from playing for \Voolwi ch agai nst Sand hurst.

••• The Ann ual O.K.S. Dinner will be held at the Monico Re iitaurant. Pic!.:adilly Circus, on \Vednesday, January 19th, '910, al7 . 15 p.m. The Rev. R. F. Elwyn ( H eadmaster-

OXFORD Dear School. Aroused from sleep one morning we fOllnd the E ditorial mandate awaitin g us tor an O. K. S. letter. That relentless "Sword and Pen" (or was it Pen and Sword ?) had pursued us and sto rme d our peaceful retreat, fa r from Oxfor d's maddening crowd . and as we read, we were re minded of that famous line, so feelin gly declaimed in th e Chapte r House a few Speech Days ago. "Come, come, despat ch ! 'Tis bootless to exclaim/'

and groa ni ng inwardly, we resigned ourselves to fate. But let us fi rst complain of the unparallelled la teness of the last "Can tuarian" and of the omission therein of any noti ce about th e O.K .S. XV. and Captain, which makes a hard task fa r

Elect of King's School, Rochester), has kindly conse nted to take the Chair. It is hoped that a rrangem ents may be made whereby O.1<.S. who live at a distance from London may receive hospitality at the hands of those who live in or near London. Any who intend to be present, and any wh o are prepared to put up one or more O.K.S., or wish to receive hospitality, are requested to wri te as soon as possible to B. H. Latter. Esq .. Pixfield, Bromley. Kent. N a ti ckets are issued, but the sum of 7j- each will be collected from th ose present at th e Dinner.

LETTER . harde r. Great it seems is the loss of that versatil e editor, the writer of " I taly through a microscope," and sundry other essays. But in a nswer to the editorial command we mu st strive to give some accou nt of the doin gs cf O.K.S. this term, a task whi ch increases in diffi culty, year by year, as our numbers g row larger. Some indeed we have only seen at O.K..S. Meetings, or perhaps, not even the re, an d of th em we can give news only by hearsay. Spafford ha s 10ft us after a long sojourn up here, and we have also lost E. A. Roper, BLlc1c1, and Strahan. who have all " pulled up the deeply rooted anchor and sailedout!into the great unknown (sk )." But in addition to those recruits, who came up direct from


THE

CANTUARIAN.

the School, we discovered among th e Freshmen. D. K. S. Grant (Non. Coll. ). ¡ F. R Matthews (St. John's). a nd B. Wrigh t (Oriel), 0.1<.5. of longer standing. Of our fourth year patriarch s. Brinsley-Richards watch es over our morals and has un limited meetings to attend and other engagements to keep. At the Union he combats in vi gorous terms Socialism and the Budget . Townend is a shining li ght at St. J oh n's, and is a frequ ent source of disord er at O.K.S. Meetings. He al so teac hes Frp.shers how to row. Illness, alas 1 removed Dibben from our midst and after a few weeks he retired to recruit. MacJear played his ann ual game of Rugger at the beginning of term, but after that retired to the touch-li ne as a spectator. We hear that Bax has developed into a great singe r and delights his friends with char ming ditties, but O.K.S. are not musical enough for his taste. Scott lives like a lord in princely " digs," and min gles medicine with philosophy. Golf is his pasti me. "Vinser's slim figure can be seen one day trippi ng along the towpath, and on a nother leadin g the Corpus serum with his wonted \'igour. We enjoyed a most successful 0 K. S. Meeting in A. B . Emden's rooms, but si nce then the Anthropological Society and other societies with long names have filled up his time. His brother, C. 5 .â&#x20AC;˘ is a great rowing critic at Trinity. Of th e Keble contingent, O. B. :parsons has won great fame in the Varsity hockey team, and according to the sporting critics he is "versatility itself." Burdett finds recreation from Theology in a varied round of games. Horn

50 9

returned to Oxford this te rm like fC a giant refreshed" after his long rest and is sairl to be quite one of the elite of Keble, while we are told on good authority that Barber has tak en up his abode for good on the College Barge, to which all letters shou ld be addressed. Baker leads a retired life 50 that we have seen him but littl e, and of Roper we have no certai n news. St.. J olm's boasts the largest number of O.K.S .. eight in a ll, and of th ese we have al ready me ntioned Townend and MacJear, but of the rest, Smith could be seen on most aftern oons of the term running off his superfluous fat on the Iffley ground, and Aylward is a pillar of strength in the XV. He al so rOlVed for one afternoon, but thinking that he had to slide himself, as the seat was fixed, he did so and for th e next felV days sat down "very delicately." Adams plays vigorously for a ll the College " A" Teams and tri es to reconcile Kettel well and Parsons after occasional quarrels. For the most. part they live together in peace and unity; J. K. comforts himself with golf and the theatre, and Parsons plays both hockey and rugger, and has at last decided to take up arms in defence of his country. Matthews is a great ornament to t he College. Simeon does his best to save the Tri nity Team from defeat by his ferocious forward play, but from their unusual numbe r of failures the XV. clearly arc in need of Gent's brilli ance. T he last named, after winning fame by his dramatic exit from the Fresher's Match, has un fo rtu nate ly been kept there by from increasing his reputatio n, but we hope he will have better lo ck next te rm. H owell , our other disti nguished three-quarter, returned fo r the brief space of an afternoon


5 10

THE

CANTUARIAN.

to the scene of his old trium phs. the Rugger field, and it is rumoured that the Selection Committee. after seeing him play, regretted that the Oxford T eam was filled up. Nelson plays golf and studies med icine. At Exeter, the Rowing Club and Rugger XV. fight for the employment of Abbott's precious lime. H e rowed for a few days in the trial eights. 'Webste r, also of E xeter. devotes some of his spare time to Reagli ng and some to Th eology, and O'Neill, we believe. lives a blameless life. Tho Hertford XV. fi nds Yates' help in th e se rum in dispensab le and have awarded him his colours, and the a.K.S. th ink his secretarial energy unequalled. H oski ng, in spite of sundry a:r.c. certificates, has not yet been made a Major-General. but to make up for this he once played win g three -quarter for the Wad ham .. A 11 Team with great success. We have not been honoured with the sight of Channing Pearce or \ÂĽright, and fear to

fabricate any doings of theirs. Chave has been und er Doctor's orders all the term, but we must congratulate him on being ordered by that a uthori ty to give up Hon . :Mods. .. 'Tis a consummation devoutly to be wished for." D. K. S. Grant is hard at work with unlimited lectures on Forestry and kindred subjects. We a re very so rry that most of us co uld not stay up in Oxrord to entertain the Scholarship hunters and sustain them in their struggle, but we hope they manfl.ged to survive. During the tp,nn we re ceived visits from 'Wa rdell, who was about to sail for India. from J. H . D. \ÂĽatson. who came down with the Academical XV., and from Mr. and Mrs. Varley. We are glad to hear better news .of Mrs. Galpin and hope to find her qmte recovered when we appear at the end of term, Yo urs ever, O.K.S. OXON.

CAMBRIDGE DE AR SCHOOL,

T alking about flyin g machines (N.B. one must begin somehow) we had a flyin g visit from T elfe r not l?ng ago. \,ye werc veri' pleased to see lum ; he being one of t lose co mfortable souls whom Time does not alter, and wh o must have looked the same even in the c radl e. He, H. A. J enkin , a nd \\'atkins have go ne down with th eir respective halos and left us to our ow n devices.

LETTER . So F . M. Deighton is now our senior member. He is tcach ing the CI Parrots" of Cambridge, besides taking the Geography diploma an d is therefore pretty busy, but who wo uld mind with India in view ? May the gods be kind to Dickso n who is even now trying to persuade the Examiners that he knows enoug h to pass the 2nd M.B. R. T. Jenkin is tack ling the ,. Stinks" Trip and in his spare time


THE

CANTUARIA N.

tours the neighbouring villages playing ho ckey, presumably mixed. but we haven't enquired. The Co rpu s people have not yet dedded whether they have lost a shilling and found eighteen pence or Vice versa . Anyhow 'Watkins has gone, and Nelso n has arri ved, a nd we hope he will foll ow in the form t: r' s footsteps and always be seen in th e Corpus eight. Kempe and Gage represent the same place in most of the otht:r lines of at hletics : the fo rmer held a very sllccessful O.K.S. meetin g this te rm. 'Williamson adds to the joy of nations at Magdale ne; besides he makes the ave rage weight of their serum sound 5 0 impressive. In addition to being H on. Sec. of thei r R ugger and Sports, he organised an excellent II smoker" with a home-made band. We e njoyed it very mu ch especially as fugues by Bach and other weary compositions of the ultra-classical kind were not on the programme. Incidentally the band contained another O.K.S. in K. G. Thomas of Pete rh ouse.

INDIAN I may as well tell yo u what I knowthough its not much. The co nte mps of the heroes mentioned will be glad to kn ow of the co ntinued existence of the said heroes. First, then, there is G. F. Paget of the greatest Calcutta Banki ng and Agency Firm. H e is ever flying

5 11

Bellars we met on the platform as he was going down; wh ile Moline, who has come up to Emmanuel. may often be seen shewing lad ies the beauties of the town. Todd. burdened by "Labs," has dese rted the river for boxing, which takes up less tim e. Sparling and the two Mow lls we have not seen, and T ownshend only in Chapel, but we hear he is rowing. The Scholarship people have come and gone, and , we si nce rely hope, have conquered : we wish them the best of luck, though by the time this comes out they wi ll know the results. The Varsity match we kn ew was a forego ne conclusion . but never in our most pessimistic moods had we expected anyt hing quite 50 bad. We must hope to turn the tables next year. Yours eve r, O.K.S. CANTAB.

LETTER. through India Broad and India Long; holds unorthodox views as to the benefits conferred by railways. Laid up with jaundice or fever as the cffect of overloco motion, he was se nt off up the Irrawaddy in Burmah to recuperate. The Irrawaddy was a garden of Eden, and sent


Sl2

THE

CANTUARIAN.

him back to grind agai n in Calcutta, remodelled. H e is keen on hunting up Covell at Aj mer. who has been too busy in building rai lway carriages for Paget's use, to send any self-advertisement for the Cantuarian . Secondly. the re is J. E. Husbands, C.S., Assistant Collector in Baoora, near Bombay. It was he who was for shooting panthers in yo ur penultimate number : but he forgot to sign hi s name. '¥onde rful how forgetful of one's name a bit of bad luck makes one. H e writes to ask if I will assist in running an a.K.S. dinner. He has bee n to Poena for the Civil St!rvice Week, wh ich is a great and solemn event (See Latin Dictionary for sense of solemn). a nd was appan~ntly great on the toes there. a thi ng I personally could neve r manage. I prefe r the brid ge table whil e the dancing is going on . H e tells me of F. M. Gadney, wh o is (Pm not sure of the nobl e services titles) A~sistant Deputy Inspecto r General of Police, Bombay; and in a short spp.ll of I 0 y~ars will, a ll bei ng we ll, be a great 1l.l.G. Itself. He (H usbands) sings too of arms. A. R. Humphry, of the Northampton Regiment, was met: the latter suggested the O.K.S. feed. In Bombay, is E. H. Curli ng of the great Agency kn ow n as Cox's, wh o would willi ngly manage th e finan cial side of the proposed show (Liability Limi ted , I presum e). H. N. S. Husbands is joini ng Akola in Berar to Hingoli, in Hyderabad, by a rail way. Bad luck for Paget that Covell an d Husbands-and perh aps still G. R. Stuart, ].]. Inglis and F . R. Hawkesare all e ngaged in paving his road to bed (and the Irrawaddy).

Thus far J. E. Husband's notes. Now for .I.H.S.'s comm entary. I have had to tell J.E.H. that I can't be at a ll su re of bei ng able to participate -bodily: and I take it ] .E.H.'s proposed feast was one for the body. My movements are somew hat tied. I have sent him the list of those O.K.S. who are comparatively near to Bombay, ,·.t., within 800 miles. as far as I can recall them : but I ha ve misl aid my list, and Paris has my du pl icate list and he is still I believe with YO ll . Perso nally I thi nk a feed is too brief a spell for the expense of coin and time: and I have suggested an Xmas week out shooting. which I myself shall be glad to organize in Cutch if the Fates allow me to return there. It is a grand place for duck shooting, and a 1 0 days under canvas at that time of year is delightful, but I fear it canlt be done this Xmas. Rid ing along an old grass-grown military road a few days ago, I caught sight of what looked like a hare jumping about in a bush close to the road . Thillking it odd that a hare should be a musing himself whil e a man passed. I tll mod back. I saw a black cobra's head sticking out fro m the top of the bush, hood erect. H e was hissi ng and darting at the hare ·like object, which proved to be a mongoose-a very long and big brownish ferret with lon g bushy tai l. The mongoose is the sworn foc of the snake. The cobra had been apparentl y way-laying a bird: for a dilapidated 7-sister was hopping from twig to twig, not watc hing the combat, yet unable or unwilling to flyaway. The cobra was lying in waves across the twigs


THE

CANTUARIAN.

on the further side of th e bush: the ' place, I rod e along a foot- track by its mongoose wa.s. sp rin ~in g up from under- ~ Ide, amon g so me ~parse ~ushes. Passing neath and bitIng h1m. Each time the one bush, I had an Imp reSSIOn of a noise or mongoose sprang the cobra hissed and moveme nt :. I can't say whi ch. "Snake" darted. suggested ltself: so I turned my head. Sure enough: -:a sowar ri ding close be. Af~er I had seen abo ut a minute's play hll1d me (l uckily we were going pretty hke thIS ( I was standing quite close). the fast) had a great thick black cobra's head mongoose turned and ran off into the 10nO' close t? his foot, hood extended wide. grass. I thought he had eit her seen m~ I could nt see whether the snake bit the or had gOI the worst of the battle. Slowly horse or not: and have not since found the snake lowered Its hood and slid down out. Then we were on ly 100 yards from off the bush i.nto the grass, away from the the spot wh ere fresh horses were waiting. mongoose's hne of retreat. H e had gone and the horses have not yet been brouo-ht only a yard when the long grass shook: in from the last stage. For all I knoow out came the mongoose. and sat for the cob ra may have had a shot at my three seconds : cobra lay still with head horse too, but I hardly expect this. for up but hood closed. Then like a flash of when I turn ed, the sna ke was coiled on ~l ghtnlIlg the mongo?se ~pral1g. nipped the path, and he had not been so when Its head and dragged It offmto the jungle. I. approached . It was the thickn ess and Ju gglers sometimes show a fiO'ht SIZt;: of the beast that struck me most: he bet ween a mongoose and sna ke-but ~he waS huge. teeth of both being extracted, it is onl y With this effusion (and othe rs ), I fear play. I doubt whether many folk have 1 may have take n lip too much of vour seen t l.l e actual fight . My horse seemed pound-a-line r space. Mu'af kijiye.- H ere's much mterested. my syce and horse : all right :-cobra bit a co w soon after: co w not dead 2 hours . T~i s incident happened on my 30 back. mil e nde to Abu, on the 5th. On the ]. H . SM ITH. 12th. I retume? the same way. Rain had fallen, and as It covered the road in one 13/9/09 .


THE

CANTUARIAN.

CORRESPONDENCE.

N. 8. -The Editors duUne to accept a"y respoltSibility connected 1vith the o/Jiniom del,ts.

Name (md address must always be givell , /lot necessarily tor

,guaralltee oj cood Ja itlt. wl'ittm

To lilt Edl'/ors

011

on, side

0/

0/ their Corres/tm-

pl~bli(atioll.

PersOltalities will iuvolve certat"tl ,'ejec!io'l.

Imt as a

Letters should /It

0/ the paper Mly.

"THE CANTUAR IAN."

DEAN. SIRS.

gives up an enormous amount of time to it, that the Boat Club has achieved the modicum of success that it has already obtai ned. Consequently an appeal by him to O.K.S. and friends of the School ought to meet with a ready response. I expect they do not yet realize that, unl ess new boats are forthcoming. we cann ot possibly ask Tonbridge to row us on our own course this summ er. I expect too, that they are waiting to see someone else start the list. But they know now, and it is to be hoped that they will respond to this call, as they have so generously done to many befo re.

{ wish to call attention to a matter which is ext remely urgent with regard to one branch of the School Sports. I refer, of course, to the present financial crisis of the Boat Club. In the last two numbers of Tlu Canluariall have appeared requests for subscriptions, however small, to purchase a new pair of " fours" j and so fa r there has bee n no response. One hates to live on charity, but really the Boat Club is a most (h:!s~rving institution. It labours un der great di sadva ntages, both financial and otherwise, which must be well known to all who have been con nected with the School.

Without any apology fo r trespassing on your valuable space,

I t is only owing to the untiring energy and zeal of the President, who

I remain, yours, OBSERVEH,


THE

CANTUARI.o\N.

OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS- JUNIOR DIVISION.

SUMMARY

OF

ACCOUNTS,

Oct., 1909. RECEIPTS. £ s. d. To Balance on Shoolin g Accou nt to end of Lent term :-tml Shooting Subscriptions same term ". .. . 25 16 2 .. Initial Grant from War Office 81 0 0

YRAR END I NG

OCl. , 1909. EXPENDIT U RE. By Printing. Stationery, &c. " Sergt.·Mnjor Inst ructor " Armoury, Assistance, &c .... " Postage, Telegrams, Parcels, &c .. Carriage of Equipment ... . "Targets .. . " Band Engagement " Repairs to Rifles Extra Inst ruction " Bugles ... .. Flags and Extra Equipment .. Kit Bags ... .. .. " Cap Bands .. . " Staff Clerk ". " Clean ing Rods " Sundries

Balance

£ 106 16

OcrORltR , 1909.

2

Aud ited and found correcl: FRANCIS H. THIRLWALL, 6th NM!., I909.

£ s. d. 6 7 1 26 7 6 o 17 6 o ,6 7 1 7 7

5 8 10

0

o 16 9

r5

0

14 10 20

9

5 8 4 o 17 2 I 6 10 o 9 10 2

I

8

55 3 51 13

£106 16 2

C. W . BELL, C.pt. Commanding KoS. COlllingent, O.T.C.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

NOTICES. We beg to acknowledge with than ks the receipt of the following Subscriptions :Miss Wilkinson (J/6). C. G. Williamson. Esq. (J/6). W. S. Barroll. Esq. (J/6). R. Watson. Esq. (J/ 6). J. Scruby. Esq. ( 10/6). W. Webb. Esq. ( J/6). A. K. Mowll. Esq. ( 10/6). Rev. Dr. R. L. Ottley (7/-). C. T. Marshall. Esq. (J/6). Rev. R. G. Hodgson (7/-). A. Wilcox. Esq. (7/-).

H. G. Dalton. Esq. (J/6). A. W. Rammell. Esq. (3/6). F. M. Furle)". Esq. (J/6). V. Austen. Esq. (J/6). R. B. Winser. Esq. (J/6). Lieut. C. Winthrop-Swithinbank

(7/-). J. R. Reeve. Esq. ( J/6). B. H. Laller. E sq. (2/4). Rev. H . H. Boys (J{6). ). H. Houghton. Esq. (J/6). Dr. T. WhItehead Reid (J/6). R. H . Goodsall. Esq. (J/6). J. P. Ryley. Esq. (7/-)' Rev. A. W. Foster (J/b). E. A. Fetherstone. Esq. (J/6). G. B. Cockrem. Esq . (3/6). Rev. G. C. Ryl ey (J/6). B. E . Money. Esq. (J/6). A. ) . Trousnell. Esq . (,/6). W. Telfer. Esq. (J/6). Mrs. Hichens (J/6). J. E. Gripper. Esq. ( J/6). Rev. A. H. Barlee (J/6). E. Ellam. Esq. ( Z1 /-). Rev. Canon Moore (J/6). A. H. Low. Esq. (J/6). F. L. SIDEBOTHAM, HOIl. Sec.

ERRATUM. For

Union Jack" read at \Vindsor."

If

II

Royal Standard" on page 418, l. 25. in

.1

The TerritoriaIs

Variolls letters have been received and are ana void ably held over through lack of space.

OUR CONTEMPORARIES . We beg to acknowledge the recei pt of th e following:-

FellestaJl

Al/v'mclII, Blue, Brolllsgroviatl, CartlmslCW, Sf. Edward's SclJOoi Chrollicle,

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L orellolll.(III,


THE VOL. VII. '

CANTUAR.lAN. MARCH.

1910.

No. 19.

EDITORIAL. We are taught to begin our elemental attempts at English Composition with a paradox, if possible; if not, with a remark as inanely irrelevant as is decorous. For these two reasons we begin neither with an inanity nor with a paradox. Some mi sguided or otherwise deformed individuals imagine that the first wo rds of a school magazine, that portion in short, vulgarly known as " Editorial," should contain certain particles of nonsense relati ng to contemporary events in the history of the said school. Which is to be deplored. If the ~ickly sentimental ity which evokes spluttering effusions six times per an num frolll that hotch -potch of congealed carpetsweepings known as the editorial brain, if. . .. but here let us pause in our impassioned oratory, let us halt, nay, rather let liS stand easy and devour our pork-pie and our captain-biscuit, paying no attention whatso ever to our water-bottle, for just now we uttered th e one word which can ultimately attract the attention of mankind, the mo nosyllable "brain." Let us talk about brains, for such a topic does not affect present company. To commence, IJere it is that the advantage of the animal over man is appare nt , - if you or I find ourselves sudden I}' endo wed with brains, we usually dC\'elop brain-fever; whereas if the calf or a\'erage intelligence possesses brains, though rar be it from mt: to insinuate that he does possess such an asset-indeed we will adopt Mr. J. A. H . Murray'S definition and ca ll it a" convoluted mass of nervous substance "-if then this happy e vent sometimes occurs, what course of action do we, mere men, adopt? But let us turn to more cheerful subjects. The weather, for example, is flourishing,


THE

CANTUARIAN.

so are the weeds; football is for the time over, "flu" has not yet begun. In th e meantime we cherish delusions of sports and di et ourselves daily on two grains of salt and a ping-pong ball. Whe n not engaged in other frivolities we read Shakespeare or debate on Polar bears; as a final resort we edit the Can/uarian. Having now done so we retire and trust that no evil consequences will corne.

3n Memoriam. -1< ADMIRAL

ROBERT

Admiral Robert Gordon Douglas who di ed at Walmer on Jan uarr 13 th , aged 80, was onc of th e oldest a.K.S., having entered the School as far back as 1836 . Being intended for the Navy his school career was necessarily short, but he prese rved all through his life a warm regard for his Alma Mater, and a lively recollection of many cu ri ous incidents connected with school life in those now remote days, when \;Vallace was only just beg-inning his long headmastership. In hi s profession Gordon Douglas proved himself a capable officer, and he subsequently attained to an eminent position in th e service; but to the boys of the King's School, his memory shou~d rather be connected with his gallantry as a brave officer who on two occasions jumped overboard in a heavy sea in order to attempt to save the life of a shipmate. On the first occasion when he was a mere boy serving as midshipman on H. M.S Grampus, off the Brazilian Coast he rescued a man who had fall t: n over-

GORDON

DOUGLAS.

board. though at great personal ri sk to himself. for the station was known to be much infested by sharks. The second time the condi tions we re still more perilowi, his ship the Orion was und er reefed topsai ls in the Baltic, wh en th e cry of c. man overboard" was rai sed . Although th ere was a heavy sea run ning and th e ship was making twelve knots, Lieutenant Douglas at once went over the side, but unfortunate ly he was unabl e this time to reach the dro wnin g man, though he managed to re~ain his ship, and received the public thanks of the Captain for his gallant act. Admiral Douglas first hoisted his flag as second in command of the Mediterranean fleet in 1880, and in I8 87 was appointed Admiral Superintende nt of Malta Dockyard. In the following yt:ar he was raised to the rank of Vice-Admiral , and retired from active service in 1894. He was an A.D.C. to Queen VictOria. and Justice of the Peace for the Ci nq ue Ports' divi sion.


THE

CANTUARiAN.

or ] AMES

BAKER

WHITE.

-1< James Baker White who died very sudde nly at the Rectory house of the Church of St. Francis of Assisi in Po~tery Lane, Nouingdale, W. was qUIte. un,known to the present generation of King s School mas te rs or boys. For mo re. than a quarte r of a century he had. give n up all the ordinarv amenities o f. l~fe , and d~~oted himself" entirely to raising the spmtual and social condition of the. un~or tunate people who inhabit the CrIme mfested area, which surrounds th e Church of St. Francis. Born in I H43, he entered the King's School in 1855-the same year as the late \;Valter Pater . . His father, also an O.K..S .. and erst whIle Speech Day preacher being in those days Vi car of St. Stephen's, near Cante rbury. From Canterbury

J . B. White went up to St. J ohn'S College, Cambridge, graduating B.A. In 1 ~64 and shortly afterwards he was ordamed deacon by the Bishop of L~)I~don to th e .Curacy of St. J ohn the DI\' lI1e, KeuI1l1lgton. Here he did excellent wo rk and was greatly beloved by the poor, but for many years he remained in deacon's orders, and ultimately joined th e Roman ComIl1lllli.on.. For tl~e last twenty-six years of IllS lIfe he hved and la boured in Pottery Lane the worst slum in West London, and perhaps in some respects the worst in all London, but those who know say that there has been a marked improvem ~ nt. in recent years, and that much of It IS due to th e un remitti ng efforts of the late Father White. R.I.P.

MUS I C. It was d~cid ed this year, for various reasons, to gIve up the orchestral part of the concert, an? reasons. like misfortunes, seldo.n'l. come s.ll1gJy ; th ey were, however, suffiCIently weIghty to make it obvious that the change would be wise, at any rate, for the present. The Headmaster came to the rescue in this emerge ncy and engaged the Folk-song Quartette' th e cha~m s of whose perform ance has WOl; ~~em Wide renown i ,md their singing, it IS need less to say, gave great pleasure to

th e audi e nce. For th e School thei r performance had this add itional interest !11 t.hat .th.eir repertoire includes many Items Originally arran ged for ourselves, and some of these were included in the programme. 'We had also the pleas ure of heari ng two O.K.S. who had done mu ch for our music in the past, and their success may well encourage those of th e present ge neration to persevere on the same lines. Anoth er. and I may add, a welcome novt:1ty was Lhe singing of


THE

CANTU AR IAN .

choruses by boys in the aud ience; they sang well, she win g perception of rhythm and the tone was good. The piano work had to be of a less advanced charar.:ter than usual. Those who study the piano would do well to do their utmost before they are sixtee n or th ereabouts; other work , if of no g reater impo rtance educationally, has morc im mcrliate claims to which musi c may have to g ive way later on. The orchestral co ncerts, which ha d reached such a pitch of excellence, both as regards choral si nging and o rchestral playing. were not originally due to my in itiative. but it is needless to say I was only too glad to fall in with the sll.ggestiol1 , and lookin g back on the mUSIC of the last te ll years und er th e present H eadmaster, I feel it a privilege to have been associated with sll ch fine and enthusiastic work on th e part of the boys, se venty or eighty of whom have usually taken part in th e choral work of these concerts.

this year so excellently may feel that their work was quite up to that standard. Music is a language, it is the poetry of sound, and its inspirat io n must ~e sought elsewhere tha n in the acade mIC world. The Folk music, such as we have hithe rto studied, is the outcome of the life of the var ious races who give their feeli ngs utterance in their music, and to study th eir music is slim ul atin g, in the hi ghest degree , to musical thought and utterance. I take leave to quote another letter out of several recei ved last Xmas, whi ch puts my views on musi cal educatio n bette r than I can myse lL

Dec.

P ERCY GODFRRY. 2.2.

"I am only too glad to have an "excuse for putting into imperis.habl e "ink what I tried to express to you 111 the "winged word th~ other night. <l;nd for "tell ing yO ll agalll what a n enjoyabl.e "evening we had. To me, personall y, It U was full of especial interest as I have " had so mu ch experie nce of school Those of us concerned in the mu sical wo rk have to thank t.he Dea n for his .. mu sic both here and in Ameri ca, and kindly speech at the Conce rt, the first " I was very charmed indeed with th e public reference, I believe. to our work "beauty or" tone of the boys. and with here, and I would again qu ote th e "the way they pronounced their words by testimony of 1\'lr. Bennett in th e Daily "the manner you have tau ght th em to Telegraph, a yea r or two back, all th e "sing' Ohmf: Blatt.' I need hard ly. say more gratifying as it came six months .. th at I am hearti ly with you in your Idea after the notice of the concert which had "of basing musical training upon Folk~ appeared in that paper. He wrote of .. so ng. From Bach to Brahms no great heari ng "at the Kin g"s School, Can~er­ .. composer has ever been able to affo ~d bury, somt 30 or 40 boy sopranos slll g " to overlook this pure source of mUSIC with such a delicacy of style and " un defiled j nay, as we kn ow, our g reat refinement of tone." That, co min g from •• writers, poets and music ian~ ha va such an a uthority, is praise of which we .. revelled in, and so ught thelT best inspiration in, the music of the people. may justly be proud to have. dese rved, Yours, etc., and the fe:w boys of th e .I ulllor School A. FOXTON FERGUSON. who sang their two little E nglish so ngs j,


THE

CANT UAR IAN .

We appmd aft ex/mel from Ihe Catllerbury Paper:-

52 1

C. L. Nighti ngale, and a ll with choruses 'by the School. went with a swin g. increasing with every stanza. The T erritorials ' won a rapturous recall, and an old sacred ¡ lullaby, 'A Babe he's in the Cradle." and the H ebrew chant, ' A Kid. a Kid,' a remarkable sacred co mposition 01) which 'The H ouse th at Jack Built' is supposed to have been modelled . carne nex t. The trebles acq uitted themselves right well in the song, 'Cockles and Mussels,' an d some nursery rhymes by the quartet created mu ch amuseme nt. Vv. F . C. Pallise r con trib uted a Scotch song. and Mr. G. C. Strahan (O.K.S. ). a ' Zo merzetzhi re zong,' both with choruses. The last item was, ,IS usual. 'Forty Years on ,' with chorus. The Dean proposed a vote of thanks to Mr. Godfrey for the most del ightful musical eveni ng he had ever enjoyed. They would wish that he should be appointed Musical Director-in-Chief to the T erritorial Army-provided he co uld fill the office without leavin g the King's School. (Laughte r and applause). j

Folksongs, German, Spanish, Scott:h, Irish, an d Northumbrian, and a J ewish chant, by the 'Folk¡ song Quartette ' (M iss Beatri ce Spencer, Miss Florence Christie, Mr. Louis Godfrey. and Mr. Foxton F erguso n) were striking features at the King's School Conce rt on Mond ay evenin g in the School Gym nasium. M r. Percy Godfrey conducted with great ability, and about thirty-five members of the Musical Society took part. The programme ope ned with a carol. followed by a piano duet by C. J. Galpin and C . N. Rya n. and this by a part song and un accompanied folk-songs, most artistically ren dered. Mr. C. Gann gave violin solos, and Mr. E . K. Barber (O. K ,S.), C. J. Ga lpin an d C. N. Rya n piano solos. Mr. Percy Godfrey'S marching so ngs, 'The Ca ll of the Bugle.' 'The T erritorials.' and (Farewell,' the solos in the first and second by J. M. Co urtney and KINO' S SCHOOL CONCERT.- H

FOOTBALL. KING'S SCHOOL v. HAMPSTEAD WAND ERERS. Played on Cullen's. T hursday, Februa ry roth, and resulted in a win for the visitors by 3 goals and 1 try ( 18 points) to I goal (5 points ). The Wanderers brought down thei r best team. which included a very fas t, though somewhat erratic line of backs. The School on the other hand were with out five colours, and half the tea m was composed of th e 2nd XV. Ho wever a thoroughly good game was the res ul t, though combination on both sides was rather wanti ng . Fluke ki cked off at 3. 10, a scrum immediately forming or. their twenty-five, fro m which the Hampstead th rees got well away, and a score was only preven ted by a good tackl e on th e touch-line by Forsyth. Ju ckes getting the ball, afte r a few vai n attem pts our forwards broke away and ru shed it up the field, but th e opposing half neatly gat hered it from beneath their feet and hurled it away to th e outside-three, wh o scored. The try was converted (0-5).


THE

CANTUARIAN.

ostl)' in the mi ddle of the d I From the kick off, various serums resulted ~n ,P ay was III After the usual bouts of field till their back relieved with a good kick 1I1to touch~ backs who made some by-p'lay on the to uch line, Ollr forwards hee~ed ~uth to t~ ler but ~vas neatly brought considerable ground and Cremer was d~lm~5t III a t e f~~I~inO" they got away and by down by the opposing three. Imme l~te y. ~ serum r w~~ not converted (0-8 ). means of so me clever feints succeeded In scon ~l g. _ ~he t Y re neater in handling, but The School now bc&an to get the ball away qUl.ck~~ fni~~~~diatcly. From a line-out each tim e the outside got the ball he was t~lC ec t d ( 8) From the however Juckes sec ure~1 the ball and sco red. Th~s t\~as cOl~:~r ~he quickly down

tall

ki ck otT and the result~ng. scrun~s. the H~mp~e~1 t .Hee~e ing co n verted. Thu s th ey t h e line and scored tWlce 111 rapld succeSSIOn, 0 1 n es ~ \I s ._ were left vic toriou s by 18 points to 5· T he School. team was as 0 ~v H Cremer

L

A. B. Forsyth (back); G. Byron, H. de H . Smlth'h~iv~~ Sn'tit , C . C;lmberbateh, (three-quarters); R. L. Gottwaltz, R·LE · GFonlton ~ B J~ttreil G. A. T ownend, A. C. Fluke, R. Juekes, J. W. Wayte, . L . os er, . . , G. H. Claypole (forwards). LIST

OF

MATCHES. For.

D.I,.

OJojomnls.

Ground.

Rtsuil.

p . I

---------1-------'-----------1-------- 1------ GMU' I~~ 1909· Th., Oct. 14 21 Th., Tu., " 26 Sal., " 3° W . , N'~v. 3 Tu., 9 Th., " 11 Sat., " '3 Tu., " .6 Th., " . 8 Tu., 23 Th., 25 " 21 Tu., Dec.

F I R ST

1\'rr. A. Laucr's xv ....... Wye College ............. .. Epsom Collcge ........... Dover College ............ Merchant Taylors' Sch. Mr. I-I. Poolc's xv ... ... Mr. G. n. Cockrcm's xv. Bythe·F. C: ....... :...... Leieestcrshlre Regl1llcnt EaslbOl1rnc Collegc ...... WycCollcgc......... .. Dover College ..... O.K.S. ................... .

1910.

Th., Feb. 10 Hampstcad Wanderers '909·

Th.,Oct. 28 Tonbddgc Seh. 3rd xv. Sat., J> 30 Dover College 2nd xv ... Th.,Nov.25 Dover Collegc 2nd xv... Sat., " 27 Tonhridge Seh. 3rd xv.

Canterbury Canterbury Beekenllam Dover ...... Bellingham Canterlm ry Canterbury Canterbury Canterbury Canterbury Wye .. Canterbury Canterbury

XV.

Won .... 3 Won . ... 2 Won .... Lost ..... Lost .... • \:Von ... 4

•2 5 2

5' 25 6

5

5 35

3

•2

8

Lost ... .

Won .... • (1'.) Lost .. \Von 2 V'lOIl .... Scrtehd. Scrtchd.

3

Canterbury Lost ....

Goals.

... ... ..... ... .

4

3

7

3

.. 7 (1 D.)

3

'9

5

'7

.8 36 3 43 5 5

.8

3 5

'S 3

4

4'

'7 3

...... i·\

.. . ..... ...

SECOND XV,

Canterbury Lost . .......... - ....... .. Canterbury Won . .. . I 4 Dover ...... , Sc rlchd . ......... ... .. Tonbridge Lost.. .. ......... I

Arainst. Tries. Points.

6


THE

CANTUARIAN.

52 3

TUTOR S.ETS. The Tutor Set Shi.e ld was won this year by the Swallows, their first victory since they have come into Mr. Porter's hands. The team is strong in every point and all m e mbe rs contributed to secure Success. Th e ir game: against Mr. Cape's was certainly th eir best-th e ir victory ( r 2 points to 3) be ing la rgely due to the fine play and com b inati on of Gottwaltz and C re mer2. Their team is young and should have very good prospects for next year. All the Sets, except Mr. Reay's, were able to put good teams into th e field, so th at the g reate r number of the games were quite ha rd. Mr. Rear'S lot altho ugh very small were ne ve rth e less able to keep down the Sco res, and Forsyth's tackling was exce ll e nt. They are a young lot who will do we ll in a year's ti me. Mr. Be ll's Set, who were the favourites at the start, had extremely bad lu ck in losin g Field, their half, against Mr. Cape' s, and with the ir victory against Mr. Porter' s would have carried off the Shield . Their team consisted of a solid line of threes . and a very heavy lot of forwards, but they we re un able to combine their forces. Mr. Cape's had hard luck in havin g Gordon on the sick list when they lost to Mr. Moxon's Set. The latter had a good forward line but were decided ly wea k behind the scrnrn. Their severe defeat by 1\11'. P orter's in the first round was not e xpected, and they managed to pick up against Mr. Cape's. Mr. Evans' had a very good back divi sion who were rather heavily let down by their forwards. ' All colours played nobly for their teams, whil st Gent, Field, Brannon, Sharpe2, and Gore al so did excellent work .

~•

.>

• X

." ..,.,

..,"

X

c.o

~

'"

0

0-

• " ..• "C. .!2

• --- - - --- ---- - 0

i:'

Wood, Berryman,

t

<: tl c

.

'4

'43

~

£ f.15 :5 ----------.----- - --i\'lart lets (?dr. Evans) x 11 9 11 30 0 66 52 -'4 4 -Hawks - --------------- --- ---- --- --- 53- ----(Mr. Bell) 22 x 6 26 118 2 9 + '09 -Herons - ----------.6- - -- ----- --- - - ---- ------ - (Mr. Cape) x 60 9 0 88 3 43 + 45 3 - - - - - ---- ------ --- --- ---- - ---- --- --Choughs (Mr. Reay) .. 0 9 x 0 3 .2 2 25 - 240 6 ----------- ---- - - . - - --- -----I- ° ---- ------- ---Gryphons (M r. i\'l oxon) 0 2 0 3 86 -43 ° 5 -------------- - ------ - -- -_.- - - -43- - ---- -----Swallows (Mr. Porter) 0 )l

.Q

u

If)

£

II

II

'9

'2

X

77

49

x

'57


THE

FOOTBALL

CANTUARIAN.

RETROSPECT, 1909-1910.

Matches played, 12 . Won, 7. Lost,S ¡ Points for, 166. Points against, 148. Such is th e record for the season just fini shed. It m,i&h,t have been much belter had it not been for the unusual weakness of the back dlV1SlOll . The ~orwards \~ere a better lot than we have ever had beforc, and in no single l!latch dlc! they fal,l to have the best of it, except agai nst the heavy Leicestcrshire Regiment. Even agamst lVIr. Cockrem's XV .. from Guy's H ospital, the fact that they were, better together than their opponents gave them the advantage. The result was, that 111 match after match they we re constantly giving their backs ~ood ~hances. but the tl~ree-ql1~rters WC:C. far too hesitating and unresource fui , and theIr pass1l1g lacked both sWiftness and precIsIo n. vVe :confess to di sappoi ntm ent, as we had fondly hoped t~lat the effo~t~ and example of the three-quarters of the p~st few y~ars had e~tabhshed a tradition I)f good back play, of st raight an,d determ.1l1e.d. rUI1l~1l1g, of vanety of method, of good combination with a sound achmxture of llldIvlduahsm. However, the want of success was not from any want of keenness, on .the part either of the Captain or of the play~rs concerned? ~nd to be abl~ to say that IS nearly as good as to be able to say they played a bnlllant game. lior thougl~ we can not expect ahvays to have great players, so long as the spirit of th e games IS keen and vigorous we shall not go far wrong. . To speak of individuals is difficult. especially among the fo rward s, for the ir excellence lay largely in the fact that they were a v~ry level and well-balanced lot. Taylor led them with tremend ous e nergy and was admIrably b'lcked up. ~ \ Gottwaltz hardly improved up to expectations, but was often handicapped by having fresh partners who did not know him. Gelsthorpe was easily the best three¡quarte r, and should make a great player with more knowledge of the game . Forsyth at full back was quite good, but wants more pace. . Taylor deserves our gratitude for his energetic Captaincy, and for the enthUSiasm with which he certainly infected some of the lower ga mes. We append some' remarks on individual members of the team: Ei~ ll Back. A. B. FORSYTH.-A plucky and fearless stopper of rushes. Fields and kick s very well, and tackles well but must try and improve his pace. 'l'h1-ee-quarler Backs. A. M. GELSTHOIUE.-Got very few chances. Is a strong runner with a fine swerve, though he is as yet apt to fall down in executing it. Not much' finesse' at present, but should be really good when he knows the ga me better.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

5 '5

H. A. KEYSER. -Plucky, but far too fonci of doubling back into the scrum . Tackles and ki cks well. C. V. SNATT.-Hesitates far too much for a centre, with the resnlt that the defence is. upon his win g-man when the time for a pass comes. Too fond of lobbing ~lJS passes, or of not looking at the man to whom he is passing. Should Improve next year. A. F. B. COTTRELL.-Improved in defence. In atLack still apt to run too obliquely. Haif Backs. R. L. GOTTWAI.1'z.-Always dangerolls ncar the opponents' goal-line. Does not run fast enough whtm making an opening. Improved in defence. R. E . GORDON .- Very slow, but saves excellently and is improving. Forwards. V. C. TAYLoR-(Captain).-Set a fine example of hard work. Very good tackler, and is less clumsy than last real' in the open . Good place-kick. R. C. CU.MBERBATcH-(Captain in Easter Term, 191O).-Honest worker and much improved in the open. Good tackler. D. H. COWIE.-Good fo rward, always on the ball. Tackles excellently. A. C. FLUKE.-Much stronger than last yea r and played a good game. His height very usefu l, out of touch. R. JUCK ES.-A most promising forward . Uses his weight and height well, and is al ways on the ball. Has plenty of resource. Good kick. J. ~V. WAYTE.-Hard-working forward with plenty of weight. A little clumsy with his feet, but improving. D. O. FARDEu.. - Improved a good deal, but still hardly does his full share of shoving. Q uite useful in the open. L. L. FOSTER.-Vigorolls forward, always on th e ball. Apt to kick too hard some times. Saves we ll.

DEBATING SOCIETY. On Thursday, February ,oth. C. N. RJ'alt, proposed a vote of confidence in

the Liberal Party. H e was supported by H. D. 7 'owJJelld and G. If. Claypole ; an d opposed by C. J. Galpill, D. J. N. Lee and C. F. Baliz'scomhe. The mution was

defeated by 52 votes to 12. (W hen the same motion was proposed after the 1906 Election, it was lost by 79 to 10). As always with political, a nd especially with party debates. the contest was kee n and sj)arkling. There was perhaps a little


THE

CANTUARIAN.

tendency to heckle, but that is unavoidable where spirits run so high . It is certain, however, that all speakt'rs were handicapped by shortageoftime, which although it had been increased by five minutes in eac h case. was quite inadequate for the needs of most of the orato rs. T he innovation of a tea intervai at six o'clock, proved most welcome refreshm ent both for speakers and audience, and did not see m to entangle the thread of argument in any way. We were ve ry glad to sec several visitors present. C. 1\'. Ryall opened th e case for Liberalism bv uegging for a n impartial hearing. The Public School boy is only too prone to be prejudiced in favour of the Conservative party. After thus touching the pathetic note. the speaker proceeded to display an extraordinarily clear grasp of the intricacies of the Budget : he quoted several examples of the iniquity of the present land systems, and the extremely modest dema nds of the Chancellor of the Exchequer j with a dramatic gesture he denounced the brewers j amid a whirl of arms and phrases he settled all sllch peers as Lord Curzon, Lord l"IiIner, Lord Lansdowne. He urged that the Lords be amended, though he quile admitted that a Second Chamber was esse ntial. He demonstrated the much¡maligned principles of Mr. Lloyd-George with a few captivating and enlightening stories. After a peroration and a spirited controversy with the Chair, he sat down, ten minutes after his due time, flush ed with his viol ent physical exercise, and blushing at his well-merited applause. C. F. Balliscombt rose to reply. In a studiedly unpretensious style he attacked

the licensing clauses of the Budget, picking hol es with clever and cunning fingers. The mislaying of a reference, however, upset him early in his speech: and afte r that he became less icy, and more convin cing. He evolved so me bright phrases in th e co urse of his remarks: " paper-chasing after banknotes II wa s a good description of the business of the present Chancellor. He closed with an admirable description of chaos (as represented by the Liberal party), and with a fusillade of appropriate but Parliamentary epithets. At this juncture, the House adjourned for rest and refreshment, which occupied a quarte r-of-an-hour. On the fe-opening of the debate: H. D. Towmnd rose to deal with the Liberal Naval and Military policies. He showed the excellence of Mr. Haldane's Army Reform and Territorial System; and cleverly put the case for the Navy. Quoting from the German Ambassador to prove the absence of danger from that quarter, he proceeded to give reasons why an invasion of England was wellnigh impossible. If it must be admitted that he juggled with figures, it cannot be doubted that he did so skilfully. But being hampered by time, he was forced to desist in medias res. n. J. N L ee then came forward to oppose him. He bore one of the great mainstays of the Opposition Case nam ely Home Rule. This argument he proceeded to unfold, showing how the Liberals are pledged to grant H ome Rule, and whal would be the evil effects of it on t his country. He see med hampered by mistrust in his own line of thought, a nd altho ugh his speec h was consecutive and


TI-JE

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audi~le! ye t it lacked, if anything, fire and c<?nvlctlOn ...It would only be falling in With the spl nt of th e age if he thumped the table more.

0..

Ii. CfaJ'jofe followed him, with the an of a Socialistic eremite. The triumphant four years' rei g n of Liberalism appealed to him by reason of the quantity of little n~easures. that had been passed: A long stnng of blils, otherwise un known, was produced before the H ouse and exci ted no opposition. He then' wen t on to give an accou nt of the benefits resulting from the Labour Exchanges. <lnd found food for rumination over Social . Reform. He had, as it were, the sweepi ngs o~ the Liberal case ; and although no one WIll deny that he acquitted himself manfully, yet after the pcrfervid oratory of his colleagues, he seemed a trifle quiet. After complaining of the clock, he concluded.

As soon as the debate was opened tq the audience:

G. C. w: Hark,,. leaped to his feet, and held the House spell- bound with a denun ciation of the Lords, and a lucid narrative of t he notorious Gorringe case. I-] is feelings, pent up for so long. at last burst their bonds in fie ry eloq uence. He was compelled to emi ab ruptly. owing to shortage of time. G. C. de jllallos followed him. He indignantl y arraigned the Land Tax~s, chivalrously champio ned the Lords, and subtly misquoted th e figures of the Gorringe case. The latter slip was unhappy; but was probably owing-s hall we say-to the diplomacy of party literature.

S. I jJ£aidm rose to add lustre to the solid serenity of the last speaker. H e vehemently opposed the mover's estimate C . .f. Galplil was the last set speaker of Lord Curzon. and ended pianissimo for the opposition. He wasted some grazioso. valuable time in pleasant jibings, subtle, C. N. Ryall then crashed on to the but hardly profitable. The rosettes of his dai¡s. Who had refutert the Land Taxes ? opponents, the discomfiture of undeveloped Nobody. Who, since 1884, wonld give farmers seemed to provoke him to humour. Home Rule? Nob ody. Who doubted At last, however, he got into his stride our Navy's preeminent excellence? Noand leaving the atmosphere of trifles' body. Could anyone show him a single entered on a serio us discussion of th~ Unionist bill thrown out by the Lords? Navy. H e showed the need of a strong No answer. Could anyone deny th e fairNavy; and also the danger we were in ness of the Budget? Not a whisper. The from Germany. H e proved the Libe ral s rafters rang with rhetoric: a cascade of guilty of weakening the service, as in a unpremeditated passion dazzled the car. few rears England \~ould no longer be The audience was struck dumb, wheth er supenor to other natIOns. The Liberals from inability to confute, or from sheer had constantly petitioned the Cabinet for transport of joy. It was as a great prean reduction of armament. It was a pity he so ng of victory, a cry of ecstatic triumph took so long i~ getting to his real argu- in a glorio lls cause .... ments, but havl11g done so he mad e quite Amid some cheers, the motion was a convincing speech. defeated by 5' to ll.


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VIRTUTE FUNCTI MORE PATRUM DUCES. C. B. J'RRA M.-Entered the Schoo l, Oct ., 1905 ; V I. Form, J an., 19°9· A. F . B. COTTRELL.- Entered the S{:hooi. J an., ' 907; VI. Form, Oct., ' 90 9; Row in g Colours, '909; Sports' Com mittee, ' 909 ; 1St XV" 190 9; Entrance \\7oo1wich. G. T. CARRE.-Entered th e Sc hool, Jan ., 1906; 1St Xl., 19°9·,

J.

H . Woo Ds.- Entered t.he School, Jan., 1904; Sergeant, a.T.C., ' 909 ; E ntrance

Sandh urst . V . C. TAYLOR .-Entered the School, Mal', 19°5; 1St XV., 1907-8- 9 ; Captain, 19°0 ; R owi ng Colours. 1(01); Captain, O ct., I C)09 ; Sports' Co mmi ttee, I Qo8 ; Entrance Sand hurst. H . A . K EYSER.-Entered the School, J an., 19°7; 1St XV., 19 09.

V ALETE . J. M. Courtney, C. C. D enman , T. S. Cave, G. H. T. Wade.

K. S. C. T YPE A curly and chubby cheru b wh en he came : curly and ch ubby still when he left-also, of course, cherubi c. vVe called him " Bobby": that is we did n' t : but we called him by a pet name eq ually suitable to his character. Anyhow" Bobby" will do, else I'll give the show a way. Not much in height: good breadth of chest:

TYPES, Ill. darki sh haired: hai r rather recedent abo ut the temples. Gowned all hi s time : hence obviously a fellow who knew his paradigms. No smug, mind you : he scorned sllllHmc ry and the suspicion of it. Yet he hel d his own in his class with an easy sangfroid y grace. I can't recall if he became


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captain : I have no doubt he co uld have bee n and would have run the School most ex?ell ently. I fancy he wa s content with belllg a good third, but I may be maligning him. Ho lidays were his c hie f joy, and plenty of the m. I stayed with him part of one holiday at his home, a lovely oldgardened Rectory. H e was the n longing for the first of September to go out shooting with his big brother. H e took me oyt fi shin g o ne mo rnin g on his native Tlver: and Bobby-li ke left me to do the paddling and likewise the fi sh ing, as he prefe rred to loll opse and lollopsin g, to sleep. Always chattin g, when 110l sleeping. Always chee rful and chee rfuliz ing. Even ~vh~n .he. h~d a gro use again st an mdlsc n mmatlng Bl.aste r, his bittern ess Good tempered, rarely showed teeth. natural, lazy chee rfulness. Cricket was his real delight : and one would often . find . him in hi s study. manipulati ng a ~ n cket bat to get into the shape uf the ~vnsts ~or a go~d hard cut. Proficiency 10 cutt10g was Ius g reat ambitio n. I remember how bitterly sore I felt when the St. Lawrence match was on. Our best fell ows went out withou t sayin g much: Bobby and I got together. He mad e 36 : I made, I think, 32. The ever watchful tutelary t need I name hi m? ) prese nted him with a c ricket bat at th e end of the innings, wh ile I had to be conte nt with a shout. H oweve r my soreness wore off with reflecti on o n the justice of th e award: for I had pulled every 3rd man ball to square leg while Bobby had played a pukka scientific all-round-the-

wi cket game: and he was then. I t hink, only IS. Many read ers of thi s wi ll re member Mi s~ Gadd who presided so long and so ~dll11 rab l y over the H ouse's feedi ngs and Illnesses. She wanted all to feel at hom e a l School , and succeeded excellently. H er room was t he "Cl ub " fo r many of liS on our way to Dormitories. But the Cl ub developed into a beargarde n whenever Bobby happened to drop in . Sedate c l.lough a t first, ¡the meeti ng was soo n (hssolved into cushion fig hting, and when the wea ry I-l ead Mo nitor had at last got eve ry fellow into hi s Dormitory, he wo uld generally fin d Bobb/s cubicle vacant : and wonld have to fe rret under sofas an d chairs i n the Club before he found him. Bobby was then ignominiously haul ed o ut by the H ead Monitor and a selected chllcker out." F or no Monitor however puritanical coul d g ive an ord er to Bobby successfull y. Bobby on ly lau ghed and the Momtor couldn't but laugh too. But Bobby never misused this charm of his. Bobby went ill for a new dis eas~ o l~ce, ~alled facial para lysis. He didn' t Illlnd It at all, but went OIl with his perpetual humbug and badinage . T o hear h}s chuckles and shouts of laughte r eme rglll.g from behin d a motionless face \~as a most un canny experience for the hstener. I saw l)i m late r at Cambridge, just" the same ,. jolly clever, jolly jolly, and jolly lack-a-dalslcal II1 all work except play. 1 ex pect he's th e sa me still, now in the Southern H emi sphere I am told : a nyhow [ hope so. Bobby, [ looks towa rds you. II


THE CANTUARIAN .

53 0

SCHOOL AND O.K . S. NEWS. vVe offer our heart)' co ngratulatio ns to the H ead Master on his appointment by the Archbishop to an Honorary Canonry of the Cathedral.

We heartilv congratulate D. H. Cowie on obtaining' an Open tvfathematical Scholarship at Emmanuel College, Cambridge. Al so D. J. N. Lee on ~eillg awarded an Open Classical Scholarship at \Vad ham College, Oxford.

And H . D. Townend on being elected to an Open Mathematical Exhibition at Queen's CoHegc. Cambridge.

OFFICERS TRAINING

Cpls. Battiscombe. Lush, Sidebotham, Nigl1lingaJe, Cum berbatch to be Sgts. Cpls. Fardell and West to be Lance-Sgts. Lan ce-Cpls. Spence, Juckes and Squire to be Cpls.

*

'1(.

*

A Paper Cbase was run 0 11 Jan. 3 1st, the hares being C. L. Nightin gale and D. O. Fardell. The hounds arrived in the following order: Foster, Glyn,Musson , and Cottrell and Dodgson wilh the bags. Some doubt arose at the time as to tl~e course followed by individuals, but tillS is more or less the order of those who went the whol e distance.

The Sports have been fixed for iVlarch 28th and 29th, the latter date being rese rved for handicaps and under 16 events, whitt: the Dover Sports are on the 30th.

CORPS .

The followi ng promotions have been

an nounced :-Sgts. Galpin and Cowie to be Cadet Officers.

Sgt. Townend to be Colour Sergeant. L ance-Sgt. Mowll to be Quarter Masler Sergeant.

O.K.S. will regret to hear of G. F. I-lowell's long illness. H e was taken iii with se rious heart troub le just before Christmas, and has only rece nt.ly, afler two month s. been able to leave hIS room: the period of his convalescence, too, mU,s t necessarily be long. Everyone Will sympathise with him in. so unfortu nato


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53'

an interruption to what promise d to be a very successful University career.

There are eight O.K.S. in the London University Officers Training Corps.

The followin g have passed out of Sand hurst :--A. N. 1. Lilley. 5th ( with H ono urs), In dian Army; B. H. Math eso n, 26th, In dian Arm)" and W. R. N. Les li e.

The Junio r Steeple Chase was run o n Tuesday, March 1 st. Thirteen sta rted and L. G. H o usden who led the whole way came in an easy first, hi s time being 26 mins. 3St sees. Way te, Hassell and Tomkins finished in quick succession. Un the top of St. Edmund's hill Housden was leadin g with Musso n, who lost gro und later, a good second, whilst H asse ll, \Vayte and Tomkin s we re close behind

*'** Extract from the" Sportsman " re the Va rsity Hockey Match. "0 . B. Parso ns was by far the best half on th e field, until he tired in the seco nd half, after hi s enormo us exertion s in th e first."

INDIAN To Ilu Edllors ol'j THE CANT UA RIAN." TAIPING,

LETTER. con tact with a burly Sikh 's hoc key stick three days ago, but hope to play cricket on Saturrlay.

PERAK.

Yours ever,

F.M.S.

T. S.

DEAR SCHOOL,

I enclose a letter from J. B. Sc ri venor giving some account of hi s doings, and of the whereabouts of O.K..S. H e howeve r omils Colonel Walker (0.K.5.-1) who is in command of the F.IVf.S. Guides here. He has been up the Hills late ly and succeeded in gettin g a heliograph message through to Penang. For myself, I nurse a wounded kn ee, the result of coming into

ADAMS.

BATU GAJAH,

FEDERATED MALAY SAT ES. DEAR SCHOOL,

T. S. Adams has suggested to me that it is time I sho uld write to YOli co ncerning the doings of the O.K.S. in


53 2

TH E

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this part of the worl d. I fee l that I have been remiss in not doi ng so earlier, and without a reminder. and it is a matter of regret to me that any news I have to send

you no w must largely

con~ern

my;sclf.

to me to be best analysed as a maximum of labo ur with a min imum of results. Peacocks a re more satisfactory - easy to hit and plenty to eat.

[ suppose that nearl y everyone who comes out here has dreams of big game shooting btJore he arrives. I had ; and I went to a man in Lo ndon who tal ked to me pe rsuasively about my " batte ry." I n spite of his wi les I managed, fo rtun ately, to limi t my ou tlay to a ball a nd sho t gun (the same that slew the te~l) a. Jigh.tly bu ilt but very powerful co rdIte nfle With an ominous looking pad on the butt. Doubtless my case has ueen the case of many and will be t he case of many more. The outlay was wasted. How many mIles did I carr)' one or othe r of thos~ weapons C . I-I. G. Clarke I have not seen for throug h the jungle, never havlll.g reason a \0 11 0' time. bu t I hear th at he has gOire to use eit he r ? My work takes me all homet) on leave to be marri ed. When last over the country an d into the wild.est we met he was stationed at T emerl oh, in parts , and gives me more ju ngl~ tra velll1~g Pahang, whe re he was th e o nly whi te man . than fa ll s to the lot of most men. BIg I n spite of that he see med very contented game-elepha nt, rhinoceros, bison, tige r, a nd was putti ng 0 11 weight. vVe went out panther, bear, is abundant, but everywhe re dodgi ng tea l togetherancl had a tho:ough I)' is the de nse jungle, and one rarely sees enjoyable day ; and 1 do not tl~tn k the more than the tracks. Big game shooting equani mi ty of the teal was much dl.s turbed is for those who have the time and money except ill the case of one poor bird who to go into the j ungle with that obj e~t fa iled to find a path through t he pa ttern s a lone in view. T his was soon borne 1J\ 011 me, so I left my "battery" at homo, of our g un s. and have never yet regretted doing so. The mention of that solita ry teal Fo r the man in pursuit of other objects in lead s on to shootin g gene ra lly. I am the jungle tha n shooti ng. the re is a most afraid that as rega rds both bird and big comfo rt ing truth , that if he does not game shooti ng I am a hereti.c. On a ~e w molest the ani mals, they will not molest occasio ns I have been lured mto tramplllg hi m. The bison is a poss ible exception through miles of swamps in pursuit of and you may say" what abo ut man-eati ng snipe a nd I have on eac h broken up tigers"? But the man-eater is a ma n .. a happy ~ om.e j but a lth oug h ":lan y men eater because men have d riven away hi. are enth usIastIc about th e sport, it appears natural food. dee r a nd pigs, and wh II

This. however, cannot be enurely ascnbed to sins of omission on my pare l fo r we are scattered ove r a large an~a and very rarely meet. I am sorry to hear that G. C. Valpy has been ill at Klang. I met C. F . Nicholas not long ago in Pahang, where he is now a D istri<.:t Surgeon. H e too has been ill and when I was last a t Ha ub, where he is sta ti oned, he had go ne away to recoup. R. Braddell is in Singapore. a nd at the hegin ning of the year I met th ere another contem porary of mi ne. - . J ones.


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o nce he has found what a cheap dinner a China man or a Malay affo rds, he keeps to it on t he g round of domestic economy.

My . e battery" is a failure. Ba ll and shot g uns do not give good resu lts wi th shot and should be avoided, here at any rate, o n that accoun t. As for the rifle. r loosed her off once at a target wh en some Volunteers were doing class-fi ring an d she macl e pretty practi ce at zoo yards. bu t upset the a im of the Vo lun tee rs by reaso n of the unexpected violence of the di scha rge.

533

we turned a corner and came right on t hree elephants walki ng alon g the path to wards lU~ . Neither pa rty would be o utdone in the matte r of pol iteness. Bot h stepped aside into the jungle an d begged the other to make use of the path , but neithe r did . Fi nally the elephants, compr isi ng a tusker, a female. and a youn g one, passed by in the jun gle on th e fa r side , and t he other party. much relieved, si nce they ha d an ancient re volver as their sole weapo n, went on their way.

In crossing ove r fro m one State to the other we lost o ur way an d got into . Pe rhap~ a short account of the only a n un inh abi ted part of Kemaman. 'liVe tri p on which r had any excite ment with follo wed down the fi rst strea m we came big game may be of inte rest. I t was in to, know in g that it mu st take us to the sea 1<)06 and m)' object was to go through if our provisions lasted long eno ug h. We Pa hang fo llowing the Te mbeli ng River, trusted to luck and lu ck was with us, for cut across so me li ttle kn o wn coun try into it proved that had we not had the g reat K e mama n, to visit the re a big ti n-mine a t good fo rtun e to fin c! an old dug-out hi dden Buudi, and then go on to the cas t coast. in the jungle wh ile we we re looking fo r materials to make a raft. we should have T he T embeling is a beautiful river been abou t three days without food, unless wi th many big rapids. I went up in we could hav~ ca ught fis h, before reaching a <I dug-out " with a fe w l\ifa lays and it llundi. owing to the abse nce of paths and was seve ra l days before we reached the the mul titude of fall en t rees bloc ki ng the spot wh ere further navigat ion became rive rs. I migh t digress fur ther he re to impossi ble and we had to take to the say that the chances of shooti ng foo d in jung le. T he pa rty then co nsisted of my- the j ung le while trave ll ing a re not suffiself, a J avanese boy, one Malay carrying cie nt to wa rrant ca rrying a g un. The my foo I a nother my clot hes and bedding. weight of a g un and a mmun itio n in tinl!cd and a third the rice. We had hard ly left food or in he ns is much more to the poin t. th e ri ver when our excite me nt began (I can hard ly call what follows "adventures II). Vofe mended o ur d ug-out as wt: lI as ,"Valking quietly along a path, each with we:: could with plugs of wood and clay, and a hen under his arm for fut ure cons ump- were ddighted to find that it wo uld carry tion (I am told that it is W TOn to call the all five of li S. We set off clown st ream in birds hens, but t1-:. e ri gid cftgnity of a good spir its, a nd I th ink it was the ve ry Malay chicken's flesh is slic h that the fi rst eve nin g in the du g-o ll t th at we came matron ly term seems more app ropria te ), 0 11 our g reat exci tement. T he ri ve r was (Âť


534-

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low and vcry narrow, in fact the dug-out co ul d only just get along. Ahout 6 p.m. we were drifting silently with the cu rrent, when on rounding a bend we surprised a

magnificent tiger asleep on a spit of sand. My J avanese boy leapt into action and handed me the revolver, but I shall always reflect with pleasure on the wisdom that prompted me not to use it. The Malays did and said nothing, and as we drifted on to the sand-spit we had the satisfaction of seein g the tiger ri se up and lurch away into the jungle. Never was the sight of a eat's tail more comfortin g. It is gratify ing to think that one has faced a ti ger unarmed (practically) and not run away. The hypercritical might object that funning away uneler the circumstances was a physical impossibility. but the fact remain s, and it is the facts of life that count. Previous to thi s meeting there had been some talk of campi ng for the night, but the subj ect was not mention ed again until we had pu t at least an hour' s journey between ourselves and the sand-spi t. By that ti me it was almost dark. and we had arrived at a spot where the shallow strea m ran betwee n two small ban ks of saud in the thick est jungle, the enormous trees on either side meeti ng far above our heads and shutting out the sky. In the deep gloom my boy was cooking the last of the hen s, an old grey, affable creature with a wall-p.ye. but grown thin from lo ng marr hing, whep. the jungle suddenly reechoed with a terrific blast from close by, the n another, then another. I was sitting unde r a waterproof sheet slung over a pole: the Malays were cooking rice.

I sat up with a tingling sensation at the roots of my hair and we all looked at one another while we realized the situation. We had camped 0 11 the edge of a herd of elephants who wanted to come and drink or c ross the stream where we were. The trumpeting went o n, and it was clear from th e noi se that one or two of the beasts must have been on the bank above us. My feelings were far from easy, but everything' has its humorous side, or nearly everything, and when I look back o n that night now it is the humorous side that appeals to me most. 'What happened was this. There was a possibility that the elephants might come down on us to have their drink or cross the stream, whichever they wished . and in doing so, smash up our dug-out, which would have been a disaster, to say nothing of trampling on us. But we had a fire and I argued to myself that if there were any real danger the Malays, whom I supposed to be more accustomed to dealing with such situations than myse lf, would tell me, and we would move on down stream-a perfectly simple manceuvre. They said nothing about danger , so I ate the hen, smo ked by the fire , and tried to behave as though invi<:iible elepha nts trumpeting, snortin g, and bang¡ ing bran ches about on a pi tch dark night in den se jungle, days away from habitation s. constituted surroundings I had long been accustom ed to and rather enjoyed. But the iVIa lays, as I found afterwards, had argued in precisely the same way. <l If Maste r thinks" th ey said "that there is any real danger he will say so, and we will go on down stream." The consequence was that five human beings, supposed to be sane, deliberately sat there, everyone afraid to own that he was afraid and


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appear a coward in the others ' eyes, while those elephants reconnoitred our position for four long hours, when at last they condescended to leave us in possession. Before closing this letter, already very long I fear, I should like to add that under different circumstances I should in all p~obability! be as keen as anyone else on blg.game shooti ng. But trophies collected dUrIng my work, which, as I have said, takes me to the wildest parts, wou ld only

O. K. S.

535

hamper me and very likely have to be abandon .!d. Moreover, I know that most men who have to go beyond civilization on. pe.aceful pursuits will agree with me in thmklllg that one necessary item towards ensuring a safe return is to leave severely ~Ione ani~als that are capable of II knock109 you sldeways" or reducing you to pulp. Yours ever.

J. B.

SCRIVENOR.

DINNER.

The Annual O.K.S. Dinner took res~onded to by Mr. Elwyn, with a 5 much place at the Cafe Monico on J an. 19 th , feeh ng as lifelong friends permit themunder the chairmanship of the Rev. selves to interchange in publk. The R. F . Elwyn, Headmaster of Rocheste r toast of .. Floreat Schola Regia" was Cathedral School. The attendance wa s proposed by the Rev. E. L. A. Hertslet not so full as in SOme previo us years, ( Domestic Chaplai n to the Archbishop). and we do not consider that a total o r [-Ie conve~ed a message of goodw ill from 4 0 :ep:~sents at all adequately the the ArchbIshop and a reg ret that he had posslbtl l~les of such a gatheri ng. Perhaps been unable to accept an invitation to the electIOns had something to do with it, preside on this occasion. Mr. Hertslet, but we shrewdly suspect that ma ny fai led to after congratulating the Headmaster on appear: through inability to get away'his appointment as an Hon. Canon of a preClolls phrase which provides a vague the Cathedral. spoke enthusiastically of but unassailable excuse and allows liS to the strong influences always exerted by hug the conviction that we are miohty th e School on her past mem bers. Canon busy feHows. After due honours don~ to Galpin in. the course of his reply re ferred the Throne, the health of the Chairman ~o some Improveme?ts that he hoped to was proposed by Mr. A. Latter, and lIlaugurate In the School premises, conC


T HE

CANT UARIAN.

giatnlated the Officers of the O .T.C. on the excellent results of the first year's training anel poi nted to the ample proofs of the h igh standard maintained in the various d epartments of School work.

Some excellent songs by Mr. B. H. Latter and Mr. G . M. Rende ll gave furt her interest to a gathering which was on all hands regarded as most sllccessfu l. E ighty next ycar, please!

ERRATA-WANDERINGS OF INTELLECT.

The following account of the last Debate has bee n received from an impartial contributor for, as he says, " I got so mew hat mixed as to arguments employed an d as to which sid e I finally backed,"

At 5. J 5. C. N. Ryan, Radical, began the opening speec h. I-Je proceeded to give a very clear exposition of the Liberal vi ews with reg3 rd to the .B udget, stating some Vel.')' extraordinary cases of collieries being sold for thousands of pounds per cub ic foot after costing only a half-penny in th e pound per acre, and showi ng how Ll oyd George pro posed to co nfiscate ce rtain of the leasehold laws. Followed (but d isagreed with) by C. F Battiscombe who, tho ugh speaking slower than the last speake r, was, if possible, less convincing and sho wed clearly the utter worthless ness of the last Government, in that they possessed Winston C. as a Minister. He then gave liS some trenchant denu nciations of somebody's

policy with regard to something else. Then came th e tea interval of ten minutes (the only period in th e evening in which we had time to collect our thoughts). These were nicely muddled up again by the next Land-taxer, H. D. Townend, who showed (am idst great applause ) that the Lib era ls had promised not to prevent Germany attacking us, that the condition of the Navy was never so extraordinary, and that Lord Charles Blatchford was a man . Th en jumped up D. J. N. Lee. aFoodtaxer, who mentioned that the method of electing Nationalists was too good to be tru e and that Asquith was unj ustified. No one objected to th is (if we ignore Except a few a heckler, sq uashed ). absolute ly biassed li ttle-Navy Libera ls who disagreed with him and tltey were rea lly wonderfully moved. He, th e Nationalist advocate, resumed hi s bench . Then came the speech of the evening by H is wit was as G. I-I. Claypole. scin til lating as a need le in a bundle or hay, and the Honse roared at his sall ies.


T HE

CANTUARIAN.

His last question "is Canterbury a Cathedral City)l ? moved many to tears. (Apparently Some Cathedral cities had not ele<;ted Liberals at the last elec tion . Gathered han. gent was h imself a FreeFooder).

.\37

. The debate being ope ned to t he audience, three speakers divided the following arguments.

. That the land-taxes proposed were dlsl?raceful. That th e Rad ica l use of a little Navy over the heads of the Then arose the P resident II'ho Ge r mans was a shame: that the food s u ~gested cabbages as an alterna'tive to taxes proposed were disgracefu l, that the 0p~l1m, all the Liberals p resent beinO" Navy was stronger than eve r, that the pOIsoned with vio lets in honour of Lord Navy was not; that the beer-taxes ~eaco nsfield . [ Query. \Vhy poisoned proposed were disgraceful. C. F . M . N, In ho nou r of ~ord B.? \~'e didn't know. ] ~ya n , a pro misi ng eno ugh you ng speake r He was perfec tly convinced that th e If !le stops at once, concluded the debate. Lords were part of the Tory organization, H 1.S speech was qu estionable, the q uestio n as Glad~to n e had said in J 66 J, and that belllg" why did they all persist in voting speculatIOn on the Stock Exchange ought I Liber~l '-? As usual nobody answered: to be forbidden by Laws (? Lo rds ) on 1 1he dIscourse ended with a co up le of account of the deficit in the Budg-et. exclamation marks. Cheers and counter '" exclamation ma rks.

HARVEY SOCIETY . T he office rs fo r th is term are as follows:-

President: M. Ware, Esq. HOll .

Secntary : C. F, Po·I. N . Ryan.

CO!ll?lUltu: The President, The HOll . Sec.,

W. F . C. Palliser, C. J. Galpin, C. L. Nightingale, E. F. H ousden.

List of Papers, Easter T erm, Feb. 19· "De Quincey."

19 1 0.

C. H. Claypole.

Feb. 26 ... Nests. "

E. F. Housden .

Mar. 5· "Spiritualism."

C. F. Battiscombe. H . Spence.

Mar.

12.

"Ants."

Mar. 19. " The O rchestra." C. Ma r. 26. "Cockroaches."

J. Gal pi n.

G.F.J. Rosenberg, Esq.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

CO RRE SPONDENCE. N. B.-The Editors declinc to auep' alty respomibi/it)' coltn ec/ed with the o/Jbtiom oj their Cornspolf ' dents. Nallle alld address must always be .e ivtn, lIot IUcessari/y jor /mblicQlitm J but as a guarantee of good failh . PerS(mal£ties will involve certain }',',diolt. Letters should 111 written ()It olle side of tilt paptt¡ Oil!;',

To Ih e Editors

0/ ., THE

CANTUAR IAN,"

DEAR S IRS,

Some tim e ago th e idea of a Sc hoo l Register was started, bu t it seems to have been allo wed to drop. I think this is a pity, and although the ~xpt:nse 01 a com ple te Regi ster wo uld be conside rabl e, yet 1 thi nk a vcry dficient and at th e same time easi ly constructed substitute could be made . My suggestion is simply that the addresses of the subscribers to the Q,K.S. Fund be added to their names in the Pink Book. After the first year the alteration and addition of addresses wo uld be very little trouble, and th e kn owledge of one;> another's wh ereabouts would be advan tageous to mallY O. K .S. To quote InY own case, I was here, in Norwich, for some 1 2 months be fore I discovered the presence of th ree other O.K.S. I think that the addition of th e addresses migh t also be an ind uct:: ment for others to subscribe to the O.1(.s. Fund. Yours faithfully. T. S. EMERY.

(1/" THE CANTUARIAN.I! SIRS, As I am anxious to make the records of o ur Conti nge nt O.T.C. as complete as possible, may I take advantage of your To Illl Editors

DEAR

columns to ask all O.K.S. who are serving in th e T erritorial Force or Special Reserve

of Officers to com mu nicate with me ? L should also be glad to have a complete list of O.K.S. members of any Contin gent of th e Senior Division O.T.C. ( Uni ve rsities, Hospitals. &c.)

Yours fait hfu ll y,

C. W. BELL, Capt. To th e Edl10rs 0/

H

THE CANTUA RJ AN/'

DEAR S IRS,

The s uggestion I am about to make, comin g as it does so soo n after the excit.ement of the t utorset matches, may perhaps seem somewhat invidious. My only apology is thi s; the necessity seemed to call forth the invention, and I hope 1 may be pardoned for t read ing o n rather dangerous gro un d. T he co ntest for th e shield thi s year has been a very ope n affair, and the t wo sets at the top have both lost a match. Under the present system of reckoning by points, we have the ano maly that th e winning set was beaten by the .run ners-up, and yet secured th e shi eld. In suc h a case as this, wo uld it not be better for all concerned if the first and seco nd sets played off a final game for the cham pionship? Surely thi s would be a fairer method and in addition


TH E

CANTUARIAN.

would provide an excellent" wind-up" to the foote.r season, instead of the usua l tame end mg. Without any excitement. CALM

IDIOT.

We have received the following from a Correspondent :_ There arc many wonderful things in our. world, but one of the most wonderful IS a littl e Annelid or sea-wonn known as Palolo verud is which, by some method on ly known to its Creator, determines th~ day of the month, and the acre of the n:l Oon-a . feat whi ch wo ul d b~mc most human bClIlgS. These worms rise to the sllrface of the sea in the Navigation I slands on four days only in the year nam ely, before, and the day of, th ~ last quarter of the Moon in Oct. and Nov . Now let a ny of Our readers suppose t~at he was put to sleep for an indefinite tllne, ~md t:allsported during hi~ sleep to an ulll nhabtted isla nd, and wh en he woke up there, were at th e task of d isco vering the day ~f the month and the age of the ~oon WIth extreme exactitude, and he Will t~en realize the feat whi ch these AnnelIds perform. Even a skill ed Astronomer a nd Mathemati cian would not find the calculation an easy one.

Dear Si r,

Suhmarine Min in g School, Gi lli ngham, Kent, january, i glO.

.1 . sh~)U ld be g lad if you would give publICIty 111 your School paper to fact that th ere are three vacancies for co mmissions

539

in the Chatham Companies of th e Kent Fortress Royal Engineers. T.wo C?f the vacancies exi st in the two E~ectnc LIght Companies, and one in the ~ orks Company. The duties of the former are to man th e Searchlights of the Thames and Medway Defences, and of the latter to ca rry out the Field Engineering req uired on the land front of the Fortress. I am a nxi ous to obtain Publ ic School men, and s hould be glad if any of your Old Boys, ove'.' 18, particularly those who have served III any Officers TraininO' Co rps,. w.ho are desi ro us of being offered CO mnllSS1 0ns would comm un icate withCapt. F. V. THoMP,oN. R .E., Adjutant, Kent ( I"ortress). R.E., Submarine Min ing School, Gillingham, Kent. Office rs' expenses in this Corps have been redu ced to a minimum. A previous kn o wl edge of the work is not essential ~lS Officers' Classe~ with full pay anci <lilowances are provId ed at the Sc hoo l of Electric Li~h t, Portsmo uth, and at the Sc hoo l of Military Engineering, Chatham . . Illte~l(lin g Officers s hould either live 1Jl the neighbo urhood of Chatham, Or be l~repared to travel there two Or three ~lInes a month. and to spend a fortnight III Camp. Yours faithfull y (Sig?led)

,

NORMAN F. STRPHENS Major Officer Commanding Kent ( Fdrtress) E . To the Officer Commandi n 0cr ' Offi eers Training Co rps King's Schoo l, â&#x20AC;˘ Canterbury.

R.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

NOTICES . We beg to acknowl edge with thanks the receipt of the following Subscriptions ;-

A. J. Blackford. E sq. (J/6). C. F. G Walker. Esq. (7/-). E . F. Smart, Esq. (3/6). C. H. Woodhouse, Esq: (3/6), Wright I-Iunt, E sq. ( J/6), E . G. 1 easdale, Esq. (,/6). G. E. L. Hargreaves, Esq . (J/b), R. H. Edwards, E sq. (J/6), Rutley Mowll. Esq. (3/6). C. Redman. Esq' ,( 3/6). C. J. N. Adams, Esq. (3/b). MISS Evens, (J/6), L. G. L. Denne, Esq. ( 3/ 6), Rev. Canoll Stuart (J/b), A. W. RI chardso n, Esq. (3/b) . D. F. Co rson. Esq .. ( 3/b) . J. M. Courtney. Esq. ( Z/4). K. B. DIckson,

Esq. (Io/b), R. S. Haskew, Esq. (3/6). A. E. Carpenter, Esq. (J/6) • .1. H. Rammell, Esq . (7/-). C. M. RIcketts. E sq. (3/b). Rev. F. H. Hall (J/6), G. F. Paget, Esq. (7/6). B. n. Horsb rugh, Esq. (3/6), G. Hawkes. Esq. (3/6). P. Hemery, E sq. (7/-). P. Chave. Esq. (3 /b) , A; J. Fenn, Esq. (3/b), G. Lee Warner. Esq . (7/-), Capt. W. H. Evans, (J/b) , ~~v. E. J. Janson Smith (3/-), B. Cro'lley. Esq . (J/6). F . S. Whalley, Esq. (J/ 6). H . P. W . L . I," . Rc)'nolds, Esq. (3/b), Sparling. Esq. (J/6), H. C. B a ker, Esq. (7/- ), A. D. D. Spafford, Esq. (7/-), R. W. H . Moline. Esq. (3/6). F. L . SIDEBOTHAM. H OIl. Sec.

OUR CONTEMPORARIES. We beg to acknowledge the receipt

of the following;Blut, Bmdjidd C~romCle•. Bromsgroman, Eagle, E'aslboltl1ltaJl. Elzzabelllall,

Pellts/an , folmjan. King's SellOot jl1a~az~"/e. Lallciwl' College Magazillt, L eodte11S1.all, Leys F;rlllighlly, Lorellollz'OIl, 111alverlll,flll , O/avian, Ousd. Swan, Plymolluan . rrj'verJl.

Gibbs and Sons, Printer,. Palace Street, Canterbury.


THE VOL . VII.

CANTUARIAN. APRIL,

IqlO.

No. zo,

EDITORIAL. How do? It really is grand to see you again . What glorious weather we are ha ving now. And they tell me the Sports will be held after all. Yes: such rain we had-you n~ver would have thought it. Do you know that it absolutely poured on the two half-h oldidays we had in honour of the Headmaster . . .. Well, you know, .

people diffe r.

Some prefer to call him Canon Galpin, but I believe (and I heard it

from a ve ry safe source) that he wishes to be ca lled Dr. Ga lpin. Such a striking red, is it not, that Oxford D.D. hood. Yes, the induction was a g reat success . .. . You

sa w the Bishop of Arkansas? Really?. , oh yes J â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ . onyes I ... yes . .. yes-er no . , .. yes, yes . .. Ah-um-how interesti ng I I' ve been watching th e Boat Races : do you row? Tell me, why do they empty out the boats so often? They seem to be always full (If water. I as ke-d a man who was turning his boat upside down and patting its und erneath whether that was called bucketing j but he said that was bilges Or bilge or something. They always Seem to be patching up their Boats. I Suppose they must want new ones. No; I don't row myself: but I kn ow a man who ... yes . . . no, no .. . res , yes . . . yes . . . Ba ... Ha . . . Haven't you heard of our Band yet? Extraordinary noise just at prese nt, but most promising. Spanking, as yo u say. Oh, you didn 't say If spanking "-sorry, old man, sorry. I've been


THE

CANTUARI AN.

shooting i my ears are all deaf just at present. Corps going strong? Of course it is ... yes, er ... yes, yes ... I say j I'm really sorry. but I must trot off now, I got to drill-you'll find any news you'll want in the Cantuaggers here. The School has been abu ndantly honoured by the way in which the Dean and Chapter have decided to recogni ze th e work of our prescnt H eadmaster, by ca n¡ ferring on him an Honorary Canonry of the Cathedral. At the same time he took his degree of Doctor of Divinity at Oxford. These two triumphs we re celebrated by two half-holidays. Friday and Saturday, 11 th and 12th Nl arch; and in tht! mornin g of the latter day the School attendt::d the ceremony of Induction. whi ch took place durin g Cathedral Mattins. Vve are glad of this opportunity to put into print the congratulations of the School, wh ich have hitherto been only by applause .

3n Memoriam. -1< THOMAS

MOSSE

-1< Thomas Mosse Macdonald, whose death at the comparatively early age of 52, occurred on the 12th of January at West Malvern, was one of three brothers who were educated at the School. H e entered the School with his twin brother in 1870, and became in turn a Junior and Senior Schol ar. H e left in 1875, winning onc of the School exhibitions, ha ving already gained a Scholarship at Brasenose College, Oxford . Later on he was elected to a Hulmeian Exhibition at that College; he obtai ned also a 3rd class in Moderations and a 3rd class in Greats. In J 879 he gained the Newdigate Prize with his poem "Iona," which with some other of the author's ve rses was

MACDONALD.

afterwards published. In 1881 he was Prox. Acc. for the Ellerton Theological Essay. For some years after taking his degree h e was Secretary of Kin g's College, Lond on, of which Dean Wace was Principal. But he had always a drawing towards Holy Orders, and in I ~93 was ordained by the Bishop of Chester, and became Chaplain and Classical Tutor of St. Aidan's College, Birkenh ead, where he worked for two years. Then , wishing for parochial work, between 1895 and IQ 03 he served in five different cu racies in the diocese of Worcester, one bei ng at St. Alban's, Birmingham, and another at Kidderminster ; and in ' 903 he was presented by the Ecclesiastical Com ..


THE

CANTUARIAN .

missioners to the benefice of W t Malve rn . In I906 he was the Anniv::s ary P reacher In the Cathed ral on the chool Speech Day. I t has been well said of hi m that

543

~li~.w.ads a ~}'m pathetic

and picturesque uahty-that he was a man of cultured and scholarly tastes gifted \~lth great spirit and humour: and of smgular attractiveness, and his loss causes a blank in many hearts.

10 IVl

+ LIEU T.-COLONEL

EDWIN

STANLE'_Y

The late Lieut.-Colonel Ed win -Dickenson was b om 111 . . Stanl ey Newton . G ucrnsey 111 the )'car 7 b' â&#x20AC;˘ 184. emg t he so n k 0 [ t IIe late Rev . E . N ewtonD' IC enson, formerly of D osthill House, SF~affo rd. and Mary, daughterofCo lonel 1tzgerald,d of sh' T Maperton , Some rsetIre, an urloll gh Park C Ma)Io H . ,ountv . . e ma rned in 1880 Alice Cathenn.e, daughter of Edward Field o~ Norwic h, and t widow of J E . Lee ' L ' leu enant of the 55th R egim en t. ' He fi rst became attached to th 8th Foot Regiment, and on bein e tralls fe~red to the Lancashire Fusilier; he attallled the rank of captain H' ~bseq~ently acted as adjutant to orksillre Re~imel1t. from which he e~e ntuall y retired with the rank of LIe utenant-Colonel.

th:

Lieut. - Colonel Dickenson will

N EWTON -DI CKENSON.

perhaps, be chiefly re membered b re~son of the position which he held a~ High Seneschal of Canterbury Cathe dra l, to winch he was appointed in C895. A few yea rs later he became lerk t.o the. Chapter. and in , 902, on the resIgnahon, we believe of Cano Holland, he also acted as agent to th n e Cha pter. The funeral took place on Th da urs. y, th e 2ft h . A service was conducted 111 th e Nave of Canterbury Cathedral at z p.m. by the Lord Bishop of Dover and the Dean of Canterbury. There were a large number of clergy present a number of the members of th~ County Bench of Magistrates the ~ayor of Canterbllry, and others' The :nterm~nt. by the exp ress wish ~f the ate Ll~ut.-Co l onel Dicken son, took place In Thanington church ard LFrom Canterbury Pnss.] y.


THE

54+

CANTUARIAN.

THE GYMNASIUM.

.

standard of work m the Under Sergt.-Majo r Cooper and IllS aSslstan sCars 'E.s ecially among the Gymnasium has risen considerably above that ofhformer yde th·e ex!rcises in the New · 11 ergy has been s own , an younger mem bers mu eh rno.r~ en d l C better than last year. vve Boys and under 1 6 Competltlons \~ere on the wh.o~e. ~l who have being doing gym. have noticed several people ol1ts~de the 1St DIY~fl~esu1ts to th emselves. It is to be voluntarily three time s a week-with very beneficlt f r 't is obvious that 5S minutes' hoped that more will follow th eir exampl e next y~arfr 0 t I Meanwhil e we look forward gym in seven day s is not enough to have any rca e e~ . eac h week tim e when everyo ne will have at least two hours gym. . I J J to .. J JI Tuesday Narc 1 221H, The New Boys' and und er 16 COmpetl~I~~l~ b" ;~~n~~~er~l~IC m~r~i~s. The marks and were won by Clayton and Gent respectlve } } . ve re as follows: .

.

th

t

the

NEW BoYS'

Horilonllli

Parallel Bars.

Bar.

(I)

(2)

1

5

5

... 6

3~

4,

... .. .

3,

Latter': Best

...

Groom

..

..

I,

J

12

----

Tomkins

... ...

H ousden': ." Gore

...

.. •1 61

\6 .. . 3. .\4

-

Ortler.

, ,

( .)

•• ••

,. --54

1.

(, )

- - --

1'01:'11.

Rope.

(4l

(,)

3

4~

7,

6

2 13 3 3

4

3

6

-

44

II

5

2, 1 3 ~

3

5

-

4 1,

2,

6

4

3

3,

7

-

39

I V.

5

I,

4

([1.

4~

<I

3.

4,

3.

2.

2,

3,

4

-

32

V.

2, 3

2

3

5

2~

2,

2

2

3

UNDER

16

9

7

9

8,

6

5

7

4.

4~

8

7;

6;

3

5,

5

3

I

Gent

s

6

... ... ...

Hassell

\ (,)

s

5i

7,

French

(.)

••

7

----

... 8 ... 5

CI:lylon

T

(.)

,0

10

Horse.

Rings.

10

10

-

COMPF.TlTTON.

COMPETITlON.- ( l}fax.,

_.

58,

II.

7

57

Ill.

30

36

[v.

4

S

4

3,

7 4

3;

I,

I

1.

5 8

:I.\::I;

VI.

69;

9;

5

\

90 ) .

3' 3,

3 \ 3.

27


THE

CANTUARIAN.

545

The Open Competilion wa!'; ht'·ld on March 24th. Afte r a close contt'st Cowie won by one mark from Housden. Snatt was, unfo rtunately, out of schooL Horizolllal

nar.

(.)

------ -•• Ml'Iximum

Cowie

...

...

H ousde n l

...

... 9. ... 4

Gottwaltz ...

Way te l

...

Beards worth

6

41

... 3

(,)

Parallel

Bars.

Rings.

-(.)- (,)

Rope.

Horse.

T otal. Older.

(.)

(,)

(,)

(.)

(,)

, , , •• •• go •• - •• - •• - -•• - - S --- - - - --- --(:;)

9

5.

9.

8,

5

4. 4.

5

9.

9

76

l.

8i

6.

8.

6.

41

41

4.

4.

8.

9

75

II.

5

4.

41

6

3

4;

4

4

7.

7

54

Ill.

5

4

4

4.

3

3.

31

3.

7

7

49.

IV.

1

31

3

3

2.

31

2.

3

5.

5

37.

V.

Cowie was seve ral marks below his true form, especially in the first exercises on the horizontal and parallel bars. Housden was about his usual standard and sho ul d be very good next year. The Junio r School Com petition was won by Wacher'; B a rber~ 2nd; Galpin) Jrd . At Aldershot the pair-D. H. Cowie and E. F. H ousden-were 15th. The place is not so hi gh as we have bee n acc ustom ed to fill in the last fe w years, but that was no fault of the pair, who were every bit as good as usual and did their best throughout the com petition. We wish to tender our thanks to them for their strenuous work, and also LO Sergt.-Major Cooper whose energy and vigour has done much to make up for the short ti me at his disposal. We can only hope th at nex t year he will be able to see th e shield here as the fruit s of his labour. At a meeting of the Sports Committee it was decided that R. L. Gottwaltz, C. V. Snatt, and J . W. 'Wayte should receive their colours this year ; in future colo urs (not exceeding eight in num ber) to be a ward4~d by the Sports Committee acting under advice of the gym, instructor.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

PENNY READING. Saturday, February 5th, 1910, at 8.15 p.m. PROGRAMME.

.' .. .... \

PIANO SOLO ........................ . .. .

MR. GODFREY.

SONG." ......... H I-rouse of Pee rs

•••

SIII/iva",

REA DING ...... ................................... . .... . .

G. I-I. CLAVPOLl~ and C. K. Mown. D UET ............ " I have n songll ......... Srlllival1. C. L. NI GliTINGA l.i~ and G. B. PRATT. PIANO S01.0 ... ... " J ngcrlicd" ..... .. l lfcDowell.

SONG ...... " ....

H

SONG

II

W.

. ..Moi,-,

C. F. BA'I'TI SCOMnE. ,< Norwegischc T anze" .. . erie/f_

PIA NO D UET ...

C.

SONG.

J.

GALPIN and 1\11(, GODFREY .

. .," Yeomen of Rngland " MR.

DUET......

Gerll/{llt.

P OOLE.

"Willow \Valy " ... .... .Sul/;1)all. R. PRATT.

C. L. NI GliTINGA\.F. and G .

R YAN.

Suicide's GTI\ve" ..... 5ttllivml.

J.

c.

SONG ...... ..... . " Down the Vale" ... .. . If ••

C. V. SNATl"

C. F. M. N.

PIANO SOLO" Chansons Espagnolcs" JetlSeII. J. GALPIN.

SONG.,

Ehcu Fugaces !" .. W. C. PALl.I SE1L I I

. SIlIUvall .

WhYTE.

The Magnet and the Churn " Stllliv(lH.

PIANO D UET .... . .

. . •. .. . ' ........

MR. GODFREY a nd C.

C. L. NIGHTtNGAl.E.

J.

GI"I·e.~,

GAI.PIN.

LITERARY SOCIETY. A Society has bee n forme~l u ~de r this title for th e reading of dramatiC hterature. Its numbers are confined to twenty·three, and the Sixth Form has p reference of membership, any vacancies then left being filled by co-option from the Upper Fifth. The Society avoids fonna.lity as far as possible, but has been obltg~d to maintai n its organization by ele ctm~ a President (R. E. Everitt. E sq.). a V,cePresident (Rev . L. H .. Eva ns),. and a Secretary (C. J. GalpIn ). Dunn g the

T erm the following plays have been read: .. Mid summ er Night's Dream ," " H enry V " and The \¥inter' s Tale." The r~ading was inclined to be nervOUS and halting at first, but has improved \"ast~' even in the small number of plays rca . The Society is deeply indebted. to th,'. President for his energy III prepann g th t plays and alloting the characters ; an d t.o Mr. Evans fo r the. kind loan of hut draw ing-room for readmgs. II


THE

CANtUARiAN .

5+7

HARVEY SOCIETY. Some very successful meetings have been helo this T erm, and, for the later ones, th e attendances have been good. It was a great pity that papers like the one on De Quincey, whi ch was so interesting from a literary poin t of view, and like that on .. Nests," whi ch shoul d have attracted all naturalists, should have been only feebly supported. The papers read this T erm have all been very well worth hearing, and only one person failed to redee m his promise of a .pape r. It should not be necessary to inform members-of which th l" re are over eighty-that it is pointless to join the Society and no t attend the lectures. On Saturday, Feb ru ary 19th, at five p.m. G. H. Claypole read a paper 011 "De Quincey." H e began hy giving a short acco unt of this a.uth or' s life, commenting on his extraordinary precocity in yo uthfo r he was a complete classical scholar at th e age of fifteen. The remarkable fact about his work is that he neve r wrote a line befo re he was thirty-five, an d yet he is one of the most vol uminous of English auth ors. A large proportion of his writings are uninteresting j he was neither hum ourist nor logicia n, and at times he tended towards lo ng- windedness. But a few of his essays rank with the best English work. H e wrote historical, critical and romantic essays in a style noted specially for the music of its utterance. H e was, however, a bigoted Tory,

and subject to some weak and very co ntemptib le prejudices. His lIse of opium began during his Oxford days i it was the only remedy for an especial disease and le ngthened his life by some thirty yea rs. The lecturer read several extracts from the essays; and these were fo llowed by a discussion . On Saturday, f ebruary 26th, E. F. Housden read a pape r on "Birds' Nests," at which there was only a moderate attend¡ ance. It was illustrated by lante rn slides, which were somew hat handicapped by the fact that the room was not qui te dark. Ho wever, some of them were excellent, all of them were good, and they were all made by the lecturer. H e first dealt with the nests of those birds which build upon the groun d, and then gave a few examples of nests situated in trees. H e pointed out how birds, which choose the same nesting si te, differ greatly in their selection of nes tin g materials. Finally he discussed those birds which build on cliffs, and answered several general questions on the formation of nests . On Saturday, February 12th, at 6.3 0 p.m., C. F . Battiscombe read a pape r on .. Spiritualism." The attendance was very good, and the experiment of holding a meeti ng after tea was quite justified. He rel ated some remarkable instances of spiritual phenomena, and gave results of recent sittings with a medium Eusapia Palladino. Perhaps the most re markable


tHE CANTUARiAN. was that of the levitation of D. D. Hume out of th e window on the ground fl oor into

that of the floor above. He then proceedect to give some explanations of these Occurrences on the basis of Hudson's theory

respl¡ cti ng the

objective

minds.

In

suhjective

conclusion

and

he

pointed out that thou gh the ph e nom e na of

Spiritualism and the Science ofPsycho!ogy are extremely interesting, th e results are but trivial and tell us nothing of any real

value.

On Saturday, March 19th, C. J. Galpin gave an excelle nt lecture on "The Orchestra." He statted by showing the composition of an orchestra. pointing out how it was divid ed into fouT families, nam ely, the wood wind, th e brass windwhose sounds are produced by blowing on instruments of wood or brass res pectively- the strings, including the harp and piano. and the battery, wh ich consisted of instruments struck by percussion. Each family was taken in turn from its earliest so urce, and traced down to its present position in the orchestra. The ancient instruments were illustrated by lantern slides, and their mod ern counterparts by gramaphone records. The lecturer th en expl ained how the orchestra was placed wi th regard to the conductor. and showed what a difficult task a conductor of a big orchestra had.

Bringing to a close probably one of the best pape rs read before th e Society for some time. he pointed out what instru men ts were prod ucing the various so unds as an orchestral record was played on the gramaphone. On Saturday, Marc1i 26th, G. F. J. Rosenberg. E sq ., read a paper on . , Cockroaches " and other things, these being chitfty microscopes a nd photomicrography. H e brought up his apparatus to the Parry Library, and explained how negatives a re taken of slides as looked at through a microscope. Most of the slides shewn during the paper were made by himself. and " ere the He result of much patient labour. sketched the habits of the cockroach . and deplored the fact that it had no friends. I-Ie then dealt in somt: detail with its head, its body, and its legs, and co mpared th em with those of other in sects. By simple mathemati cal reasoning he proved that. although fleas can jump several tim es thei r own hc;"ight, elephants cannot lea p over the Cathed ral. After the lecture he explained in fuller detail the working of the photomicrographic apparatus, and amplified several further points of an extre mely inte res ting paper. The mee ting was attended by some fifty members, and was a very suc cessful conclusion to a very successful Term.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

549

THE LIBRARY. The follo wing boo ks have been added to the Library :_ " London Town Pas t and Present" cd . by W W H t h ' t. National D~fence ." ' . . u C ¡ lllgs. " S~ien c~ in.. 1\~odc r.1l ~irc , " ed . by J. R. Ainsworth Da\' is. d'" C . Maitland 5 Constitu tIO nal Hi story of F nghnd " and B' ~1~~I:f\~~istory of the Middle Age~ " ; < bo'th kindlya~nr~~el:ted ~;'fr~n ~~ Professor Osler's " Th omas Linacre"; ki ndly presented by the Author.

KHAYYAMAERA, Awake! for Mornin g in th e shape of Potts I-l as summon ed us all sleepy from our cots ~nd hark! the frigid all-indifferent Bell ' b ¡om off our Fancy each Night-phantom blots.

Dreaming before so me Fiends Ala rm gave tongue

I heard a ll oaf-stentorian of lun g , Murmur some hazy lingo of Parades And Formi ng Fours - I think I wished him hung.

" ~i s a ll ~ Cheque-board of Dark and Light, ',.'.here Nature, lIke a Machiavellian Sprite, GIves we~ry Mortals far too long a day - And With low cunnin g cancels half the night.

I sOIll.etimes think that Parodies are cheap, In cJ~lef tl~at feebl~ so rt that makes one weep, (I thlOk thIS one wIiI take th e latter line) Oh, happy thought! Pe rchance it is too deep. I meant to spin a yarn abo ut a Bell But now I think there isn't much t~ tell . And when it wakes me for the final time' 1 ween I'll heave a sigh and say" Farewell."


55 0

tHE

CANTUARIAN.

OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS. There is not much to report this Term under this head. The training has been mu ch interfered with by the bad weather, and consequently not much progress has been made. We have. however, pushed along with our Musketry. A very interesting Miniature Course has been laid down. and until we get well set. we shall have to content ourselves with that. The Elementary Test has occupied us all this term in the Gymnasium. and except for a few stragglers, whom carts and horses won't drag on to the range till all is over, we have pretty well polished off the whole of the four practices which make up the T est. The shooting on the whole is quite good; only a tiny majority have failed to reach the standard. Next term the Qualifying Test of five marc difficult practices will be shot on the Miniature Range at the Barracks. I am glad that 28 cadets have been able to fire 20 or 25 rounds apiece of ball cartridge this term on the 200 yd. range. A good deal was lea rnt. I will not say who scored two out of his twenty poin ts, but I will record thaI.. Cd.¡Officer D. H . Cowie made a possible. We have had two "long days" this term. On one occasion we supposed ourselves to be a strong patrol of two com panies bent o n turning a detached force of the enemy out of his position this side of Chartham. The enemy showed fight contrary to orders and held up our sco uts, but the latter, with commendable selfdenial. and under the stern leadership of Sergt. Mowll, refrained (on th is occasion ) from undertaking the responsibility of a frontal attack and left the" rollin g-up " to be done by Capt. Latter on the high road and Capt. Bell on the lower road. To th e best of my recoll ectio n the ene my entered Chartham und er an escort of fixed bayone ts at the tail of Capt. Latter's colu mn, and the whole force ftew upon ginger¡ beer and buns in the village school-roo m. Our second day-out was when we tried an outpos t scheme on the Scotland Hills. Capt. Harland was presen t. I think something was learnt. Generally s peaking we have not mad e the advance in extended movements which T should have liked to see; the weather and the weL ground have kept ti S to close o rde r and th e g ravel. Nor have the lectures bee n encouragingly attend ed. Certificate A will take some getting. It is hoped th :.l t a combined Field Day, in which East Kent Schools will take part, will be held on May 12th. The Inspection has been fixed for June 23rd. The Annual Camp this yea r will be held on Salisbury Plain. This Continge nt will march into Camp on Friday, July 29th, so that at any rate for this year the date of Speech Day will not want alttring. It has been decided to mn a Drum and Fife Band. As noiseless dmms and bugles are to be invented, it is to be feared that people wit h nerves will have for sarno time to exercise co nsiderable patie nce and moderation of language. The fifers havo


THE

CANTUARIAN.

55 '

already got beyond the stage at which mere wind is produced, and no doubt before long a modern Ba~aam will be req uis.itioned. The big drum is yet in the painter's hands. \Vhen DanH:: 1 gets to work on It! The subject is too painful. I am .afraid O.K.S. don't read their Call1uarian. If they did, I should have had man)' rephes to m)' letter printed in the last number. So far oIlI), aile Royal Naval Volunteer has communicated with me. Even E. B. H. has not fulfilled his promise mad.e three month s. ago. I know there are many Old Boys adorning several Regiments and Contmgents. May I hope for a prompt post card from each ?

I feel it is my duty again to l1rge O~l a~l . Cadets-and I hope their parents will read . \~hat I wnte-tha~, th~ ~fficers framing Corps exists for th e purpose of recTlutmg offic~rs for the I e.rrltonal Force and the Special Rese rve of Office rs. We shall not be dOlllg o ur duty If we do not all do our best to e nter either one or the o ther. VI/e. have plenty of good stuff-I don't thi nk any Contingent can produce bette; materIal than w e have in our Cade~-Office rs , Co~our-Sergeants, and Sergeantsand} au may be sure that the Commandlllg O fficer Wll! not spare himself to help on anyone who means to do his duty.

C. W. B.

FIVES. The 1st pair have played two match es; again st the S.A.C. they were beaten by two games to one. Unfortunat~ly Gordo n was. out of School. His place was taken by Housde~ who, a lth ough playmg very well mdeed, did not come up to Gordon 's form . Agalllst th e C.O.S. we won (gamc-j , game-5) . the return match had to be abandoned. . â&#x20AC;˘ , The. 2nd pair played one match only, v. S.A.C ., and we re weakened as Housden was playmg for the I st on the same day. The under ,6 singles have been won by H. L. H. Cremer.

The pai rs are as follows : I st pair 2nd " 3rd "

R. E. Gordon and A. C. Fluke. E. F. Housden and G. C. W. Harker. F. H. Sea brooke and R. Juekes.


55 2

THE

CANTUARIAN.

ROWING. In reviewing the record of th e Boat Cl ub this Term it is noticeable that the num ber of members is greater than that of any previous T e rm . Owing to the absence however of boat race s last Easter through illness. there were a large numbe r of novices on han d, and in fact th ere were not more th an twelve or fifteen membe rs who had ever rowed in a race before. This naturally gave rise to (i great necessity fo r coaching , but owing to the combined efforts of Mr. Reay, the Captain, and Vice~Captain a nd the others, who devoted a large portion of their tim e this T e rm to coac hing, th e difficulty was shrm ounted. and the resul ts of the ra ces are greatly to t hei r credit. The coaching was however by no means the only difficulty, and the real source of delay and an noyance in fraining the" fours" lay in the fact that the boats themselves were constantly requirin g repairs. Our boats have done th eir duty and done it nobl y in b }'~gone days, bu t now th e fact has to be faced that they ha ve reached a state in whi ch repairs a re an impossibility and th ey might well be recommended for" old age pensions l" It is clear that the need of new boats is urge nt. These are only a few o f the many difficulties which th e Captai n has had to face ' during this T erm , and he dese rves much cong rat ul ation for the successful res ul t of the rowing as proved by the excellent fo rm di splayed in the races. The " Juniors " present rather a formidabl e list 0 11 pape r, but they were dispatched in prompt style in the heats rowed on Tuesday, March 22nd. A fairly strong breeze blowing again st stream raised rath er a choppy surface which always te nd s towards that species of " shell fi sh" so well known to the novice oar. In spite of these conditions, however, some quite good rowing was witnessed betwee n th e emptyings of the boats. In th e race between Cooper and Braddell's boats th e latter won by half a le ngth. so me slight excitement being caused by a bad crab bow three yards from the finish ; recovering themselves howeve r they just managed to win. In H eat II. Da~i e l's boat beat Hinds! after a close race. In Hcat III. Sidebotham's boat beat Jucke~' l boat easily, th e latter bei n g hind ered by crabs by "bow" and . 1 two." In Heat IV. Braddell's boat met Daniel's boat and succ umbed to them, the latter possessi ng greater staying power. The conditions on Thursday were ideal, and some very good rowing resulted. The first race was a Senior, Nightingale's v. Smith's, wh ich resulted in a fairly easy win for Smith's boat, who caught their opponents by the corner and kept their advantage all the way, although at one time Nightingale's boat drew away slightly on the strai ght. The next race was Ju ckes' v. Cumberbatch's boat. Owing to a bad start by the fo rmer, Cum berbatch's crew had their opponents well in hand from the beginning and kept close up to them all the way. The Junior Final was then rowed and proved a hard fought contest. In spite of a bad start Sidebotham's

or


THE

CANTUARIAN.

553

crew drew away and h Id I' h i d was, however, too fast efor ~;e~ :n ea at the ?eginn.ing of the" straight." Th e pace boat began to tell i th eir stroke Pic~~~~ts~penorh welg~t and lastin¥ power of Danie l's by the narrow margin of half a Ie ng th ~ at t e finI sh and they Just ma naged to win event on the programm e the Sen·lor F: 1 en cam e the last and probably the best lll.a, and although .Sm ith·s c rew won by three length s, yet for the first hal f of tl the boats. and in the end botl 1e COurse there ~vas nothin g much to choose between gai ned sligh tly up to the bend, ~lI~re~~:i~:e r~ qUltc;owed out. Cu mberbatch 's boat drew away slightly 'md at tl 0 0 an excellent Co rn er by Depree Smith a~ vantage. Once ·o~ the" st;: ig~~tn~,m en ~Clllel1t. of the straigh.t n ej~he r boat 'had th e hIS cre w kept a good swin o- a ll th '" S~ltl~ Iset~lIlg a steady tlllrty~slx to the minute, M e \\ ay, <lll ( astll1 g we ll to the end, they 1V0n by three lengths.

11 t l k Everything we nt off ver Captai n, an d Ste wards anI t'~: " a lall s to the combined efforts of the President in teresting pro (Yramm e' Tile }. re to be co? g ra tulated on a very successful and co stan d a rd ; manyo of th em' took novice II . xes' t hiS )rear \ 'e re Con sl'd cra bl y above the Afi . exce ent corne rs, notably Best a nd Kerrich . h rk ter th e races, WIth a pec ulhr unheard of sprang into existence n~u s r~om~ 1 ' e growth, me mbers heretofore ~rm s." where th ey had a most e~J·~nab[ l1~t~ a ormldab~e party invaded th e " Fordwich III which he passed a favourable X.· e e<\. After th iS the Captain made a speech • r . cn t IClsm ' n e c ~sslty lor di sci pline in th e boats Th on p . the . Junior F ours, IHit e mpI laSlsed the SenlOrs and also made a fe w pessim'isflc e l e~l de11L then spoke a few words about the were closed with chee rs for the Pres'd t~emdar hS aCbout ~he ne w boats. Proceedings I en an t e a ptal1l. . The crcws were as follows :_

< ,

d

1. Bow. Glyn 2. Wakeford Town e nd~ 3· Str. Nightingale (Capt.) Cox. Best

I. Bow. Thre lfall 2. Sidebotham! Fry 3· Str. Sharpe' Cox. Pilgrim

SltNJOR FOURS.

II. Bow. Ryan 2. Morris! Fardell' 3· Str. Smith (Capt. ) Cox. Depree

III. Bow. Gordon ! 2. Beardsworth ,;Vayte t 3· Str. Juckes ' (Capt. ) Cox . Gent

IV. Bow. Dodgson 2. Cumberbatch (Capt. ) 3· Foster Stl'. Ke)'sel' Cox. Gore

J UN IOR FOURS.

II.

Bow. Lee 2. Morris' French 3· Str. Bradde" Cox. Kin g

III.

Bow. Sidebotham' 2. Sandes Musson 3· Str. J uckes' Cox. Housden'


THE

5H IV. Bow. H asse ll 2. Gordon 2 H ey wood 3· Str. Cooper Cox. K eble

CANTUARIAN. VI.

V. Bow. Claylon 2. Barbe r Daniel 3· Str. Smythe Cox. Kerrich

Bow. Hinds 2.

Latter" Durham SIr. Mason Cox. Pralt

\Ve beg to acknowledge the rollowing donations :£ s. d.

The H eadmaster (first donation ) . . E. K. Barher, Esq. B. G. Garibaldi, Esq . S. D. Turner, E sq .

5 2

o

o

o o 16

o o o o

D . V. Baco n, E sq . E. ElIam, Esq. A. B . F. Cottrell , E sq . C. , . Galpin .. O.K.S. Oxon ...

£ 0

s. d. 10

0 0

0

5

0

10

0

0

0 0

ot

SCHOOL AND O.K.S. NEWS. \Ve hea rtily congratulate H. Gardner o n playing for the Army agains,t the Navy. We are told on good authonty that he was the best half-back on the field. 0)(.-:"11-

The Senior Steeplec hase was, run on March 5th. The re were 2 1 . entrIes ~nd J 8 starters, of wh om I I fintsh ed: 1 he g ro und was still heavy afte r the recent rains. A. C . T elfer took the lead at the top of the first hill and maintained It easIly throughout the race, 'yinning in the excellent time of Z9 mm. 3 sees. He was apparently quitl! as fresh at the Baths as at St. Stephe n's, and c~:)Uld have reduced the time considerably If pressed.

H e was followed at an interval of 50 seconds by H. L . H. Cremer,. R . B. Saunderson was third, an d C. L . Nlg~tm: gale, who ran very pluckily with a spramea foot, rourth. -x.

';"

'No

On F e b. '7th, G. H. Hallam, Esq., gave a most interesting lecture on " Rom e and the Anio," illustrated by lantern slides. It wi ll be remembered th~t he was one of th e E xa min ers in the HIgher Certificate two years ago.

......

On Feb. 25th, H . Bedford Pym, Esq ., gave a lecture 011 .. Joan of Arc/' con ~ sisting of an e loquent defence and appreci~tion of her character.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

\Ve were very pleased to wel come the Rev. H. H orsley (O.K .S.) on Mar. l oth. All the more so as hi s visit took the rorm of a most amusing accoun t , too interesting to be a lecture, of his life as a Missionary in Ceylon.

Vvc co ngratulate H. T owns hend on

CAMBRIDGE Cambridge. Dear School, Term is over and a belated Can/naYi(nt a rrives as we are going down .

555

being elected to a Major Scholarship for Mathematics at Trinity College, Ca mbridge i and this in spite of th e influenza which occ upi ed half of hi s fi rst term. li'o",*'

\Ve cong ratulate C. N. Ryan o n being promoted to Colour-Sergeant, and G. H . Claypole to Sergeant.

LETTER .

Dickson is work ing as he never worked at Call terbury. and Pinse nt we have o nly seen in p'yjamas ambling into Great Court a fter an " early" bath. \Vill iamson helped to shove Magdalen e li p three Don't apologize, fo r we apprecialt. places and added to his list of ach ieve the ed itorial effort. As ~us ual th ere is ments by putting his foot through one nothing extraord inary to relate ; thc or the boat~house basins. Kcmpe ha s electio n resul ts were digested fair(.y rorsaken his Teddy Bear for a toy t rain. quietly. and the Lents have been rowed. Ga.,{c is more vigo rous now and is the Neve r before have such alterati ons in ma instay of Corpus hoc key and socce r ; the order of rowing taken place. cleve n Nelson, our oth er reprl"se ntative th ere. hoats demand ed fOllr places, and ten boats must sure ly have become an acco mplish ed asce nded th ree, tw o only winning their roller- skater. If you wa nt to talk oars. " E lection " go and see Mowll 1, who is H ea rty congratulations to De i ghton~ a shining light in th e Historical Society. who stroked the lusty Trinity Rugge r Sparling and Bellan,; we have hardly seen, uoat up four places. Deig hton L is still and the latest ne ws of Thomas is that a inspiring small boys with a we, and swoll en fac e prevents him performi ng on Lound li ves a q uiet life at J enkin s plays golf when not pursuing the flute . fair faces on bicyclp.s. T o wn shend Selwyn. H itchcoc k co ntinues to act over â&#x20AC;˘. Cats. " stroll ed into Cambridge at half term after an attack of brain fever (sic) .. flu. " H o ward is in such a state Il OW that \Ve were also glad t¡o see Todd back agai ll he ca n co m e up o r go do wn as it pleases after his nasty fall in the hunting-fi eld . ~i m .


THE

CANTUARIAN.

We were delighted to receive the hasty visit from Oxford of Pa rsons and Burdett. Mr. Edmonds is looking as well as ever, a nd cann ot make out how certain people still get up so early. H e has been e lected an honorary member of

Girton and Newnham . Congratulations to the H ead ma.c;;ter if he has not already received them. Wishing you the b~st of luck in the I nter-Sports,

F rom O.K.S. CANTAB .

DEBATING SOCIETY. On Tuesday, March 8th, H . D. Townend moved "that Arctic expeditions are bene ficial to humani ty." The debate was morc or less of a comic quality, ancl relied less on the kp owledge of the various spea kers than on th e versatil ity of their wit. For this reason it is impossible to give a detail ed account of the various speeche s, as the member deputed to report the debate for the

Cantualian was busily engaged in can· cocting a fe w rambling remarks for his own speech. and so missed the drift of his colleagues' eloquence. The rh etoric was light and conversational, and for the most part consisttd of airy banter. The motion was supported by C . N. Rya n an d D. J. N. Lee ; and opposed by C. J. Galpin, G. H. Claypole and L. C. Sargent. I t was carried by 23 votes to 16.

A POST·MORTEM. One began one's study of Greek with a great kee nness. To know Gree k was to become a distinguish ed man. True the desire for distinction gre w fainter before one could be quite ce rtain wh ether it was cp or 'fr that came next to 0 mikron : still fainter when you co me to 76TUf'(ft€"ot w: and vanish ed when a ce rtain master ( I'll spare him ) kept you in for two hours for the sake

of th e irregular verbs. Some varicoseminded " de'il's buchie" had printed Olll the whole lot on a folio sheet. neatly bound in a brown cloth cover : very handy and ve ry cheap. The undertoned co m.. ments on this Editor's a ncestory were vigorous and justifiablf;:. If fe llows havo got to learn Greek, please do make il attractive . One verbs' P.Pts. on a paSt'


THE

CANTUARIAN.

would look quite pretty and would inspire the "young student" with a desire to swallow page after page. But about 50 verbs on a folio shee t: wh ere however hard you worked you always looked lip and saw ,I page I " staring you stolidly in the eye-no, that was not playing the game. Gree k revived. Vvc passed the crisis: Mr. Mason began to teach us the beauties of the game: not the re sthetic, preRaphrelitic beauties, so much as the goor! fun of it; and we began to think that there was something not so bad a fter all in the article. Mr. Gordon carried li S with him through the Antigone: he appreciated it, and he made us appreciate it: and Greek became a thoroug h pleas ure-until -Dark ghostlike shapes began to stal k about in an Cimmerian darkness to wh ich we were fast app roaching. Daylight bega n to fade: we were movin g with Dante to the Infe rn o. vVe tried to keep our eyes on the fad ing brightness of the path: but the gaunt and thick jungle with its horrid huge black stalkin g trunks closed eve ry avenue of light. A voice-in forme, ingens-yelled out from a murky bl1sh"Halt, what am I?" \Ve turned in terror to our Bredekers. "Please, sir, you're an Antithe!;is." Pass, sirs : all's well." We had not go ne more t han ten lines further before we we re suddenly arresled by a shrill piping squill. H ey, hey: look here: can't you see me : wha t am I?" The voice proceeded from a tall thin sapling with a forest of grinning greenery round its emaciated face."Yes, sir: I know you," !;aid Parke r baldy: you' re only a Ka ta Su nesin ,,_

557

the ta ll sapling screamed and hissed with fury and bent savagely toward s liS : I thought he had been called a bad name: so I trembled and faltered : but H .S.S.P. took me by the hand and said" Come on he ca n't harm us IJ and led me boldly on. But the way was dar kening: the jungle was getting marc tangled: we both feared the sudd en spring of some wild and savage beast. And sure enough we were sudd enly held up by three brothers, which stood and barred our path. H ere our Bredekers failed li S: we coul dn't decipher them : and sure eno ugh we had turn ed and fled the n and th ere had not Mr. Fici ci's voice sudd enly corne to 11 S fro m behind th e terrific and bramble-clad obstruction: H e called out to ll S dimly at (i rst, but with increasing clarity. that we had to count the different wrinkles in their ugly faces: and we SllOll ld soon kn ow which was HypalJage which was Synallage and which was Metallage : all broth ers as the ir surname testified. The three b rother~ stal ked a ngrily aside and li ght once more fell on our path . And so we we nt on more and marc pe rplexed: occasionally SynaUage ca me back when we expec ted his brothe r Hyp: or Antithesis leered from out some bush. Fresh horrible faces kept looming forth: but we soon ca me to recognise some. Oxy moron couldn't well hide himself. Paraprosdokian was a terror : he kept coming in so many questio na ble shapes : and when fellows called him by the wrong name, he got ve ry ang ry. I remember getting past one terrible bulk b)' acc ident. He ),elled out "What am I ?" I had caught a cold and answered uninte ntionally by three sneezes. I I Right"


5S 8

THE

CANTUARIAN.

he said" Pass." Parker and I were non- selves up for lost : but somehow gradually plussed for a time, till Pa rker at last light filtered through : the tliickets and suggested Bredeker. vVe found it there- tree trunks seemed to shrink: and w~ could dispel several forbidding giants synezesis, he spelt it. from some distance so that they lay prone One day Parker, Longfield and I were and flat as we stepped over thei r deflated much disturbed over a huge forbidding carcasses. mass heavin g among some tangled The memory of those terrible times creepers. Even our Baedekers were has has come back to me this evening : getting nneasy and kicking up a shindy for I have been reading an old book: ancl as if something was coming. I sent P. the quotation at the head of o ne chapter is and L. to exploit it o n the Hanks while I kept its attention fixed in front. After ' 1 Flu, kill the poys and the luggage." some minutes of stealthy stalking, Parker " Ze ugma " I muttered: bless me: I returned draggi ng a so rt of demoralized lion by the tail. "It's only an Aposiopesis" got up from the bottom to the top once he said. You see it wasn't treelike as thanks to Zeugma. I t was some such the other Figures; for they were figures quotati o n as this -but in Latin. Anyho w of speech: and his was a Figure of silence. e.g. we' ll say it was "kill the pays and the luggage" Top boy-" What figure One very long giant' s nam.c (ca n't is that?" . I Kata Su nesin says he. recall even to-day)-it ended in- H cath- .. Next" ; " H ypallage." "Next;" I f Anaholonkaimeros": what his first part was colouthon." . 1 Next i" ., Paraprosdokian" I can't re member: anyhow the surname Suddenl), the big strong fellow, the foot~ should be e nough to tell him by. Chias- ball captain who as usual had been sitting mus was an casy going fellow: he soon with his eyes closed, springs up " I njurire stepped aside. Anacolouthon was bad: insultus additio." The chuckle of laughter but the distant voice of Mr. Field told us was checked by th e stern reproachful how we coulel always tell him. "Only chiding of the master, "Next;"" somego up to the Scotland Hill s behind the thing Katholon kai meros." "Next; " butts, anel yOll'lI see him on the notice " Oxymoron." IC Next" "Antexema" bo;,trd-' 'W hen the reel flag is hoisted it replied Jam es ( rl.M.)-mi.~ht as well shows that rifl c practice has begun anel have a sho t. . , , I was waitIng patlcn tly lowered as soo n as it is over.'" Afte r at the bottom, e liminating, as I knew this we fel t no fear of Anacolonthon : but how to do four quadratics. The n' ] expect Maj. 1-]. Isacke has destroyed were only three things left that I knew of this valuable Greek asset bv a well aimed and three boys to answer. Two morC' rifle bullet if he has been practi!'ing at the were eliminated: and I came in triurnph Butts : for I'm sure Isacke will have no with my "Zellgma." "Go up top." kindly feelings for Anacolouthon. P.S.-The last paragraph is slightly At one time the way became so black and threatenin g that we a lmost gave our- exaggerated.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

559

COR RESPONDE N CE. N.B.-The Edilol'sdec#ne 10 '''I ' , . dellis "" d a~;r any "UjJ01Ulbtbly (owlecled 1uill1 the o/Ji1lio1lS 01 Iheh' Corns""" . ~1fame mt aUflress must always 0 ' t ' '.f r gZla1antee 0/ good faitl1 Personal'I' e ,ft,v,m, to 7lece~sarzly for pub/haft'oll, but as n wrillm 01# olle side of Ihe pape,. only. Z u s fUt mvo ve fer/a m "e;eclioll. Leltt1's should ,,~

To the Edztors of "TH E CANl'UARIAN," ments by SectiOll!, commencing, say, with Dear Sirs, A. ~, and endlOg with B. 4? Each Is it not time that the notice boards SectIOn Commander coule! enter the under the Arches should be inspected? armoury after the last man of his Section In the first place, the exc use that notices and control the door till all were have not been, seen is fast becoming a l1nd~ess~d. !o show I have no ultp-rior ~eal reason, WhICh shows that someth ing illatIve III wntlllg, IS wrong. And secondly, several notices I am, dear Sirs, in all si ncerity, have suddenly.and mystf'Tiously vanished. A MEMBER OF B. 4. The . blame, ,IS generally laid 011 th e Amencan VISItors, but why they should 1'0 lIlt EdÂŁtors oj "THE C ANT U ARIAN ." figure they must remove meaningless lists of ll~mes, ~asses our comprehension. The My dear Sirs, ~Iease pardon me for trespassing on net.tlIlg whIch is supposed to protect, and whl.c h ~ctually renders invisible most your 1Jlval,uabl~ space. Have no sc ruples notIces, IS fast deteriorating. Would not whatever III uSIllg my letter to light your glass ,b,e a morc durable and complete fire, or to serve any other equally useful protectIon? purl?ose, But meanwhile remember that ( I) 111 five weeks' time, we shall all, or I remain, Sirs, least tl~e more en~rgetic portion of us, Yours faithfully. H. O. N. SEC. be plaYlIlg the glOrIOUS game of cricket' (2) the fashionable thing is to bowl ~ [We C?lIrse,lves also have found difficulties in Ihi ~ :' googlie"; ( 3) this type of monstrosity r.h rectlOo, -- Eoo.] IS us.ually tossed rather high j (4) the nets III the Green Court (excep t that one To Ilu Edttors oj' I. THE CANTUA 1HAN," at .the furthe: ,enrl, a ll an inferio r pitt: h) Dear Sirs, ohJect to recclvlllg any ball which exceeds . After a full parade of the O.T.C., there ~h~ alti~ude of six fee t. In other words. It IS ,qllltc useless for slow bowle rs in the IS al ways more or less of a rush and scra mble among Cadets who wish to be first to maklllg to attempt practice on the Green remov~ thei.r belts, bottles, bayonets, and Court, as their balls invariably choose to other 1?!lPe~mUJJta . E\'cn ackno wl edging repose on the top of the nets, Could thiS be avoided? ' that thIS IS not so bad as it used t be, there is still room for improvemen~ Yours faithfully, \Vhy cannot everyone discard their orna-

at

R. R. ACWD.


THE

560

CANTUARIAN.

NOTICES. 'We beg to acknowledge with thanks the receipt or the following Subscri pti ons :-

Rev. C. E. Woodruff (J/6), J. S. Yates, Esq. ( J/6), H . H. W. Cole, Esq. ( 11 /4), Major Jones (J/6), W. H. Swinford, Esq. (3/6), R. E . Everitt, Esq. (J/ 6), His H ono ur Judge Carter ( 10/6),

Rev. Hugh Horsley (3/6), W. T . Mercer, Esq . (5/ 10 ), C. S. Merrett, Esq. (5 / 10), R. H. Warde, Esq . (4 / 8), F. Vaughan, Esq . ( 10/-), W. H. Horsley, Esq. (3 10), Col. Trupman (J/6), L. F. Paris, Esq. (7/-), J. W. Sharman, Esq. ( 3/ 6), L. H. Finn, Esq. ( 10/6), H. Gardner, Esq . (5/10), Gibbs & Sons Cl/6). F . L. SIDE BOT HAM , Hon. Sec

OUR CONTEMPORARIES. We beg to ackn owledge the recei pt

of th e following :Alleym'rw, Elu(, BdgMoll College j}fagazme. Bro?llsgroviall, Carthusian, Chobnddan, C .O.S, Dens/ollzan, flovor/an , SI. Edward's School Clu"01ude, Epsomiall ,

Fe/sled/an., Jr'eltuz'rw, Glenalmol1d College Cll rom'cle, Laurmlz'a11, Lalldl1g College Maga zl1lt , L eodltmlCl1l, Leys Forilliglilly, Lord/olllem, l11alvenn"an, PlymollJ1(l1J, Rod/eiall, R ep/onian, SIn"rbuntt'a1l, Straud Sellool 111agaz"m, Tonbn"dgl{W.

Gibbs and Sons, Printeri, Palace Street, Canterbury.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

VOL. VII.

J UNE,

1910.

3n Memoriam, 6tb Mar, 1910. >I< THE

LATE

KING.

>I< I.

A mys tic Presence stole across the world Hea vy wi th winter's icc- embroide red pall' And v~lIeys woke to sunshine, trees unfurl e~1 . TheI r leafy ~alln ers , from the gabled wall Ri ch creepers garbe d III g lory, let their ~potJ ess petals fall. Sang the lark in th e meadow then . J Fled he r music over th e 0i"TJenâ&#x20AC;˘ F resh wate rs fl owing, Sof~ breezes blowi ng, WhIte orchards snowing, Glad pastures growing, Happy earth, well may ye sing. It IS the Spring ! It is the Spring!

No.

2 1.


THE

562

CANTUARTAN .

2.

He crept into the Palace. did none ma:\ That silent Figure on th e marble stmr . T he kee pers slum bered in the royal park, H e passed th e se ntine ls un challenged there; Who shook to hear an awful bell toll th ro' the muffied air. One only Soul that Prese nce kn ew, Laid down the work h ~ had to do. Peace and prospenty, Simple sincerity. E mbl em of verity, Noble fid elity. Selfless Rul er. happy Kin g, It is the Spring ! It is th e Spring!

-'------------------------- ~ EDITORIAL. As llsual, qu ite

un~l,~~~:,~::;;. gr~Tt~~il~fJ~ ~;: ~~~ngu~il~l~~~nt~'l~~rd;bj~~t EO~li;~:l~~!

~~eb~fl;~n~~r~~h~~e si~ weeks i<;tte. but a -trifle of three weeks more or less of tard mcsf(

is as inevitable as the weather IS bad . . 0' Despite th e unsettled co ndition of th e latte r, Cri,cket has been gOl I~~ as stron Ob~~ d thou h the First XI. have ex penenced an ex trao rulllary num , Iladgd istinctly bad luck in not. winnind g at ca ndraws, be expectctle of an lave C leastt , two matches; Vv)'r . heat us easi ly with a team that wou ld not have di sgrace a oun). Nex t to Cricket, the Corps has taken chie f place. a nd. fo r most ~ as OCCUpl d t' e than the form er ' we can only hope that our form III Camp Will be s~e n to ~no:e 1m ' . in th~t line. There was an interes tin g Tactical ExerCIse 0,11 half-way between Folkeston e and Dove:, when Std' REdmundt " ur" d f D College Maldstone an amsga ('. ileiped a was advanci ng the 'd" ho " , W e say " e I Ill ' were ill front After the engagement an t lw tim e and presu mably il;;er~~~:er~ and th e incid~nt of the section marchin g to II the in;pression that it was th e re nd ez-volls, we marcill'd to Dover Station a nd tralil ed back

J'rllShtlfYSd~y"r Je~~~t109~~~ 1I~ tOd~~~: ~l~~~ :~~~e ~~~~~:e Ol~ fo~cveercertainl):

~~~~s;2~~,~t I~~~~ ~:~)'~I~lder


THE

CANTUARIAN.

. The \'Var Offi ce Inspection is now loo min g da ngerously nea r, or in the language 01 Our amateur ski rmishers quile one finger above th e horizon, and it can uot be said tha t it is at all an inviting prospect. IVray some goddess p reside over us on that day a nd see that th e recruits do not tie wate r-bottles ro und their wa ists in mistake for belts j there is indted a sim ilarity between them. but with due care and p recauti ons laken th e slight diffe re nce may be dete cled . ( Fo r the sa ke of those who objec t to a nac hronisms, thi s eve nt has a lready taken place). The new boats for the Boat Clu b are apparently a lmost a fmt accompft' as they have bee n pro mised for th e nca r future, and the subsc ripti ons, but for a fe w pound s, have reac hed the necessa ry am ount. The thank s of the School , as well as th e Boat Club, a re due to all who so generously subsc ribed. News has just reacl~ed li S of th e SUCcess in th e Cambridge Math . Tripos of G. H . S. Pinse nt, who was one out of till! bare hal f-dozen who gai ned di stinctio ns. We offe r him our sinceres t co ngratulations and are ( privately) inclined to regret tha t th e Senior V/ra ngle rship is a thing .of the past.

\~'e have to announce th e resignat ion of the H eadmaste r. In May last th e Archbishop offt'red him the Recto ry of . ¡.. Itwood, which he has accepted. Those wh o know Dr. Galpin will realize how impossi~le it is for us to express our so rrow at losing so admirable a Headmaster and so good a friend . His new home is situated nca r Hyt he, a mil e or so inla nd; Salt wood Castle, once the property of th e Archbishops, enjoys th e distin ction of be ing th e meet ing-place of the five knights wh o cr6ssed from France to murder Becket. IJl spite of thi s archreological but dismal l~lCt, we hope that the bcst of health a nd Success wi ll attend not on ly Dr. Gal pin, but also Mrs. Galpin and th e ir chi ldren ; and that th ey wi ll have th e g reatest happiness in th eir new sphere o f life. They will neve r lack a welcome here. We mu st also record th e depa rture or Mr. Cape, wh o has been e lec ted to th e H eadmastership of Sir J oseph \'Villia mso n's Mathe matical School, Rochester. This School was found ed in I 70 1 j a nd a lthoug h it still reta ins the name whi ch desc ribes its original purpose, now, however, it embraces the whole of the ordi na ry mo dern c urri culUIll. The 111l11lbt.: r of boys is 2 70. We hea rtily co ng ratulate Mr. Cape on his appointment, and wish him th e best or sucCt.:ss.


TI-IE

CANTUARIA N.

311 Memoriam. of< THOMAS Wl-IITEHEAD R EID.

O.K.S., Died March

31St,

1910.

of< It is wi th g reat regret that we chronicl e th e death of Dr. \oVhitehead R eid, who passed away on the last day of last term. Dr. Reid was a me mber of the School in 1860; and proceeded, after

his co mse here, to S. Bartholomew's Hospital. H e gained several degrees, amongst others those of Doctor of Medicine, St. Andrew's ; Fe ll ow of the

Royal College of Physicians, Edi nburgh ;

Lkcntiatc

of

the

Royal

College of Physician s, London; Mem-

ber of the Royal College of Physicians, England. After leaving S. Bartholomew's, he was (or some ti me pri vate physicia n to the late Baron Roth schild . I n 1874, on his father' s retiremen t, he took over the practice in Canterbury. and was appointed Medical Adviser to the School. H e always showed th e keenest interest in the doings of th e Sc hool, and was a well-known fi g ure at our various match es and sports.

ATHLETIC SPORTS. The Athletic Sports were held this year on Nl onday and Tuesday. March 28th and 29 th. on th e St. Law rence Groun d. Ol'i. both days we were favoured by fin e, nOt to say brilliant weathe r aud a large attenda nce. An unforeseen breakdown in the Sports' Committee's co mmi ssariat a rrangements delayed the start for twenty minut S, but apart from this the whole meeting went off without hitch and was generally co nsidered one of the best held in rece nt years. Among the visitors on Monday were the Dean and Canon Stuart ; on Tuesday the Archbishop and the Bishop of D over were kind eno ugh to stay to the bitter end of the Tutor-Mile. We g reatly apprec iated the kindness on their part, and can only regret that their presence did not inspi re the breaking and making of record s. H owever we must be satisfied with several pe rformances, each of which, it may be said, prox. accessil, notably A. Fluke's put of 34 fl.. H. L. H . Cremer' s Mi le in 5 min. , and H. D. Towncnd' lI 1 00 yds. in l OA. sees. It was most unfortunate t hat A. M. Gelstho rpc, after jumpiliH 2 I ft. 2 in . (a Hew Public Schools' record) in practico, twi sted his knee and \Vnlt


THE

CANTUARIAN.

V::j~~ t~6 c~11~PtteJ'

A simdila r piece of bad lu ck befell C. H. Trehane, who won the e' 19 l llmp a n other events in J 908. Many of the Ju nior events thi s YG aLr wrerre e~tremely good . Vve expect mu ch in the future from S. 'vV Wayte and

.

.

=klns.

.

l'l~must/xpress our th.""ks

th De

to the following for their kindness in giving prizes'

Bf les RO Ca nterbury, Mrs. Farrar, Mrs. Hodgson Mrs Galpin Mrs Be ll'

r. ore, ev. R. G. Hodgsoll, Rev. G. C. E. Ryley, Rev. E: L. A Hertsl~t th~ H ead Master, A. Latter, Esq., the l\'I asters, and the Vlth Form. ' LoNG J UMP (O I' Il: N).

I.

E. F. Housden

I

Poor jl1mping.

220 I.

2.

I

3· Bing Ti mc,3 l t secs.

JSI Heal : -1, S. \Y. Waytc 2 . R. Crowley T ime,61isecs. 2nd Heal : - I. J. I-I. Mtlsson 2. L. G. Housdcn Time, 63! sccs. Fillal :- 1. S. W. Wayte 2. J. I-I. Musson Time, 6q sccs. .Wayt.e WI'IS last round the 1St corner, but l?a~Slllg Crowley ::t. nd l\Jusson by the chestnut, hmshed strongly and in good time. LoNG JUMP (J UNIOR SCHOOL). 2 . Dalton

I

Ba rber.

Length,

14

fc

I

in.

HALF M ILE (OPE N). I. H. L. H. Cremer 2. C. A. West '

I 3·

E. F. H yde

I

2.

L. W. H. neS!

Time,

I

min. 19k sees.

16). 2. G. F. Wood Height , 4 ft. 9 lO S. Jumping good; Wood cleared 4 ft. 8 ins. and lour others did d feet. I.

QUARTER MlI,Eo; (UNDKR 16).

I.

I.

HIG H J U MP (UND~R

VAlms (J UNIOR SCHOOL).

Uarber 2 Dalton

QUAKTER MILE (UNDI~R 14).

G. Byron Length , 18 ft. 2 ins. (Reco rd, 19 ft. loin.)

2.

C. L. Nightingale

Time, 2min. I4secs. (Record, 2min. 8!secs.) . ~ big fie ld i two ranks were necessary. Nlghtmgale led for the firs t lap, Cremer being second. West sprinted just before the chestnut and pll:ssed bot!l, but Cremer came up very fast ~nd with fine Judgment and won easily in good tllne. Bad second, worse third.

G. L. Tomkins

I

100 YARDS (OPEN).

JSI /feal :-1 . 1-1. D. Towncnd 2. G. Bryon 2nd Heal :-1: I-I. de H. Smit h 2. G. O. R. Cremer ,Jrd Heal : -1. R. 'c. Cumberbatch 2. 1-1. S. Wacher Fi"al:- I. H. D. T ownend 2. H. de H. Smith 3· R. C. Cumberbatch

Time, lo/o-secs. (Record, 10~ sees. ; Townend and Smith were 0[[ to an excell ent stnrl: Towncnd immcdiately shot ah cad, was leadlllg by a yard at half distance and won by about 2 yards. Cumberbatch never recovered [rom a b.ld start. 220 YAIWS (J UNIOR SCHOOL . UNDER I.

Dean 2

fI).

I 2. Rolfe Time, 331 secs. 100 YARDS (UNDER 16).

JSI H eal ;-- 1. R. CrOWley 2. S. W. Wayle Time,

12t secs.


TI-IE

566

CANTUARIAN.

=

211d Heat :-1. C. E. W. Chapman R. A. F. Whistler

The fir st lap was slow, Mus;;on leading most of the way. " '''ayle quickened hIs pace at a~~)U~ 00 yards and passed Musson at the La les r)avilion . Won by yards. between second and

1"d Heat :-1. G. F. \"'ood 2. C. C. Smythe

th ird.

•.

Time, 13t sees.

HI GR JU MP (OP E!'l").

Time, 121 sees.

R L GOtlW;1tz

4th Heat :-1. T. H. French 2 . G. L. Tomkins Time,

1.

12,*

12

Time,

C. R. N. Groom

I.

2. L. G. H Ollsden Length, 17 flo 6! ins. A good attempt. Crowley made full use of h is . II t a ncl weight . There is.marked contrast ' IlClg bctween the open and under 16 Jumplllg.

J 3~

sees.

(UNm.;R 14)· I 2. L . W . H. Bcst Time, 14%sees.

H URDL I~5 (UNDER 16).

G. F. JlIckes

I

2. G . L. Tomkins Time, 22 sees.

Style and jumping were both good; 00 hurdles down. Juckes gamed ground a lilhe way and won by 5 yards. Very fair time. QUARTJf.R MIJ.I~ (01'&1'1). R. E. L. Beardsworth 1. H. D . T ownend 3· 2. H. L. IT . Crcmcr Tim e, 58 sccs. (Record, 531 sees.)

I

Townend cul out lhe pace but was challcnged by Smith hefo.re the chestn~IL After som.e answe ring spurts Sllllth ove rran iUlUself 50 yards from the finish. Cremer sprintcd well but too late and lost h half.a-yard to Townend, though fa r fr csher than t~e winner. Three yards between second and third .

I-tAU'

S. W. Wayte 2. L . G. H ousden I.

MIL~ (uNUlm 16).

J.

J.

I

R. C rowley

1.

The winner's stride was remarkable. I.

2. E. F. H ousden. Height, 4 ft. to ms. (Record,S ft. 5 ins.)

LoNG J U MP (U~ I) F.R 16).

sees.

\ 3. Moore

100 YARDS

1

Housden and UYTon werc hoth

Not good. out of form .

100 Y ARDS (J UNIOR SC HOOl.).

Fillal:-· J . Barbcr 2 2 . Dalton

.

sees.

FilIal : -1. R. C rowley

2. C. E. W . Chapman T ime, Won in good time by a fool .

11. Musson

Time, 2 min. 27 secs.

H iG H

JU MI' (J UNIOR SC HOO L).

I

Moore

L

2.

Waehcr

2

Il cigh t, 4 ft.

600 VARUS (HAND ICAP ). I. C. E. A. PLlllan (10 1 yards) 2. D . 0, F ardcll (35.. ) 3. G. L. T omkins (7 8 " ) Won by '0 yardS. Time, I min. 19 seCS.

I.

Purl'l NG THI!. W&IGHT. 1 2, II. de J-I. Smith Length, 34 (t , (Record, 34ft. 9 in !!. )

A. C. Fluke

T he best since Aylward's put. Fl uk.e mfnl !' ood lise of his height. Smith's:9 flo '0 II.)!';' wrH' ~ood but dwarfed in comparison with the wlllncr,

II UROL ES I . A. C. Fluke

(0 1'&1").

2. R, L. Gollwa!t1. T ime , 20 hCCM, (Record, 17 lie ., '

Won hy Iwo yards. L'llI~c tripl?cd at the 1 11 ~1 hurdle o r would have won caslly. rlllle nOI g(Iud 220 YA RDS ( H ANDlCA I')'

Filial : -1. E. G. Sharpe (30 ya.rds) 2. C. R. N. Groom (52 II ) 3. D. O. F ardcll (10,... ) 111ne, 'lJl

:J".


THE Won Ly 6 YMds. third.

A fool between sccond and

Barber2

2.

Bing

I

SCHOOL).

3· Palmer Time, 69! secs.

( HA ND ICAP) . /;i·llal :-1. C. E. A. Pullan (20 yards) 2. J. T . F. Sande!> (21!,,) 3. G. O. R. C rcmer ( II ! .. ) Tim e, 12isecs. \\'011 casil),. A foot bctween second and third. 120 YARDS

220 YARDS (J UN IOR S CIIOOL).

Final :_1. Harber 2 2. Dalton 3. Bing Time, 31-$ sccs. (OI'E"') , I. H . L, I I. Cremcr 3· A, C. TcHer 2. R. de B. Saundcrson 4. C. A. West T ime, 5 mins. (Record, 4 min. 49 secs.) T CUCf went off rather fasl and led fo r the first two laps, but sprinting by mistake in t he third rOllnd ran himself out and was easi ly passed J 50 yards from the fini sh by Cremer, who won by about 18 yards. Saunderson just heat Tclfer for second place. ONl~ i\ 1 1L~

I

CONSOLATION RAC J~ I.

G. O. R. Cremcr

T UTOR MILt-:. D. T ownend, R. E. L. Beards· worth, II. de H. Sm ith, R. D. M. Daniel). 2. HERONS-(G. Byron, R. E. Gordon, G . H, ClaypoIe, K. C. McCleland). 3. GRYPHONS-(R. C. Cu mberbatch , C. A. W t!sl, L . L. Foster, A. C. Kc~'se r) . Time, 3 mill. 57 ~ secs. (Record, 3 min. 48* secs. I.

QUARTER ~I IL~ OU!'>IOR I.

CANTUARIAN.

(QUARTER M ILE). Tim e, 67 secs,

ATHLETIC SPORTS

l-i AWKS-(I-1.

The firsl lap was close as lar as the small pavilion, where Bcards worl h s printed well and tin ished 20 yards in front of Cumberbatch. McCiclalld passed Fosler and Todd in the second rou nd and Daniel increased the H awks' lead to 60 ya rds. Th is was lengthened to 90 by S mith, whi le Gordon drew away. In the last quarter Uryon gained twen ty yards on Townend who won very casily. Cryphons were third, followed by Choughs, Marllets, and S wallows. .r\ good race for sixth place betwcen I-J. L. and G, O. R. Crem er. The Spans' Shield was won by the Swallows with a record score. To j udge from their under 16 successes thty have a good chance of repeating their victory. T ABLE OF POINTS :

,. S wallows

2. llawk!> 3· (\-Iartlets

4· Choughs 5· Gryphons 6. Herons

v.

Open.

'54

106 48 8

'4 .8

Under 16. Under rot.

46 9

26 3' 6

,6

-

Total.

.,6 "5 74

8

39 38 .8

DOVER COLLEGE.

After an interval of two yeals the At hlet ic Sports against Dover College took place on March 3Jst at DOvel, and resulted ill a win for our o pponents by 4 ~ events to 3~. fheir success was cc rt:;t.inly deserved as the number of st:cond places gained by them will testify, but luck was very mu ch against liS, especially in th e 10 0 yards.


THE

568

CANTUARIAN.

The following was the order of events :I . -HICH JUMP,

V.- H URDLES.

E. F. Housden (K .S.) I 2. P.G.l\'I unns(Dover) H eight,s ft. 1 in. H ousden jumped far belter than. in our ~w n Sports Icaving Gottwaltz at 4 ft. 10 Ill. We Just managed to maintain the 5 ft. s tandard, but the jumping was not brilliant.

R. H. R. Parminter (Do" er) Time, 19! sees. Fluke won with great eas(' b}' 9 yards, having gained ground fro m the first hurdle.

J.

II. -

H uNDR& D YAROS.

P . G. Mun ns (Dover) r 2 . D. H. Pratt (Dover) Time, I I sees. Owing to a misunderstanding with the slarter both Qur strings were left at the post; with an equal start a fi ne race should have resulted as T ownend's t ime in the School Sports was a fract ion under ) I sees. III.- H Al F MILK.

1.

I.

H.L.H. Crcmcr(K. S.} I

2.

R,C,B.Eoote( Dovcr)

Time, 2 min. 13! sees. C remer Tan with very fi ne judgment and was well paced by Nightingale and West. H e had the race well in hand at 600 yards and won by IS yards.

IV.-LoNG J UMP.

I.

R. H. R. Parminler

I

2.

A. F. Hill ( Dover)

(K.S.) Length, 19ft. If in . K. S. were quite out of the running. Gelstborpe had not recovered from his strain to do more than I7~ flo and Housden was 100 light to jump against the slrong wind . The winner showed good form.

I.

A. C. Fluke (K. S.)

I

2.

V I. -PUTTI NG THK WEIGHT.

A. C. Fluke (K.S.) I 2. H.de H ,Sm ith{ K.S.) Qistance, 3' ft. 71 in. Fluke's put, th ough considerably short er than on Tuesday, was an easy fir sl. Smith also did well with 29 ft. 10 in. V II .- QuARTER lVIII.ÂĽ.. I. G. Dixon (Do\'cr) I 2. C. A. C. Wood (Do\'er) Time, 56! secs. Dixon started fast and increased his pace all the way fini shing in extremely good time, consid er. A good race for second place, ing the wind. Townend just failing. J.

V III. ¡-ON E M 11.1=:.

C!. fo.'l un ns (Dover) I

J. R. de 13. ,Sal1nder. R. C. B. F oote " son (K .S.) Time, 4 min. 56} sees. Cremer could not ma.nage t he mile as well (l~ the half and was never dangerous. Munns and Foote ra n well, neck to neck most of the way, (uld finished only a few yards apa rt. Saunderson , nfte. paci ng C reme r for the first three laps sprinted juSl III time to secure third place. J.

2.

P.

LARMES CREPUSCULAIRES. For tile (ollvenieuce of Ihose 1/Jho 'Iave not the pleasure oj " Geoy,lfe's" tuquailttanu, it lIIay 6e 1/Je/l11 stale Ihallhe hero of Ihis poem is Ihe Zoological Society's Afalldrill, a" Ajrica/L ape 0/ /Jizarn but pe "/~d laveliuess (first (ousi". 0/ the auimal melltioned z'u Slevenson's poem" A por/rait "), and 1IIille ltWH (amiliar friend.

He sat on the stump of a long-dead tree, Did George, And a sorrowful glance he shot at me, Did George,


THE

CANTUARIA N.

And his cheeks were blue, and his nose was red And he looked so sad tha t my soft heart bled, ' But all he wanted was just to be fed .. ... . Dear George ! I went to a friend who was kind and good To George, And politely asked him to give me food For George, And I bore the spoil, banana and grape, To my 9~p 9â&#x201A;Źor, angel or ape, \-Vho, seeing me, joyed with his jaws agape, Dear George! He extended swiftly a swart, sweet hand , Did George, And endeavoured to make me understand Did George, ' That although he looked like a Persian cloth Or a frisky and flamboyant Behemoth, ' In manners at least he was not a Goth, Dear George. I watched him munching th e tropic fruit, Oh George I And r sa w the teeth that were on the brute By George! And I can't make out why a tusk so big I s neede.d for chewi ng a peach or fig, For he lIves on fruit- olJ"u1JI cum dig. - __ Does George. He smiled his th anks, then he went away Did George, ' Having eaten the lot, ... whh;:h is George's way, Shame George I And the last I saw (having said" Adieu ") ' ;Vas th at marvellous ani mal puce an d blue Looking too sweet to be really true, ' Posed 0!l a stump as the darkness grew, Companng ?Prt11gboks and Klipsprhzgen too, And th e Af!ICa n kopjes he'd once skipped through, And th e vO Iceless att raction s of Timbuktoo To th e sq ualo r and horro r of London's Zoo', Ah oo! Ahoo! Poor George I

l'


THE

CANTUARIAN.

CRICKET. LIST OF DATE,

OPPONENTS.

------ -------_.

FIXTURES. R esult

GROUND.

1st XI.

Th. Mny 5· Tn. 10. Tu. " 17· Tu. " 24· , 6. Th. " Tu. " 31. " 8. W. June T u. 14·

Th. Fri. Sat. Tu . Sal.

Tu.

" 21. " '4· } " " '5· 28.

J:II)'

Tu .

Wed.

" " "

lSi In n.

Tu.

" "

Th . Th. W. J~ly

14· 16. 30 . 6.

1St I nn.

2nd 11111.

Wyc College M.C.C . .. Felsled School

Fels ted

Highgate School S. Edmund's School Enstbourne College

S. Edmund s ..~.... ~1t;

Rev, L. II . Evans' XI. " . R.M.L.r. S. La wrence " A." S. Lawrence Dover College

.. Drawn

B":,,cy .; . .4>~ .

. J~.I. :": .~ .............?,..I.~ .. .

.. .1.7. ... ..... ~ ......Ift.. · 'i'v.;"li

...... .+.1 .. , ... ' '' i';.~~, . . .. . :::::::~ : . :~: : : i:'~::. :: : : . . . :: ::~.7.:: .. :::~~:f::

1- - -- 1- -- - - -- 1 - --

,.

211d Inn.

RU NS AGA INST.

Chnrlhnm ... Sclchd Beverle}' ... Sctchd Beverley" Drawn 250 (S w) . 98 (7 w) .. Beverley .. Drawn 164 ... 159 (4 w) Beverley .. . Drawn 139 (3 w) .. .. ... 200 (3 w) Beverley ... Drawn 106 (4 w) ........................... . . Dover ... Drawn 180 (7 w) ...... 258 Beverley ... Laslo.. 71 29 (4 w) ~22! ." Beverley ... Lost. .... /!Q.l.. .. . ............... .5 .. .7..

Chnrthnm Asylum Mr. A. L aUer's X I.

2. 5· 26. } O.K.S. 27·

Tn. May 3 1. Th. June Tu. 7· Wed. " S.

RUNS FO R.

-1-- - - -

--

2nd XI. S. Lawrence Coil. 2nd X I. H nrbledowf\ C. C.

Wye Coll ege 2nd XI. ... Do\'cr College 2nd XL . S. Ed mund's Sell. 2nd X I. Harblcdown C. C. DO\fc r College 2nd XL .. S. Edmun<Jls Seh. 2nd XI.

Rc \'c l"l ey ... Piece Beverley : .. Beverl ey ... Beverley ... H a rbledown Dover S. Edmu nd '!; Bl o l"e'~

Drawn 192( 4 w) .... L()~ I .. . J 21

Losl... Won..

11 2 131

\-Von .. 93 (6 wJ Lost.. . 34 45 (4 w) ... .......... . ......... ..

'58 (S w) 184 (8 w)

"4 81

7'

84


THE

CANTUARIAN.

57 1

MATCHES. REV. L.

KING'S SCHOOL v.

Fl . EVANS'

XI.

Played on th e Beverl ey on May 17th. Mr. Evans wo n the toss and put the Schoo l in. a proceeding whi ch was hardly justified by resul ts. Seabrooke knocked lip J 7 in five minu tes, and after hi s depa rLtlre Gottwaltz and F luke, batting with g reat con fi dence, added 90 to the score before the latte r was caught and bow led by Capt. Campbell. ':Vith Cremer in, Gottwaltz reached hi s 50, and a furth er pa rtners hip produced 80 run s. Gordon failed, but Gottwaltz co ntinued to play well ti ll bowled by Mr. Evans wh en three nm s sho rt of his ce ntury. Housden and Baker had some mer ry play before the innings was declared closed at 250 for 5 wickets, a very good perform ance for the first match of the season. A surprisi ng amount of co nfid ence was shown by the Sc hool batsmen, and espec ially the new members of the team . The bow lin g was moderate, Cowie, H . L. Cremer and H . VV. C reme r sharin g the wickets. The fea ture of th e day was undoubtedly Gottwaltz's innings. KING'S SC HOOL. R. L. Gottwait z, b Evans .. . F. H . Seabrooke, c and b Latter .. . A. C. Fluke, c and b Campbell .. . H. L. H . C remer, c Latter, b Evans R. E. Gordon, !bw, b Evans P. D. Bake r, not oul E. F. Housden, not out ... C. A. Wes' } H . W. Cremer d'·' 'b L. L. H assell Iu no at. D. Ii. Cowie Extras

97 17 48

39 a 12

'3

14

T Oln ! (5 wickets )

REV.

L.

II.

Rev. L. }-1. Evans, b 1-1 , W. Creme r J. H . Smith, h I-I, L. Cremer '" F. S. Po rter, c H. W. C re me r, b Cow ie Capt. Cam pbell, c West, h H. W, Cre me r R. E. Martin, c I-I. W. C rc m!.:r, b Hasse ll Re v. W. Ra shl ~ igh, h Cowie A. Latter, not out ... Re v. H. Brereton, b Cowie Rev. S, T aylor, not o ut ... Three Others did not bal Extms T Ola l (7 wickets)

EVANS' XI. 3

a

50 4 27

6 19 I

4 4

98


â&#x20AC;˘

57 2

THE

CANTUARIAN.

BOWLING ANALYSIS : REV. L.

H. H. D. L. C.

L. Cremer W. Cremer H. Cowie L. Hassell A. West

H.

EVA~S'

X I.

O.

M.

R.

4

0

21

27 22 24

6

1

8

0

4 2

1 2

0

W. 1 2 3 0

KING'S SC HOOL v. R.M.L.1. Played on the Beverley, May 24th, an d resulted in a draw, in favour of ou r opponents. Fluke won the toss and ele cted to bat. . <;'ottwaltz and Scabrooke opened the innings. The wicket was in ve ry good COn (htlOll, and th e weather fine . Seabrooke batted well for 13 an d was caught and bowled by ,"Villiams. \OVil h Gottwaltz and Fluke together run s came at a good rate. and whe n the score had reached 94, Fluke was bowled by Herford, havin g mad e c; good 40. Cre mer then joined Gottwaltz, who was caught in the slips after a goo~ dI splay. He had bad luck in just missing his So. Gordon was bowled for a slllgle. H . L. Cremer was caught at mid-on afte r adding 39 to the score. Afte r thi s there was a to~al ~ollaps~ . Baker being rlln out for 12. H ousden, West, and H. W. Crcl!ler lost theIr wlckets 111 quick succession. Lastly, Hassell was lbw, the total score belllg 164. Festing and Ri chard son opened the innings for the R.M.L .I. a~l.(1 41 had bec.n scored when the former was dismi ssed by a good ball from CowIe . . After this H. L . Cremer took two wickets and Fluke one, but both were expenSlve. Wh 11 stumps were drawn , th e opposing team had scored 159. The gam~ was very close', a nd the School were extremely lucky in e ffecting a draw. The fi eldll1g. left mu ch to be desired, which helps to account for th e ineffective nature of the bow hng. KI NG'S SC HOOL. F. H. Seabrooke, c H erford, b Williams R. L. Gotlwaltz, c Garnier, b H erford ... A. C. Fluke, b H erford... H. L. H. Cremer, c Wray, b Garnier R. E. Gordon, b H erford P. D. Baker, rlln alit .. E . F. Hotlsden, c Wray, b Garnier C. A. \:Vest, b Williams .. . H. W. Cremer, b William s L. L. Hassell, Ibw, b Ga rnier D. H. Cowie, not Ollt ... Extras : byes, S ; leg¡ hyes, I ... T otal ...

12

5 o o 2

o G


THE

CANTUARIAN.

573

R.M.L. 1.

Capt. Festing, b Cowie ..

16

Pte. Richardson, c Gordon, b 1I . L. Cremer Pte. Williams, 1b,';, b Fluke ... .. Lt. Herford, c Gordon, b H. L. 'Cremer .. LI. Garnie r, not alit .. . Cnpt. Hickson, not out .. .

Mal'.

W"Y

71 24 IO

26 . 4

}

Co. lo.'Iercer did not bat. Pte. Roper Pte. H earne Lnce.·Cpl. Lawson Extras : byes, 7 ; leg·byes, I .

8

T otal

159

ROWI.I NG

A N,\I.VS IS :

R.M . I .. !.

H. L. H. Crem er .. .

1-1: W. D. H. l.. L.

A. C. C. A.

Cremer Cowie Hassell Fluke West

KING'S

O.

20 ~

13 7 3 2

SCHOOL v. ST.

M. 3 2 2

R.

W.

40 29 47

2 0

0

20

0

1

8

0

7

1 0

LAWRENCE

" A."

Played on th e Beverley on May 26th in brilliant weather. The pitch was perfectly tru e and em inently suited to run -getti ng. Huyshe and Hardy started to the bowling of the two CI emers; th e scorin g was at first slow and mainly by means of .sin gles but th e total increased steadily and the first wicket prod uced S9 runs. O n Mr. Porter's ar rival the score rose q ui ckl y a nd the bats men seemed perfectly at their ease. Both reac hed the~r fifti ~s before. b e~n g dismissed and Murrin with a llseful 4 8 brough t u~ the 2~O, ~t which POlllt the mnll1 gs. was declared closed. Our bowling was very fair conslden ng the soundness of the Wicket but the fi eldinO' was faulty in the extre me several catches being missed. Seabroo ke and Gottwaltz,o as usual, commenced th~ Schoo l inn in gs but IVfurrin's first ove r res ulted in a tame" c and b" for the firstnam ed . Fluke and Gottwaltz at once settled to steady and excellent cricket and put on 74 runs despite changes in th e bowling. Gottwaltz was smartly caught by Huysl1e f?r a good though slow 36. Cremer and Fluke th e n proceeded to attack th e bowling vIgorously. The form e r scored es pecially fast, hitting se ven fours in his 38. Ofr th e last ball of th e day Fluke was caught at th e wicket for a faultless 66. Score ;-


THE

57+

ST.

CANTUARIAN. LAWRENCE

"A."

O. F. Huyshe, c H. L, Cremer, b l-[assell I-I. S. Hardy, c Cowie, b H. L. Cremcr F. S. P orter, b H. "V. Cremcr Murrin, not out _._ Rev. P. T:lylor, not out ...

~'. ~'h~~~:is

}

N. \V. Wight wick T. Blain H. FUller · Clinch Extms

did not hal .

3

T otal (for 3 wickets)

* rnnings declared c\o.c;ed. KING'S

SCHOOL.

F. H. Scabrooke. c and b Murrin -;' R. C. Gottwaltz, c Huyshe. b MUrrin A. C. Fluke, c Hu),shc, b Taylor H . L. H. Cremer. not out

~:E . 5:.F. g~~~~n ) HOllsden I-I. S. Wacher L . L. Hassell H . \Y. Cremer O. H. Cowie

did not bat.

139

Total (for 3 wickets)

• KI NG'S SCHOOL v.

ST.

LAWRENCE.

T his match was played on th e Beve rley on Tuesday, May 31 st. in very UII S 'L1l t,!! chool were at full strenoth Gottwaltz and Seabrooke o pe ned Ih l' I weat le r. TIle S . 0 . I h I It be led by lilw l! i nin O"s and a fter abo ut thirty-five mmutes pay t e . a er was w , dott\~altz meanwhi le was baltin g with great steadll~ess ~uht perhtP~.~vel~. ~Irl~j:: . t th I Unfortunately Fluke after starllllg WIt a sp en I 0 I }estrtm :~) ;~~~\'t in the slips by Hilt~n. \Vith Creme r and Gottwalt l. LOgol!!.'1 t~~ ~~;e ~ose s te!dily despite th e unfavourable co nditions but eventually th e (M IIIII was bowled by Murri n after scoring 34 out of the 88 runs on th~ b(;>ard . ~ll oll followed but was not at horne with either bowler and was soon cilsmlssed by {tI lll


THE

CANTUARIAN.

575

Trueman. Baker joined Gottwaitz but soon afte r the weath er stopped play and the match was abandoned. Score : KING'S SCHOOL. F. H . Seabrooke, b Clinch R. L. Gottwaltz, not out ... A. C. Fluke, c I-IiI ta ll, b Ca mpbell H. L. H. Cremer, b Mur rin R. E. Gordon, b Trueman P. D. Baker, not out ... E. F. Housden Ie E. Hawkins C. A. West did not bat. D. H. Cowie L . L. Hassell ; E xtras

21

36 5 34

1

5 2

3

106

Total (for 4 wi ckets)

KING'S

SCHOOL v. WYE

COLLEGE.

This match was played o n the St. La wrenc e Gro un d on Jun e 14th, and resulted in a defeat for the School by 160 run s. Wye won the toss and put their opponents in to bat on a treacherous wicket, Seabrooke and Gottwaltz o pening the innings to the bowling of Hatfield and Rutherford. Seabrooke's stay however, was very short, and he was caug ht at mid-wicket o ff Hatfield 'with t~e score at fi ve. Fluke then joined Gottwaltz and the usual sta nd was made, both batsmen, however, experiencing some difficulty with the bowling . The score was carried to 40 befo re Gottwaltz was bowled by a If swerver" from Ha ines whn had di splaced Rutherford, after a sound innings of 26. Cremer and,.(}o rdon, who followed, did not make a very long stay, whi le th e latter had some exciting mom ents at th e wi cket relieved by a ve ry fine off drive before he was dismissed by Hatfield. Fluke who had been batting fo r an hour for I I wa s caug ht at mid-off from Haines' bowlin g, and the inevitable procession, delayed for a time by th e luncheon interval. began. The fina l score was 71. The batsme n had all a long experienced considerab le difficulty with th e state of th e wicket, but towards the e nd it had improved a g reat deal , and when 'Vye wen t in to bat they (;eltainlv had a distinct advantage. The School bo wling, weake ned as it was by the abse m:e of H . W. Cremer, was yet very good wh en the streng th of thei r oppon ents is co nsidered . H. L . Creme r took five wickets for 04-1 rllll S. a n achi evement well worth y of more praise than it received . For once th e School fieldin g was good; at last th e XL see m to have realized that fielding is a most important part of cri cket, aB el that the slove nly man ner in whi ch they have hitherto performed this seaso n is not condu cive to winning


THE CANTUARIAN. f

Although th e School lost, they can console than themselves have fared worse agalllst

~:~~:~es ':ft~ th~r~ac~l~h~~tbe~t:/~;~ms Vvye th is season. Score and Anal ysis:R. L . Goltwaltz, b Edwards F. H. Seahrooke, c Bell , b Hatfield A. C. F luke , c H ood-Daniel, b EdwtlTds H . L. Cremer, b H atfield ... R. E. Gordon, b Hatfield ," P. D. Baker, c Gordon , b Edwards ... E. F . Housden , b Hatfield , .. K. E. Hawkins. not out ... C. A. W e~l. b Edwnrds '" O. H . Cowie, b Hatfield ... C. 1-1 . C. Gore, b Rdwards Extras

K ING'S SC HOOL. 26

17

4 b Hood-Da niel

"6 7 o

o

c Nelthor pe. b Haines not out not 0\11

.,-

7 2 2

".

4

c H asti ngs, h H ood -Damel

I

b I-!ainci

1

o 4

o 8

71

T otal

T otal (for 4 wickets)

WYE COLLEGE. 0

A. F . H ood.Daniel, b Cremer

;"

68 8

A. W . 1-1Rstings, c Gordon , b ~ow l e

A. H. J. I-inines, c Fluke, b Gore G. M. Gordon , \bw, b C remer C. E. Hatfield, b Gorc ...

~3

15 5

R. Edwards, c H awkins, b Crcmer F . A. Bell, c GotlWl\ltz, b Gore ". J. C. Rutherford, c GOllwaltz, h C reme r A. D. Parkin, not out... ." J. W. Page· Roberts, e West , b Cremcr C. Sutton-Nelsthorpc, b Cowie Extras

19 14

....

22

·co

0

8 22 1

T otal BOWl.lNG ANAI.VSIS: WVE

11. L. II. Cremer

C. 1-1, C. Gore C. A, West D. H . Cowie A. C. F luke ...

COI,LEGH,

o. 23 14 5 7'2 4

M.

5 1 0

2 0

R.

41 83 28

W.

5 3 0

2~

2

26

0


THE CANTUARIAN .

577

KING'S SCHOOL v. DOVER CO LLEGE. Played at Dover on Jnne 8th. O ur oppone nts went in first on a perfect wicket and batted consistently for three and a half hours. Thei r lJ1 ay was not slow at any time: Pollock batted with great freedom and gained nearly all his runs by boundaries. Our fielding was quite good on the whol e, but Mun ns should have ueen out much earlie r. Of our bo wle rs Fluke was th e most successful and was well backed up by th e slips; Gore kept a good length throughout. We went in at about four o'dock. Gottwaltz and Seab rooke opened the innings, alld with steady batti ng put on l 8 run s. Fluke joined Gottwaltz, and in a fine display proved how hard it is to get him out when he is once set. Playing at first with great ca re, he gradua lly became freer. H e wa~ at the wicke ts nver an houra nd- a-half, during which time he gave only two difficult chances after making- 50. \,Vhen set he hit very hard all round the wicket. The rest of the Sc hool, with th e exce ption of Gordo n, who compiled 20 in a very short and lucky in nings, fai led to do anything useful. Dover secured seven of our wickets, and the match, as had been ob vious for so me time, ended in yet anothe r draw. S.cQre and analysis : DOVER COLLEGE. C. T. Maclaren, c Gore, b C remer... E. de L. R oebuck, b Wesl F . S. Clarke, b C remer ... G. Walson, c Cremer, b Fluke

19

19

~G~_bW_

M

G. Stevens. c Gore, b Cowie G. D ixon, b Gore ... ... R. H . Parminler, c Wcst, b Fluke.. . A. H. Pollock, c Wesl, b Fluke D. H. Pratt, not out T. L. Mills, b Fluke Extras

17 14

26 1

J.

27 54 9 5

13 25 8

Tola l

â&#x20AC;˘

KING 'S SCHOO L.

R L . Gotlwaltz, b ?...lunns F. H. Sc.lbrookc, c and b Watson .. A. C. Fluke, nol out ... H. L . Cremer. c Stevens, b Poll ock R. E. Gordon. b Munns .. P. D. Baker, c PraU , b Pollock E. F. H ousden. b Pollor.k K. E. Hall kins, b Munns C. A. West } D. H . Cowie did not bat. C. H. C. Gore Extras

19

15 103 2

20 7 1

3

10 180

Total (7 wickets)

â&#x20AC;˘


THE

CANTUARIAN.

BOWLING ANALYSIS: DOVER COLLEGK.

Cremer Cowie Gore .. . West .. . Fluke .. .

'''Ie congratulate C. A. West on CI.

>I .

R.

1

2

11

o o o

76

47 31 43 48

1

9 9 8'1

SC HOO L being mad e

o. 17

IV[onitor i

J.

C . Page and

H. C. Powell have been promoted to the VIth Form.

*'*%

'We congratulate 1\1 r. Porter on taking his M.A. last April.

· ·

•~

Dr. Douglas Whitohead Reid has been appointed Medical Officer to the School.

"

" A. C. Telfer. running from scratch, was fifth in the Da)' Boys' Handicap Steeplechase, in the record time of 27 min . 40 sec. .;.'

*' *' Everitt gave

Lieut.-Col. an excellent series of recitations in ' the Parry on June 1St includi ng among them Tennyson's .. L~lcknow" and" The Revenge."

· "

We congratulate "F. H. Seabrooke on receiving his I st XI. Colours j and L. L. Hassell, C. H. C. Gore. E . G. V. Hughes. L . E.-Field. and A. J. Lush their 2nd XI. Colours after the Dover ma tch.

W.

1

2

4

NEWS. Abo 1-1 . de H. Smith and M. O. Depree (cox ). ' st Boat; and A. C. Keyser, 2nd Boat.

. ~

"

We congratulat~ 2nd Lieut. H. Pool on being gazetted Lieutenant.

"

.;,. 1(-

D. O. Fardell has been promoted to Sergeant, A. C. Fluke to Lance-Serge~nt, 1-1. C. Powell to Corporal and F. L. S,d _ botham to Lance-Corporal.

""*

The Cam p Party has now rca hed its limit of 80 men. The \;Var ffi C(1 Inspection took place. on Jun e 23rd.

*'A\\I Vr/e sho uld correct an error in Oil! last number. The Honorary Can O IH~' was conferred on the H eadmas te r, not hy the Dean and Chapter. but by tho ArC'l, bishop, wh o appoints all non-RCSldontlul Canons.

"*,,

At the moment of going t~ pr ft14 w, are able to announce the election nt I h, Rev. C. R. L. McDowall. Assistant ~1i" I ' , at Eton College. to succeed Dr. llill)).


THE

CANTUARIAN. S7'J

THE RI VER. On Saturday. June +th, the ~chool boat met Mr. E. C. Green's Four at Fordwich under very favourable conditions, a light breeze blowing straight up stream. The School were given back station . Both crews got a good sta rt, but Our Opponents drew away considerably, in splte of the good Co rn er taken by Depree. The School Four gained slightly at the beginning of the st raight but towards the e nd Our opponents spurted, and again drew away. This, however, proved too much for them and the School came dght o n at th e Jast bend and won by three Jengtlls. A. G. Keyser was rolVing at bow instead or the Captain. who was incapacitated by a sprained ankle. The crews were as follows ;_ THE SCHOOL FO UR .

Bow. 2.

3· Str. Cox.

l'vhc

A. G. Keyser. R. C. Cumberbatch. R. Juckes. H . de H . Smith. M. O. Depree.

SUBSCRIPTIONS

Already acknowledged Sir Guildford Molesworth ... R. Kennerley RumfOld, Esq. M. O. Depree V. C. Taylor, Esq. H. Townshend, Esq. G. C. W. Harker J. C. Morris II. de H. Smith J. W. Wayte L. L. Foster E. F. H ousden D. O. Fardell R. Juckes G. H. Claypole H . D. T ownend

...

GREEN'S FOUR.

C. J . Brodie. G. E. Barford. E. C. Green. C. W. Rudgard. C. H. Baker. RECEIVED

£ s. II 1

2 , ,

1

, 10

o o o

10 10

FOR

NEW BOATS.

d. 0 0 0 0

0 0 0

020 050 050 020 020 026 050 026 02 6

£ s.

Anonymous C. L. Nightingale

D. H . Cowie D. J. N. Lee ... J. H. H oughton, ESQ. C. H . H oug hton , Esq. L. H. J ones, Esq. Anonymous

O. H.

...

W. E. Guttentag, Esq . Anonymous Mr. E. C. Green's Four Cambridge O. K.S. J ohn KettelwelJ, Esq. Sports' Committee F . L. Sidebotham

0 3 o 10 0 5 0 2 0 5 0 2 0 5 0 5 0 '5 0 2 0 3 2 2 , 0 0 5 0 0 2

,

d. 6

0 0 6

0

6

0 0 0 6 6

0 0 0 0 6


THE

580

CANT UARIAN.

O. K. S. H . Gardn e r tied for first place in Putti ng th e Shot at Woolwich, fi rst at 32 feet an d agai n at 2 9 ft. 10 in . ~

.;:.

~

R. M. Gent is wickel-keeping for Tri nity. Oxrord , and has bee n appointed Secrelary of lhe College R.F.C.

.•

~

C. M. Riekells and C. W. C. Redman were ordained at Salisbury and St. Paul's respectively. on Trinity Sunday.

....

NEWS. \Vc offer our hea rtiest congratulati n • to G. H . S. Pinsc nt who is placed ill th e 'Wran g le rs' list at Cambrid ge wilh di stinction in the extra subjects . -)t.'1(.-)t.

The Archbishop has conferred I hi' deg ree of Doctor or Divi nity upon tll, 1 Rev. W. A. Wigram who has bee n IWtHI of the Archbh;hop' s Mission to til! l Assyrian Christians for se veral years.

.•

*

~

Second - Lieutenant n. S. Collard, 4lh Ball. " The Buffs " (East Kent Regt.) is gazetted Lieute na nt.

vVc heartily co ngratulate Dr. \·ViAIIIIII 011 thi s we ll-deserved recognition 0 1 hi M valuable work, as we believe it is VIII ) seldom that H is Grace exerci scH till anci ent power of his office to COllI! I degrees.

Tuesday and Wedn esday, July 26 and 2i. Any who wish to play sho ul d write to the captain. R. E . Martin, E sq., Hanwell Asylum, Middlesex.

*%",.

.

.. .. The O.K. S. match will take place on *.

.;:. 0)1-

VI. H . H orsley captai ned the Canterbury Ch ess Club which won t he Ke nt County Cup for last, season.

vVe hope that as man y .1('S t II possible will come to Spec h 1)11 ) 1 July 28 th, in vi ew of th c resignati on " the H eadmaste r. Subsc ribers wh o 111 1 he re th en are req uested to call ill Iwnhlll for the ir Call/uarialls' , lest (itl) )1 1 III. copies should be se nt to the ir add ,,'Hili.


THE

CANTUARI AN.

VIRTUTE FUNCTI MORE PATRUM DUCES. C. F. BATTISCOMBF.:.-Entered St:hool, Sept., ' 9°7, VI. Form , Se pt., 1905 . Munitor, Sept., 1909. Sergeant In O.T.C., May, 1909. • Sept., /g og. Scholar of Lincoln College, Oxford .

V ALET E. L. C. Sargent, G. Bryon, L. Cre me r.

i\[.

Hopkins, W. C. Fry, G. F. Leggatt, G. O. R .

CORRE S POND E NCE . . N. B.-The Editors decline 10 accept auy respollSibilily coltlw:led 'witlt the o/JiltiollS oj Ilui,. Cornspolt. de nts. Nam e and " ddress must always b~ .ltivelt, Ilot Itecessarily for p/~blicalio1t, but as a g lUttantee of good faith. Persollalities 1uill t'lwolve cerlaill 1·tjedioJt. L etters should bt written on OIU side 0/ the paper only.

To tlze Edl'lors 0/

II

THE CANTUARIAN."

Hamilton, Ontario. Dear Sirs, The eyes of many British boys are looking towards Canada as a land of opportunity. D uring her rapid expansion

she will absorb atld find work for multitudes of p:ople. There is probably no cou ntry which offers a more certain return for honest endeavour than Canada. ~for~over, i~ is a deligh tful country to live Ul , and IS, comparatively speaking, so ncar home that the enterprising youth who settles there need not feel that he is


THE

582

CANTUARIAN.

an exile, ,,~ith little or no hope of agai n visiting his people.

Many men of mark in Great Britain a nd Canada claim Trinity as their alma maler ,

At present, British boys of good educati on seek ca reers in Canada in some kind of fa rmin g. Few enter the professio ns or engage in comm erce ; as a rule, th ey reach the count ry at an age whcn it is di menl t to do ::;0 with a reasonable hope of Sllccess.

We re a British boy to ente r Trinity at the e nd of his School life, he could in a fe w years become familiar with Canad ia n life and thought, and be as tho ro ughly equipped fo r any profession or business as a ny of his Unive rsity friends. A Un ive rsity Cale nd ar will be sent to any one who applies to . 1 T he Provost, Tri nity College, T oronto, Canada,"

â&#x20AC;˘

But if yo uth s were to rece ive last few yea rs of their ed ucation in land 01 their adoption, they wo uld able to com pete on equal lerms with native- born.

the the be t he

Trinity College. T oronto, is an in stitu tion which should appeal strongly to parents of boys destined for Ca nada. I t is a residentia l College of the Unive rsity of T oronto. I ts Provost is a Camb ridge ma n, wh ile the Professors an d Lec turers are fo r th e most pa rt g rad ua tes of Oxforrl or Cam bridge. Its Corporation incl udes all the Bishops of ' Ontario dioceses. I t has a splendid history, and has long held a proud position in th e edu cational worl d.

JOl-IN H. COLLI NSON, M.A. (Cambridge), i Jfember 0/ Corporation .

To Ille Editors

0/ .. TH E

CANTUA R I AN."

Dear Sirs, Why clon't peo ple play stump I Yours affectionately.

THE TUCK SHOP PROFlTS.


THE

CANTUAR IAN.

OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS, JUNIOR DIVISION, KING'S SCHOOL, CANTERBURY. Statement

0/

A CC01Wls f or lIlt Y ear mded 3 1st M arch,

RECE IPT S. T o Balance of Shootiu.e: Accoun t ., I nitial Crllnt from War Office " Efficiency Grant " Elltrance Fees •• " Subscriptions .. " Chan;:-e.'l for Repairs, &c. " Charges for Continge nt Expell se.~.

.(. s. d,

95

0

0

118

8

8

, ,

,

1 TO 0

£

EX P ENDITURE.

s. d.

25 16

2

81 84

0 0

0 0

19 10 .

By

STORRS A:>'!)

EQu ll',\IBNT.'. ..

Uniforms Carriage Map~ .. Cap Band s Flags .. H aversacks •• Kit bag.'l .. Creat COat Carriers Sandbag.'l .. Rep;air!i (recoverable) .. . Vanous E qu ipmen t :'Ind Sundries

,"

.c

s. d.

2,52 15 1

o

11),

~

Instructor .. Bugles .. Bands engaged Sundries By

F'IOI. D TR ... tN1NG-

Folkestone E x pense.'l .. Chartbam " .. I n.'lpection Day Expen~e~

'0

Snndri e~

C. W. BE LL, ,C APT, O.C. King's Sch~olJ CanterLllry, O.T.C,

'6 i

,,

,

liS)

0

0

0"

,

, , " ,"

o 's o"

," ,

, 0

0 1 14 10 0 4 0

,

,

,

0 0

,, ", , 0

3 "

7 "

9

,,, """ ,6 , , ,•

,,

0

0

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6 16 10

o "

Balance (subiect to outMnn<ling bills) . . .. ..

," , , ,, ,,

j3)' i\ h SCRI.I.ANROUS-

P ostage and telegrams .. P ri ming .. . Stationer), Cheque Book . . Record hooks . Clerk "

,

S ,

0

By n,o,rw El(I'~NSES-

18 TO

0>0

Sundrie.~ M VS KKTR V-

Targets .. Range expen~es Repairs ..

~. d.

o 17 2 o '4 0 10 I 8 ~ 8 4

11), I N.'ITRUCTORS AND AII~IOURY­

Sergl .•Major E)(tra help Clenning rods Lamps and Oil

£

3

... ,, ,, 2. '4

"

Audited and found correct, F I~ANC I S H. T H I R LWA LL. l\fAN"GRR,

London Count)· & \Vc-stllliIiSler Ba.nk, Ld., Canterbury, ,5. 4, 1910.

7


THE

CANTUARIAN.

NOTICES.

'7r.le beg to ack nowledge with thank s the rece ipt of the following Subscriptions : -

H. L. Dibben. Esq. (7/-). C. Redman. Esq. ( l /6). A. B. R. Walley. Esq. (l/6) The Ven. Archdeacon Dundas (J/6). ] . T\~ell s . Esq. ( 10/0). J. E. H,llsbands. 'Esq. (J/6). L . W. Smith. Esq. ( l /6). R. Mannering. Esq. (3/6). Capt. C. A.

Knapp. (J/6). H. W. K. Mowll. Esq . (3/ 6). H. M. James. Esq . (3/6). E., C. Linton. Esq. ( 3/ 6). E. F . Smart. Esq. (l /6). R. H. Brinsley-Richards, E s~. ( 10/6). C. W. Carrington. Esq ., (7/-,. ]. H. Smith. Esq . ( , /6). B. S. collard. 'Esq. (3/ 6). J. H. Woods. Esq. (3/ 6). L. C. Sargent. Esq . (3/6 ). Rev. E. L. A. H ertslet ( 10/ 6). F. L. SIDEBOTHAM, H OIl. Sec.

I

OUR CONTEMPORARIES.

\\7e beg to acknowledge- th e receipt

of the following;Bltte, Bmdjield College Cllrolll:de, Briglllon College il1agaZ11Il, BromsgroVI~ll, Cartlluslan, Clllg'Wc/liall, C~ol1!1e/erall, Culhbcrliatl, DmsloJlian, D avar/all, Eagle, Easlbourlliall, St. Edward's College

,

Cln-ollicle, Elizabethan, Epsomia1t, Felsled/~lI, Fe/ltSiall, Glmal1l1olld Col/ege Cllrol/l~/tl

Herefordiau, }(il1g'S School A!lac.as1IIr , Lallciug Collegf Afaga~i1lt. L.l)IS Forlmgll(b',

Lily, L orel/ollian. A!aJds/omall, JJ!atv~rlll~,II. Olavian, PhlJllO/ll1au, Por(culhs,. ) d~1 flf' R adllial1, R ip/onion, ShlrbllrnwlI, 'J Olt bridgiall, H~lvt'nl.

Gibbs and Sons, Printen:, Palace Street , Cante rbury .


TilE VOL .

VII.

CANTUARIAN. JULY.

IqIO .

No.

22.

EDITORIAL. This is not merely th e end of a Summer Term. It is the finale of one of those periods which. like the ~ uccessive reigns of a dynasty, mark off the annals of the life of a School. Men come, toil and depart- maybe they receive a reward. But History shuts her c reaking gate behind them i and from an enclosure which had seemed all the world, they pass out into the beyond. Th eir labour they leave behind them incomplete. It is only lesser minds that rea li se their ideal: the g reat workers have never finished. Those that a whil e ago welcomed th em, now bid th em farewell, their gaze following th e retreating figure until it is lost in the sunset. Memories remain to stir the old pulse of fr iendshi p for a few moments i but often these are fickl e dreams, that disappoint when most we call upon them . There are left records; books are written-but the panting. present life has stiffened into a splendid pageant of the past, to be admi red and pronounced upon, but lived in no more. It is hard. even for an Editor, to lay down th e emblems of ollice. To watch the growing and shaping of a Magazine. from its early uncouthness to its final glories. is not only an ed ucation , but has also some of th e thr ill of hazard in it. The stirring up of contributors, the fashioning of articles. the arrangements, the cudgelling of brains an d tht detecting of errors, are all of th em st imuli that give zest to otherwi se humdrum lives. Even the ambigui ty as to the exact date of publication-hill let us not revive ancient ta les. It is hard. we say, to leave all th ese things. Yet perhaps it


586

THE

CANTU'ARIAN.

is most fitting we should leave th em in a Summer T erm. Some of the stin g r departure is lost amid th e glamour of the going off, of meeting old friends, of th" sunshine and th e chatter, and the myriad and five things that have to be do ne al once. All thi s crowds o ut th e sadder thoug hts-which is a mercifu l di spensatio n. YOli shall return , ancl yo u--and you. Happy you are ; greate r thing s a wait you. You shall pass through th e gard en of your years as we have passed. You shall ta lw up the mantle we doff. and kn ow the blessin g that accompanies it. Yon shall sl p into YOUT inherita nce, and may th e Muses and Pa n prosper you . So sayin g we at last put down th e pen, clap on our hats, and swin g out of th Mint Yard for ever.

31t memoriam. of< J OliN C I\~IP BELL,

O.K.S. , Died February, >l<

John Campbell entered th e Junior School in Janua ry, 18 88 ; and afte r winning a probati onership passed into the Senior School till I H92. He then went to Dublin to study for the Medical profession, passed the various examination s, and qualifi ed as a Doctor in I R97. From 1898- 1900 he was Medi cal Officer to th e British North i:Jorneo Co. at Kudat; acting Colonial Surgeo n at Labuan 18qq a nd a Magistrate first class for North Borneo. From 1900J()04 he was Consultin g Surgeon to the New London Amsterda m Borne.o Co. and H onorary Medica l Office r to the Gove rnment of North Born eo. In August, '904. he cam e back to Dublin where he took hi s F .R.C.S. and became a Free mason. In March, 1906, he went to Au stral ia and settled in

1910.

Clon curry, North Queensland, wh I r~ he had a very good hospital built. and did excellent work. In F ebruary, I I) I 0 , he was seized with an attack of typhoid fever and di ed at the age o f 34 in t1 w H os pita l in whi ch he had take n !Hu'l. inte rest. His greatest fri end in Ion curry in a letter says "he was buri c¡1I with full Masonic honours, his fllnnl ,iI being the largest eve r know n th ' m, f li l he was loved by the inha bi tants old a nd young; and a ll with th e 'hild lt lll in. the Schools attended the fun eral. According to hi s wish, h i ~ t\ll ll l, Miss Davidson has g ive n t hlH 11111 School all the curiositi es whic'1I III collected in Oorneo, whi d l lulolll I hI Gymn asium a nd the II a ll 0 1 !I n' 1unior School.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

A. J. GALPIN, D.D., HEADMASTER 1897-1910.

We lose this te rm one who for fourteen years has been the motive force of the School. There can be few tasks more difficult than that of leading a Public School; and Dr. Ga lpin was never a despot, but always a leader. The new boy that comes with tl prejudice against discipline and hard work finds no sympathy from him: slackness and indolence are th e two thing s he cannot and will not tolerate. Himself a man of th e utmost energy. he likes to see others also doing their best. H e has not kept all th e different lines of control in his own hand s, but is content to give to each his labour, while retaining ultimate power to himself, in case of need. But not a departm ent of the School has bee n left without so me indications of his personality; a nd not a boy but retains a vivid picture of his unflagging activity. Those that have been privileged to work with him know him for a ma n of a high ideal and invincible purpose ; a man who can make the plans and erect the buildings, who hates bad work and glorious shame. He has had some stern battles to fight; but he fo ught steadilv, and won. As a result, he has with him the confidence of all the School, and o( all who can value a great fighter and a good man. Born at Dorchester, and educated at Dorcheste r Grammar School and Sherborne, he has had a strikin gly successful caree r. His public School life was distinguished by a multitude of prizes a nd by his skilful presiding over one of t he H ouses. But not only was he to the front in intellectual ac tivities ; he was for three yea rs a membe r of th e Football XV. and took a prominent part in forwarding the study of natural history, archaeology and architec ture among his sc hoolfellows. In 1879 he gained an Open Classical Scholarship at Trinity College. Oxford; and fulfilled th e high expectation 3 he had thu s raised by takin g a First Class in Moderati ons, and First Classes ill th e Final Classical Schools and also in tho se of .. Litterae Huma niores." At the University he was well known as a shot, bein g selec ted to compete against th e Cambridge VIII. in 188 2 and 188 3; and also as a musician , for he played th e violoncello in the Musica l Union and had charge of th e music in his Coll ege Chapel. Be fore the announcement of his degree had been mad e, he received a n offer of the post of Assistant Private Secretary to the Marquis of Lansdowne, wh o was then Viceroy of Canada. He spent eighteen months at Ottawa, and th en returned to Oxford to be elected to a Classical Lectureship at his old College. He had been at .

.


588

THE

CANTUARIAN.

this work for a year, when he received his appointment as Assistant Master at Marlborough College. H e took up his work the re in 1887. and in 1893 was given the control of one of the large Houses. Four years later he came to Canterbury. with a wid e experi ence of the requireme nts and difficulties of modern education. H e saw the time had come in which to mollify severe classicism to suit the needs of the other great spheres of thought and profession into whi ch every Public School should be able to send its quota. In this he showed that his own trainin g in n o way interfered with his broad and lofty conception of the right edu cation of the mod ern boy. In his second term he created a class especially to prepare candidates for th e Army, the Navy and Engineering professions j and he at once proposed a scheme for the better teaching of Mathematics throughout the School, a scheme whic h has fulfilled every expectation. When he came, there were 143 boys : in 1903 there were 250, and beyond thi ti limit he refuses to go. The first Boarding H ouse was Win chelsea House, opened by the Rev. L. H. Evans in J 898 j Mr. Evans has since then moved to Holme HOlls '. In 1902 anoth er house, und er th e auspices of Mr. Bell, was opened j and on his retirement in 1908 from I-Iouse mastership, another was opened by Mr. Reay. Thus the School has expanded; and with the increase in numbers has come a corres pond ing enlargement and beautification of the buildings. In rl:S 98, at Dr. Galpin 'li instigation, th e Oak panelling which now adorns th e walls of the big School was Pil l up, and at the same time th e windows we re replaced by fresh dia mond-paned glnsH and were orname nted with the interesting a nd illustrious escutcheons whi ch we :H tl proud to be able to claim as belonging to O.K.S. and othe rs connected with tl ill School. The year followin g plans were made for a ne w block of buildings to a 'ullY the space behind the Gran ge j and in 1900 the New Wing, consisting of a Dillin" Hall, Dormitories, Master' s Rooms, and Laboratories, was used for the first tinw , In 1902 it was felt that the arrange ments in the School Chapel, which by th e cO Unt'H of the Dean and Chapter, consists of the South choir-transept of the Cath ed ral, W (11 11 inadequate for our purposes. A fund was quickly raised, and a beautiful alta r fll il l reredos was placed in the small apse of S. John, the scats being arran ged all to rll n eastward. A short while afterward Dr. Galpin was responsible for th e buildill H II I a ne w cove red Fives Court in fron t of the GymnasiUlTI i and in conneC1.ion with Lhlll \\1 would express our de ep gratitud e to him for the inte rest he has always show n in li d game, encouraging it by some ve ry valuable prizes. But the g rtatesLad vancu 01 li ll was made in 1905, wh en the mod C' rn requirements of Chemistry and Physi ' $ , HIU\\ 111 111 steadily under the Headmaster's rule, were re wa rded by the building 0 1 I ~ III Chemical Laboratory, whi ch was dedi cated by one of the greatest nanWH In 11 11 domain of science, William Harvey, O.K.S. The building was fo rmally OIHlIII II It, the Archbishop on th e 18th of November, 1905 . In additi on to thi s g n 'ftL wlllk. WI would mention less pretentious, but quite as useful, edifi ces, such as Ihll 11 11 \I II Sheds, and th e Armoury whi ch Dr. Galpin most liberally gave to th o SchoOl II .'"111


THE

CANtUARiAN.

as the need was felt. Lastly. casting away a venerable but a ntiquated custom, he has .replaced the traditional twilight of the Studies by modern but comfortable electric light. On January 2nd, '900, the H eadmaster was married to Miss Millicent Hichens, daughter of Ca non Hichens, Rector of S. Stephen's, Canterbury. Any account of the School which omits to mention the great debt that we owe to Mrs. Galpin, is necessarily incomplete. The task of guiding a house of over a hundred boys is no light one: but Mrs. Galpin has been completely victorious, a nd the unfailing sympathy, no less than th e bountiful hospitality, she has always extended to us, have gone a long way towards enriching th e success which her energy and tact had already secured to her. But the work of the H eadmaste r is not merely to be valued by increased numbers or e nlarged buildings. Throughout the School he has made his influence felt, and has raised both study a nd games into a hi ghe r plane altogether. H e has brought the old classical edu cation into line with the mos t exacting requirements of the Universities j he has made ample provision for th e due expansion of the Math ematical side ; he has greatly assisted the cause of .English and History j he has practically laid the foundation of instruction in Natural Science, Physics and Chemistry j he has created a class for special preparation for the Army and Navy. The strikin g successes which have been gained in every one of these spheres of me ntal activity arc sufficient testimony to the abi lity with which he has made these improvements. The School is no longe r confined to a rigid classicism, but has blossomed forth into all the flowers of a variega te d education. The last ten yea rs have been ma rked by such an outburst of lUlisic as is rare in the lifetime of any School. Natural Histo ry, Archaeology a nd the study of that ar chitecture which is so abundantly illustrated in Canterbury, have flouri shed beneath his active support. T he Ha rvey Society owes many papers to him-and most interesting they were. Football, Cricket and Sports ha ve always received his unqualified support, and ma ny a pestered captain could tell of the sympathy and readin~ ss with which he has proffe red advice and assistan ce. But above ail, he has taught us the way to live. By his own example and his constant instruction, he has uplifted the spirit of the School to a heig ht worthy of its best traditions. We might sum up his teaching with his two fa vou rite maxims" Be straight" and" Be cuurteous." Both of these he is himself, and both of them he has done his best to render us. The highest praise with which we can repay him, is to follow out the pa th on which he has direc ted us. Although he himselr is leav ing us, yet th e spirit he has made remains with us. Call it memories, or tone, o r influence, or what you will, we shall not lightly forget what he would have us be, no r what he has laboured to effect for the we ll ~lre of th e School as a whole, and of e very boy within it. He goes to a life of diffe rent tasks, but we feel certain he will acquit himself no less nobly than he has done here. We shall watch his future career with


THE CANTUARIAN. eagerness, lest we should miss any of the fullness of the success that will be his. And when he comes here to visit us, he may be sure he wi ll not lack a welcome. Absence is not separation; nor could any that have come in contact with him, mu ch less his old School, ever forget him.

CRICKET.

KING'S

SCHOOL v.

IvI. C. C.

Played 011 the Beverley, June 21St. The School had a full team with ti lli exception of Seabrooke, the loss of whose wicket-keeping was felt con siderably. OUf opponents won th e toss and put us in. Gottwaltz and Snalt opened tlw il1ni n~: " for the School against the bowling of Young and Brown . Gottwaltz fell an easy prt) , to a good ball from Young. Fluke joined Snatl, and when th e score had n.:ach(ld 30, the latter was bowled by Yo un g. With H. L. H. Cremer in, brighter cri ktlL ensued, Fluke playing a brilliant game, the score rising rapidly to 65, when Fluk go t his legs in front of a straight ball from Young. Gordon, who never seemed al ho rll n with. the bowling, was bowled after making eleve n. Baker joined Cremer, and lI wv brought the score to 127 when th e former from a very poor stroke was ca tl 8'h ~ III mid-on. After th is came a series of disasters, Housden, Hawkins, \VachL: r and W r \~1 failing to store ; but H. W. Cremer came to the rescne with two or th ree good h h ~, Baker was then bowled and SOOI1 after Cremer who had made a useful '1 J . 'l'IH innings closing for . 6 I. 6

Galloway and Dean opened the innings for th e M.C.C. The form er was ru ll 0111 at 23. It was obviously Gore's bowling day, for in addition to beatin g th . blt l p'1J1t11j frequentl y, he clean bowled three of the seven wickets which were tak II . AI 11 11 __ stage of the game, when the board registered 76 runs for five wi ckets, iL 8(') 11I{'d lUI If the School had a chance of winning, but the Hon. G. Harris, and R. A. I( flllll ll! I both played gbod inni ngs, bringing the score to ' 37, when t he lattur Wlut howl! il Only one more wicket fell, and that afte r the School score had been Pi.(ss d. The bowling of Young was too good, for the School, buL Lhoy di d Y"IY III II the strength of the opponents.

consid~ring


THE CANTUARIAN.

R.

59'

KINO'S SCHOOL.

t.

Gottwaltt, b You ng c. V. Snntt, b Young... ... A. C. Fluke, lbw Young .. . . .. H. L. H. Cremer, c O'Connorl b Yotmg R. E. Gordon, b Young ... P. D. Baker, b O'Connor ... ·E. F. Housden, hit wkt., b Voung K. E. Hawkins, b Young ... H. S. Wacher, b Young ... C. A. West, b Young ... H. W. Cremer, b Hatfield C. H. C. Gore, not out Extras

o 10

37 41 II

19 o o o o 21

4 18

T otal ...

161

M. C. C.

J. J.

W. Galloway, ftl n out ... Dean, b Gore K. L . Mallet, b Gore . .. .. .. Hon. G. Harris, c Hawkins, b H. L. Cremer ... ... C. E. Hatfield, c and b West Capt. Nicholls, b Gore... ". R. A. Rammel, Ibw, b H. L. Cremer V. O'Connor, not Ollt

C. HUlton}

. Brown

Storer

6 30 2

47 5 15

33

16

.

did not bat.

Young

Extras

II

T otal ...

165

.. . BOWLI NG

ANALYS(S.

H. L. H. Cremer H . W. Cremer C. H . C. Gore C. A. West A. C. Fluke

KING'S SCHOOL v.

o. 17·5 12 10

M. 4 2

0

4

I

3

0

R. 51

36 39 II

18

IV.

2

a 3 I

0

FELSTED.

This match was played at Fel sted on June 2-4th and '25th, and resulted in a draw. Our opponents won the toss and went in on a wicket which, thouO'h sodden wit h rain , Q


THE

59 2

CANTUARIAN.

gave the batsmen a decided advantage as the ball was almost too wet to hold. H. L. Cremer bowled throughout the innings and kept his length well. but none of the other regular bowlers appeared able to hold the ball and gave him no assistance. They seemed never to have sent down a well-pitched ball in their li ves. Play ceased at 7 p.m., when Felsted had made J80 odd Tuns for the loss of nine wickets. The match was resu med next morning at 10.30 and the last wi cket fell with the score at 216. Cremer' s seven wickets for 79 was quite the feature of the match, while F Inke took the remaining 3 for 38 . When the School went in the wicket had begun to dry, and as the day advan ced, the pitch which had been terribly cut up. became quite difficu lt. GoUwaltz and Baker made a good sta rt and the score was carried to 90 for the loss of the first three wickets; the fourth fell at 11 0 and here the inevitable collapse set in; two more went down with. the score un changed, and then an aojournment was made for lunch. Rain came on and play was delayed till 3. 15; even th en the ground was hardly fit. Hawkins and Housden faced the bowling for a few minutes before the latter was unfortunately run out. H awki ns and Hassell then played out time, giving the best exhibition of batting which we have seen from them. The final score was 14 1 ~ r seven wickets. The School batting was rather slow; GotLwaltz's 40, by no means without blemish was the best innings. There was far too much tendency on the part or everyone to use unnecessary care and especially to play back to half-volley. It se In H a pity that a two-day match should not be brought to a definite conclusion, but undt¡, the existing circumstances of wicket and weather there was some excuse. Scar and analysis :FELSTED SCHOOL. T. R. Cox, c and b n. L. H. Cremer ... D. 1-1. H. Jewell, c Gotlwaltz, b H. L. I-I. Cremer C. K. Waller, b IT . L. 1-1_ Cremer

...

A. G. Thurlow c Ilousdell, b I-I. L. 1-1. Cremer G, A. F. Campbell, lbw, b F luke '" C. C. Spooner, c Baker, b F luke " . A. F . I-I. Wiggin b 1-1. L, I-I. Cremer C. W, Howlett, b H. L. H. Cremer A. C. Mortlock, b H . L. I I. Cremer R. V, Routledge, c H assell, b Fluke O. C. Hasler, not out ". .., ... Extras-byes, II, leg byes, I, wides, I. ,. Total _

.

3 21

'1

13 30 j6

S j.

,3 10

"

.1 '(1


THE

CANTUARIAN.

593

KING'S SCI-IOOL. R. L.'Oottwaltz, .lbw, b Rou:Lfedge P. D. Baker, Ibw. b Monlock ."

40 12 12

A. C. Fluke, b Howlett ". .. . . I-I. L.. H. Cremer, c Mortlock, b Waller R. E. Gordon, b Routledge C. V, Snalt, b Routledge I{, E. Hawkins, not out ." E. F. Housden, run Ollt ... L. L. Hassell, not Ollt ... I-T. W, Cremer } _ C. H. C. Gore (~Icl not bat. EXlras-byes, 18

26 8 o 12 II 2

18

Total ,:: nOWLI NG

ANALYSIS.

fI, L. H. Cremer C. H. C. Gore

H, W. Cremer A. C. Fluke

KING'S

SCHOOL v.

O. 21

M.

R.

IV.

2

3 6

I

0

0

19 49 39

12

2

HIGHGATE

38

7 0

3

SCHOOL.

d ~1';1'ed on the Beverley, Jun e 28th . T he School won the toss and sent Gottwaltz

a~l . a er.1Il to bat. Gottwaltz was caught in the slips when he had made 17. Baker ~e'!lallled to see Snat~, Cremer and Gordon dismissed in quick succession, all three . elllg ca~g 1t and bo~vled. ,Soon after H ousden's clltry Baker was run out, through ~me d m\sudn~ er~tan dlllg 'vltl~ ~ousden. There was little attempt to score after

1;1

ous en s Ismlssai and the 1l111lngs closed for 87.

H. L . H. Creme'r took the first wicket which fell at 20 There were four wickets down fo~ 49. bU,t Phillips played a good innings for 45, 'thus bringing the score to 8 1, and so depnved the School of all chance of winning. When the sixth wicket fell they were one run ahead and finished with a total of 154. d Thhe SbchoOi fielding was not up to usual form, several easy chances being missed an tea sellce of Fluke was felt considerably, â&#x20AC;˘


THE CANTUARIAN.

' 594

KII/G'S SC HOOL.

[7

R. L. Gottwaltz. c Read, b Caston P. D. Baker, fun out ... C. V. Snatt, c and b Caston H. L. I-I. Cremer, c and b Phillips R. E. Gordon, c and b Caston E . F. Housden , b Caston H . S. Wacher. c Maude, b Phillips L. L. Hassell, b Phillips H. W. Cremer, not Oll t D. I-I. Cowie, b Caston C. H. C. Gore, c Winclover, b Caston Extras ...

[7 a a [

22

5 [ [

7

a [6

Total

I-IIGHGATE SC HOO L. II

G. C. C. P.

L. McKay, b 1-1. L. I-I. Cremer R. Heaton-Ellis. b Gore '" A. Caston, b H. L. I-I. Cremer." R. Phillips, c Gordon, b Hassell J. W. Hodge, b H. L. H. Cremcr ... A. M. Ritchie, b H. W. Cremcr ... C. 1-1. Shipton, c I-I. L. H . Cremer, b Cowie .. G. R. Crole- Rees. not out .. . .. E. W. Maude, b Gore .. _ H . ~1. Read. c 1-1. W. Cremer, b H. L. H. Cremer R. E. Windovcr, c Gordon, b Gore

[5 7

45 a 7 6 24

6 3

[3 17

Extras ...

154

T otal BOWLING AN ALYSIS :

I-IIGHGATi': SCHOOL. I-I. L. I-I. Cremer C. H. C. Gore H. W. Cremer D. H. Cowie L. L. Hassell

O.

M.

R.

w.

21 [5 13

3 3

46

4

4

5

I

2 a

32 40

3

5

[4

KING'S SC HOOL v. EASTBOURNE COLLEGE. Played on July 5th. th is match resulted in an easy win for th e visiting l(lll ill I I, four wickets and thirty-one runs_ The School batting, weakened by th nh!Hl II II' III Fluke, was poor, Housden and Baker being the only batsmen able to c p wh,1t II"


THE CANTUARIAN.

595.

bowling, while our fi eldin g was at times very slack. Winning the toss, Gottwaltz and Baker opened the innings to the bowling of Coxhead and Maynard. but in his third over the former clean bowled Gottwaltz for Z. ' Joined by Snat!, Baker continued impassively to score by si ngles, the two bringing the score to 28; when King replaced Maynard, and with the last ball of his first over dismissed Snatt for a useful 18. The next man, Cremer, had some bad luck in not getli ng One or two of his shots to the boundary, but he never looked likely to remain long, and was bowled by Maynard (4-5-3- 8). Baker was still defendi ng his wicket with his accustomed ease, and on Cremer's dismissal was joined by Gord on. The latter, save for one stroke, never seemecl comfortable till back again in th e pavilion, an d his downfall was more or less inevitabl e; he was bowled by a /toad ball from Dalpat Singh, and his dismissal let in H ousde n. H e proceeded to follo w Baker's good example in refusirig to get out, wh ile occasionall y gettin g a good hit in, and scored well off th e lobs of Muir-Smith. The last over before lunch saw Baker cau ght in trying to lift Muir-Smith to the boundary ( 8<)-5-20). Afte r the interval Housden sco red more rapid ly and in excellent style, but could find no one to stay with him, Crowther, Wacher and Cowie being his best partners. The innings closed for 161, HOllsdeh being not out with a well played and invaluable 54. Eastbollrne went in with by no means a difficult task before them, though when th e first wicket fell for 1[ , the hopes of the School rose considerably; but Maynard, partnered by Dalpat Singh. and later by Malik, proceeded to help himself liberally to ru ns, and EastbdiJrne had only four wickets down when our total was passed. The game was continued until Maynard ' had completed a superh century, wlien stumps were drawn. The Eastbourne fielding and batting was excellent, while individually Maynard, Dalpat Singh and Malik each gave an exceedingly good display, the former' s roo not out being the best performance we have seen for some time. KING'S SCHooL R L. Gottwaltz, b Coxheatl .. P. D. Baker. c Wilson, b Muir-Smith C. V_ Snatt, b King.. . .., H. L_ H. Cremer, b Maynard R E. Gordon, b Dnlpat S ingh E. F. H ousden. not out .. _ A. H . Crowther, c Maynard, b Muir-Smith H. S_ Wacher, c Schneider, b King __. D _ H. Cowie, b Maynard H. W. Cremer, t: Tudor, b Maynard C. H. C. Gore, c Mnlik , b Coxhead Extras... 01. T otal

2

20

18 8 7

5~

14 7 I

a 2J .. .

162


THE CANTUARIAN. EASTBOURNE COLLEGE. R. E. Tudor, Ibw, b H . L. H. Cremer

6

II. A. V. Maynard, not out Dnlp.u Singh, c and b Gore .. E . 1-1. Muir·Smith, b H. L. H. Cremer H. Doughty, c Crowther, b H. W. Cremer H. S. Malik, run out, _, _ R. D. Sch neider, c Baker, b H. W. Cremer R. H. King } I. L. Comm . 'I <hd not bat. C• E • W I son

I-I.

100

25 7 10 30

5

J. Coxhcad

10

Extras ." Total

193 BOWLING ANALYSIS: EASTBOURNE COLl,EGE.

I-I. L. C remer

C. H. C. Gore I-I. W. Cremer D. H. Cowie R. L. Gatt waltz

J:I. S. Wllchc;r

KING'S

o.

M.

R.

21 16 18 3 2

2

I

0

56 58 44 15 7

SCHOOL v. ST. EDMUND'S

2 0 I

3

w. 2 I

2 0 0 0

SCHOOL.

Played at St. Edmund's on July 9th. We sympathise with R. L. Gottwall" UII being called upon to captain a team. from which six of the regular playe rs wcr HWIl ', but at the same tim e we confess a certain sense of sham e at the result. 'vV II/IVI I rarely seen a morc pitiable exhibition, even allowing for general desponden cy a nd lll" state of the g round. The C.O.S. innings produced nothin g of ex traordinary 11ltuIIIMI and ended soon after lunch for 109; Cowie took five wickets with some vcry moclN !l 1I bowling. Several catches were missed, Wacher, Hassell and Field bein g 11 11' offenders. We consider it a mistake to have sent in our two slowest batsmen on n wit kl I where hitting was the only chance. For once th~y both failed and th o r It t ul ti ll side in consequence became too nervous to do much else thal1 walk t and from II If wickets. The total score was 53 . Snatt's 15 was the best individual ~ I t II lId ,,was unluckily run out.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

597

Cremer bowled very \~ell in the C.O.S. second innings but was not backed up. Our ~pponents too~ no nsks and declared about 5 o'clock, leaving us 176 to win. NothIng need be SaId about our second altempt ; the score speaks for itself:ST.

EDMUND'S SC HOOL.

J.

G. Shaw, Ibw, b Cowie ... W. E. S. Napier, Ibw, b Cowie W. E. Darby, c Baker, b Cowie E. F. Duggan, b Cowie ... B. H. Geary, c Baker, b Cremer G. C. White, b Cremer .. . A. Neal, c Snatt, b West .. . R. G. Havcloik, Ibw, b West A. B. Adams, b Cremer ... J. B. Neal, c Field, b Cowie J. G. Clarke, not out ... Extras

10 b Cremer 13 b Cremer I I c Field, L Cr:mer 11 c Crowther, b West 1 b Cremer 41 b Cremer 7 not alit

13 IS

21 45

.,.

II

4 '2

o o

II

o

T otal

4

Extra$ ...

5

109

T otal

126

KING'S SC HOOL. R. L. Gottwaltt, c Napier, b Darby P. D. Baker, b Darby E. F. Housden, b Darby C. V. Snatt, run out ... A~ H. Crowther, b Duggan H. S. Wacher, c Clarke, b Darby .. . L. E . Field, b Darby ... .. . H. W. Cremer, c Havelock, b Darby D. H. Cowie, Ibw, b Neal C. A. West, b Darby L. L. H assell, not out Extras

0 st Clarke, b Geary

2 7

b Darby

c Clarke, b Geary 3 run alit

2 5 2 3

IS

6 st Clarke, b Geary 4 b Darby I

0 5 0 0 10

Total

st Clarke, b Duggan c nnd b Geary ... c Darby, b Duggan not Oll t not alit Extras ...

I

12 I

3 2 41

Total (for 9 wickets)

53 BOWLING ANALYSIS :

ST. EOMUNO'S

SCHOOL.

2nd Innings.

1st Innings. H . W. Cremer. D. H. Cowie L. L. Hassell C. A. West

o. 19 14'3 3

2

M.

R.

w.

3

42 43

3

I

6

IS

5 0

5

2

H. W. Cremer ... D. H. Cowie L. L. Hassell .. , C. A. West R. L. Gatt waltz A. Crowther

...

o. 19 10 2 3'3 2 4

M.

K.

4

50 29 9

2

0 0 0 0

W.

5 0 0

II

9 '4

0 0


TH E

CANTUARIAN.

KING'S SCHOOL CONCERTS, 19 00- 19 08 . . Subjoined is a list of the more important music perfo rmed at th e part series of the mu sic concerts which came to an end Chri stmas, Ig08.

ssohn. "Frcizsehiitz," \:\feber. OJ to.ll.:lluu." A. T homas. " Merry W ives," N icho ll.". Miseellaneolls :Fi rst Movement, C Mi nor Symphony, 110CI IIO VI' " '

C H ORUS AND ORC III~ST RA.

Gounoc1 , ..

Faml

.,. Soldier's Choru s

(twice).

Wagner ,"

..

Ki rmcsse Scene (twice), Waltz Scene. TnulI/ta;;ser Pilgrim's Chorus (twice).

Auber Bizet Gluck H andel Elgar '" W eber Schumann

March and Chorus. " LolulJgrilt Bridal Chorus. Masam'ello Market Chorus (twice). Canllell . . , Ch. des Gamins. Armida Selection. Ads ,_, .. . F inal Chorus. Bavarian Dance, No. r. ". Preciosa .. , Gipsy Chorus. ", ... Gi psy Chorus (twice).

FOLK MUSIC FOR CUORUS AND ORC Hl~ST R A .

British, 18.

H ungarian, 3.

R ussian , 7.

Spanish, 8.

One each of-Greek. Basque, Zulu. H indoo. Roum elinn. C1\Oadia n. Maori. Italian. Bearnaise (1 360).

Chinese.

O ld F rench.

V ARIATlO NS }l'OR ORCHItSTRA AND C HORUS

on Sen Chanties, s. ORCHESTRAL.

Overtures : " Deux II F igaro," Mozart.

J ournccs," Cherubine. If Ruy Bias, " Mendel.

"

Symph. C. (27 Brcllhnl,q I 11)'1 11 1

"" D. ( 1782) Mo" ,,1 Invitation to WaUz ... \\It,l'l l Dansc des Sylphen H 1\1,,_ Graceful Dance, H enry VI II. S ull lvlllI Pizzicato, Sylvia 1)1,11111 Dansc des Bacchantes .. . Couu'HI Ball et Music (2 movements) F IUlst " ( " II ) Rosn mun,!

S Imb' II Peer Gynel Suite (2 movCIIIC11I8) (I \VIce) (II Ii Caesse Noisclle (4 movcm ents) 1'lIch"iknw ~ Gavotte .. Mignon " ... A. '11111111" Selection... "Carmen".. . ... IIh I " II F lying Outchmlln II WIIU" I 1st movement" Nell Gwynne " ~ lIh 1';. (1 111111...

· Rustic Su it e (twice) Dr. II. (" 1'",,111 ·Waltz f:ju iIC... (" I I,Hlli - Romance for Oboc II . . Irr\clw f, MUll. III Suite (arranged) on Walt'.cl J HhlUIii II" March "Pomp and ir Ullulll lWl II I I~ H AnQanle (arranged for strinQ' ) Ad III lit I ~ 11 111

or

1.1111 l llt!!ll.

(. speciall y composed for lit 4n '11111'4'11 ), P IANO SOI.Oll. Nocturne in E Oat .. . hoplo ... H, A, 111'11111 Utnhnl ... ,,, I ' T wo Waltzes


THE

CANTUARIAN.

Holberg Sui Ie. Prelude ... Greig ". C. N. Ryan. C. J. N, Ryan . Nocturne F minor... Chopin... Polka de la Reine ." Raff "" Prelude.. . Rachmaninoff C. A. M. Richardson. E. K. Barber. Schmetterling Grieg Prelude. NO. 3 of the 48. C. }. Galpin.

Other boys have also give n e vidence o f conside rable ta lent by their performan ces at Oll r sma ller Conce rts , at which we have hea rd a certain amount or c ha mbe r music) including :-Qua rteltc in A. op. 18, No. 15 Beethoven. Trio in D minor. Fi nale Mendelssohn. Quart ettes in A. Minuet. Ai r and Va r. Mozart . Qui ntette in E Oat. 1st movement ... Schumann.

Of instrume ntal solos, th e most interestin g were those by l\,'lr. Zacharevitc h, who very kindly came to play to the boys, and we have had a quartette of c1arionets and a quartette of trombones, and also solos by excellent players on the saxophone, bassoon, and doubl e-bass. From time to time com positions by boys have been played, those by C. J. Galpin shewing a hig!: degree o f musical culture. Mention should a lso be made of piano solos and songs by R.G.Hancock. A Chant, by O. F. H uyshe, was included

599

in the Cathedral service book, and is,

I believe, still sung occasionally. Some of the best work by boys here used \0 be in ensemble playing of simple music arranged for such instru mental combination as might be available. P ERCY GOD1!'REY.

It is only fitting that th is brief summary of the mu sic work should ap pear here. T he School has developed and prospered greatly under the rule of t he present H eadmaster, to whom it can only be a pleasure t hat an a rt, in which he is perso nally in terested, should have been cultivated by t he boys of the School with such success, a success wh ic h has only been made possible by his in terest and encouragement i an d on behalf of the Musica l Society I wish to add a word to express our g reat appreciation or the inte rest and sym pathy Mrs. Galpin has always show n towards our Society. H er en rorced absence at the last Concert was a ve ry great reg ret to us, and we a ll join most sincere ly in wishin g her complete an d speedy restora tion to health in her new home. P ER CY G ODFREY.

ROWI N G. KING'S

SCa OOL v.

TONBRIDGE

SCH OOL.

The annual races v. T onbridge ' School, I st a nd 2nd boats were rowed at Fordwich on Th ursday, Ju ne 30th, and resul ted in a win for both the School crews. The School won the toss and chose back station. The re was a strong wi nd blowing


THE

600

CANTUARIAN.

k

against the boats. but in spite of it the crews got off without delay. The School sta rting well gai ned rapidly till the beginnin g of th e st raight wh ere Tonbridge began to draw away and at the last bend were nearly at their original distance. Here the School /I picked it up," but TOllhridge soon aft er followed their example and the School only just managed to win a most exciting race by three or four feet. Smith kept a very level stroke all the way a nd was well backed-up in his sprint. Best, who was cox instead of Depree, took an excellent corner which greatly inc reased our lead at the begi nning of the race. The School crew were greatly handicapped since they had only been in the new boat twice before the race and were by 'no means settled; it was there rore a wc1learned victory.

The 2nd boat lost the toss but our opponents chose froni stati on. The School were rather slow at the start but began. to overhaul T onbridge on th e straight. Towards the end of the straight Tonbridge went ahead. but were ca ught up at the finish by the School, who responde d well to Keyser' s sprint and won by a short le ngth. We should like to express our most sincere thanks to Dr. Whitehead Reid wh o has given up so much of his time to coaching the 1st boat. and who has, in spite of difficulties with th e old boats. succeeded in turning out a cre w whi ch. if not a model in style. at least is able to win races. We hope they will improve in style, also now that they have stepped at last into the longed-for new boats which a rc esse ntial if any good form is desired. The crews were as follows :KING'S S CH OOL (1 St UOM).

C. L. Night ingale (bow).

R. C. Cumberbatch. R. Juckes. H. de H. Smith (stroke). L. W. H. Best (cox).

(2nd Boat). C. N. Ryan (bow). O. O. Fardell.

J.

W. Wayte.

A. G. Keyser (stroke).

H. L. Kcrrich (cox).

TONI.IRIDGK SCHOOL (1St

R. E. Armitage (bow). U. de B. Daly. W. S. Knight (Captain). G. Kinnear (stroke) . C. Atkinson (cox).

(2nd Boat). 11.1. B. Simpson. K. 1-1. Beale. R. E. Hindson. It Garlick (Captain). C. Atkinson (cox).

Boat) .


THl;:

KIN G'S

CANTUARIAN.

SCHOOL v. TONBRIDGE

60 1

TOWN.

This race was rowed on Saturday, July 2nd, at Fordwich, against a strong wind and stream, which made rowin g rather diffi cult. The School start was not all that was to be desi red and so the distance between the two boats did not decrease much umil out on the straig ht whe n the School began to gain steadily, obtaining a lead of three lengths which they held to the e nd. At the finish T onbridge picked it up to a ve ry fast stroke, but the home crew res pond ed and held their lead. The School were a little more acc ustomed to thei r Il ew boats in this race than in that against T onbrid ge School and rowed well; our opponents also rowed well, but being a very light cre w, the heavy headw ind and stream to ld co nsiderably against them. The School crew was as follows :C. L. Night inga le (bow). R. C. Cmnbe rb."I.lch.

It J uckes. H. de H. Smilh (stroke). M. O. Depree (cox).

BOAT

CLUB.

The An nual Sculling Races were held at F ordwi ch on \Vednesday, July 6th, under most un fortunate circumstances, th e rain comi ng down steadily t~e whol e afternoon; nevertheless the re was quite a fair attendance. The re was a noti ceable improvement in the sculling this year and some good rat.:ing was witnessed. Proceedings ope ned with the se mi-final of the Juniors, Brann on v. Musso n. This proved a good race, res ul ting in a win for th e fo rm er by half a length. Lee th en opposed Sandcs and won his race in good style. Next came the sem i~final of the Seni ors, Nighti ngale v. Keyser; the former had his opponent well in han d and won easily. K.eyse r finding the bank just before the e nd. III the next heat Dodgso n succu mbed to Cottrel)! who was keeping a good long stroke against a heavy head wind . At th is period in th e proceedings came th e " piece de resistance n of the afternoon , a race between th e Oxford and Cambrid ge representatives jn t he School , which res ul ted in an easy win for the upholders of the dark ribbon by fOllr lengths. Neither c rew obtai ned a good sta rt; but with Smith setting a fast stroke round the corner th e Oxonians began to creep up and soo n were leadin g by two lengths. All along the "straight" the" T eddy Bear " mascot, draped in dark ribbon, drew nearer th e stern of th eir opponents and finished over-lappi ng it. All the members of the crew rowed . well and particularly Wayte a t " three" who used his [3(ipor; to considerable advantage. Gore coxed the winners well for a novice.


THE

602

CANTuARIAN.

The crews were as follows : D AR K B LUE,

LIGHT B LUE. Nigh li nga l ~

Rya n. Cqnlberbatch. Wa)'te. Smith (Cal>'ain). Gore cox).

(Caplain).

F ardell. J uckes. K eyser. Best ¡(cox).

The finals of th e Scullin g races were then rowed, In th e Juniors, Brannon bea t Lee by a length. In the Seniors, Cottrell' won by half a length. Up to half-way there was nothing to chose betwee n the competiti on, but towa rd the cnd Cottrell drew away slightly from Nightingale and ended by winnin g by half a le ngth.

After the races th e Boat Club enjoyed a well earned and well attended tea.

KING'S

SCHOOL v.

MEDWAY

R.C.

We congratulate th e Rowing Club on arranging two new races against th o Medway Club this season. They took place on our o wn co urse on Saturday, Jul y 16. Unfortunately neither of the School boats was at full strength, Juckes being abse nt owing to illness, while th e :m d boat contained only one colour. The I st fo ur had back station and went ofT well; Depree .took a good corner a nd the School had gai ned a length and a half at th e beginning of th e straight. H ere a catastroplw happened; .\\Tayte caught a n immense " crab," whi ch cost li S nearly fo ur le n glh ~. Undismaye d the School went ofT again at a splend id pace and gained rapidly, but thn effort was too mu ch fo r the m and our opponents, sprin ting well at th e e nd, won h)! one and a half length s. It was a di sappointin g result as the School seemed to ha vl' th~ race in hand at the beginning of the straight and th ey had rowed a reco rd sli m I course (three minutes) a fe w days previously. The second boat also had back station and rowed stt:adil y and in good styl\! I considerin g th e little practice they have had, th ey were ve ry we ll toge th er. 0111 opponents, however, started with a ve ry fast and long stroke, which th ey kept li p Lil l whole course, winning by fi ve length s. The wind was blowin g stron gly lI P " M t F(~ 1I1 11 and the wate r very choppy. The crews w.ere as follows :KIN G'S SC HOOL (1 St Boat).

C. L. Nig htingale (bow). R . C. Cumberbatch. W . Way'e. H. de H. S mi th (stroke). M. O. Depree (cox).

J.

~hnWAV (1 St

F. E. Weekes. E. J. L. You ng. P. Mathews. E. W. C. Corry.

Boat).


â&#x20AC;˘

-

THE (2nd Boat). R. E. L. Beardsworth. G. A. Townend. J. C. Morris. A. G. Keyser (strol;;e). L. W. H. Hest . (cox).

CANTUARIAN. (2 nd Boat). W. West. F. W. L)'le. E. George.

E. D.

W r !gh ~ .

A furth er list of subscripti ons to ward s th e new Boats will appear in our next number.

ATQUE VALE. This is no time fo r sighing or for tears Amid th e flowers We st re w in hono ur for th ese bygone yea rs And fas t flown ho urs. Thou seest th e guerd on of still laughing eyes As thou dost go ; Yet call to mind th e surge of memories We may not show. Vtle ca n still keep the toili ngs a nd the dreams We loved anon ; For we have plucked Time's Iilit:s from his streams As we passed on. To us, amid Life's th ousan d crying tongues, The re murmurs },et The burthen of past laug hLe r and old songs. Wilt tholl forget ? Oft as th e c1appings and the cries ring out Over th e -field Thou shalt recall hot vi cto ry a nd th e shout That warns a yie ld . And when th e creeping twili ght softly falls On court and t ree i The peaceful benison of our grey walls Shall light on th ee.


â&#x20AC;˘ 604-

THE

CANTUARIAN .

OFF I CE R S TRAININ G CORPS. Our stre ngth 011 pa per thi s term was 169 and 3 oniceni, Paper armi es, h OWCVl'I, are decepti ve and our full est mu ster has been 154, all rank s. LclllS ho pe th e.f(' \,vi ll be a O"ood e nrolm ent of rccuits next term to fi ll up the gaps caused by cadets l cavlIl ~ the S~hool this term . Let me al so remind these latter that as far as t hey possi bly 'nil they should join some Territorial unit or the Senior Div ision o f the D.T.C., on pa rlin H company with. us, and the old er boys sho uld always have in m,ind that tl~e ~r?lI.bl ' II1H1 expen se of their training here can only be adequately repaid by their ) 0 1111118' til(' Special Reserve of Officers o r taking a commission in the T. F. Let me furth r bOH of all who carry out any of these admirable sc he mes to acq uain t the CO I11Il1 ~ndhIH Officer with their doings. Only in this way can a com plete reco rd of the Contlng II ~ be kept. On Thursday, June Qth, the Contingent took part in a combined l'ield E x r -1M ,' with other schools of East Ke nt. Th e g eneral idea was that an e nemy' s army hllil land ed at Dover and had push ed forw ard a force ( Dove r, St. Lawre nce, San dwil II O.T.C., abo ut 200 st rong) in the direction of Sho rncl iffc to cove r the di sembarkation , The home a rmy dispatched a force ( Kin g 's School, and Sl. Edmund's Schoo l :1',<"I also about 200 strong) to fi nd out the enemy's dispositions and push him ba k ullIll costs : which we no doubt would have done had not th e bu g le sound ed <I easo 1"11("" Our Contingent numbered ove r. 150: a blazing hot day: great coats o n ba k, wldl II howeve r were discarded beiore the train left the station . Captain LaUer led til ndll~ line and soon came into action, but not unti l two or three of our scouts we re cltjllln l'iI , Th e C.O.S. Company were direc ted to conduct a flank attack, but somehO\1! lilt , got m ixed up with so me out -of-bounds ground and th e attack didn't com of!'. '1'1" General Reserve was in the hand s of the C.O. Th e e nemy' s advan ced PIHU WII ,. atta 4ked and turn ed, and Ollr attack jumbled half-left drivin g an un sec n I.JlH'1I1 IIUt I on th eir main p0sition. The counter-attack was j ust bein g delivered wh ' Ii 0 1111111111111 ended. Brigadier-Gene ral Fanshawe was present durin g th e fI g ht anel I\XllI PIIilI d himself as very pl eased with what he saw. H e gave us a na sty o nc, h OWI' VIII , w ill II he said that the enemy had no need of scouts beca use the K.8. boys tnlkNI 1111111 that even the blind and the deaf could detect th eir position . Th is o r co m HU IHIIMI 11111 happen again . Apres la pltde Ie beau temps. Soon after th e battlc, th o hUI 111 Iltt "Chequers" Inn at West Hougham was a seething mass o f khaki, lind IIfW I II '" II earned rest, the whole force (bar a section of the C.O.S. wh o 10811h 1, 1"'1I1i11 )

"It


THE

CANTUAR IAN.

605

marched back to Dover in th e cool of th e late afternoon . T he conduct of our troops was excellent. The entraining and ri etraining were well done, and not a man fe ll out. The Inspection too k place on June 23rd. On the previolls day we had a reh earsal and th e Rev. R. G. Hodgson was kind enoug h to take the School on the occasion. This day was memorabl e too as th e nrsl occasion on whi ch Our Own Band turned out. I t on ly co nsisted of drum s, but th ey did ex tremt' ly well. On Inspection Day th e band of the 2nd Hom e Counties Field Amb ulance, by ki nd permissio n of Major H ellchlcy, played us to a nd from th e Old Park, a nd al so ma rched us past. Th e II~specting Officer was IVlajor Mei ketjoh n, V.C., Ge neral Staff. H e was re ce ived wi th due honuurs and after the marc h past, th e CUll ti ngent wa s drilled as a battalio n or 4 small companies by the C. O. Co mpany drill by Capt. Latter and Lie ut. Poo le fo ll owed, and after that two section s were taken in ex tend ed order by thei r sec tion commanders. I t is gratifying to fe el tha t Major Meike ljoh n was rea lly pleased with what he saw. I t was pleasant to heal' hi s praise after three terms' pounding and g rinding a way ( no t to spea k of a ce rtain amount uf hair lost). He praised our boots and th e way we handled our arms: and above all he asked the C . O. to te ll the Cadets in his name how much he appreciated the fact that all this work had been do ne in out-of-school hours. During th e latter pa rt of term as much tim e as possi ble was devoted to knocking the Camp Detachm ent into sha pe. At th e time of writing this Party is very fairl y pro fi cient in th e ir work. It is tru e we ha ve never yet had a full pa rad e of th e 7 8 cadets who propose to join the camp at Tidwo rth , but no doubt th ey will all tllrn up smiling on the 29th. The IVl usketry for th t! year was quite satisractory. We took the Milliature COUTse throughout the whole Con tin ge nt . . About 25 Cadets were exercised on th e 200 yard range with ball cartridge-a start, let li S hope for the Ashburton Shield . Th e results of th e shooting tabulated below s how that th ere is not much to choose betwee n the t wo companies. Isl Class.

2nd Class.

3rd Class.

ToiaL

'3

" "

6, 6,

35

4-7

4-'

"4

,

,

.. A" Company " B II Company

'7 ,8

'4

Totals Officers Cadets unde r IS Th ere are

1 18

,

Efficients for th e year 1909-19 10.


606

THE CANTUARIAN.

This is the last accou nt of the O.T.C. doiugs that will be written whil Dr. Galpin is H ead Mastt r. The Contingent welcomes Mr. McDowall most cordially an d hopes that the vc ry fair standard reached un der his predecessor will ever bo ma in tained . But we fee l that we should be Jacking in our duty if we did not officially rend er to Dr. Galpi n our warmest thanks for all he has done towards securing th e efficienc), of the Contin gent. A kee n Voluntee r in the o lrl days and a crack ShOl, he had so und reasons for holding back the fo rm ation o f a ., Cadet Corps" here till May, 1909. But once th e serious importance to the cou ntry of the Officers T rainin g Corps was seen, he.: seL himself to fulfil wha t he considered to be his duty in no hnll

hearted spirit. Th e present C. O. was the humble instrum ent chose n to carry out Dr. Galpin's sc heme, and if he has had any success in hi ~ work -no sinecure, bill we' ll rathe r say nothin g a bout th at- he owes it very la rge ly to th e ample sympathy exte nd ed to him by th e H ead l\'r astcr. No r must we forget that it was Dr. Ga lp in who paid th e heavy initial cost of building and eq uipping the Armoury. Our h ca ll y good wishes to him in his future home .

TENNIS

CL UB.

Und er the management of [-1. D. T o wne nd the T e nnis C lu b ha s hac! a ll l ' xl l'l llIllll' good season. There werc a record nu mber of entri es, six ty-follf for th dOllhh I p and two less for the sin gles. By this ti me we hope that the final s have a ln'(uly III " II decided . 'rhe cO llrts hav e neve r bee n in better condi tion and mu ch t ronble h UH Ill jl II saved by the erectio n of a net to preve nt balls co ntinually findi ng th e ir wlty OVl1l Ihl asphalt and into th e bicycl e sheds. It is to be hoped that next yoa r it n w ' , \1\ fI It, I will be provided, as onc at least of those at present used is in a ve ry bad atM\). A match waS played agai nst the Masters on July 1St. but was unfort lill uill y II II unfinished. The school seco nd pair, T . L. Gordon and R. J. N. Norrl. """ II N" I" I Mr. Latter and Mr. Evans and a lso against Mr. Ware a nd Mr. Ev 'ritt; th 1",11',11t R. C. Cum be rbatch and H. de H. S mith lost to Mr. Latter and Mr. I'; VIIII. 111111 II I I to Mr. Porter and Mr. Goss i the 3Td pair. H . D. T ownend and ', J I. ' 1'1 11111\111 III I all three matches. The ties have resulted as follows :-


THE CANTUARIAN.

DOUBLES.

1st Round. Norris Gore T owncnd Fa rdell Hinds Berryman Nightingale !,1cClcland t \Vayle F rench

2nd Round. }

}

}

Morris l Durham 1 Gordon Threlfnll Page

T owncntl Fn rdcll

!\'Iorris'

Page

P~wcll

CUmberbatch } Seabrooke Field Field Wakeford Wakefonl Coltrell } Claypole CottrelP Smit hz Claypolc Dawbarn

}

Saunderson Bea rdswonh Benrdsworth Hugh{'s Hughes '\ H odgson }uckes 2 I H odgson

Seymour Wood

T ow nend Fa rdell

1

Mo"".

Durham

Powell

Dodgson

I I l I

TOW,,,,,d '·'ardell

Hinds BCTI'ymnn

Du rham }

Semi-Final.

3Td Round.

fJ uckes'l

lTow"e"d

IFa,dell

co",ell. Clnypolc

Ucards\\'orth ,

1-1 ughcs

Beardsworth

Hughes

f

.

J


THE

boS

CANTUARIAN.

DOUBLES. - C01l/i1IUed. 1St Rou nd. i\'t ussnn H edgcock de Mattos Snalt Kidson Whistler Crosse! Clayton Mason Goldsmith Sidebotham l Gordon 2 H ousden! Juckes! Todd Groom

2nd Round.

3rd Round.

Semi· Final.

} de M.llos Soatt

} K;dson

Whistler

} K;dson

Whi stl er

Sidebotham! ) Gordon 2

} S;debotlmm'

I

Gordon 2

} S;deboth.m'

l';· ~'·

Gordon'

} Housden' Juckes l

Gordon'2

Lee Gent Barber Cremer l H arker Green Palliser Wayte 2 Ryan Keble Daniell Deans Galpin Goad Sidebotham' West

} Lee

Gent

} Harker Green

}Hnrker Green

} Kcblc Ry.u

1

Harker Green

I

J

.

Keblc rnn

} S;deltollt.m' West

The fin al was won over by Townend and Fardell, Gord on being unable 10 pIny.


THE CANTUARIAN.

SI NGLES. 1st Round. Sm ilhl N ightingale Way tel Groom Baker Whistler Mason H ughes Dodgson Benrdsworth

Lee

2nd Rounc. } Smith ' } wayte l

3rd Round.

4th Rou nd.

Semi · Final.

Final.

} Sm ith! lSlllith l

}Baker } Hughes

}B.k"

J Benrdsworth

} Benrdsworth

} Berryman Berryman Clayton } Pa lliser Palliser French } French Deans Ryan }Ryan Wakeford H ousden! } Gordon'2 Gordon H odgson }Claypole Claypole Wood } Wood Kain Sanderson }Oawba rn Uawbarn Durham }Durham Todd Sey mour } Hark er Harke r Gent, a bye.

} Beardsworlh

} Be.rdswMh } French Gordon 2

~ Gordon'2 } Gordon' }CI:tYPOle

}ourham

} D",ltnm } H arker

)~.oo.


THE

610

CANTUARIAN.

SINGLES. 1st Rou nd. McCleland Green Townend Goad de Matt os Kidson Sidebotham I CottrclP Juckcs ' Gord on'

Hands Gore

I-J edgcock Morris' Wayte 2 \Vest Field Seabrooke Sidebotham 2 N or ris Galpin Barber Cum,berbatch Damel Goldsmith Powell Juckes"l

2nd Round .

4th Round.

3rd Round.

} McClelland

}Towncnd }Towncnd

Semi·Finnl.

Fin al.

1

~ T ownend

I

}de Mattos }dC Mattos }

CoJllimud.

Sidcbotham l

J

Gordon'

} Gordon I

} GnrdOn

l

}Gorc

} cmdon.

} i'o1orris'

} Wcst }WCSI Norris

} Seabrooke

} Non;,

} Norris

} Norri s

} Barber

}ClImbcrhatch

} cumherbal Ch Norris.

} Powell

}Juckcs Crosse l Cremer' }Cremer' Keyser Trehanc. a bye

} Powell

2

l Cremer'

} Powell

Gordon heat Norris in the Final.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

K. S. C. TYPE A school is not a school ir it does not number amon g its vario lls Typesranging as they do from perky cheru bs through shy top boys, and reckl ess athletes to clear- eyed enthusiasts-some stately and majestic monitor on wh ose harried front th e happy burden of res ponsibility for the school's fair name has driven its early plough. YOll sho uld have seen him and his fellow giant- th e twain happening to be third and fourth moni to rs - as they brought up the rear of th e Scholars' Cathedral procession, a sort o f fattened end of a telescope into whic.h the who le body of the prececllng files could be easily shoved: or if this simile should wound dig nity, we may compare them to the huge car of Jaga roath dragged by mile, of pigmy devofees. There \hey stand impassive at the" Horns of the Altar" beni gnantly presiding over the blackened files of commoners depl oying into the seats which a malign fate and a benign Chapter have conspired to make their portion. See how the middle file s haste to ig nore those last vacant chairs and slither nimbly into the back benches, hopin g for co mfort in devotion; but how they are ignorninously sq uashed and have wi th shame to march ont amid a co ngregation's eyes and flin g themselves, disgusted with life generally, into th e vacant chairs. \ÂĽith no aspe rsions on the prese nt 3rd and 4th, I dare to state that neve r

6"

TYPES. IV. has a more di gnified and decorative pair fulfi lled its processional duties so a(lInirably. ¡Nork done, they abollt turn ed, each outwards, and stepped to th eir scats without a smile-at least with no outward one. Both ge nerally had inne r ones; bot h were ready afterward s to chuckle over the vagaries of a belated pew-hunter, th e bedes men' s g roans, or the sugges tive mellow ness of a lay clerk' s intonation. But this sketch is to be confined to one of the pai r. A well knit body an d should ers supported a fine head with a f~lirly massive forehead-massive with no suggestion of mathemati cs on th e brain, but Shakspearian. Unlike Shakspeare, he had a thick masS of hair, and somewhat hollow chee ks. His mOllstach e was a credit to ttle School. I didn't know him intimate ly, for he was two years senior, and eventu ally when [ became a bud on the bottom boug h of the Sixth Form Tree, I found him a mellow apple not far from its summit. He was one of those whom a Headm as ter fcels that he can lean on without wounding his hand. A most steady workerwith perhaps not quite enou gh flashiness to carry off the Chapter H Ollse laurel wrea ths, but always pretty near to proxime acccss it. Not champagne, but good solid bee r: o r it may be better to say here, not a frothy omelette, but a good solid egg. With him life was se ri olls- not a thing to be frittered away in vanity.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

H e could not endure a foo l gladly. but first tried to get some se n ~c into him. He valued his school life and seemed to appreciate its importance morc than th e usual happy-go- lucky fellow does. Most ploclding in his work. He was fond of the Library and would quote Maine's Ancien t Law without turnin g a hair. an d

was e xcellent in the Debatin g Society, because he was so thorough. I have a so rt of memory that he was in th e football teilm on e vear, a nd

a rare good hard - working' forward. I seem to remember him in a team jersey, shovin g hard. But I have an idea that a football accident checked his gene ral share in athleti cs towards th e end of his time. But if you think that he utilized th e football a nd cricket tim e to gain a n advantag~ in studi es ever his athletic competitors you are mistaken. He was too square and honest for that. Among his othe r accomplishments he was a n excellent mimi o. H e would often keep the study or th e dormitory hilarious with his "rend e rin gs " of Cathedral dig nitar ies, and. if imitation is th e sincerest flatte ry. th e dig nitaries could not have co mplained of th eir virtu es being un appreciated by our frie nd . He had a kee n sense of hu mour, and little points or remarks which passed most of us dullards as co mmonplace, would be caught up by Type IV. and reprodu ced in most killin g style or vo ice. Mr. Mason m\lst have revelled in trainin g Type IV. for th e theatricals and speeches. /I To Pa ri s and back for ÂŁ5 'I was once one of the farces, and th e excita ble he~o can still be heard and see n by the wnter (and others) as he wild ly exclai ms :

"And shall r sland calmly by as :t fell ow creature -.llatt les wit h the billows of the briny deep-stop though, r can't swim. II Type as the Sallsage Sell er in the Greek Speech rocked the Chapter House like an ea rthquake.

Commandee rin g and co nsiderate : seriou s whil e full of fun. A splendid monitor: strai ght and thorough. T don't remembe r him ever saying a nastv or inconsiderate word against anyon e. ' If fI fellow had objections to rolling thr Gree n Co nrt. &c., he would hear ont hi ~ a rguments a nd then squash his rh etori c with a flood of reasoned eloq uence. In his last year, he was H OUS(\ Monitor: and only a H .M. kn ows til t' strain of that work. The Captain hnll th e otium cum di gnitate of th e G r3I1A( I: as did a lso his two choice fri end s- ~I 'h l \ brunt of the hardwork fell on th e 11 . ~ 1 , One study was known as tile rowdy 0 11 (1 I it contained four very self-will ed. sltll'iI)' and re be llious inmates- anarchists /I diffi cult type. How order was maintnlllllil among so many rebels was a lwl\)'" 1\ mystery to me ; but T ype I V.. willi a mixture of bonhomie and Ii vN II\'j managed the business for a y:ar wil II wonderful dexterity. His last wiAh Wil li! to have a Monitors'meetin g ull C'd : 11111 1 though the Captain and th e fellow ", Innl backed him up excellentl y, y t Ihl\ IIl1u lI was sq uare ly borne by Type a l I1 n.

or

I have lost sight o r him Ain (' hll II II school: but I believe he is now {l l 'llih . and one has no doubt th a t hi :'! 111(1111 11 11 is as stron g and wise in hi R IlO lIlI lI II " II was. in the old days, in t H' ~ I Itlllli And if th e influence o f all m(I I! \\'1111 I health y there would bo a Rrr r\l 111'1 11 II of wickedn ess in th e world .


THE

COL.

CANTUARIAN.

WALKER.

Vve regret to announce th e retirement of Lieut.-Col. R. S. F. Walker, C'.M.G. (O.KS.), from the command of the Malay States Guides, a regiment wh ic h he himself raised from th e best classes of Sikhs for service in Pe rak, Borneo, in 1896. Col. Walker was he re in 18 58, and after leaving Sandhurst, weIlt out to Hong- Kong and Singapore where he was Aid e-de-Ca mp IQ Sir William Robinson in 1 87 ~:L Six years later he was Commandant of th e 1st Perak Sikhs with local rank of Major, and in 1889 was gazetted Hon. Lieut.-Colonel. He has acted as Assistant Resident, Perak ( 188,), Secretary to the Gove rnment, Pe rak ( 1889). British Reside nt. Salangar ( 1899), and Perak ( 1900). In 1902 he was granted local rank of Lieut.-Colonel in command of the Malay States Guides. Col. Walker has been extremely popular in Malaya both in social an d military life. He founded the Perak Turf and Cricket Clubs, th e latter of which is the champion team in those parts. H e was a n enthu siastic sportsman whil e in England, and in th e matc hes v. Scotland at th e Oval, 18 70 and ,872, he scored the only four goals obtained for England. At Hong-Kong he was stroke of the boat which won the famous race against the United States ship" Kearsage ," He has also a fine collec tion of Malay weapon s,

bra sses and silver, a nd his kn owledge of things Malayan has won him a fell owship in th e Ro)'al Geographical ancl Royal Geological Societies. H e was made a C.M.G. in 190 I.in recognition of his public se rvices; the th an ks of the Home Govern .. Il.lent were recorded to him in conne ction with th e suppression of th e Perak riots in 1879 and the ex pediti ons to Pehang in 1892 a nd 189 4. At the Diamond Jubil ee he command ed the dismounted Colonial troops. His reco rd of 40 years' s tn~nll o us se rvi ce in the East will be hard 10 beat. Alth ough health no longe r permits him to re main in the tropics, he has by 11 0 means retired to seclusion, and has rece ntly been conspicuous at Bisley in charge of the Rifle Team of the Mala)' Guides. The many O.KS. now in the :llal.)' Stales were a ll warmly greeted on th eir arrival by Col. Walker and had th e benefit of the sound advice based on hi s long expe rien ce for their start in a rath e r trying tropical climate. We trust that Col. Frowd Walke r' s una bated interest in cricket will ofte n bring him to Canterbury. and give us th e pleasure of seein g an O.K.S. wh o is th e embodiment of the best traditions o f lhe Army.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

INDI AN

the exclamation-Evans (not 'eavens):

NORWOOD,

3, 6,

LETTER .

10.

First I must shake hand s with my old fri en d J. 13. Scrive no r across the Bay for h is contrbutio n to yOllr last No. I ha lf expect the title of his essay wa s an ed itorial flo urish; for we hardly count the settlements as part of India, though see n in perspective from a Grange Study arm-chair, th ey wou ld appea r to be a ll one thi ng . Howeve r th e hon our was clone to us In dians ; so [ don't co mplain . We welcome th e three 0 K. S. mentioned in your last number, Matheson, Strahan ancl Lilley, and hope to run across them so meti me ; but I hea r Matheson is posted to Ranikh et, which is, I believe. some 1500 m iles away from my ·qu arters. I fear I am ge.tting a bit o ut of date and I cannot well keep up with the pace of the modern ru sh-witn ess my e fforts to cross the Strand yesterday. So it will be mu ch better if Capt. R. L. Paris, R.E ., wi ll now take up the incandescent mantle an d inspire it with more gas. Paris, I leave it to YOll, expecti ng no trumps. Howeve r, one final flicke r. 1 was in Bombay before sailin g on leave. 1 saw a face in the drawing room of the Great Western H otel. It looked steadily a t A we ll me; I loo ked stead ily at it. rem embered kink in th e S.W. corner of the left cheek instin ctively drew fto m m ~

and the quiet rejoinde r, " Bullo, SmlLh." VIe had written and written, imagi n,'cI un!! imagined; but hadn' t met for 15 y{·(II ~ . Evans it was, W. H., though grey thnlC'il ml. Still hard at it, engineering J abfllJlIII . Our respective better halves \Veru HOWl drawn into the O.K.S. circle, ancl \Y O hud

what you might call an O.K.S.

III

'CLill H'

H . 1\1 . James writes to-day t) Il Hl from Assam, whe re he is sti ll I'lIIInlllH II T ea Estate . H e so und s pretly flL 111111 1 hi s lOne, and med itates rc ti ro mllll In 15 years with a vi ew 1 fan 'Y W UI IIII matches on the Beverl ey . 11 0 tal klil tt j JIll O.K.S., viz.: Bremner, who is shtllll)' II I

join his es tate at Sh umsternagar.

Another of our fraternity,

III \\ I

W. A. J. Milne r, has re ntl y H 111,·,1 II Vandiperyar, S. Indja, wher till' t nil. I berries come from .

It is very jolly to co m hfl ' k II lId 111,,1 so many old friends so full or h VI1 ' V" 111111 abandon" to say nothing Of v III IIII'I vigour. Also to se th u ('lint,,,,,,,;,,

heroes of the foo tball and prlt 1 ktll II, "' in th e flesh, whom on hM (:)" nll /111 IIU, " in th e spirit.

Not no plllllKllI1I

II IIIIII!

bet ween a drive of A. :, 1 " I\l kl~ lilill 1111 boundary, nor to r lilt ! 1I 00u till "~I second ball. Bul of CO III K!' lIB Ihlllllllill I proceeding there i ~ How l "., 11111' '" see 1 have be II ..• , •• hlll I III plll t.'11 II No doubt my .. f(l tlltl llWIII 1t 'I\! III School one chan e of wllllliliN


TH E

cANTUARIAN .

Of course I have visited Radley where I found Dr. and Mrs. Field very fit, very ac ti ve and ve ry mu ch like what tMy were of old. Cante rbury and KS .C. and O .K .S. were our chief th emes. and were not exh alisted when I had to leave . The fin e old staircase is a panorama of Canterbury, and Dr. Field remarked to m,e that in looki ng at his picture gallery,

SCH OO L

AND

\Ve omiltf'd to record in th e last number that C. V. Snatt received his 2nd X I. co lours afte r the Dover matc h, for which apol ogies a nd congratulation s.

*~* The following received th eir rowin g colo urs after the Tonb rirlge race ;-1 s t boat: R. JlIckcs, R . C umberbatch; 2nd boat:. J. W. Wayte.

*'*' *'

Th e result of the Scholarship Examination is as follows:-

6' 5

he ever felt incli ned to say co H I forg et thee, may my right han d forget he r cunni ng," whic h is the feeli ng which one would expect from Dr. and Mrs. Field, and ex ult in hearing th em express. Yours ever,

J.

O.K.S.

H.

SMITH .

NE W S.

!Iouse Scholars: R . A. Ross borough* (School hou se) ; H. G.Evans¡ (Mr. Evans' hOll st:) j G. A. Pug h* ( Mr. Reay's. house). K /nc's SdlOlars : Juniors-E. J. Gent, L. W. Goldsmit h, S. W. Wayte, J. K. Fl eming¡Sandes, R. K. Pagett.

Probaliomrs.' R. J. Routh,>i< F. B. iI'larsh," G . E . C layto n," G. L. D. Davidson, C. E. Bing, E. R. Watt s .~

.

"*'

Three School Exhibition s fell vacant thi s year. Th e first was awa rded to C. J. Ga lpin, the second to D . H. Cowie, the thi rd was divided betwee n D. J. N . L ee and H. D . Townend.

Eulrance SdlOIars .' R. J. Routh,-I.' G. J. E ccles, < G. Haward, G. E. C lay ton' *.*':.:. (School house) ; F. B. Marsh" ( Mr. Evans' house) ; L. G . Rob ertson*' ( Mr. Rea)"s We congratul ate E. F. H ousden, hOllse ). P. D. Baker, H. W . Cremer, C. H . C. * Not yet a member of the School.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

Gore and D. H. Cowie on receivin g their , st Xl. colours; C. E. W. Chapman, A. H. Crowther, C. H. Trehane and A. B. Cowley, znd Xl.

"â&#x20AC;˘" The Cambridge Theological Society have accepted th e work of Rev. 1\II elvi ll c Scott. of Castlec hurch Vicarage, Stafford, on the " Atonement," as qualifying him for the B.D. degree. His treatise for th e D.D . degree will be "The Atonement in the early Fathers from Clement to Athanasius,"

H Parsons has been elected Secretary of St. John's Oxford, Cricket Club .

We are glad to be abl e to state that the scheme of decoration in the Big School, which the Headmaste r ina ug urated in 1898, is now co mpleted-or at least will be so within a mont.h or two. Dr. Galpi n has inse rted into the window in the left of the fireplace two esc utcheons,

of which the Olle bears the nam e of "Dering," commemorating two dis ~ tinguished members of that old Kcntish family. on~ of whom ent~red the Scho?1 in 1550 and the other In 1603 . . Their doings are recorded in the Dictionary r National Biography and in the History of th e King's School. Below the other escutcheon is " lVlolesworth .II to co m memorate Sir Guilford Molesworth , K.C .I. E. (O. K.S., ,836- ,840), who served with distinction in the Afghall and Rurman Wars and was ConsultitlK Engineer to the Government of India fOI State Railways. Th e remaimng two spaces will rc oivlI the coats ¡of~arm s of Archbishop K 1111' and Dr. Thomas Linacre.

We wOllld like to remind Ollr l'cll tlllU that Ollr acco unt of the last fou rt n )It'll' is of necessity morc compressed thnn WI\ would have wished and that they will 111111 a much iuller record of Dr. ~ull,III ' " H eadmastership in the hist ry 01 ti ll King's SchooL


THE

CANTUARIAN.

CORRESPONDENCE. N. B. - Th e Editors dec/ine to accept ally responsibilil)' coltllecler! 1uith Ilu o/liniOll s oj Ih e£,. ConupoJt· dents. ,Vame ami address JIIltst aIW(I),s be .Itivell , not nu essari!;' Jor publication, but as a guatalltee of good faith. Personalilies will involve certail. rtjectioll. Letters sl/ould be written Olt one side of the paper oltly.

1'0 tlte Editors of" TI-m I I,

CANTUAR I AN."

Quarry Street, G uildford,

juty, /9' o.

Dear Sirs, I hope YOli will permit me to use the columns of your Magazine to ask wh ether any reader of the CalltuancU! would be good enough to lend or sell me one copy each of No. 24 of Volume VI. and No. I of Volume VII. of th e Cantuar£alt. These are the only numbers missi ng from my set of Calttuaricms which cover a period of just over '7 years. and 1 hav~ ascer~ tai ned from the Hall . Sec. that he has no copies of these numb~rs. It is possible that there was no No. 24 to Volume Vl., No. t of Volume VlI. following No. 23 of Vol ume VI. Perhaps somf!one can enlighten me on this fact. Any information and any offers can perhaps be se nt to the above address. Yours faithfully, REGINALD BRI NSLEY-RICHARDS. The numbers melltioned hy our correspondent were printed, but the Editors regret they have none on hand.

'1'0 the Editors

<if" THE

CANTUAHIAN ."

Ecclesiastical Commission, Millbank, London, S.W., 1 I tit JulY. 1910. Dear Sirs, I venture, as an O.K.S. to ask for the hospitality of your colu mn s in order to bring before yo ur readers a few facts relating to the Inns of Court Officers Training Cvrps, which, I hope, will induce so me to avail themselves of the opportunity offered of contin uin g the military training begun in the School Cadet Corps.

It is, no doubt, well known that the Public School Corps are th e ] llnior, and the Universities~ Corps the Senior Divisions of the O.T.C. The Inns of Court is the only O.T.C . in the Territorial Force, its members bring soldiers, not cadets, and as such liable for service at home in the event of mobilization.


618

THE

CANTUARIAN.

The E stabli shment consists of one squadron of caval ry and three companies of infantry. and a section of cyclists may be added in th e future . The Corps is open to membe rs of th e [ollr Inns of Court and to University and Public 81.: hool me n. Members are enti tl ed to use the Mess in th e T e mpl e, with writing and smoking room s and a library of military works ; a school of arms j a rifle range at Harrow, and a pa vilion at Bisley. Tlw subscription is one guin ea a year with an extra £ J for camp whi ch ensures bette r messing conditions than those which ordinarily obtai n. For the sq uad ron there is an ex tra subsc ription of three or fou r guineas [or a horse fund. On leaving School a mall may not be abl e to take 3. commission at once, but during his four years in th e Inns of Court he takes certificate A and B, whkh qualify him for a commission up LO the ra nk of Ca ptain . He has the advantage of beginning in th e rank s with the 1!I?re interesting work of omcers. I n additIOn to squadron and co mpany training and annual camp in August th ere arc vo lun taqr camps at Easter and Whitsun , reco nna issance walks, war ga me, lecture by R egular oflicers and Army coac:hes, signalling, shooting, and for th e sq uadro n veterinary work and shoei ng.

for a member of th e School Corps wh comes to London to com plete the trainin g begun at School and put it to pract ica l use by undertakin g the liability for hom defen ce in whi ch every able-bodied man should be prepared to lake his sha r ' . The officer commanding th e School Co rp" will be pleased 10 supply a pamphl ot givin g fuller details to anyone desiring iI, and I need not say I shall be happy t() give any assista nce in my power to th 08(' who desire to become members. I am, Sirs, Your obedient servant, J AMES A. McCULLO' II . To the Edilors 0/ " THI~ CANTUAI(1i\ N ," Dear Sirs, Cou ld it not be ar ran ged that 11 (, It' li l should be affi xed to the bla :'.er in a<ifll i lwi to the prest:ll t 2nd XV. colours ? Also could not a few morc .£ I\( I XV matches bt.:: arran ged, e.g., v. 1':1\:;tbOIlIIlI College, Epsom a nd Mercha nt '1'n)' lol" , With usual apologies.

I am. Yours failh fuJl )'. .. PR O ' R I'; S I VI· "

Though there is no obligation to do so, it is hoped that men o n ob taining certificate B will take commissions, a nd on mo biliza tion members of the Inns of Court will be posted as office rs in the Territorial Force or Special Rese rve.

Dea r Sir,

From these facts it will be seen that the Corps provides the best opportunity

Your devoted sui.>6c rl hll " ' t !'IIHllh opening your eve r UII I( I H~ 'l4" t Iii 01

T o tlu Ed/lors

of

II

I'll It

A N I 11,\ Itl AH,1f


THE

CANTUARIAN.

619

=============T==========~

number, came bolt upon a disconce rtin g innovation. You in vite them to mend th ei r \vays. Their intolerabl e dilato riness in paxing their subsc riptions will not do. H they wish to receive th eir Can/uan"all th ey must pay for it properly. The time has come, you lell them presu mptively, to awake. arise, or be for eve r fall en. Hitherto we have paid (I do not attempt to ep.:use it) when we remembered. If a year or two ago we happened to think of doing so, we paid a year or two in advance : if, on the other hand . we forgot, we paid thi s yea r (or next year, or whenever we rem embered it) a year or two in arrear. The Call1uariall went on : we were its subscribers, and we wen t on too. But now a ll this is to be reformed . In the past we have trifled. Now we arc to be punctual. \Vc are to pay every rear. ~Ve are not to ex pec t more than one te rm' s grace for non-payment. And when we fall. we fall like Lu ci fer, never to hope again. I do not wish to complain of that. Vi rtue I know is auste re. But let one waverin g voice be raised on behalf of human weakness. \Ve shall still sometim es forget th e da te and be late with our subscripti ons. This is very deplorab le. l\'Tany of us. of course, live at home at case with in reac h of post offi ces, a nd have no excuse . What of others furth e r off? The Calltuaniw is read , and re- read, at a hundred lone ly outposts of civilisation , by remote camp fires. Your edict will (7et there too. \Vhat of Afri ca? Canada ? tlle Solomon Islands? Are YOll go in g to ignore Greenwich and impose a set tim c-

limit over whole Continents? Wh at of Tndia and yo ur army of subscribers th ere? Punctuality, I have heard. is no virtu e \Vhat sort of in the dreamy east. pun ctual ity are yo u goi ng to exact from ] ndia ? There are no postal orders in the Jungle. Your three and si xpence is li n kno wn in their st ra nge cur rencies. H ow is it to be got to you? The postman star ts when he can . H e waits for th e moon, or the rains: and the tiger waits for him . But, you say, a term's g race is to be a ll owed. \ÂĽhat is a term's grace at these vast distances? I t takes a r ear to hear of it. And what are Hilary or Michaelmas to the springing tiger? Fall we cert.inly shall. And when x. controlling the destiny of dusky millions over a province the size of E ngland, and readin ~ his Calltuarian in th e intervals-when. I say, x' by a lamentable chan ce omits to catch the mail wi th his an nual 3/6, he can no more than the rest of us send it in his old dilato ry fashion with a fri endly apology by th e next boat. He has had his warn illg, and he mu st be removed from the list of subscribers . r know x. I believe he will lea rn of his removal with so me asto ni shm en t. 'Vhy, let me ask. this sudden vote of con fidence? ';Vhy these profound (~d i to ri a l misgivings? Sir, you kn ow what men are. You know that what th ey prize most th ey often are most dil igent to ac knowledge. Do I indeed still owe for 190 q ? YOllr magnanimity will not misinterpret my delay. My regard for the Callillan"au is not an affair of co ntract, revocable yea rly. The relatio ns of your sub sc ribers


6 20

TH E

CANT U A RTAN.

to your editorial chair arc not th ose of a ncient fable of the Goose and the golde n the counter. We cannot leave you and Eggs. go to another shop. vVe too have been The Goose wife killed the Goose, pars parva in T roy. \,yhat is all this you recollect, to get more eggs. about cash terms ? In the mature judgment of tho ughtful [ sho uld be 10th to take the matter minds th e expe riment was ill considered. on lower gro und s : but these are perhaps I cherish a lively sympath y for the Gooso. ot her aspects. Finer spirits will some I am, Sir, times volu nt arily deny themselves, rathe r than incur obligations which they fear " PIETAS." they may be ul1£l ble to d ischarge. Yo ur {Ou r corrcspondclll docs not realise that S01ll anxie t.y for yo ur subsc ri ptio n list is entirely of the geese at home nnd abroad have scvl,lrn l j us t an d laud able. But take dow n fro m years' arrears of cges, and st ill rciusc to lay. Wa the Parry shelves a nd read again that would save .our poult ry (ood.-ED]).]

NOTICES. \ ¥e beg to ack no wledge with thanks receipt o f the foll owi ng Subscriptions :-

H. Parsons, Esq. ( J/6). A. ] . TrousdelI , Esq .. ( 3/6), G. M. 'Puke , E S9" (3/6 ), E. Wil cox , Esq. (7/- .), H . Flelchng, bq, \ ' / 6). C. L. Druilt, Esq . (7/-), G. "jllll, Esq. (7/ '-, ), C. W. I-runt. Esq. (10/6 ). F. L. SroRBOT U AM, 1/011. SfI ,

t~e

E. W. H ughes. Esq. (3/6 ), A. W. Sarson, E sq . ( 7/-), I, . J o hn son , Esq. ( 15/-·), H . T . Matheso n, Esq. ( 10/-.),

OUR CONTEMP ORARIES. 'We beg to ack nowledge t he receipt of the followi ng:Allej'llIclJI , Barrovia lJ , /JIm, BrolJls, grovian, Carl/ms/all, 0/ L om/Ofl School

e,l"

l11agazine. Dovorian.. e'ag/t'. SI. Edward's SellOot CIlrolll(:/e, Eas/bourn/all, Feltes/{w ,

I

Glenaimoud College ChmlllCie, KI'II , CullrA" Chrotlicle, Lawrellliall, LOIll;/lJg ('III/"N' l11agaz//l I!, LeodtJIsJf1lJ, L orel/oll/f1I1, Oh" ",,,,, Ousel, Radl",illl, SldrburJllflll, Slmm/ Stlll,,1/

Il£agaz/lle, S"I/OII Val,'urf' Srlw(J1 ( '1" ,1",'/1 TOllbnilg/all, U,,/Ied Sf'rwct$ Col"'!",. 111" 1(11 ZlIIe, V/gonllf1lJ.

Gibbs nnd Sons, P rinters, Pa lace S treet, Can terbu r),.


THE VO L. VII.

CA NTUARIAN. NOVEMBE R ,

Iq I O.

No. 23.

EDITORIAL. O ur fi rst duty is to offer a very hearty welcome to the new Headmaster, Rev. C. R . L. McDowa ll and to Mrs. McDowall. Half- term may seem somewhat latc fo r such a greetin g, but the knowledge that Mr. McDowall has settled down so we ll in his new position will not lessen the warmth with which we wish him eve ry success in the futu re. We feel th at all the traditions of the School are safe in his keeping. At th e beginnin g of a School yea r of course we should indul ge in a number of platitudes on the theme t hat all things flo w and that some people who were here l as~ term have now departed, while OIl th e o the r ha nd there are so me here this te rm who were else where in July. Of course th is is all ve ry interesting and true , and would no do ubt be original if someone hadn't said th e same a t least seventeen times before . So we shall no t now enumera te a ll the U changes and chances of this mortal life," but go straight to the point. We conside r that t here is a strange lack of va riety in ou r co ntributors. We know it is dangerous to criticise such peo ple at a ll ; t here a re so fe w specimens extant that a ny chance shot mig ht destroy the whole gUlUS. Yet we never receive contrib utions of the really helpful type; correspondence is of course all very well in its way, but the ed itors caft write it themselves at the last pinch; also. we have noth ing to say against poetry except that there is not enough of it; but


THE

622

CANTUARIAN .

think of the joy, the un earthly irresistible joy that would surround us, if some enterprising friend sent us a real, live editorial. This te rm we embarked cheerily enough on the first number, (and, we believe, have broken a cherished tradition by publishing it before exeat,) but wh en we had done all but the" infandum dolorem It of the Editorial a mental paralysis seized us. We tried to invent a new kind altogether. We thought, this poor potted prose is too lame, too one-eyed, we will wnte poetry, celebrate in blank verse the heroism of the XV. and the gallan try of th e O.T.C. But we discovered that the editors of a contemporary had conceived the same brilliant idea, and aft~r rcading their effusion we decided on the spot not to imitate it : we have a little respect for our readers. But, in good sooth, as the ancients say, whe n we ponder on all the mighty things that the world has done duri ng the past fe w weeks, of Mr. Theophilus Wellman dropping gracefully into the boso m of the Atlantic, of Manoel who left the kingdom of his ancestors in a fi shin g-smllck, of the enterprisi ng engi ne-driver who ran th gauntlet of enraged strikers from Paris to Calais and had th e honour of a collection at the end of the journ ey, not to mention Hawley C. Crippen, the eighth won der or the world j when, we repeat, these stirring deeds stir our soul to its marrow, we hnv a right to consider ourselves the victi ms of an undeserved fate to be writing thi s, this rubbish. And so, gentlemen, on these grounds, as they say in the Debating Society, w O beg to present you with this fat and newly-born infant, which has been ch ristened by Mr. Gibbs, No. 23, Vol. VII.

THE

HEADMASTER.

Rev. Charles R. L. McDowall, M.A., is a son of t he late Rev. Prebendary McDowall, Headmaster of Highgate School. H e was educated at Marlborough College, being a foundation scholar fro m 1886- , 89 1, during which time Dr. Galpin was a Master there. H e gained a Classical Scholarship a~ Exeter College, Oxford, and won a First Class in Moderations, , 893, followed by a First Class in the Final School of Li teroo Humaniores, 189 5. In the next year he was appoi nted a Master at Wellington College by Dr. Pollock, the prese nt Bishop of Norwich. He remained th ere for five years, for the great r part of the time in charge of all the Classical and E nglish work of the Lower Vlth. At the beginning of 1 902 he was appointed by Dr. Warre as a Classica l Mastor at Eton, where he remained ti ll the end of last summer. Mr. McDowall is married and has three children.


.. THE

CANTUARIAN.

PRESENTATIONS

TO

DR.

GALPIN.

On July 28th, a presentation was made by th e School to Dr. Galpin in the It took th e form of a large ornamental clock with two side pieces. The Captain, formally presenting the clock, said how glad everyone in the School was to be able to show their appreciation of Dr. Galpin in sdme material form, and he hoped that both he and Mrs. Galpin would find this small tribute of some use to them in the future . The Headmaster, who was greatly moved, replied in a graceful speech. and thanked the School very much for their g reat kindness to him and Mrs. Galpin. to whom the cloc k would be a perpetual reminder of their association with the School. At t he same ti me the Captain handed Dr. Galpin a silver inkpbt fitted with a watch, the gift of the VIth Form. After house prayers on the last evening of th e term, the H ouse Monitor, on behalf of the House. presented Mrs. Galpin with a silver card case, which, together with the other gifts, was sui tably inscribed . On Speech Day the O.K.S. made a small personal presentation to Mrs. Galpin. They are also putting up a canopy over the Headmaster' s seat in the Schoolroom as a memorial to Dr. Galpin. Sc~odlroom after morning prayers.

SPEECH

â&#x20AC;˘

DAY.

Speech Day was celebrated this year on Thursday, July 29th, and, fortunately, was favoured with fine \\leather. The Holy Communion Service, at 7.45 a.m., was attended by large, nu mbers j while at Lh e Commemoration Service at 10 a.m., the Choir was almost fill ed. The Anniversary . 'erman was preached by Canon Mason, D,D., iViasterof Pembroke College. Cambridge, and Vice-Chancellor of the University, who delivered an eloquent and most impressive add ress. At 2 p.m. the Speer.hes were delivered in the Chapter Hou ~e , among those present being the Dean of Canterbury, the Mayor, the Lord Bishop of Dover, the Archdeacon of Maidstone, Canon. Mason, Canon ~1oore and Canon Danks, besides many parents, O.K.S., and other friends of the School.


T HE

CANTUARI AN.

I.-Scene from the Aulularia/' Act. iv. Euclio (a miser) . . Lyconides (a YOltllg matt) Strobilus (a slave)

P Iau /us.

U

H . Spence. C. L. Nightingale. G. H. Claypole.

Euclia, n miser, hides a pot of gold, but is seen by Strobilus, the slave of Lyconides. who, seizing his opportunity, steals the pot of gold which he takes to his home and hides there. Euclio meets Strobilus coming out of the house. suspect s him of trying to stca l something, but, though he examines his hands and clothes, can find nothing. Accordingly he drives him away with threats. The miser now discovers his loss and, half mad with grief, even aCCllses Lyconides. who is to he his son-in-law, of the theft; he denies it and promises to try and fi nd lhe money . After Euclie has gone, Strobilus re-appears and tells his master that he has found a pot of gold, and asks to huy his freedom with it. Lyconidcs inrlignantly refuses, demands the restorat ion of Eucl io's treasure, and as StrolJilus will not give it up, he takes it from him by force, and restores it to Euclio who is delighted at its recovery and is completely reconciled to Lyconidcs.

t.-Scene from Le Malade Imaginaire" Argan (Ie Afalade Imagt'naire) Beralde (Ill' brollIer ) M. Purgo n (III' doc/or) Toinette (!tis maid servant ) If

Moll'ere. C. F . N. Ryan. D. H . Cowie. R. C. Cumberbat h. H . D. T ownend.

Beralde and Toinette have formed a plan to get rid of M. Purgon and cure Argan, whose iIln ess ' ~ they know to exist only in his imagination. lvL Purgon, denied admittance to the house, forces his way in , and angrily throws up the case, but be fore leaving he threatens Argan with all sorts of diseases, and declares that in four days he will become incuralJle and die. Then Toinette. with a change of dress and manners, comes in as a new und better doctor, and p(escribes for Argan just the things he likes, but cannot help at the end teasing him into believing that his arm had better come off and his right eye come out.

3.- Scene fro m " The Acharnians Jl Dicaeopolis Daughter of above E uripides Servant Leader of Chorus

. . AristopllafUS.

••

Chorus of Charcoal-Burners

T. Galpin. J. E. Sidebotham.

C.

G. H. Claypo l . T. B. Sideootham. b. [. N. Lee. F. L Sielebotham. F. L. Goad . R. J. N. Norri•. C. W. Kielson.

I

During the war between Athens and Sparta, an Athenian uf the peace party, Di caeopolitl, he humorously described as having concluded a private treaty with the enemy. The sce ne opens With him celebrating this in a song and dance. At that moment his fell ow-villagers, charcoal · burners by treli le, burst upon him and threaten him with a tr:litor's death. But he meets Ihreat with thrcnt. 11 <: will, hll says, slay one whom they prize. Accordingly he goes and fet ches. not one of their chi ldren nil tll llY fear, but a charcoal basket, and threatens to pierce it with his sword. Their n!lger. lI? w glvel' 1,IIHlO to fear. The charcoal-burners wi11 not betray the hostage. They throw down thClr llussllc8 nnd {ItII 'f 10


â&#x20AC;˘ TH E CANTuARIAN. show that no stones are concealed in thei r cloaks. They consent to let Dicaeopolis plead with his hClld on a chopping-block and state why he made peace aga inst their wil l. But he says he mllst fir st dress in suppliant guise. So he goes to the house of Euripides to crave a begga r's costume fr om one of the poet's dramas. Euripides comes out on the eccyctellla and shows Dicaeopolis several costumes, one of which Dicneopolis finally selects. But this does not satisfy him . He begs for one thing aft er another-beggar's capl stafT and basket, etc., and wilh his many requests nearly drives Euripides distracted. The poet eventually flings hi mself baek into his house exelaim ing tha.t he is being insulled and robbed 01 his stock¡in-t rade.

f .-Scenes fro m" T he Fate of the Macdo nalds" Talfollrd. Maclan (cll/'j' of Ihe Clall) " C. F. N. Ryan. C. A. West. Alastair (SOlI oj'Maclall) Halbert Macdonald (SOil of III , lale chiif) H . D. T ownend. Henry Macdo nald (brolher of Halberl) C. L. Nightmgale. Angus ! j C. K. Mowll. Donald ) ClallslIletl t D. O. Fardell. Captain Robert Campbell of Glenlyon (,i, commalld C J G I . 0/ a detaclwlwt of Argyle R Cglillwt ..' . . a pm . Lindsay (all officer tmder Glenl)lolt's COmlJlafld) E. A. Squire. Drummond (a sergea"l) A. J. Lush. R. C. Cumberbatch. A Catholic Priest Lady Macdonald (moil"r oj Halb,rl a"d Henry) J. T . F leming-Sandes. Helen Campbell (m, ee 10 Glen)'o" a1ld ullder care oj' J C P Lady lWacdollald .. .. . . age.

I

I

Scene i.

Glenlyon's Quarters in G lencoe. Scene ii. MacInn's H ouse: a fes tive gathering. Scene ii i. A Chapel. Time : Ja n. , 1689. There is an interval of olle day between the Scenes. . l\<Iacdonald and MacIan were rivals for the chieftain ship of the Clan Macdonald. The former on h ~ s death-bed resigns the c\ail!lS of his famity and begs his elder son H albert to agree. I-Ialbert, in Violent passion, refuses, but gives way on heari ng the voice of Moina the witch crying, " 1-1albert obey, the hour that sees thee rule O'er the i\'facdonalds of Glencoe shall bring Terror and death." Henry, Halbert's brother, has joined the Duke of Arg yle's regiment (chosen to carry Ollt the inhuman massacre of their own kin), captained by Glenlyon, who receives secret oroers from Maj or Duncanson. Gleniyon, fi nding both brothers claimants fo r the hand of Helen, his niece, who is under the due of Lady Macdonald, promises to secure H den for Henry if he will shew ~ h e troops the secret outlets of the glen. This Henry consents to do in ignorance of Glcnlyon's real motive. Halbert suspects treachery, but his open challenge is regarded as an outbreak of JIlere passion. !\'leantime, learning from Lady Macdonald that Helenl though pledged to him, really loves llcnry better , he resolves to release her. Scarcely has he done so, in the Chapel where they arc Illet for the bridal riles, when the news of the massacre is brought ; and Alastair, escaping mortn.lIy wound ed, with his last un:nth denounces Henry as the traitor. The chieftainship thus passes into the hands of ll albert who is spared by a tragic occurrence {rom the ordeal of put,,iog to death his own brother and He len 's lover, and gains in death that pence which his pnssionate nature denied him ih life. The history of the massacre is lO\(\ by SCOtl in "Tnles of a Grandfather, " (ch. 58). 'fhe character of Halbert is fictitious, but the outline of the play is historica1 ; while the leller rend by Lindsay in Scene i. is an actual transcript.


â&#x20AC;˘ 626

THE

CANTUARIAN.

As the first three speeches arc rendered intelligible to most of the School only by th e amount of action put into them, we think we arc ri ght in giving our impressions on that alone. The Greek was amazi ng, sensational. Duets, classical dancing, mock exec utions, discarded foo tball cloth es follo wed each other with extraordinary vehemence. Galpin sustai ned the combined rOle of prima-donna (or was it high- priest) cond emned convict and travell ing pantechni coll wi th superb lighthea rtedn ess, whil e Claypole scattered verses and football vests over the stage with apparent inditI:erence. and Sidcbotham accompanied a Greek comic song on what we -are told was a clay-pipe. T owncnd, as th e gay Toinette. kept the Fre nch well on th e move, a nd took a cruel delight in pinchin g the unfortunate patient i the bowing contest we award to Ryan; Cum berbatch's callous recital of innumerable I f pepsies" was quite terri fying. In the Latin, Spence as th e miser was very effective j his heartrending monologue qui te brought thlj house down. In passing, ought not the marmalade pot to have bee n labelled Ie golde n-shred" and not ! t aurum." The English was the piece de resistance, and concerning it we could not do better than quote the Dean's wo rds .. the best I have e\'er seen." All the parts were well filled . Of the three most importan t, Ga lpin acted a difficult and disagreeable character with great feeling j Ryan was the ideal open-handed and unsu spicious chieftain; Townend, as the impetuous and noble Halbert was perh aps best of the three. Of the smaller parts \\Test was very good and the " lad ies " charming. I t says much for th e actin g that the difficult last scene was ne ver in danger of dege nerati ng into melodrama.

At the conclusion of th e speeches th e H eadmaster gave all accoun t of th e School year. He was sure all would join with him in giving a hearty vote of ~hanks to the Masters who had charge or the preparation of the speeches -to Mr. Moxon for the Greek and Latin, to Mr. Bell for the French and to Mr. E vans for t he English, a nd he desired to ex press the since re gratitude of the School for the se n~1On which Dr. Mason had preached at their Co mm emoration Service that mormng. In th e course of his speec h he paid a tribute to the skill and care, as Medical Attendant to the School, of the late Dr. Whitehead Rei d, a nd also referred in warm term s of praise to the good work of Mr. Cape wh o was leaving the' School to become H eadmaster of t he Mathe matical School at R ochester. Dr. Gal pin said, in drawin g to a close, they woul d fo rgive him in the circumstances if he lingered rathe r lovin gly with the details of th e School , because he was like one who, wh en he stopped speaking, would ceaSe to be. That was th e fourtee nth occasion on which he had I~ ad the privilege and honour of presiding at that t able in th e Chapter H ouse, a nd dunng those fourteen years he had tried to do his ow n duty, and to make it easier, so fa r as he could, for othe rs to do th eirs. This period had been a time of g reat happiness for him , and his heart was full of gratitude to those who had made it so. H e th anked the Governing Body for the constant support that they had given him, and there was one name especially which he w.ould like to mention for a word of deep and hearty thanks- he meant the Visitor, the Lord Archbishop-not merely fo r the great and


â&#x20AC;˘ 'THE

CANTUARIAN.

friendly heart with wh ich he ; cceived the School, but also for the char ming hospitality extended by himself and Mrs. Davidson to the boys of the VIth Form. H e was deeply grateful to the Archbish8p th at he had seen fi t to link him on to the fou ndation of the Cathedral for life, and, as the School was a part of the Cathedral, hr. liked to feel that he was linked also for ever with the Schoo l in its religious life-a token of that sacred fellowship of souls which woul d last even beyond the g rave. The H eadmaster then di stributed th e prizes adjudged during the past year. The Dean of Canterbury then read the list of distinctions gained since last Speech Day. He remarked that the mere el~ u meration of these hono urs was the best evidence that could be afford erl of the fact that the School was living up to the high standard to which it had been raised by its prt!se nt H eadmaster. After a sympathetic refe rence to th e death of the late Dr. Whitehead Reid and an expression of regret on behalf of the Governing Body at the loss of Mr. Cape, the Dean said he felt everyone would wish him to place publicly on reco rd the dee p gratitude which the Governing Body felt to Dr. Galpin for the services which he had rendered th e School, and he thought he might add gratitud e of the wh ole of th at assembly for those g reat services. Comme nting on th e large number of Old Boys present, the Dean said that th e chief reason, which had broug ht so many togethe r, was to offer that mark of hon our to their old H eadmaste r. H e then read the minute adopted by the Governing Body on th e receipt of th e Headmaster's resignation. It was, he said, e ntirely a re co rd of fac ts, and a more remarkabl e reco rd respecting work done in a School of that kind during fo urtee n years he was qui te sure it would be very difficult to find. T hey had had excellent H ead masters b fore who did their. best in their times, but Canon Galpin had certainly raised the School to an importa nce and to an excellence which it had never previously possessed. The Mayor of Canterbury rose to give expression to the widespread regret which the citizens of Canterb ury fe lt at the departure of Dr. Galpin. Canon Galpin would be giving up th e reins of office to anot he r scholar who had gained a do uble first at Oxford. To him and to Mrs. McDvwali the city would extend a warm and sincere welcome. In concl usio n he wished Canon and Mrs. Galpin every possible happiness in their future sphere of Christian activ ity. The principal guests were chee red according to custom 011 coming out of the Chapter House, a nd afterwards Dr. and Mrs. Galpin entertained nearly six hundred guests to a garden party on t he Green Court.


• bz8

THE

CANTUARIAN .

PRIZES ADJUDGED DURING THE YEAR 1909 -1910.

C. J. Galpin, i. H. D. T ownend, i. R. C. Cumberbatch. i. J H. W. Cremer, ii. l H. C. Powel l. C. J. Galpin, i. C. J. Galpin , i. D. J. N. Lee. C. J. Galpin, i. E. A. Squire. 1<. C. McCleland. G. H. Claypole. G. H. Claypole. , C. N. Ryan.

Classics ( 1I1t"1cn£mon) .. . Mathematics (MUchi1lS0llj .. . l\'!odern Languages, French (Afil, !dmon)

Natural Science (Alz'tcMmolt) Greek and Latin ( B,'oug lttouj English Literature (Sln atfdld) ... Classical Composition ( Dean Farrar) Private Study ( Edward Store) Latin Prose ( F. J. H. Horsley) Latin Verse Greek P rose Greek Verse E nglish Essays

I G. H. Claypole. E. F. H ousden, i. F. N. H olt.

Natural History Collection ( Head Jl1asler) Drawing ". ... Shorthand (Lady Sttml't)

H. Spence.

G. H. Clavpole. R. J . N. Norris. Prize. P. B. Cottrell, i. A. C. Telfer. S. J. Maiden, i. R. W. Brothers. C. E. W. Chapman . F. 1-1. Fa rdell, ii. K. C. Lillingston. G. Haward. R. J. Mowll, ii. F. F. Finn.

H istory, VI. Form (Stauley) V. «. Form (Head /I1aster ) ... V. b. Form (Head Afaster). .. " IV. a. Form " IV. D. Form French, I V, a. to I II. c. F orms (G, eaves ) rVl athcmatics, Div. 1. (Harrison) Div. II. (H(lrrisoll) Div. III . (HarrisOll) " Div. I V. (Harrison) Div. V. (HartisOlt) H

I)

DIVINITY VI. Form ( BrougMon) ... V. a. Form (Mars/lall Wi/d) Army Class (Archdeacolt of lI'laidstone)

PRIZES. G. H. Clay/mi•. D. H. G. Northcotc. C. K. Mowll, i.


T HE

CANTUARIA N. P. B. Cottrell , i. F. C. Gentry. A, J, Partridge.

V. b. Form (Marshall Wi/d) ... IV. a. Form (Arehdeacon of Maidstone) I V. b. Form (Head A£aster) III. a. Form (Head lI{aster)

{ D , S. R. B. A. C. { p, E,

Gurney. S. Henning. Woodruff. Welchman. C. Dale. A. J. Partridge. SoJ. Maiden. { F. N. Holt. P. E. 'Welchman,

III. b. Form ( H ead IIfaster) III. c. Form ( Head Master) V. a. to IV. b. Forms (Elwy,,) I V. a. and I V. b Forms (lihu)m) Lower School (Lady Stuart)

FORM

PRIZES. G. H. Claypole. T . Fleming-Sandes. R. S, F, Cooper. R. S. F. Cooper. R. E. C. Smith, i. L. C. Sargent. A. C. Fluke, i. D. O. Fardell, i. C. A. West. P. B. Cottrell, i. F. C. Gentry, C. E. A, Pullan. S. W, Wayte, ii. J, Potts. A, Sargent. G. Haward . C. S, Pittis. A, H. Shelswell , E. G, V. Hughes, C, L. Green. G, E. F. Leggalt. C. Ii, Crabt ree,

V I. Form (Christmas) V. a. Form (Christmas) .. . " (Midsummer, Gordon) ., Composition (Prose) JI Coml?osition (Verse) " Enghsh Essay ... Army Class (Christmas) .. (Midsummer) ... II (Geometrical D rawing) V. b. Form (Chr istmas) .. " (Midsummer) ... " (Engli sh Essay) ... I V. a. Form (Ch ristmas) ... " (Midsummer) I V. b. Form (Christmas) .. (Midsummer) .. . I n . a. Form (Ch ristmas) " (M idsummer) III . b. Form (Christmas) .. (Midsummer) .. I II. c. Form (Christmas) , .. ,. (Midsummer) ...

J.

'\1.

LOWER SCHOOL PRIZES. E. H . Moline.

Mathematics (Christmas) ... " (Midsummer) ... Natural Science (.J1itC/dltS01l ) F rench

...

H istory .. Dictation ... Geography (Greaves) Music

R. W. Morris, ii.

F'i'

{

Maggs. F. . .ll. B, Maggs.

J, -t. Musson.

R. B. S, H en ning. T . R. Juckes, iii. H . L, Kerrich. C. H. Clayton.


THE

CANTUARIAN .

JU NIOR . SCHOOL II.

PRIZES.

F orm (Christmas) II (Midsummer) II. b. Form (Christmas) " (Midsu mmer) . .. II. c. Form (Christmas) " (Midsummer) I. Form (Christ mns) " (Midsu mm er) Divinity (Hodgso,t);IJ II. IJ. Form " II. b, Form " II. c. Form " 1. Form ,., English : " II. a. Form " II. b. Form " II. c. F orm

B. W. Galpin , it

(I,

I)

G, G, A. C. A, A.

J.

D. W. Galpin, ii. S. Blu nt. C. H. Rolle. F. E. Lang, iii.

J.

B. W. Galpin , ii. W. E. Dean, i. A. V. T. Dean , ii. F . E. Lang, iii. G. L. D. Dn\ idson . A. G. D. West, ii. B. W. Galpin . ii.

I. Form ...

Mathematics (Christmas) (Midsummer)

Drawi~g ".

L. D. Davidson. L. D. Davidson. W. Rigden. E. R. Alford. V. T. Dean , ih V. T. Dean, ii. da R. Lavies.

.. ,

S. G. Galpin, iiL, Pri'l.(. E. S. Wills. C. W. Barber, ii.

D ictation .. .

Music

Anniversary Preacher. TH E REV. CANON MASON, D.O., Master of Pembroke College, and Vice· Chancellor of Cambridge University. The List of Anniversary Preachers goes back to 17 14.

Exhibitioners Elected July 1909-10. C. ]. GALPIN, (Rose) Classical Scholar of St. John's ColJege, Oxford. D . H, COWIE, (Rose) Mathematical Scholar of Emmanuel Coll ege, Cambridge, D, ] , N, LEE, (Bunce) Classical Scholar of Wadham College, Oxford. { H . D. TOWNF.ND, (Bunce) Mathematical Exhibitioner of Queen's College, Cambridge. T. S. CAVE, (Parker elect) Corpus Christi College, Cambridge.


THE CANT UARIAN.

The Shepher4 Gift. D. ]. N. LI.B, Classical Scholar of Wadham College, Oxford.

The O.K.S. Gift. A , F . COTTRELL, Royal Military Academy, Woolwich.

The Waddington Gift. C . F, BATTISCOMBE, History Scholar of Lincoln College, Oxford .

Exhibitioners now at the Universities. H. BRINSLEY-RICHARDS, (Rose) Scholar of H ertford College, Oxford . · H. P. V. TOWNF..ND, (Bunce) Scholar of St . J ohn's Colleg~ 1 Oxford.

IIR.

·G, I-I. S. PIN SENT, (Rose) Major Scholar of Trinity College, Cambridge_ ·W. N. KEMPE, (Parker) Corpus Christ i College, Cambrid ge. C. ]. N. ADAMS, (Rose) Exhibitioner of St. John's College, Cx ford. A. R, BELLARS , (Stanhope) Scholar of Pembroke College, Cambridge. R. M. GENT, (Rose) Classical Scholar of Trinity College, Oxford. { 1-1, TOWNSHEND, (Rose) Major Mathematical Scholar of Trinity College, Cambridge. E. n, NELSON, (Parker) Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. II

Vacate

""-S /ttl)'.

Scholars. Elected J)ecember, 1909. KING'S SCHOLARS, J UNIORS.

R. S. F. Cooper. R. F. Mason, 1-1. G. Kain .

PROBATIONERS.

W, ]. Potts. G. H. Crosse. T. R, ]uckes,

E. F. Hyde. A. D. C. West, ' utH'or School.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

ENTRANCE SCHOLARS,

Mr. Rea)"s House.

School House. L. W . Goldsmith. W. J. Potts. R. F. S. Cooper. G. B. Pratt. A. B. Cowley.

E. F. Hyde.

HOUSE SCHOLAR.

Rfr. Rea)!'s Home. A. H. Shelswell.

Elected july,

19 10.

KING'S SCHOLARS . SENIORS .

F. L. Sidebotham . F. L. Goad. R. E. L. Deardsworth. C. W. Kidson. D. Hussey. E. J. Hodgson.

PROBATIONER S .

JUNIORS.

*R. J. Routh. *G. E. Clayton. G. L. D. Dav idson, jur. Scllool. E. C. Ding, jun ior School. *E. R. Walts. E. S. 'WiUs, l1mior School.

E . J. Gent. L. W. Goldsmith. S. W. Wayte. J. T . Fl eming·Sandes. R. K. Pagett. ENTRANCE SCHOLAR S .

*R.

J. J.

SCRool Hom e.

Mr. Reay's House.

*L. G. Robertson.

Routh. - G. lEcc1es. G. Haward. *G. E. Clayton.

HOUS E SCHOLARS .

School House. - R. A. Rossborough.

~llr. Evans' Hotne. *1-1. J. Evans.

* Not

yet members of lhe School.

/lb'.

Reays House.

*G. A. Pugh.


• THE

CANTUARIAN.

Academical and other Distinctions gained during the year 1909-10. C.

J.

GALl' IN

D. J. N. LEI!. D. H. COWI&

C. F. 1-1. D.

BATTI SCOMBlt T OW N END K. C. M CCLKLAND A. F. COTTRELL ... V. C. TAYLOR H. WOODS

J.

n.

TOW..~SHEND ...

A. R.

DI!LLARS .. .

G; H . S. R.

n.

G. D.

PIN SENT

13RI!\SLEy·RICHARDS MACLEAR ...

I. R. MADGE H . TOWNSHEND R. W. H . MOUNJ.:

E. A.

ROPER

H. V. P.

TOWNEND

A. G. ROPER

D.

H . HAMMONDS H . F . REYNOLDS

G. A.

BYRON ... T ROUSDEL L

J.

Open Classical Scholarship, 51. John's College, Oxford . Opcn Classicnl Scholarship, Wadham College, Oxford. Opt!n t-.h lh Cl1llltical Schol:lIship, Emmanuel College, Cambridge. Open History Scholarship, Lincoln College, Oxford. Open Mathematical Exhibition, Queen's College, Cambridge. Ford Studcn tship (or Classics, Trinhy College, Oxford . Admission to Royal :\1ilitary Academy, Woolwich. Admission to Royal Military Coll ege, Sand hurst. ... Admission to Royal Military College, Sandhurst.

.. , ... .. . ..,

... S cholar of Trinity College, Cambridge : elected to a Major Schol ar~ ship for Mathematics. Classical Exhihitioner of Pembroke Collegc, Cambridge: elected to a Classical Scholarship. Major Mathematical Scholar of Trinity College, Cambridge: \Vrangler with d istinction, l\<fathematical Tripos. Cla ssical Scholar of H ertford College, Oxford : 1St Class, Final Classica l Schools. History Scholnr of St. John's College, Oxford : 1st Class, Final llistory Schools. 1St Class in Final Honom Examination, Harvard Unive rsity. Maj or Mathematical Scholar of Trinity College, Cambridge: 1st Class, l\'lnthematical T ripos, Part I. Mathematica l Scholnr of Emmanuel College, Cambridge: 1St Class, Mathematical Tripos, Part I. Classical Scholar of Queen's College, Oxford: 2nd Class, Final Classical chools. ... Classical Scholar of St. John's College, Oxford: 2nd Class, Fi nal Classical Schools. Classical Scholar of Keble College, Oxford : 2nd Class, Final Classical Schools. .. . 2nd Class H onours, n.Se. (Engineering), London University. Passed 14th for Appointments to the I ndian Police. .. Passed 8th for Naval Assistant Clerkships. 1st place in Spccial Rescrve Compctitive Examination for Commissons in the Regular Army.


• THE G. C.

STRAHAN

H. H. E.

GOSSET

A. N. I. LI LLY ...

B. H.

MATHESON

G. C.

STRAHAN

R. H. H . A.

JENKI N

CHARLES

I

CANTUARIAN.

1st place in Examination of University Candidates (or Commissions in the Regular Army. ... Passe<14th out of 'Woolw ich into Royal Engineers.

'" Passed 3rd out of Snndhurst with honours . Prize for Military Law. Appointment to Indian Army. Passed 26th out of Sandhurst. Appointment to Indian Army. ... Commission from the University (13th place). Appointment to Indian Army. Appointed one of His Maj esty's Inspectors of Schools. ... Appointed one of I-li s Majesty's Junior Inspectors of Schools. 0

••

0

••

CRICKET.

KING'S SCHOOL v. O.K.S. Played on the Beverley on Tuesday, July 27th . Although a two-day match, no play was necessary 011 Wednesday, the School winning by an inni ngs overnight. Martin had collected a strong team, but lost several of his men at the eleventh hour. A good deal of rain during th e past week had left the pitch rather soft. Fluke lost the toss and our opponents elec ted to bat first. Gardner hit H. L. Cremer's first ball to the boundary and was bowled with the second, the third sent Parsons back. Moline was run out at the same total and three more wickets fell ..with only 20 on the board. A timely stand by Carter and Gillibrand saved the O.K.S. from utter disaster, but the innings closed for 57, a very unexpected performan ce . The School fielding was good and H . L. Cremer bowled extremely well, as his figures show (7 for 24). Gottwaltz and Snatt started steadily for the School, but the former was bowled by Martin at 29; Snatl's dismissal, three runs later, brought Fluke and Cremer. Their partnership was quite the best piece of batting in the match. The sco re mounted rapidly, both hitting well all round th e wicket; Cremer was at length caught by Hancock off Denne's bowling after J 24 funs had been added. His 66 included two fives and nine fours. Fluke was caught 8 ru ns later and th e remaining batsmen did little, Baker and Cowie alone reach ing double figures. The innings closed about + dclock for 2 T5. The O.K.S. were in a deficit of 15 8 and again started badly, Carter and Elwyn both being caught off H . W. Cremer for 5· GiJJibrand and Martin stayed together for half an hour and Gardner also reached th e "twenties JI before being bowled by a splendid baJJ of Cremer's. But the last five wickets alone produced 28 runs and


THE

CANTUARIAN.

the game ended in a tame victory for the School by an innings and 50 run s. H . W. Cremer took the bowling honours with four for J 8 and was well backed up by H . L. Cremer and Cowie. Score and Analysis ;H. Gardner, b H. L. Cremer ... L. G. L. Denne, c Gore, b H. W. Cremer H. Parsons, b H. L. Cremer . .. R. W. lI. r-,'l oUne, run out... .. ro.'lajor Isnacke, c Fluke, b R. L. Cremer R. E. Martin, Ibw, b H. L. Cremer W. M. Carter, not out _... . .. R. F: ~Iwyn, c Chapman, b H. L . C remer A. Gllhbrand, c Gottwahz, b F lu ke ... 1(. C. G. Hancock, b H. L. Cremer L. N. K. O'Neill, b H . L. Cremer .. Extras: Byes, 4 ... ...

O.K. S. 4 b If W. Cremer .... 5 c and b H. W. Cremer o run out ... o b H. L. Cremer o c Fluke, b Gore 7 b Cowie .. ... 14 c Cowie, b H. W. Cremer 3 c Fluke, b H. W. Cremer

20

8 8 10

4

23

o o

c Gotlwaltz, b Cowie 3 not ou t ... o h H. L. Cremer 4 Extras

17

Total

57

27 1

o 7

T otal

...

108

KING'S SC I-IQOL.

R. L. Gottwaltz, b Martin C. V. Snatt , b Elwyn ... I-I. C. Fluke, c Denne, b Moline ... l-I. L. H. Cremer, c Hancock, b Denne R. E. Gordon, hit wicket, b Molin e E. F. H ousden, Ibw, b Moline . ., P. D. Baker, not alit ... ... C. E. W. Chapman , c Gardner, b Denne H. W. Cremer, c ;\1artin, b Denne D. H. Cowie, b Martin ... C. H. C. Gore, b Martin Extras ...

6

23 62 66 1

4 16 2

o 16 1

18

Total

21 5 BOWLING ANALYSIS:

1St Innings. H. L . Cremer H. W. Cremer Cowie Fluke

O.K.S.

o.

M.

R.

W.

15'4 8 3 4

4 2

24 13 4 13

7

0 0

I

0

H. L. Cremer " . H.W. Cremer .. . Cowie Gore

2nd Innings.

...

o.

M.

R.

W.

JJ 'J

1

1~

4

17

2 I

9 4 6

0 I

21

2


~THE

KING'S

SCHOOL v.

CANTUARIAN.

MR.

R.

E.

MARTIN'S

XI.

As the O.K.S. match was finished on Tuesday, the next day would have be~n left blank but for the kindness of R. E. Martin in collecting a team. The match took place on Blore's Piece and resulted, on the first innings, in an exciting win for the School by one run . KI NG'S A. C. Fluke, b Martin... .. ' C. V. Snntt, c Cumberbatch, b Martin R. L. Gottwnlt7., c Gillibrand, b Moline II. L. H. Cremer, b Moline R. E. Gordon, c Gill ibrnnd, b Moline E. F. Housden, b Denne P. D. Baker, b Marlin ... C. E. W. Chapman, b Moline H. W. Cremer, not out D. }-1. Cow ie, lbw, b Moline C. }-1, C. Gore, b l\'[olinc Extras ...

SCHOOL. 10 2

25 36 3 5 7 I

8

8 o 4

Total

...

MR. R. E. MARTIN'S Rev, L. H. Evans, c Gottwaltz, b H. ' V. Cremer A. Gillibrand. b l-l. L. Cremer F. S. Porter, b H. L. Cremer H. Gardner, b Gore .. H. Parsons, c Gordon, b Gore '" W . M. Carter, c Smith , b H. W. Cremer R. E. Martin , c Gordon , b Gore .. . L. G. L. Denne, run out .. . R. W. H. Moline, c Snalt, b H. L. Cremer ... R. C. Cumberbatch, c Gottwaltz, b H. W. Cremer H. de H. Smith, not out Extras .,.

10 1

XI.

5

5

o 22 II

27 10 10 2

o 2 12

106

Total BOWLING ANALYSIS :

l\h. R. E. MARTI:"<'S X I.

o. H. L. Cremer H . W. Cremer Gore Cowie Fluke

IS 5'4

7 2

4

M.

R.

W.

0 0 0 0 0

29 19 30

3 3 3

10

0

6

0


'fHE

CANT OARIAN.

CRICKET RETROSPECT, 1910. Matches played, 13; Won, z; Lost, 5; Drawn, 6. This "is not a fi'tlttering record, especially when we remember ~hat the h,.o victories were won at the expense of a weak O.K.S. team and a scratch side on the last two days of the season. It is possible however to plead some very genuine excuses for the team's want of success. Bad management in the fi rst place arranged several of the important fixtures during the period when the Captain was up for his Examinations. Fortune was also agaill~t us in the matter of accident an d illness. Our wi cket- keeper, wh o bid fair to be a very useful first-wicket bat, broke his arm at the less heroic game of pat-ball, and several other important members of the team fell ill on oj::casions when we could ill alford the loss of their services. Against our ¡ friends on St. Thomas! Hill we could only raise five members of the team, while several of the substitutes who would naturally have taken their places were on the sick list too. Making all allowances, however, we must still confess we were not a good side. By fa r the best performance, strangely enough, was that against the M.e.C. Fluke was easily the best bat on the side j H . L. Cremer and Gottwaltz gave him good support, thou gh the latter was very disappointing during th e second half of the season. Baker batted well and generall y kept his end up for some time. H. L. Cretner bore the brunt of the bowl ing and did valuable service. The fieldi ng of the side was generally good, though it went to pieces badly on a few occasions. Fluke set his side a good example both in batting and fielding, and captained the team with. good judgment. H e deserves our gratitude for this and our sy mpathy for the want of success of his side.

A,. C. FLUKE (Capt.)-A very good bat. Much improved in defence, he has strokes all round the wicket and indulges in no half-measures. Excellent field, covering a lot of ground in th e co untry. Moderate change bowler. H . L. H. CREMER.-Very useful all-round cricketer. A steady bowler, generally keeping an excellent length. Hardly improved as much in batting as was expected but played some very good innings. Good field. R. L. "GoTTwALTz.- Began the season very well. H as much more power than last year, but after one or two failures he seemed to lose his nerve, and did little during the last part of the term. Good field.


THE

CANT UARIAN.

R. E. GORDON.-Suffered 50 badly from "nerves" that he never did himself justice and was most disappointing. Very fair field. F. H. SEABROoKE.-Gave promise of being useful both as a bat and as a wicketkeeper, but owing to an accident was out of the team for half the season.

E . F. HO USDEN.-Improved as a bat, but is not very correct. with a straighter bat. Fair field. P. D.

BAKER.

Must learn to play

-A very promising bat, though at pres en ~fhlel l,cUks Pfower !ll.tfront of

the wicket.

Wa tches the ball well and cuts beautI u y.

H. W. CREMER.-Vcry fair bowler but lack!\ variety. Poor bat and fair fie ld.

D . H. COWIE.- Useful change bowler.

se ul pom.

Did Some good performances.

Ke eps a steady length ,and. is rather faster

than he looks. Rather slow in the field.

Moderate bat WIth httle defence.

.. C. H . C. GORE.-Has a very good action and bowls s0t;1c very good balls, but sends down far too many loose ol.!es. Poor bat and fau field.

BATTING AVERAGES, ~'Iatches.

A. C. Fluke H. L . H. Cremer R. L. Gottwaltz . . P. D. Baker E. F. H ousden F. H. Seabrooke C. V. Snatt D. H. Cowie R. E. Gordon

..

H. W. Cremer

C. H. C. Gore

10 12

13 13 13 6 7 II

12 10 8

Innings.

10 13 1414 13 7 8 8 12 8 6

19 1O â&#x20AC;˘

Times not out.

Total Runs.

Highest Innings.

I

394 333 353 173 14-0 88 70 59 71 30 5

J03if

f

â&#x20AC;˘

0 0 2

66 97 .6 S4-~

21 23 16 .0 21 4-*

Average.

39'40 '7' 65 27' I 5 17'3 0 12 '73 12'57 8'75 8' 4-3 6'56 5 '00 " 00

*Not out.

The following also batted : C. A. West (5-1-1 ), L. L. Hasse ll (5- 2- 8), K. E. Hawkins (5-2-17 ), H. S. Wacher (5-0-25 ), A. H. Crowther ( 3-0 - 19), L. E. Field ( 2-0-4-), C. E . W. Chapman ( 2-0-3).


THE

CANTUARIAN. BOWLING.

H. L. H . Cre~er C. A. West A. C. Fluke D. H . Cowie H. W. Cremer C. H. C. Go re L. L. Hassell

Overs.

~fai dcns .

Runs.

Wickets.

212'5

27 4 5 9 18 7

57 1 105 181 28 7 427 35 2 105

39 6 10 15 22 16 3

27'3 44' 1 85'5 138'4 89

'5 The following also bowled: R. L. Gottwaltz (4- 1- 16- 0), A. (4- 0- 14- 0), and H . S. Wacher ( 1-0- 3- 0 ).

Average. 1~' 64

17'5 0 J 8' 10

19' I 3 19'4- 1 11'00

35'00

H.

Crowther

â&#x20AC;˘

THE RIVER. O.K.S.

RACE.

This was rowed on the short Course at Fordwich, on Saturday, July z4th, Wayte being at I< two l> instead of Cumberbatch, who was indisposed. The O.K.S. brought down a strong crew and their speed took th e School by surprise. They went off very fast, and the School, taking things too leisurely at the start, never got properly goin g

and were beaten by the O.K.S. for the first time. The distance was given as l- length . The Crews we re: -

K.S. C. L. Nightingale. 2 J. W. Wayte. R. Juckes. 3 Stroke H. de H. Smith. Cox. M. O. Depree. Bow

V. A. E. T. L.

O.K.S. C. Taylor. F. B. Cottrell. K. Barber. S. Nelson. H . Best.

We thus finished the season with a record of three wins to two losses. We beat E. C. Grecn's crew, Tonbridge T own and Tonbridge School; losing to the Medway

Club and the O.K.S.

I t should be noted that we had our full crew out only against

Tonbridge Town and TOl1bridge School, and this partly accounted for the two defeats. Continual changes had to be made in the la st fe w weeks and it speaks well for th e gene ral effiCiency of the crews that this did not make ve ry much more difference than it

actually did.


WE

CANTUARIAN.

THE "FOURS'" FUND. We publish the account of the" Fours'" Fund up t~ the present. It will be seen that" contrary to what wa~ stated in the Ca"tuan(w some time ago, there is still a consIderable sum to be raised. We shall be glad to receive subscriptions, however small, from those who have not already subscribed. . Cost of Boats Carriage

...

£ ,. d. 55 0 0 3 18 2

Amount nlready acknow ledged Mrs. Galpin " .. .

R. B. Wlnser, Esq. · L. Reay, Esq. .,'

.

G. Rosenberg, Esq.

A. Latter, Esq. A. J. L . ... C. F. Ryan Balance due

£58 18

2

£ s. d.

29 7 6 2 2 2 I I

2

0 0 0 0

0

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 7 0 5 20 16

8

£58 18

2

---

VIRTUTE FUNCTI MORE PATRUM DUCES. C. J . GALPIN.-1Gng's Scholar; entered the School, Feb., 1901; Vlth Form, Sept., 1907; Monitor, Sept., 1908; Captain of the School, Sept., ' 909; Editor of the Cantuanall, Sept" 1908 j President Debating Society, S,ept., I g09; Sports' Committee, Sept., T909 j Sergeant, O.T.C., 1909; Cadet Officer, ' 910 i School ExhibitiOJl cr and Open Classical Scholar of St. Jolm's College, 0xford. D. H . CowlE.-King's Scholar; entered the School, Sept., 1904; VIth Form, Sept., J()07; Monitor, Sept., B)08; Honse Monitor, Sept., 1<)09; 1st XV., Ig08-g-lo; Sports' Commiltee, Sept., 1908; Gym. Pair, 1909- 10; 1St XI., 1910; Sergt.O:r.C .• 19°9; Cadet Officer, 1910; School Exhibitioner and Opcn Mathematical Scholar of Emmanuel College, Cambridge.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

D. J. N. LEE.-King's Scholar; elltered the School, Jan., 1906; VIth. Form, Sept., 1908 ; Monitor, Sept., 1909; School Exhibitioner and Open Classical Scholar of Wadham College, Oxford. H. D. TOWNEND.-King's Scholar; entered the School, Sept., 19°5; Vlth Form, Sept., 'g08j Monitor.Jan ., 1909; Hon.Sec. Canluariall, 1908-9; Editor, 1<)09- 10 i Vice-President Debating Society, 1909; Sports' Co!ours,19l o j Sergt. O.T.C., 1909 j Col. -Sergt., 1910; School Exhibitioner and Open Mathematical Exhibitioner, Queen's College, Cambridge. K. C. McCLELAND.-King's Scholar; entered School, Sept., 1905; Vlth Form, Sept., 1908 ; Ford Studentship, Trinity College, Oxford. C. L. NIGHTINGALE. - Entered School, Jan., 1906 j VIth Form, Sept., '909; Monitor, Sept., 1909 j Sports' Colours, 1908-9-10; 1st Boat, '909 - l o; Capt. of Boats, Jan., 191 0; Sports' Committee, 1910 j Sergt.O.T.C. A. C. FLuKE.-Entered School, Jan., 1907 i VIth Form, Jan., 1910; 1St XL, 19089-10 j Captain of Cri cket, 1910 j 1st XV., 1908-9-10; Sports' Colours, Ig10; Captain of Games, 1910; Fives Pair, I9IO; Sports' Committ~e, J909; Lance-Sergt. O.T.C. G. C. W. HARKER.-IGng's Scholar; Entered School, Jan., 1905; Jan., 1910; Cricket Sec., 1910. H. C. POWELL.-King's Scholar; entered School, Jan., Ig07

j

VIth Form,

VIth Form, Jan., 1910.

R. de B. SAuNDERsoN.-Entered School, Sept., 1906 j Sports' Colours, 1910.

J.

W. WAYTE.-Entered School, May, 1906 ; 1St XV., 1909-10.

H. \V. CREuER.-Entered School, Jan.,

IQ07 i

1st XL, 1910.

H. L. H. CREl\lER.-Entered School, Jan . 1907 j 1st XL, IgOg-1910; Vice-Captain of Cricket, 1910 i Sports' Colours, 1909-1 0. W. G. HINDs.- Entered School, May, 1906; 1St Boat, 1909. M. O. DXPREE.·-Entered School, Jan ., 1907; 1st Boat, 1910.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

V ALETE. H. S. Wacher, K. V. Dodgso n, K. L. Williams, R. H, Little, R, D, M, Daniel, E, Hawkins, A, J, Partridge, T, R , Reid, E. M. Sursock, D, 1. Durham, H, 1. Kerrick, St, J, A. P. Methuen, E. G, V, Hughes, R. S. Glyn, R. B, S, Henning, G, M. H , Thomson, 1. L, Hassell, C, Orpin,

I{,

OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS. This year the Contingent,attended its first Camp. The advanced party, consistin g of I2 men a~ld the Sergt.-MaJor under Mr. Poole, travelled on Thursciay, Tuly 28th, an? the m~m body fol,lowed them on til,e following day. We musten!d in the MInt Yard III full marchlllg order and perfect weather. The late H ead Master bade us goo?-byc, arms werc slo ped and we trlldged off in high spirits, all of us feeling not a lIttle sorry for those who were not going with us. On arriving at Tidworth we were at once face to face with our first trouble. Like the Israelites of old we found there was a little diffi culty con nected with the provision of straw. Indeed, the advanced party had, most of them, to sleep on the bare boards the first night owing to the want of that commodity. Ho wever, di nner first, and the n what ho! the straw carts desc:ie~ bri.nging in fr~sh supplies! and sixty-nine raw recruits forgetting their ra~vness lllppmg m and helplllg themselves while the rest of the battalion were out at dnlll Tents soc:m arr~nged and everyth~llg ready for a start 011 th e morrow. The first day s opcratlOns trIed our powers a bIt. We marched out in a long line, goodness knows how many I~iles, and prac~ised an attack for goodn ess knows how many more and the n back agalll . However, It speaks well for the care that had been taken to prepare feet for camp work, when it was .found that only four Cadets complained of sore feet. nex~ day. It IS not necessary.to give a programme of each day's events. W began WIth Ch urch parade every mornlllg at 6.3 0, and after breakfast started off on s0!l1e well dev~sed scheme of fielcl-work. On the Tuesday we were inspected by HIS Royal HIghness tht: Duke of Connaught. Our biggest show was on th !hursday, when the O.T.C. Brigade of four battalions took part in field operations whi ch mvolved J 5,000 men, horse, foot aiid gun s, culminating in a great march past the Duke.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

The graceful wavinoss of the line of No, + double Co., No, + Battn" must have greatly impressed His Royal Highness. However, it was a great day. We got very we t at one time and we did not possess the resourcefulness of one of the opposing battalions, who marched to battle and fought in their waterproof sheets! keeping fairly dry no doubt, but presenting a very respectable target to the O.T.C. Brigade. We sang all the way back, H . D. T. keeping the ball rolling all the time. Then there was the night attack, necessitating grim silence an d keeping of touch. It ended in a terrible fusillade and nice hot coffee. Nor must (nor shall ) we forget our defence of Sidbury Hill: the splendid position occupied; the beautiful sight of the death-dealing lines of the attack : the piling up of troops on ou r left front: the call for reinforcements: the cheering swarm up the hill: th e mad rush of the umpires to check the impetuosity of men who had long been dead as door-nails. And how can one describe the domestic life of camp 1 That confounded bugle at 5.30: the turn out: the attempt to make those bed piles which. looked so neat in other lines and rather sad in ours: the tent orderlies: the eating at fresco : the washing-up and again the washing-up: the sing-songs: the football matc hes (generally undertaken after a 12 mile march): the snug tent, with the rain patteri ng down 011 its ever tightening canvas: the beautiful country in which our white city stood: the Sunday morning church parade: the cry of <I Officer of the Day)l just wh en you were con templating a particularly dai nty mouthful: the rifle cleaning and th e button polishing. Certainly if you want to wish your worst enem y the most awful thin g, wish that he may never go to an O.T.C. Brigade Camp. The C.O. said many things when he was there, but there is one thing he said which he wants now to repeat, to wit: That the conduct of the troops he had the honour to command was exemplary: that their work in the field was sound and second to none: th at all the hard work that had bee n done during those four terms was we ll worth it: and that our first Camp detachment had set up a standard which it will be hard to maintain, but by no means impossible, if we make up our minds to it. The term began with a shrinkage of thirty men, and eleven recruits only to take their places. It would be much better if new-corners joined at once 1i0 that they co uld get their recruits' drills over and done with during their first term. Still, our two companies, 74 strong each, can make a good show. Now that the Sturm ,uzd Draftg of our first two years is over, we can afford to go slow a bit. We have at last reached a stage when it is possible to put the thing 011 an organised basis, and this has been done (for particula rs see small bills). Col.-Sergt, Ryan and Qr.-Mr. SergI. MowJi have been promoted Cadet Officers. Both well deserve their lift; the latter especially has been an invaluable help to the C.O. in Qr.-Master's work. The band has not been heard this term. There is a large fortune awaiting anyone who can invent a machine for silencing the noise caused by practice all bugles, drum s and fifes. There is a vague rumour that an VIII. is going to Bisley next year. This will depend, we learn from an authentic source, on the devotion and perseverance of certain


64'4

THE

CANTUARIAN.

Cadets who have been told off to shoot the full¡ charge course this year. We should all like to have a hand in bringing the Ashburton shield to Canterbury, but it is not given to all of us to devote the necessary tim e and energy. Shooting Prizes in three Classes will be awarded at the end of this term on the result of the Practices in the Elementary Test Miniatute Course. The Competition is in progress and will close on Nov. 30th. An Inter-Sectional Challenge Prize is also under consideration and details will shortly be published. The examination for Certificate A. will be held in November. Eight candidates have given in their names. It is necessary to remind Cadets that the sole object of the a.T.C. is to provide officers for the Special Reserve and the Territorial Force. Certificate A. will help them . Verbum Sap. The object of Certificate ~. is not only and prl1tlarlly to get all. extra 200 marks in the Woolwich and Sand hurst Examinations. Will any O.K.S. who has joined the S.R. or the T.F., or the .enior division of the O.T.C. kindly not fai l to send word to the C.O . ? ' We congratulate C. G. Williamson on his commission in the 4th Bn. The Buffs.

ENCORPS. Sing, 0 sing of a Contingent! Mighty and strong were th ey : wise also, and mostly efficient. Proud were they, and stiff-n ecked: their heads were up and their chins in. Verily. noble were th e captains of the host; that like un to H ennessy, had Three Stars. And no less the lieutenant, who kept the cash and the plasters: and the sergeantmajor. who guarded th e ammunition and sardin es. Noble, too, were they, the wcarers of stripes, that were as fathers unto the soldiery j even the coloured sergeants and the plain se rgeants, whose name was Legion: and, to counter-balance them in the verse, the quarter-master-sergeant, whose words were weighty. Yea, not omitting the trumpeters and tabor-smiters, verily the whole Contingent was noble. Even th e batman was an aristocrat. The earth shook beneath their tramp: their steps were together, even together did they push out the left foot. The fo ur colour-sergeants observed their footsteps.


.:== .

THE

C,A;NTUARIAN,

They stood stea~y ~t ~ttention; they stood properly at ease : on parade they did not assuage untatIOns. Sing, 0 Mountains, the hardihood of this ContinO'ent I They toiled j they marched; they sang un wearied chau~l ts, ~ve n of Sonneh, that was so late, a.nd of the 'Western Sea j they lifted up the voice to Yip.i-addah the ' song of JOY. They can~e back, ~hey divided tl.l e . rati~n s : some did ~at many pots of jam; others dId bargam over puddll1gs i others went to the Canteen (where soldiers refresh th e m§~l ves) . So they were filled, and !lad repose. And .to~vards ev; n .~h·.eY -;'-;-~se, anCl girded ;;l t heir pyjamas and took th eir s wag ge r-C!~leS, and gat them to the I-l ouse of Revelry: .. And much si nging resounded; yea, th e heroes sang lustily this song of love,H . Proud is "V' love and beautiful : . Fat is she, awl w '-Ihal fa ir 10' see, Like 10 lite butlercup s. A lld ?lol unUke Ihe dalsies atfrial; Therifon WZII I pursue Iter through tIle day ..

. . Y ea, all day Will I !,ollow her." . Then would gusty Mirth sieze upon th em; and chatteri~g 'Laughter, : 'fhey wOc~~e~hen cry" Again, 0 sin~er : 1 i ~nd beat the bare leg' with the s\~aggerAlld so "auld jQvi~Iity and Ghorus go ringillg on. Sing, 0 sing the delights of this Contingent I But of a sudden would the earth-rending passion of trumpets break th roug h' th d . merriment. The;n . ~Hd l)lany with cornets and clarions make much ado to' the sound of the big drum s and rattle-drums. ", . ' At last would they turn t? th~ir t~nts j . and sW,e et sleep carne over each, as unwitting: he enwrapped ~ lm III Ill S neighbour s blankets. Throughout the camp wa~ nought but snonng slumberers and sneezing sentries. • I And on the. morrow ~h~y wo~ld turn out into the chill mists, and pile their bedding.; !lmld ~1U ch obJurgatIOn , .... '. .' . Sing, 0 's ing t~e splendour ~nd m~gl1~fice.n ce of this Contingent: Yea, theIr.fame shall.endure, .it shall end ure -until next August.

. ,.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

FOOTBALL. LIST Dale.

I _~~

01/1(1/1,,,11.

OF CYf)utui.

MATCHES. For.

FIR S T

1910: Th., Oct. 13 Mr. A. Latter's xv ..... .. Tu., .. 18 Wyc College .............. . Th ., " 20 Dover Coll ege ..... . Sat., " 22 Royal Engineers ... ",' .. . Tu., I I 25 Epsom College ...... ... .. Sat., " 29 l\'I crchant Taylors' Seh . T h. , Nov. 10 Royal Engineers ......... . W.o " 16 Eastbourne College ..... . Tu., " 22 Mr. G. n. Cockrcm's xv. SaL, .. 26 Dover College .... "" .. .. Tu., " 29 WyeCollcgc . .... ... .. .. . . Tu., Dec. 20 O.K. S....... ............. .

Ar«iHst.

h=C"r=o:-r.:=cl +RtsJlIJ"I~~~=~",= __ .I!:!!!.:.

_ _ I__ _ ___ _ __ I____

Canterbury \\'ye ... .... " Cante rbury Canterbury Bcckenham Canterbury

GtJlfls' l~

POilltS.

Coals •

Points.

XV.

Won . Won . Won . Lost .. Won . Won.

6 I

3 2

3 2

6 9 6 3 4 4

48 32 33 19 27 22

1. 2

3

4

22

15

Chathaln " .. .. ...... ... , .................. .............. ... .............. .

Eastbourne .. .. ... ......... ....... .. ... .. ..................... .. Canterbury .... ........ ....... . ................ .. ............... .. ....... . Dover .............. . .. .... .. ............... .. . ........ ... ....... ....... . Canterbury ................. . ....... . .. ........................... .... .. .. .. ......... .. " ... .......... . Canterbury........ . ............

191 I. Th. , Feb. 2 Hampstead \¥andcrers Canterbury.............. .. ... ... ................... . ............... . Tu., " 9 I'l a rlcquins II A " ......... Canterbury ......... ........ ... ...... .... ..... . ............ .. .......... ..

1910. W., Oel. 19 Sat. , II 29 Sat.,Nov.26 Th.,Dee. 1

T onbridgc Sell. 3rd xv. Dover College 2nd xv ... Dover College 2nd XV••• T onhridge Seh. 3rd xv.

SECOND XV. Tonbridge Lost.. 2 6 20 5 16 Dover ...... Lost.. 2 2 Canterbury .. .... .. .. ....... .................... ... ................ . ". Canterbury......... ......... ........ . .......... .. ................. .. .. ..


THE

CANTUARIAN.

KING'S SCHOOL v. MR. LATTER'S XV. At the beginning of the first half. before the School had woken up. the scratch side, going with a rush, kept the game in their opponents' half; Stein thaI picked up a stray pass, and runnin g st raight through to Forsyth, sent 'WiIliams over. The weakness of the football throughout the School, namely high an d half-hearted tackling, was here early in evidence. But from th is point the School monopolised the ball and therefore th e scoring. Th e heavy pack obtained the ball in eve ry scrum, and the out-sides had some valuable practise. The forward s of the sc ratch team were overweighted and unsuccessful wit h th eir packing, and their outsides, who were obviously for the most part unfit, and whose marki ng was indifferent. were kept th roughout the game busy dealin g with a keen and un flagging attac k. At first they defended grimly, then wearily, and finally outpaced and demoralised, hopelessly and unsuccessfully. The School gradually therefore increased the rate of scoring, finally reach ing a total of 48 points. For the scratch team Hammonds was occasionally co nspicuous for a dribble, and Poole saved th e se rum from extinction. Williams exhibited unusual tackling powers, but Steintha I was disappointing. For the School, Smith and Gordon showed promise of a fine wing. Housden was at times brilliant, Snatt indefatigable, and Gottwaltz useful in attack. The forwa rd s were a sound pack, Juckes was invalllable in the line out, and Cumberbatch headed many a good rush. The disquieting feature of th e School game was the weakness in defence that was conspicuous on the two or three occasions that a member of the scratch side handled th e ball. The School unfortunately lost Fardell with a displace d cartilege, but in sJ.lite of that they managed to confine the game to their opponents' half, and, finally ran up a score of 48 in which nearly every member of the team had a hand. The ScllOol.-A. B. Forsyth (back); H. de H. Smith, R. E . Gordoll, C. V. Snatt, R. E. L. Beardsworth (three-q uarters) ; R. L. Gottwaltz, E. F. H ousden (halves) ; R. C. Cumberbatch, R. Juckes, D. O. Fardell, L. L. Foster, P. B. Cottrell, G. A. T ownend, G. H . Claypole, A. J . Lush (forwards).

KING'S SCHOOL v. WYE COLLEGE . This match was played on Oct. 18th, under pleasant co nditions at Wye, and resulted in a wi n for the School by 32 points to 8. The School played up the hill and against the wind in the first half, and at the interval the score was Q to 8. The first two tries by the School were examples of what the three-quarter line co ul d do with Smith in each case to put the finis hing to uch; the other try was the resul t of an individual effort on th e part of Housden who sho wed that not only co uld he get the ball away smartly from the scrums but could go through on his own account


THE

CANTUARIAN.

if the opportunity arose. One of the Wye tries came from a s<:rambl,e on the goalline, the other from"'a fast rush down the steepest part of the hIll; whlch the School outsi des might have checke9 if a ny of those on the spot had felt inclined to fall on the ball. In the lalter pari of the first half the School attack rather frequently broke down from dropping of passes. This was rectified after the interval, and whenever the stand-off half and centre remembered-as they usually did- to draw some of the opposing defence a try was al most certain from Smi th. During the la~t twenty minutes the School outside quite found their game, and did mu ch as they hked, and the play needs no detailed de scription. Unfortunately, as a practice match for the School team, the game was not a complete success, for the Wye forwards never got the ball, or at any rate, never heeled it out, so whether the Wye teams had any power of attack remains unknown and the School defence had to meet no concerted attacks from the opposing outsides. However enough hard tackling was seen to suggest that defence is the weakest point in the play of this year's School team. T;' , S chool.-A. B. Forsyth (back); H . de H . Smith, R. E. Gordon, C. V. Snatt, R. E. L. Beardsworth (three-quarters); R. L. Gottwaltz, E . F . Housden (halves) ; ~. C. Cumberbatch, R. Juckes. L. L. Foster, P. B. Cottrell, G. A. Townend, G. H. Claypole, A. J. Lush, C. H . Trehane (forwards).

â&#x20AC;˘ KING'S

SCHOOL

v. DOVER COLLEGE.

Played at Blare's Piece on Thursday, Oct. 20th, and resulted in an easy victory for the School by 3 goals and 6 tries (33 points) to nothin g. In the early stages of the game Dover attacked and looked dangerous, but Forsyth brought off a line tackle and the three-quarters passed well. Smith almost getting in. From the ensuin g scrum, Lush got over, but the kick failed. The next incident was the gainin g of a lot of ground by Gottwaltz, Snatt and Beardsworth, followed immediately by a fine try by Gordon, who, running strongly and feinting cleverly, got through all the opposi ng backs. This was the best try of the match, and Juckes kicked a' goa l. A good run by Smith came next, and then the same player missed a good chance by mulling a pass. Dover were then. penalized for off-side. but Juckes failed . Some good kicking by Dover gave them relief, and Snatt. who held on to the ball instead of kicking" was tackled in front of our goal. The forwards, however, rushed the ball away, and Housden, tricking his opponents, got right away and just scored, though his want of pace was rather apparent. Smith, though well tack led by Dixon on many occasions, kept making ground and after ~ good run gave Gottwaltz a beautiful pass which enabled him to score easily. Our


THE

CANTUARIAN.

fonviuds continued to get possession and gave the 'back's ' plenty to do. Beardsworth had sev~ral useful runs, but took too lon g to get into his stride. He must try. to learn to hand off or swerve. At half-time we led by '4 points to ml, and on ~esllming Gor~on again made a fine run, and though tackled, managed to escape, and scored wide. ·The threequarters and halves co ntinued to attack vigorously, bu t Snatt was slow and apt to check too · mu~ h . Smith and Snatt. each scored a try, and th en Dover began to do better. A senes of attacks looked like ly to score. and on two occasions fin e tackles by Foster and Cottrell alone prevented their getting in. Then we attacked again, a~d Smith and Foster eac h scored after some excellent passin g. Just before the e nd Dixon got nearly through but Forsy th again tackled him fineJy. The match was rathe r one-sided. Our team was di stinctly bigger and heavier, and got the ball in th e scrum with great regularity. The forwards played well, Ju ckes, Foster and Cumberbatch especially di stin guishing themselves. The backs gave us quite a treat. The passing was swift, neat and accurate, with quite a lot of originality and resource. The right win g is considerably the stron ger, and Smith takes a lot of stopping. Forsyth was a lways r.eliabJe and the halves did th eir work extremely well, though they are neither as fast as they might be. The place-kicking left ·much to be desired, . and the defence generally was not severe ly tested.

TIlt School:-A. B. Forsl'th (back) ; H. de H. Smith, R. E . Gord on, C. V. Snalt, R. E. L. Beardsworth (three-quarters); R. L. Gottwaltz, E . F. Housden (halves) ; R. C. Cumberbatch, R. Juckes, L. L. Foster, P. B. Cottrell. G. H. Townend, G. H. Cla),pole, A. J. Lush, C. H . Trchanc (forwards).

KING'S

SCHOOL

v. ROYAL ENGINEERS.

As the School were obviollsly opposed to a heavier side. it see med probable that they would for the first tim e get some practi se in defence, unl ess their forward s could control th r. serums. As a matter of fact. for th e first fe w se rums, before the visi to rs were together, the School obtailled the ball eve ry time. but unfortunately the outsides, probably th rough nervousness, failed to play up to their lIsnal form, a nd bad passing led to the breakd ow n of many a promising attack. But soon it was clear that the hom e pack was being he ld, and then th at they we re faili ng to obtain the ball. The School three-qna rters, as had been feared , were unab le to withsta nd th e da shin g attack that for some time assailed th em, ancl bad tackling let the Enginee rs' stand off half and centre through several tim es, and t~vo tries resulted . one of whi ch was converted. The School, however ralli ed, and the forwards took the ball to the other.


.. THE

CANTUARIAN.

.

end, where Housden slipped round the serum for his usual try. The School continued to attack, and th e forwards having succeeded in obtaining the ball two or three times . the outsides got going and excellent passing, in which Juckcs assisted, ended in Smith scoring twice. The School thus led at half-time by '3 points to 8. •

For some time during the second half, the School held their own, but the forwards were still being beaten. and the School tackling, failing to resist the continual pressure. was often at fault . The Engineers' out side· half several times was only half-tackled and allowed to slip away, and the three-quarters or the School were too slow in getti ng up to their opponents when the Engineers obtained th e ball in the serum. Consequently the Engineers scored four times, all of which scores should have been prevented by moderate tackling. Forsyth , however, was an exce ption to the general rule, and never missed his man, and generally found a good touch. The School forwards, towards the end , made a great effort and obtaining the ball at last, heeled, and Smith scored twice , after excellent passing from openings made by Gordon. Smith's handing-off po wers proved very useful in effecting these successes. Jucke.s fail ed by inches with his kicks from the touch-line, and the end came with the Engineers victorious by 21 points to 19. .

The School.-A. B. Forsyth (back); H. de H. Smith, R. E. Gordon, C. V. Snatt, G. L. Tomkins (three-quarters) ; R. L. Gottwaltz, E. F. Housden (halves) ; R. C. Cumberbatch, R. Juckes, L. L. Foster, P. B. Cottrell, G. A. Townend, G. H. Claypole, A. J. Lush, C. H. Trehane (forwards ).

• KING'S Punctually at

2.30

SCHOOL v. EPSOM

COLLEGE .

the gates of Beckenham F. C. ground were thrown open to

admit the surging crowd of O.K.S. who had waited patiently for hours to gain entrance. We must take this opportunity of commending the police on the admirable

and tactful way in which they handled th e mob. When Epsom ki cked off down the hill, there must have been quite five of the better O.KS. present. The School showed a marked superiority over an unusually poor Epsom XV. from the start. A great many opportunities were missed, but as th e result of those accepted the score stood at I I - lIil at half-time. The forwards, during the ten minutes previous to halftime, had been somnolent to a degree. They started off in very much the same state in the second half for another ten minutes or so. after which they bucked up and played a real good game. During the lapse Epsom had twice looked dangerous, but Gordon saved well on th e first occasion and Forsyth on the second. Some of the

School backs seemed a bit reticent about sitting on the ball.

Had the School taken

full advantage of all their opportunities in the second half again, the score would


THE CANTUARIAN. have been just about doubled. Housden, who has imp roved no end. did all that was possible-the ball often staying too long in th e back-row to give him a fair chance of gettin g it away. Gottwaltz macle some good openings. but was inclined to be selfi sh. Smith was the pick of the three-quarters, though badly starved at tim es. T?mkins is not as yet fast enough or stron g enough to make a good outside, an d he wIll not use what pace he has i he was checking the whole time. Ju ckes was very good out of touch; Cumberbatch, as usual, very sound everywhere-but he might talk a bit more i Lush was once or twice surprising in hi~ foot-work. A rather poor game in wh ich the School showed how badly a really good side ca n play through over-confidence ended with the score 27-111'1. Tries were scored by Smith (three), Housden. Gordon, Trehane. Cumberbatch.

The School.-A. B. Forsyth (back); H. de H . Smith, R. E. Gordon, C. V. Snatt, G. L. Tomkins (three-quarters ) ; R. L. Gott",altz, E. F. Housden (halves); R. C. Cumberbatch, R. Juckes, L. L. Foster, P. B. Cottrell, G. A. TOlVnend, G. H. Claypole, A. J. Lush, C. H . Trehane (forwards).

KING'S

SCHOOL

SECOND

XV.

v. TONBRIDGE

THIRD

XV.

Played at Tonbridge under per fect conditions on Oct. 19th. The visitors were apposed to a heavier and more experienced team, but played a plucky and energetic game. The first half was a close and interesting struggle. For a long time the game

was fought out in the middle of the field. Then a kick across sent the Tonbridge right wing round the opposition and over in the corner. The same player put th e finishing touch to a good bout of passing some fe w minutes later. The visitors, after a fine run and dribble by Tomkins and some forwards, scored near the post through Wayte. The home side scored aga in before half-time from a serum on the line. Todd once appeared to score for us, but a five-yards' scrum resul ted. Tomkins

twice reached the full back but passed bad ly.

The second half was as keen and close

a struggle as the first . Ryan was just pushed into tonch at the corner. Ashenden, after a long and tricky run, cleared all his opponents, but was overtaken owing to sheer exhaustion. Wayte, Whi stl er and Squire were nea rly in, and finally Crowley made a stray dash, and scored near th e co rn er. Next T onbridge scored again through their right wing, after Tomkins had twi ce. by great efforts, pulled up two dangerous attacks on that quarter. In the la st five minutes Tonbridge scored twice, leaving

them victorious by

I

goal and 5 tries

(20

pts.) to

2

tries (6 pts.).

For the visitors, Watkins at back was cool, the centres were both excell ent in attack and defence, though Tomkins' passing was bad. Crowley ran strongly i


THE', CAN'l'UARIAN. the halves fell on the ball unhesitatin gly; but were both weak .in attack. The forwards, without exception, played themselves ¡out. and held their own with a much heavier pack. Sidebotham worked. perhaps, witli the most conspicuous energy in the fight, and the following up of Wayte, Whistler and Squire was excellent.

Th, School.-G, D. Watkins (back); C. F. N. Ryan, N. E. Ashenden, G. L. TomI,ins. R. Crowley, (three-quarters); W. L. E. Field, C. H . Clayton (halves); E . A. Squire, J. B. Sidebotham, R. A. F . Whistler, G. W. A. Todd, S. W. Wayte, G. F . J"ckes, E. J. H odgson, C. C. Smythe (forwards).

DEBATI NG S OCIE T Y. At a meeting held on Sept. 'sth, C. N. Ryan was elected President and G. H. Claypole Vice'President and Hon. Sec. ; J. B. Sidebotham, D. O. Fardell, H. Spence and S. J. Maiden were elected members of the Committee. The opening debate was held on Oct. J I th; the motion before the house being that ee the suffrage be extended to women on the same terms as it is now granted to men.n The Society may be congratulated on a very successful sitting. The speeches appeared to be well thought out and there was a pleasing tenden cy to answer th e last speaker's arguments before putting forwa rd your own views on the subject. The innovation of opening the debate to the audie.nce after the speeches of proposer and opposer as well as before the final effort seemed to be appreciated. Several members of the house made interesting remarks and it is hoped that on future occasio~s they and others will

speak at greater length. Criticism of other people is always easy. eve n if you have no actual views of your own to put forward . C. N. Ryall opened the proceedings on behalf of the motion by referring to the pathetic appeal of half a million women for the vote at a mass mee tin g which took place in Hyde Park some years ago. This showed that women wanted the vote. H e went on to show its advantages by pointing to the miserable case of the girls who serve in A.B.C.'s. Their condition would be ameliorated, as would that of many other women whoso wages wou ld be higher if they had th vote. Since man had had the vote his wages had gone lip 50 %. Women who paid rates and taxes should bo represented just as much as men. He conclud ed by showing how di sgrac .. fully underpaid women were, citing th case qf wO]!len who were National School


THE

CANTUARIAN.

teachers and Post Office sorters as compared with. men who occupied the same position. G. H. Claypole, the leader of the opposition, commem.:ed in light and airy tones by telling a little anecdote about a certain Mrs. Smith, who got into an om nibus and was not offe red a seat until she assured the occupants that she was not a suffragette. when instantly everyone rose and offered her a seat. Hence he pointed out that if women had the vote chivalry would be hurt. H e refuted th e president's remarks about taxtioll implying representation, pointing out that although the natives of India paid taxes they did not vote. To give women the Tole would be like giving a n infant child champagne and oysters. No arguments could be taken from Colonial Governments for these had little more authority than the London County Council. He concluded by saying that the women's vote would entail her virtual un sexing and half the charm and grace of life would be lost.

n. H. G. Northcote then rose and remarked that the girls who served in A.B .C.'s did not have to pay taxes . dId therefore should not have the vote. He sat down, begging to oppose the motion . F. L. Goad refuted the last speaker's remarks and bewildered the audience with some arguments in support of I..he motion.

L. L . Foster maintai ned that franchise was not right for all women and argued that it was better for non e, than for ali, to have it. G. C. de Mallos brought forward a time-honoured statement to the effect

that man's brain weighed heavier that woman's. Therefore man was more entitled to the vote. He wavered on being asked for his authority, but sat down declaring that he kne w it was so.

C. E. A. Pullall, suffragette, produced a sound argument about prejudice and armour-clad conservatism being at the root of the matter, and related an incident showing the obstinacy of a working-man at a suffragette meeting.

S. J. il1aid", pointed out that although many women of the style of Mrs. Gamp objected to the idea, yet surely those women who wanted the vote ought to have it. Voting was quite a lady-like occupation. The fact was that man was playing the part of a dog in th e manger in keeping the vote from women. The suffragettes had taken the best course to attract attention to themselves. Nowadays Mr. Winston Churchill provided conc~ rts and General Booth for the prisone rs, but wh en Mrs. Pankhurst went to Holloway, prison was prison and stomach-pumps were stomach-pumps. In conc:lusion men had behaved co nsiderably worse when they wanted the vote. In Bristol they had set fire to all th e public buildings and had done damage even "under the shadow of the great .... " H. Spence remarked that the proper sphere of woman was the home. If a woman went into a profession she co uld not expect to get such high wages as a man. In the first place she was not so strong, and in the second place so often she gave it up to go and get married. H e then portrayed with great effect the dramatic scene of a ship-wreck and the


THE

CANTUARIAN.

calm voice of the captain "Man the boats: women and children first. ' â&#x20AC;˘ If women had the vote all thi s would be abolished. Vvornan was not so suited for politics as man. She did not have th e same opportunities for debalin g political questions . . D. O. Fardell, referrin g to some remarks made by earl ier speakers, poi nted out the importance of women's votes in Australia. Victoria's rule had been very successful, therefore wh y should not educated women ru le well. Women of th e lower classes too were steadier th an their husbands. ~'o m e n could argue polities over the garden wall better than their husbands could in the public houses. In conclusion he showed that Board Schools were excellently managed by women. J. B . Sidebo/lJam . com mencin g with some fiery remarks to th e e ffect that women should not have the vote just because they wanted it, went on to picture the Parliament in which women sat. Moreover the feelings of India and oth er Colonies would be hurt by petticoated members in mOllster hats and hobble skirts. Elizabeth' s reign, though brilliant on the surface, had really been a failure.

Victoria herself had said that women ought to dislike such masculine occupations as voting ; wh erefore he desired II to entirely oppose the motion." C. K. l110wll then added his weight to the opposition, and his remarks were greeted wi th great applause. C. N . R)Ia1l excited, eloquent and emotional in the closing speech, pointed out that there was no necessity for women to sit in Parlia men t because they had th e vote. A statute mi ght be passed to forbid it. The argument about the thin end of the wedge only appealed to a weak ma n with a weak min d. Mr. Balfour and Lord Hugh Cecil had both said that wom en would not become Mem bers of Parliam ent. W'ith regard to the argument that ma n had greater physical force th an woman and therefore had more right to vote, in th at case Sand ow ought to have ha lf-a-dozen votes, a nd a whole constitu ency would not be enou gh for Hackens michdt. H e th erefore hoped the hou se would rise superior to politcal prejudice and masculine bigotry, and closed the Debate. On a show of hands the motion was lost by 29 votes to 11.


THE CANTUARIAN.

K. S.

TYPES.

TYPE "Vl'ien a fe llow comes fn'!sh to the School, and is promptly placed in Form V. he immediately beco mes an object of no small jealousy and suspicion to fellows in Form IV. Week's places we re then held in th e Schoolroom , each Form marching into line in front of the Master's table in turn j I hear that thi s system is changed now.. Anyh ow th e shining lights of Form IV. watched the weekly position of T ype V. with varying feelings. glumness prevailing if he were 1st, 2nd or jrd; sati sfaction if he werc lower. This was at first; but as weeks passed and Type V. showed no "side" but a genial b01lho1llit to all, we soo n forgot that he was a usurper, and bore his success or failure with equanimity. He was a big fellow, promising bigger bigth; hair pa rted in th e middl e, fullish face and not ug ly. End of year came, and he was left in the 5th, and some of ll S Fourlh fellows were leve lled up alongside Type. One or two of us were posted to th e 3rd Front, his study. Uneasiness or suspicion rapidly thawed, and he and I became firm friends, and remained so, for our rivalry of five years at the School and our subsequent spell of occasional term-end meetings and fitful correspondence. Big of body, big of limb; a powerful bat, a catapultic bowler and a tornado in

655

v. the scrum, though slow in getting up to it. One generally knew by sudd enly becomin g flat at what moment he had added his we ight to the "As wh en t wo rams stirred with ambitious pride" metee. It was a lways aggravating to me when

1 heard his quill sc ratchin g away iambic after iambic in the Grange study, whil e I was tearing my hair on Tuesday e venings in the effort to ring out the Rev. Prece ntor' s triple bob majors and ring in the necessary jingle of "Tum tum tilum tum-tu m titum tumtumtitum ."

He had a wonde rrul genius for verse j Latin or Greek were t he same to him, and he had always finished his lot a good half-hour before I got to the end of min e. And his score was nearly always 25 out of 30 duly labelled in red ink as I noti ced on th e eve nings when I had to go to Mr. Evans to have my own emended. I have an idea (possibly erroneous) that he was the author of the great line: Num hltn dum sum cum Phyllide lristis ero? Can I then be sad so long as I be with Phyllis?

Anyhow it is what you could expect from so fluent a pen as his. We three -Grange rs-regarded the Cathedral as having g rown up under the shadow of the School; anyhow we annexed th e Baptistry gardens and commandeered them into an auxilia ry force


THE

CANTUARIAN.

for our Plato or Aeschylus. On summer mornings we wended thither. There was a lovely syringa bush OIl a mossy bank. Alas, it is no more i I looked for it in vain a few days ago). Type laid his huge limbs thereaneath and we followed suit with our lesser length. The rooks above (and perhaps Mr. Plant) witnessed the easy grace with which Type solved our difficulties and shed daylight on the enigmatic page. He was rather great too at suggesting a possible funny rendering. There was no selfish ness nor markgrabbing about Type V. If he saw his way thro ugh a puzzle which baffled us denser brethren, he gave us his thread as common property, and didn't grudge us the marks or distinction we might earn thereby.

I forget if Sherlock Holmes had then been born or not; anyhow it was Type V. who was most potent at unravelling the myste ry of a certain regrettable incirl ent which occurred while we were Monitors. He suggested the examination of witnesses by candle light, he and I having to keep our backs to the candles whose light fell full on the witnesses' faces. His cross questionings speedily led us to spot the offende r of whom at first we had had no inkling. I don't think Type eve r lost his wool. He would get very serious if occasion demand ed, especially over fellows trying to shirk Green Court rolling Or cricket practice; and he had a powerful way of making malingerers play the game without

unnecessary unpleasantness. He was fully up to the great traditions of the Public School Cricket Captain and always made good friends with rival captains (w hich is, after all, a tautology). Excellent versifier as he was-and I fan cy many of his works will be found in the H eadmaster's Register of Excellent Effusions-he was also a good ar tist, having come along at full speed under thp, magnificent teachin g of Mr. Gordon. But unless there was something on, which demand ed seriousness, he was uniformly genial and hearty. Bigness and strength were to him merely the excuses for extra happiness and kindliness. And he loved his fun too. The whimsicalities and pranks of G.L.W., C.A.K., A.G.R. and Co. were appreciated heartily by Type V., even when he was a hoa ryheaded monitor. In his premonitorial days, he was vcry useful too in the Upper Dormitory in arousing the nightly snorer who sojourned opposite his 'cubicle; for which public-spirited activity alone h deserves a bust in Hall, setting aside his many other claims to a pedestal. Let this sketch be one humbl pedestal to so good a fellow. (P.S.-I could add many an instance of his appreciation of the humorous and athletic in the Chino-Japanese hour when CI so cracked the ship and remained sitting" -but these arc not supposed to be kn own ; so I must ring down the curtain. The th n Sixth will recall them.)


THE

CANTUARI AN.

O. T. C. NOTES. It is not my intention to write a revised CI Manual I' but it has always seemed to me that the parts which deal with" detailing" might be imptoved by a few practical hints to the well meaning recruit. For example in detailing the â&#x20AC;˘ II fix bayonets " we might humbly suggest the following as being th~ most accurate description of the rifl e exercises of t he mode rn rec ruit . On th e co mmand "one" thrust the rifle forward with some slight force with the righ t hand (the one opposite the left). If this is done well the rifle will slip through the fingers wilh perfect ease and bite the dust with a soft musical crash, a sOll nd dear to the ear of all section commanders; do not be disheartened, it is very good for the rifle and not only twists the sights, thus giving th e enemy a sporting chance," but also it shakes up the oil in the little can contained in the stock and so prevents its congealing. While this proceeding is going on you are supposed to grasp the handle of the bayonet with the left hand only-at least so the rules say- but if the first motion is successively carried out you will now have two hands with which to g rasp the bayonet. According to the old rul es you now draw the bayonet downwards and outwards j this method is now quite obsolete and by the new and improved style you jerk it violentlr upward thereby introducing a sporting element Cj

into tl:e movement. This is perfor~ed with the ri g ht hand while with the left you .1 hand off " your neighbour's elbow which is trav elling with high velocity towards your eye owing to a simi lar jerk. On the command H th ree, " having disengaged your bayonet point from rour neighbours' clothes and remarking that gen uine " Jaeger " would not have torn like that, and that it was an accident, and he ought to have taken it " in good part" which he will probably say he did, you commence to hunt for you r gun which YOll will easily recognise by the twisted foresight. When it is found you endeavour to place the bayonet on the muzzle end of the rifle (this is the thin end of t he rifle and in the best makes is freq uently the opposite end of the stock). If you cannot sllcceeo at first fall to the rear (not too heavily) and on pretence of adjusting your puttee wrestle with that bayonet. Assuming the bayonet is now on you will be told to watch the ri ght hand man who is to extend his left arm. When you see a man with his right arm out and his rifle on the ground you will know it is the man you want. The command stand at ease will now be given, in doing this the first motion of the" fix bayonets" is repeated except for the left hand, only this time you pick up your rifle almost immediately. R. E . CRUIT.

J


THE

CANTUARIAN.

SCHOOL NEWS. We congra~lIlate F. L. Sidebotham, E. A. Squire, C. K. Mowll, D. O. Fardell, H. de H. Smith, and E F. Housden, on being made Monitors this term.

We congratulate the following on receiving th eir I st XV. Colours: H. de H.

Smith, P. B. Cottrell. E. F . Housden; also C. H. Trehane, S. W. Wayte, R.A. F. Whistler, ], B. Sidebotham, E. A. Squire, G. L. Tomkins, on receiving their 2nd XV .

The following were promoted into

Colours.

**"

the Sixth Form at th e end of last term:

R. S. F . Cooper, P. B. Cottrell, H. G. Kain, H. de H. Smith, A. B. Forsyth, E. ]. Hodgson, R . ] uckes.

The Induction of the Head Master took place on September 19th, by the Vice-Dean, Dr. Moore.

"""

We offer a hearty we lcome to Mr. A .

A. Wright, who has joined the Staff this term in place of Mr. Cape. Mr. Wright was an exhibitioner of St. John's College. Oxford, and took a 2nd Class in th e History Tripos. He has taken considerable interest in the football this term, and spent a lot of his time coaching.

On October 27th, Mr. Cook gave a most interesting Le cture on "Canada," which was illu strated by some splendid lantern slides .

",,*

The first "Certificate A II Examination will take place this term on Nov. und , and the practical part is to be taken aL a convenient date a little later.

*"*

Owing to the hardness of the ground football was not possible in the early part of the term, and so a Paper-chase was

held on Thursday, Sept. 29th. The hares were: Fardell and Telfer, and among the first hounds were: Heslop, Cumber-

"""

H

T he excellent record of the seri o8

of Concerts given at King's School, Canterbury, betwe en 1900 and 1908 iA tabu lated in a recent numbe r o f Lh ll Cantuana:lt. The director of the soriNI organised and trained a choir co ntai nink

batch, Wayte, Lush, Cottrell and Claypole,

upwards of seventy boys of th e School,

the last two having secured the bag; but it is doubtful wheth er any of them went

and secured the services of an o rchc8tlll of over thirty performers." Tile IJ1t/Slffll

the whole course.

Tzines, Sept .,

1910.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

The asphalte Tennis Court has bee n repaired and marked for use this term .

Colour-Sergeant, R. ]uckes and H. de H. Smith to Sergeants, and H. Spence to Quarter-Master Sergeant.

*" "

The House Committee has generou sly

provided clocks for the Grange and Middle Front Studies. ~%'I(.

We

congratulate

at

Folkestone,

*""

The Librarian wishes us to state that over ' 50 books are still missing from the

Library, and that he would be very glad 1\IIr. Wright

Oil

playing in the Kent County Hockey Trial

on

La rece ive an y uf th em as soon as possible.

*,,"

Wedn es day,

October 26th.

The Headmaster would be pleased if

"**

O,K.S. in foreign parts would send him

We congratulate C. N. Ryan and C. K. Mowll on being promoted to

Cadet Officers, R. C. Cumberbatch to

any weapons such as spears, bowie-knives, or tomahawks, with whi ch to adorn the walls of th e Gymnasium .

THE SCHOOL. Captain: C. N.

RYAN .

Captain of Football Captain of Cricket

R. C. CUMBERHATCH. L. GOTTWALTZ. R. C. CUMBERBATCH . R.

Captain of Games M ONITORS :

C. N. Ryan, R. C. Cumberbatch, G. H. Claypole, ] . B. Sidebotham, A. ] . Lush, C. A. West, F. L. Sidebotham, E. A, Squire, C. K. Mowll, D. O. Fardell, H. de H. Smith E. F. Housden . EDITORS OF THE" CANTUA1UAN."

C. N. Ryan, G. H. Clay pole, F. L. Sidebotharn. SECR ETARY O l~ T J·m

"CANTUA1UAN,'J

J . C. Page. SPORTS' C OMMITTE E.

R. C. Cumberbatch, R. L. Gottwahz, D. O. Fardell, R. E. Gordon, C. N. Ryan, H . de H. Smith, R. Ju ckes.


THE

660

CANTUARIAN.

HARVEY SOCIETY. The Harvey Society seems in a flourishing condition this term, and has a list of pape rs which is well above the average. They are as foll ows ;Oct. 29. Nov. 12. Nov. 19. Nov. 26. Dec. :\. Dec. 10.

"Ants " "H. G. Wells" "Aeropl anes'~

"Ferns" ... "Norway" "Ancient Physical Theories" ...

I-I, Spence. G. 11. Claypole. E. H. F. Morris. C. W. Kidson.

F. S. Porter, Esq. Rev. L. H . Evans.

There are between eighty and nin ety members, and there sho uld be some good meetings. On Saturday, Oct. J 5th, the President, M. Ware, Esq .â&#x20AC;˘ read his paper on "The Condition of the In terio r of the Earth" at a meeting attended by about fi fty members. Considering the technicality of the subject the President was extremely lucid. He showed the interior of the earth was at a higher temperature than the exterior. but, though very hot indeed, it was probably solid for at least a

thousand miles down and possibly to the centre. H e explained the lavas which pour out of volcanoes by the fact that if the pressure in the interior was by any means relieved at any part the rocks would then become liquid. However, where the earth is not solid it is almost ce rtainly not liquid, but more probably in a pasty condition. The central parts co ntain very little oxygen, so predomihant in the crust, but are of a metallic character with a large amount of iron. This central core is not cooling. nor has it done so for a vast number of years. The interior heat of the earth, although proh ~ ably due in a great part to that heat given to it at its genesis by the collision of planets or meteorites, is also, to a largo extent, maintained by radio active chan ge. Uranium and its radio active products ar' almost certainly much ri cher in the crn ll t than in the central parts, and it is quit possible that, owing to this radio activ change, the centre of the earth is in creasing in temperature.


THE

CANTUARIAN .

66.

PEN NY READI N G. Saturday, October 22nd, 1910. I.

2. 3.

PROGRAMME: PIANO SOLO " Dance Macabre" MR. GODJo'Rgy.

RECITATION

7.

SONG

8.

PIANO SOLO ...

9.

FOLK-SONG

REV. L. H . EVANS.

Saillt Sams.

POOLE.

MISS POOLE.

PIANO D UET-

Carnaval Romain," Op. 2 (2, 3) Percy Gor(fre)'. R. E. Co SM ITH and fo.'lR. GODl-'REY .. 4. FOLK,SONG .. Winter" (Choral), Rtusttw. PIANO SOLa-

ce Elude Mignonne," Op. 16, NO.1... SeMitt. G. J. E CCLES.

"May " (Choral) ... Russian.

10.

SONG -

II.

"Barcarole-Conles d'HoR"man " Offenbach. W. C. li'. PALLISER . PIANO DUET "Praeludium" larue/ell. E. F. HO USD EN and MR. GODFREY. GLEE "Three doughty Men" (Choral)

12.

CA MBR IDGE Dear School, We cannot refrain from admiring the strenuous Editors of the Canluarian who seem determined to excel all their predecessors, even those of two years ago, in making the Call1uart'att punctual. We have received such repeated and urgent letters from them that we are compelled .to sit down and write to you. So early in the term nothing of more than passing interest has occurred and one is liable, as Mr. Cape would have put it, to write .. bilge." Even Williamson, who is usually such a mine of information on these subjects, appears to have run

'"

MR.

GLlm" Tell me, Shepherds" (Choral)

II

5.

6.

LET TER .

dr\,. His laconic answer to a frantic postcard we sent him was crushing, "Sorry - but little news - nut seen Deighton or J enkin. T elfer paid Cambridge a fiying visit from Rotherhithe last week." Such is the all too brief record of the doings of our patriarchs. vViIliamson, himself, is still the chief support of the .Nlagdalene Rugger Team and Musical Society. H e is often to be seen leani ng out of his window in Magdalene; for purposes of work, of course. BelJars is at Pembroke, and, as usual, a model of strenuous perseverance. He has been very busy chaperoning fresh-


66z

THE

CANTUARIAN.

ers. Todd has been seen hurrying from one lecture to another at Trinity, and Sparling makes out he is equall y busy. H e may be seen each afternoon plying an oar in a Queen's eight. By the bye we hope it was not t his eight in Queen's wInch made their cox sea-sick by rolling so mu ch. It is th e first ~ase on record in the Cam. Townshend seems ve ry vigorous after his bicycling tour in No rm~ ndy \~ith Sparling, He makes out he 15 workmg hard but when ~ve called th e other mo rn ~ iug he was still in bed. H e also is rowi ng this tcnTI. H. W. K . Mowll we have not yet seen , though we have heard much ?f his doings. In th e aftern oon he too phes a n oa r on th e Cam. At Emmanuel Moline and B. C. Mowll both Rourlsh. Mol ine is taking the History Trip. Mowll. has ~orsaken the rive r for Rugger. Cowie, tillS term, has re-inforced the m. H e is stii1 in the tubbing stage. At Corpu s Nelson ~as taken up rowing again. Cave is playmg Rugger. Harker may generally be seen walking about th e streets an d seems to be e nj oying himself. Quee n's has welcome.d Townend and Nightingale, the latter IS already a light in the rowing firmament there, while Townend plays Rugge r .

Mercer-Geoffrey Hamish-has given up th e big drum and go ne to S~lw)'n . H e was last seen making out a llst of O.K.S. in residence. We hope for no more subscriptions. Vie have hea rd rumours that Mr. Moxon has been up and has been seen reading in the smoking roon~ of the Uni on. When the spot was lll s~ected he had di sappeared, but we hope. if th e ru mour is true, we shall have th.c pleasure of seeing him soon. D oe~ 1t mean that we shall soon he cong ratulat1l1g Dr. Moxon? It only remains to chronicle our losses. Dickens, Thomas, Kempe a nd Gage have gone down l and with the hitter - says Williamso n - our C.O.K.S. finances. Pinsent soars higher and higher and might almost be considered as dead to the O. K. S. world. We must not co nclude withouL congratulating you all on th e New Head .. master. The reports which have reac h cI us augur well for the future. Perhapli we shall soo n have some reasollabh, O.K.S. colours. One reels quite out of it not being ab le to wear any. Yours ever, O.K.S. CANTA II,


THE

CANTUARIAN.

O.K,S.

663

NEWS,

\Ve congratulate Mr. Rutley Mowll. We co ngratulate H . P. V. Townend wh o was at the School fro m 1889 to· on passi ng I lth and R. H : \V. Brin sley1892, on bei ng appointed Coroner fo r Richards on passi ng 36th in the I st Class East Kent. Civil Service. We understand T ow nend has elected to go to India. A. L. B. Thomson, wh o holds a comm iSSIOn in the Royal Sussex Regiment, writes from Rawal Pindi to say he will be there for the next two years or so, and hopes a ny . O.K.S., who possibly can, will 190k him up.

•••

vVe we re pleased to see R. E. Marti n at the School in October; we un de rstand that he is going out to California ea rly next year.

A. N. 1. Lilly is at present attached to th e Leicester Regiment at Delgaum. and goes into the I ndian Army next year.

\Ve congratulate C. G. \Villiamson on obtaining a commissio n in 4th Batt. "The Buffs" (T.F. )

G. F . H owell , who has quite recovered from his illness, and wishes to thank all those who made constant e nquiries about his health, has just go ne to Guernsey to plant to matoes.

We congratulate R. M. Gent on playi ng in the Oxford Senio rs Match.

... "

We offer our congratul ations to the following on gaining distinction in the Final Classical Schools at Oxford:R. H. W. Brinsley-Richards, 1st Class; H. P. V. T ownend and A. G. Roper, znd Class: and H. L. Dibben, 3rd Class. Also G. D . Maclear on gaining a 1st Class in H istory.

..

.. <.

Rev. W. H. Maundrell, wh o was Chaplain on H.M.S. B edford at the time of the rece nt disaste r, has come home on leave, and visited th e School.

... "

G. C. Strahan is attached to thc Duke of Wellington's Regiment, which is at present stationed at Solon, Simla. H e hopes to get into a native regimentthe Ghoorkas-by next JIoIarch.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

"Alma Mater," wntIng from South Australia. wonders whether there are any O.K.S. in that continent, as he has not seen any for eight years. We wish, though, that" Alma Mater" had informerl us of his real name. ~/'

We congratulate H. D. ToWnCt.ld on playing for Queen's College, Cambndge.

We are delighted to have had a visit this term from Mr. Mason, who 15 looking better than we ca n ever remember.

,

The O.K.S. · match is on Tuesday, Dec. ,oth. All those who wish to play should send thei r names to V. C . Taylor, R.M.C., Camberley.

CORRESPONDENCE,

N. 8.-7 he Editors declinc to auep' any respomibiHty (omucted wltlt the o/Jilliom oj tneb' CornsjJo,, · denls. Name ami address must always be l:ivelt, not 'leccssari/y for Imb/iealioll, bul as (l guaMntee 0/ good faith. PerSDllalities will involve cu'tai11 1'qectiOll, tlJl'll/cn MOlle side 0/ the pnpet' Ollly.

"Ve' have received th e following from the British (I sles) PublIc Schools Association (Pacific Coast). Since the co nstitution is too long to print in full, we publish the most important sections. The H on. Sec. is J. L. Rainier, Esq., P. O. Box 9'+, Vancouve r, B.C., from whom further particulars may be obtained ;-

LeUers should 1"

BRITISH (ISLES) PUBLlC ASSOCIATION. (PACIFIC COAST).

SC H OO I.!tt

CONS7'f7'U7'fON.

I.-The name of this Asso -lfiLIHII shall be ,. The British ( lsi 8) 1'uhll, Schools Association (Pacific oUHt),"


THE

CANTUARIAN.

2.-This Association shall consist of Annual Meeting. In addition, the PresiBOlla-jid, Old Boys of British Isles Public dent and Vice-Presidents shall be lx-o.f!ido Schools resident on the Pacific Coast, the Members of the Council. definition of a Public School being held to include all and only those Schools which are or have been represented at the 9路-All Members shall pay an entrance H ead Masters' Conference. It shall, fee of $1.00 and a n annual subsc ription however, be competent to the Council to of $,.00, payable on the 1St July in each extend this interpretation and to make year. such extensions thereof as may seem expedient. T o lIlt Editors of "THE CANTUARIAN," 3路- The objects of the Association are:Dear Sirs, (a) To promote the interests of and good fellowship between Public Schools Old Boys resident on the Pacific Coast.

. (b) T o assist in all ways except finanCIally. save as hereinafter mentioned (c), before and after arrival in Canada, Old Boys, who on leaving Public Schools desire to make their home on the Pacific Coast. (e) In the event of the death of any member leaving a widow or orphans in . necessitous circumstances, it shall be in the discretion of the Council to call on eac h member for a voluntary subscription of a Sl1 m not exceeding one dollar. The sum thus obtained to be expended for the benefit of the family of the deceased as the Council may deem fit.

4路 - The Annual Meeting of this Association shall be held in Vancouver during the first week of Novembe r in eac h year, at which there shall be elected a President and one Or more VicePresidents. An Executive Council of twelve members shall be elected annually by ballot, the result to be declared at the

May I suggest that the names of Scholars and Exhibitioners during the past few yea rs 路be put up on the boards provided for that purpose in the Schoolroom. .Is it not possible to do this annually instead of at spasmodic intervals ? Yours truly, REWARD . [EnJ}.-A facsimile of this letter appeared in OCL, 1908, and Nov., 1906].

To the Edztors of " Dear Sirs,

THE CANTUARIAti."

The goal-posts on Blare's piece dese rve a n Old Age Pension. A's the Sports' Committee have develop ed an unwonted energy this term could they not be persuaded to supply substitutes. It should be re.membered that t!lC duty or a goa l~post IS a lofty one; those on Blore's piece are too humble. Yours sincerely, TOUCH JUDGE.


THE

66b

To the E ditors

0/ " T HE

CANTUARIAN .

CANTUA RI AN ,"

Dear Sirs, I observe th at ce rtai n generous bodies have been providing clocks a nd distributin g them in pec uliar places .

or refe r to. If this suggestion shoul d be acted lIpon, wou ld it not be possible to keep the m fo r reference and not to destroy them immediately th eir use fo r the day is over. Y o ur s ~

etc.,

M 3.Y I suggest a li ttle im provement on

POLITICIAN.

the present arran gement ? A grandfather in the Grange bath room would not be ont of place.

[E DD.- We strongly npprO\'e of this $uggestioll and com mend it to the considcration of the authoritic$ concerned].

Yours truly,

COLD BAT H S.

To Ihe E dl'lors of "TH.E

To the Edilo1'$ of

<I

T HE CANTUARI AN.'J

D ear Sin:: Woul d it not be possible to put a copy of .. The Times OJ in the Parry Library every day. H alf-penny papers abound in the studi es but they are not always reliab le, and we have plenty <;,f illustrated papers as well. But there IS not~ in g of a more seriolls kind to read

C ANTUAR I A N."

Dear Sirs, What is the School coming to ? Why clap th e tea m wh en they lose? Yours,

FIRST XV. [ED D.-No doubt our correspondent has observtd that the F ootball Captain has sat isfn ctori ly dealt with this maller].


THE

SPORTS' RECE I PT S. Bala nce in hand. September, 1909 Boys'Subscriplionss. d. l SI T erm S9 1 6 2nd Term 59 11 6 3rd Term 61 11 6

i.

Dr. Ga lpin (donalion) Masters (dillo)

..

CANTUARIAN.

I. s,

d.

19 ' 5

5

,

18,

:5

Cll utull rilln Subscript ions .

.. 2 6 I

21 S

Ten n i ~ S ubscriptions (balance) Shop Profits .. Rent for Paslurnge (Blore's P iece) Sale of Cards

1909-10.

FUND,

3

.

10

I 19 6 go , •

,

12

, 0

0

E XPE NDI TURE. /"1JO' IJa{/Rent of Grounds K.C. R.F .U. " Expenses of i\l a tches Bunce (BaHs, elc.) Al110s (Pnli mr~) Gentry (Post,;) ,. Ri gh ts of Wny Crie},:eJ-

R ent of Beverley ., P rofe,%ional nnd Goods Mnrsh (work Oil ground ) " (Bnll, ) '.. .. ,, (Rep.1 irs) .. Insurance of P rofessional Expenses 01 Matches .. " Hogben (Lu nches and Tea~) , : T wy man ( Nels slore d and repaired)

Ten"it-

Nett ing for Court Pri ~es , Bunce (Balls) ..

SMrl t -

Prizes (Lee & Wigfull) " " ( Mappen & Webb) ... " ( boujj;ht in Can:erbu ry) . . P 05t~eS a nd Carriages ,. " Murr m (work on ground) Dover Sport ~ P rogrammes ..

Errata (Nov. 1909).

s. d. w •• o 10 6

·

"

Aldershot E xpenses

should be /,26/s/6t no t £25/5/6+ (2) H ogben (cnleri ng )should be [, 1/C/St no t £ 7/o/6l (3) Balanceshould be £19/IS/S not £19/ I S/.~

, , , , ••

" ,. •• ·,, ,.", ,~ , so

0

·,. 2

•,

I ~

••

a ..

· • •• , ,. "

=3 I S

9

:2

6

"

o 16 Io! () ' S 9 4 1

~

3 0

3

CII" fuarinn-

Gibbs ( P rinting)

36 10 6

ftf i IUllam!olls-

Auste n (Wanes and help) Lilley (Rol h n ~ "

~~~~~na~~rtaSxes :: Subscri ption 10 Boat Cluh Chambers .. .. Gns & Wnter Co. Gi bbs (Priutin~ ) fo'ield (Sadlery) .. ., Stntionery Fives' Balls • .. T wyman (Pape r.cbase bags, etc. ) Cheque.books . . .• " Austen S undr ies T otal .. .. In ha nds of T reasurer Cash at Ba nk

L,

.

, '7 2 'S 0 o 10 "

C),IIIIIIISfict-

(r) Clln(fla rian Subscri ptions-

Audited and found correct : C. R.

£

McDOWALL,

6 3' J 187 .'

..

7 15

0

3

10

5

S • •

•, •

7 ,

·..., 7 , 7

,

0 10

0

,

0 10

1

32S 8 I o 11 3 28 18 2


T HE

668

CANTUARIAN .

NOTICES . We beg to acknowledge with thanks (3/6). Rev. L. H. E vans (3/6). Rev. R. S. the receipt of the following Subsc<ip- Moxon (3/6). C. W. Woodho use. Esq. tions :. (3/6). E. M. F. Evans. Esq. (7/- ). A. N. 1. Lilley. E sq. ( 10/- ). G. C. W. H arker. J. Scru by. Esq. (3 /6). H . M. Low. E sq. (3/6). Majo r E. W. B. Green (5/-). Esq. (3/6). G. A. Purton. Esq. (3/ 6). Miss M. Woodbridge (3/ 6). A. Latter. W. N. Goss. Esq. (3/ 6). L. E . Reay. E sq: Esq. ( j/6). K. V. Dodgson. E sq. (3/-). ( 3/6 ). G. F . J. Rosenberg. Esq. (3/ 6). H. C. Powell. Esq . .( 3/6). R. Watson. E . P. Guest. Esq. (3/ 6). C. W. Bell. Esq. Esq . ( 3/6). B. E. Money. Esq .. (3/6). l3/6). R. W. M. Glennie. Esq . (3/6). Mrs. Walsh (3/ 6). A. H. Spiers. Esq. M. Ware. Esq. (J/ b). A. A. Wright. Esq. ( 14/-) '

â&#x20AC;¢

OUR CONTEMPORARIES . \Ve beg to acknowledge the receipt of th e following ;Chigwellial1,

St.

Edward 's

SclJool

I Clu-om'cle,

L ey's For/nightly ( 2), Glena/~ moud College, R adleia n, AIIt)'JJl(lII , fiflsledian, L orreIJo/llcl1I . .

Gibbs and Sons, Printe rs, Palace Street, Canterbury.


THE VOL. VII.

CANTUA RIA N. DECEM BER.

IQIO .

No. '4.

EDITORIAL . Awful weather. How would you li ke to have a covered tramway running from the Grange ra ili ng to the seat of the mighty on the other side? Disturb our ancient tranqui llity, you say ? ';Ve're not sure. Besides, there could be a branch line to the shop. Break all precedent ? N ot one tittle. Our pastors and masters run a troll ey, not unknown to th ose who are privileged to th e Baptistry gardens, for what purpose ? The carrying of so bourgeois an object as common coal. Why should we , the aristocrats, be compell ed to use an umbrell a, if we consider one bath a day sufficient for ordinary man ? Gross injustice. To wh at advantage have we changed our parlia mentary repre¡sentative, if such an ap palling instance of class-hatred is suffered to continue? Howeve r, let us leave so Iowa subject- the weather, we mean, not th e


THE

CANTUARIAN.

parliamentary representative-it serves very well to start a conversation, which reminds us what an absurdity conversation is. Conversation is the conventional and most polite way of boring the other man. Some people complain of men being uninteresting because they don't (with the sous-en/mdre they won't) talk. Such. complaints are a mere amalgamation of rubbish. Nothing talks so well as silence . You don't believe that. Nobody ever does believe paradoxes. Its the fashion to say YO ll do. But, re ÂŁpsa. that one was as so und as station sandwiches. E.g., if we had not written this-(and writing is the worst form of talking. because other people read what you write, while they don't listen to what you say)-i f we hadn't inscribed, rcscribed and circumscribcd this magazine, in other words if we had locked the door of our lips you would have broken the Domes of Silence with your shouting. As it is there will be only the usual growl of the paid mourners. But that we cixpect. Whatever ,;e do, someone will say we are wrong. Some people are never happy except when they say they' re miserable. .;;. "'~ ~f % % % .;:. it- But, really, we crave your pardon j we have trespassed too long over th e preserves of your forbearance; we have monopolised the conversation. In tru th we tender a full and complete apology ; but one word before we cease. Hearty cong ratulations to R C. Cumberbatch and the XV. on their splendid season. They hm'e already broken two reco rd s by winning all the School matches and by sco ring 3'4 poin ts. Our only regret is that the Captain will not be here next term for the completion of a record season.

THE

ARCHBISHOP'S

VISIT.

The official visit of His Grace the Archbishop took place in th e Big School on Saturday, December 3rd. Th ere were also prese nt the Dea n of Canterbury, the Headmaster, th e Rev. R. G. H odgso n, Rev. G. C. E. Ryl ey, Mrs. Walsh , Mrs. Spooner, Mrs. McD owall and others. The Dean submitted a short report to His Grace of th e School reco rd durin g th c past year. T o their very deep regret th ey had lost th e services of Dr. Galpin, who had presided over the School with such signal success for so co nsiderable a tim e. The work of his headship would long be remembered, both by masters ancl b Yd, with the utm ost gratitude. They had had, however, the great good forLun e L


THE

CANTUARIAN.

receive the offer of the services of another distinguished man, th e present I-Ieadmaster (applause). He brought with him the fruits of fourteen years cxperi encp. at Wellin gton and Eton. The Dean referred to the loss of Mr. Cape and Mr. Porter from the staff, and, passing a ll. to the School work and play, he said that the usual high standard had been maintained in bot h departments. H e especially co ngratulated the XV. on their record season. The Archbishop, in his add ress, said he appreciated highly th e opportunity which was given him yt:ar by year to pay that formal visit in a formal way. It was no light matter that a tradition such as this should be scrupul ously observed. The traditio n had on that occasion bee n scrupulously obse rved. The Captain of the School came in due course with the request that he (the Archbishop ) should come and see whether th e new Headmaster was keeping the boys up to t he mark as well as th e former one had don e (laughter). H e was told that the Captain of the School was laid up-he hoped not altogether in co nsequence, but certai nly after his comin g to him (the Archbishop), to make that so mewhat seri olls and grave request (laughter). He hop ed that news would be conveyed to the Capta in that as far as they were able to judge th ere was nothing to be se riollsly alarmed at and that he might return to his work without any fea r of unfortunate circumstances (laughter). He knew that owing to circumstances it was impossible for all the members of the Chapter to be there that day, and he was especially charged by the Bishop of Dover to express his particular reg ret that he was absent on a commission which he (the Primate-) had entrusted to him. The Dean had reminded them of the changes and chances which had cO.me across the school life. They had lost from the King's School- not from affection and tou ch with it, but from the headmastcrship-one who for thirteen strenuous years had done all that lay in him to maintain the high reputation of the School. H e took up that burden and he handed it over to his Sllccessor maintained at an eve n hi gher level than when he first received it. They all owed, th e School owed, the Cathedral owed, and the Diocese owed, mu ch to Canon Galpin. He was now the Rector of Saltwood. Such a very importan t and great parish should have sllch a good man. at its head, and th ert: was a personal link which. form ed a reason why the Archbishop should sec that a very good man went th ere. He should t hink that it was about 7+0 years ago Archbisho p Becket found that at Saltwood plans were made for IllS assassination. H e (the Primate) felt it was ve ry undesirable that anything of that sort should occur again (laughter). H e believed that with Canon Galpin there, there was no fear that anyone would organise anything of thal kind. They welcomed in their formal visitation the new Headmaster who was goin g to maintain and eve n advance th e reputation of the School to which he came. H e came to them fro m the younger school of Eton. to bring its traditions up to the touch stone of an older fo undation like that; and to see as many of his colleagues had seen, how the headmasters hips of other schools could be maintained at the high level which wasl he was glad to say, secured at Eton-a school of which he had had the opportunity for many years


672

THE

CANTUARIAN.

of being a member of the governing body. He was sure that Mr. McDowall would find in the School to which he had come the best of work and play, In whlch every boy was genuinely and honestly resolved to maintain the splendid traditions which had corne down to them from the past. Let the Universities, the Army, the law and other branches of public life, know there was such a place as the King's School going all furnishing that best material, and doing the best work for the years that lay ahead. They were splendid things. these traditions. He did not want to dwell up~n them too much but when he heard people say that they looked to the old pubhc schools, sllch a's 'ÂĽinchester, as the mother of all English public schools, he, wante,d to go a little bit further. There was in 1376 a great g:athering of 'people 111 theIr Canterbury Cathedral. They came for a great ceremolllal, th~ bUrial of the Blac~ Prince, the da rling of English life, whose tomb stood to-day 111 the Cathedral, as It was then placed. If they recalled that scene and pictured those who .were the~e, they would find that prominent among them stood the executors of tI~e wllI, and foremost among the executors was \Villiam of \oVykeham. Ve ry near to hIm were boys of .that King's School. Five years had passed after that before William of Wykeham deCIded that he would found the great school of \Vinchester. Could they have any le gl tIm~t e doubt that it was the inspiration of what he had seen at Canterbury that made hlln start that school which all the world had wondered at for many hundreds of years since then? They found all the world over, the nations east and west, trying to imitate our English public school life. In China it ha~ been ~aken ~s a mo~el, although educationally it had not yet reached all that they mIght desl~e. HIs attentIon had been called to the answers in two papers made. by a boy 111. that country. In answer to the question "What is algebra?" he said," Algebra IS the name of Euclid's wife." The same boy or another described vacuum as " a la.rg~ empty place where the Pope lives." His Grace remarked that the endeav? ur .to Imitate ou r 'yays of teaching and the conduct of our school life, at all events, If dI.fferent conclusIOns were arrived at showed evidence of thoughtfulness. In conc1udlIlg he asked that a whole holiday might be granted in honour of that occasion, a request which evoked much applause. The Headmaster (Rev. McDowall) thanked the Archbishop for his prese nce, and said he would be very pleased to grant th e boys a whole holiday. He si ncerely hoped that the ex perience which he had had in th e younger foundation ~f . Eton woul? stand him in good stead, so that he might be able to keep up the tradItions of thea old~r school then~. He would also like to add how much he owed-as a new comer It made all the difference as to how one was received-to the unfailing readiness to help on the part of the Masters and staff, and he should also be ungrateful ir he did not mention the friendly help which had been given him through the term by the Monitors. H e could assure His Grace that the Monitors had been most userul. They had a knowledge of precedent-sometimes a tenacious knowlege ?f precedent (laughter)-which had been invaluable to him. His predecessor, as HIS Grace was


THE

CANTUARIAN.

aware, had left solid memorials of his long sojourn in that place, in that room i and wherever they looked in the buildings of the School they would find additions and improvements which were traces of his handiwork. He ventured to think, however, that best of all-as His Grace had mentioned-was the spirit of the boys that he left behind. There was, he thought, a spirit of discipline and industry, good feeling, courtesy of manner, and manliness, and at the same time a good healthy tone, wh ich he gathered had long been the tradition of that place, and he hoped it would long continue to be so. The visitation was perhaps a rather formidable one in that case, but he thought he could sa)' safel), that there awe was tempered by a knowledge of th e friendly sy mpathy which His Grace had always shown to the School, and he had to thank him very much for his attendance there that day. The Dean of Canterbury added a few words, and the proceedings concluded with three cheers for the Archbishop.

ANNIVERSARY

SERMON.

In response to a request made by O.K.S. and others that the Anniversary Sermon, preached last Speech Day by the Master of Pembroke College, Cambridge, should be printed, Dr. Mason has not only been kind enough to give his consent but has most Copies may be had, post free, on genero llsly defrayed the cost of printing. application to Messrs. Gibbs and Sons, Printers, Canterbury. On behalf of th e School and of the O.K.S. we wish to exp ress onr thanks to Dr. Mason for his great kindness ill enabling us to have this memorial of his sermon on that memorable occasion,


THE

CANTUARIAN.

FOOTBALL. LIST Daft.

OF Ground.

OppolUnts.

MATCHES. Arainst.

Fo".

Rtsult.

GMls'l~ P oblt;. Goa/s. 1910.

Th. , Oct. I~ Tu.. " I 20 Th., Sat. , " 22 " Tu., 25 Sat. , " 29 " Th. , NOv.IO 16 W. , Tu .• " 22 Sat., " 26 Tu., " 29 " Tu., Dee.20

Mr. A. Latter's xv ....... Wyc College ....... .... , ... Dover College ............ Royal Engineers . ......... Epsom College .......... . Merchant Taylors' Sch. Royal Engineers ...... ..... Eastbourne College" .... Mr. G. B. Cockrem's xv. Dover College WyeCollegc ... . .. . ... ... .. O.K.S. 0"" .. ... , ... " ~

...

F I RST XV. Canterbury Won . V1Tye ... ...... Won. Canterbury Won. Canterbury Lost .. Beckenham Won . Canterbury Won . Chatham ... Won. Eastbourne 'Won . Canterbury Lost. .

Dover

19 11 •

Th. , Feb. 2 H ampstead Wanderers Canterbury Tu., 9 H a rlequins " All .. ....... Canterbury

"

Won.

Canterbury Won. Canterbury , ......

..

-

2 2 6 5

6 9 6 3 4

4 4 4 2 4 9

48

32 33 19 27 22 12 21 16 42 52

1 1

-2 -

3 1 1 4 1 1

-

1

~

_.4 -2

-22

3 4

13 32 5 5

--

........ ....... . ......... ... ...... ......

-15 II

.... .... ...

......... ..... .. .. ..... . ......... ........ .. .... .......... ......... ......... ......... . ..... .. ......... ... . ... .........

SECOND XV. 1910. W.,Oel. 19 T onbridge Seh. 3rd xv . T onbridge Lost.. Sat., 29 Dover Coll ege 2nd xv ... Dover ...... Lost . .

..

6 1 3 2 3 2

Tritt. Foil/II.

Sat.,Nov.26 Dover College 2nd xv... Canterbury ' :V on. Th.,Dec. 1 Tonbridge Seh. 3rd xv. Canterbmy Lost ..

--

4

-

2

-2 -

6

-

26

-

1 1 1 4

5 4 1 3

20 I~

29


THE KING'S

CANTUARIAN.

SCHOOL v.

MERCHANT

TAYLORS'.

This match was played at Canterbury on Oct. 29th, and resulted in a win for the home side by 22 points to r 5. after an exciting game. At first the game was in the visitors It 25," till Greenhill broke away and after a long dribble, in which Forsyth was at fault, reached tl) e King' s School line, where attempting to pick up, he knock ed on. After this lucky escape the home side return ed to the attack, and, chiefly by punting to the- Taylors' full back, who always waited for the bounce, kept the game on the visitors' line. Housden finally scored after a dribble, picking up and getting an unconverted try at the corner. Juckes shortly afterwards fell over from a line out. making the score 6-0 in favour of the home side . The School forwards were pushing and out-playing th e lighter pack oPP,?sed to them, when one of the visitors' forwards had to retire with a crushed rib. Immediately the Merchant Taylors' heeled and their stand-off half broke through owing to bad marking and scored near th e post a converted try. From a stray pass Greenhill picked up and ran to Forsyth before passing to Lewis who scored by the posts. At half-time Merchant Taylors' led by 10 points to 6. On the re- commencement the home pack showed that they were determined to get the ball, and in spite of superb tackling and marking the School scored three times. Housde n scored his usual try by slipping round the scrum . Smith scored nea r the post, after excellent passing. in which Juckes and Cumberbatch joined, and Gottwaltz feinted through and scored near the post. Smith made one or two good runs, ano Beardsworth dropped many passes which should have led to tries. T en minutes from the end the home side led by J q points to 1 0. At this point the Taylors' heeled again and after magni fice nt running, feinting and passing, scored through Lewis the best try of the day. But the School made no further mistake, and Beardswo rth at last accepting one of Snatt's ope nin gs, put the issue beyond doubt. vVith regard to individuals, the School forwards were very good in the scrum, though scrappy in the open. Tuckes, Cumberbatch and Foster were prominen t. and Treha ne dribbled well. Of the backs, Housden played a brilliant game and was probably the best player on the field . Gottwaltz was very good at times, but must take and give his passes accurately and get down to rushes. Smith had not many chances and was well marked, but scored one splendid try. Gordon was not as good as usual in attack; his defence showed improvement. He should try and cultivate a short punt. This applies also to Snatt, who, except for some of his passes, played his best game of the season j his defence was strong and he gave his win g some splendid openings which were not accepted; he also kicked with judgment. Beardsworth scored one good try but must get another pair of hands. Forsyth was decidedly good and could not be blamed for any of the tries scored against the home side. He always co.ught the ball full. and, except on one occasion, returned well into touch. Our opponents were badly beaten in the scrum and found Juckes


THE

CANTUARIAN.

difficult to stop in the open . Their scrum half also was not good . These two defects prevented their outsides from showing their true form . The centre threes were brilliant. On the whole it was a creditable victory for the School against a faster side.

The School. - A. B. Forsyth (back; R . E. L. Beardsworth, C. V. Snatt, R. E. Gordon, H. de H . Smith (th ree-quarters); R. L. Gottwaltz, E. F . Housden (halves) ; R. C. Cumberbatch, R. Juckes, L. L. Foster, P. B. Cottrell, G. A. Townend , G. H. Claypole, A. J . Lush, C. H. Trehane (forwards ).

KING'S

SCHOOL v. ROYAL

ENGINEERS.

Played at Chatham on Nov. loth, and resulted in a win for the School by -4 tries ( 12 points) to 1 goal and 2 tries (II points).

For the first time this term we were playing our full team, with the exception of Fardcll, Gelsthorpe making a welcome and useful re-appearance among th e backs, At the start the Engineers heeled and their three-quarters looked dangerous, but their attacks were stopped by the School backs. The special feature of the first half was the excellent kicking of Snatt, H ousden, and Gordon, who repeatedly gamed a lot of ground by finding touch. The forwards soo n got together and after the first few minutes rarely failed to get possession, though the heeling was apt to be rath er slow. Our opponents were playing eight outsides, with the result that the School backs were very doseJy marked; Smith and Gelsthorpe did not get many chances. The former was once held up over the line. Gordon did his best but found it ha rd to get goi ng. After about 15 minutes play Snatt, who was playing very vigorously, sco red on the right wing; Smith followed sqon after with a dashing and successful run on the left. Neither try was converted . The game remained near our opponents u 25 II for the rest of the first half, except for several forward rushes, from which th o game was always taken back. After half-time our forwards were hard pressed and seemed unable to stop th frequent rushes made by the II Sappers," who repeatedly gained grou n.d in this way and eventually scored . Gelsthorpe replied with a tryon the extreme nght; but Lha Engineers, returning, scored again; the try was cOllverted (9-8), Gordon ma:nag d to work his way through to the line and increased our lead . The place kick, as usual, fail~d. The R.E. pressed us hard [or som e time after this and ~cored for th t third time. vVe were pleased to find we are not the only team w,h? desp~se to con v rL their tries, T he last ten minutes of the game were very excItIn g, Wlt~ th e se. II 12-11 in our favour. Play was chiefiylin our " 25," but we succeeded 111 repuh:llll K all their efforts and were left winners by one point.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

, The team on the whole played well and deserved to win. Forsyth and th e backs "ere good, but the latter fatled to make much ground owing to the extra man outside th~ scrum. ~ordon ofte n found himself ., surround ed" and j. unable to pass; he might have trIed short pun~s more than he did. H ousden was very closely marked a~d was rather slow at gettlllg the ball away ; several times, however, it stuck in the back-~ow . The for~vards played a hard game but were still slow, especially in bre~kl1lg and ~ollowlllg up, They play too gentle a game; there is not that" go " whIch would. lm provc t.hem so much. The kicking throughout the team was good and the tacklIng was bettcr; Snatf saved well in the second half.

The School.-A. B. Forsyth (back) ; A. M. Gelsthorpe, C. V. Snatt, R. E . Gordon, H. de H . Smith (three-quarters) ; R. L. Gottwaltz, E. F . Housde n (halves); R. C. Cumberbatch, R. J uckes, L. L. Foster, P. B. Cottrell, G. H. Claypole, G. H. Townend, A. J. Lush, C. H. Trehane (forwards).

KING'S

SC HOOL v. EASTBOURNE

COLLEGE.

This match was played at Eastbourne and resulted in a win for the School by 21 points!> goals, 4 tries)to 13 (2 goals. 1 try). Cumberbatch was unable to play, h~s place 1Il the scrum belllg taken by \Vayte. and Gottwaltz captained the team in IllS absence. The latter won the toss and elected to play with the wind. The ground was in. beautiful cO~ldition and th e weather perfect for football. From the throw out, followmg on the kIck-off, t~e School took the ball into the opposing" 25 ." There the game stayed for some tune. The School pressed continually though the forwards were not up to the .mark. Resol~te tackling by the Eastbourne backs prevented any Score on. our part tIll at last, SmIth, receiving the ball straight in front of their post!:l at ab~)Ut 30 yards! dropped a beautiful goal. Eastbollrne immediately attacked from ~he kIck- off; theIr forwards backed up well and rushing along tht:: touch-line scored In the corner (4-3 ). Befo~e half-time we gained two uncunverted tries on the wing through Gelsthorpe and Snuth ( 10-3 ). The forwards were not getting the ball well 111 the first -half, but later they woke up and heeled better, with the result that the t?ree-quarters got well on the move and out-pacing their opponents scored three tImes. Only one try was con verted. Soon after the re-start one of the Eastbourne insides dropped a very pre.tty goal fron: the "25" line, but after this the School got the upper hand and ten mmutes from tim e the score was 21-7 in our favo ur. Our opponents, howeve~, were not disheartened, and taking advantage of some ragged play on our part gamed two un converted tries befo re H no-side." E astb.ourne played a very fast and dashing game, their forward s were good at short passmg, and though over weighted in the" serum," heeled well in the first half. They were let down by their three¡quarters whose attacking powers were very little in 4


THE

CANTUARIAN.

evidence. On the who le, the match was about the hardest and fastest the School have played this term. The first half took place almost entirely in their half of the ground, but afterwards the play was more even, the School tries being gained by

superior passing and pace in the three-quarters.

The forwards hardly did themselves

justice. they seemed greatly put out by the 2, 3. 2, formation of our opponents. The outside men in the front row showed a tendency to sw in g round, and. as a result, the ball could llot be put in straight and often found its way into the Eastbourne pack without any effective" booking " on our part. Our dribbling was improved but style clumsy. Of the threes Gordon was unfortunate in not scoring, but he made several good openings from which Smith got over. In the second half Gelsthorpe scored a brilliant tryon the left wing. Tackling was better throughout the team j place· kicking down to the usual standard. vVe should like to thank our opponents very warmly for the hospitality with which they received us.

The S c/lOol.-A. B. Forsyth (back) ; A. M. Gelsthorpe, C. V. Snatt, R. E. Gordon, H. de H. Smith (three-quarters); R. L. Gott",altz, E. P. Housden (halves) ; R. J ucke., L. L. Foster, P. B. Cottrell, G. H. Townend, G. H. Claypole, A. J. Lush, C. H. Trehane, S. W. Wayte (forwards).

KING'S

SCHOOL

v.

G. B.

COCKRE M'S

XV.

This match was played at Canterbury, on Tuesday, Novembe r zznd , and l'esultud in a win for the visitors by 32 points to 16. At first the Guy' s team pressed, bu~ after some mid·field play the School forwards heeled, and Gordon, rece ivin g from Gottwaltz, cut through, and though he was upset by the full·bac k, Trehane picked lip and scored near the post, The School were shortly afterwards nea rly in again, buL Guy's, chiefly by swift forward rushes, took th e ball back, and la rge ly o wing 1.0 bad marking and the usual hesitation in the defence, scored in the right corner. Forsyt.h , who had been playing excellently, was hurt at this point, and had to go oil' permanently with a badly· cut eye. Largely as a result of this handiL:a p Guy's sc rutl twice (13-5), before Smith received th e ball from his centre and makin g a Sl.rO Ii K dash for the li ne in whi ch he made excellent llse of his hand·off, scored in th 1111'1 corner. From a weak trick by Gordon, Stringer secured, and , thou gh tackled hy Cumberbatch, the co rner flag being knocked down, was awarded a try. At half-Lillltl

Guy's led [6- 8. On the resumption, the visitors quickly scored on the ri ght ( 19-8), but lilt l Schoo l then made a great effort. First, Gordon deceived th e wh ole Guy's den '(, hy his feint and swerve and scored near the posts' ( 19-13 ), and th e n Gclsth rpo !lllt,t twice being tackled on the line, and once held up, scored an exce ll ent tl y nlt tll perfect passing ( 19- 16). The School for a time continued th e pr ~ssu r , bUlllI'


THE

CANTUARIAN.

pas5ing conti nually broke down, a very uncommon failing on the part of the Schoo l

?utsides. But after Covell had dribbled the whole length of th e fi eld for a try tZ4-16 ), the School defence rather went to pieces, and Guy's scored twi ce more

before the end through Stringer and J. P. Jones, and the end came with the vi sitors

victorious by 3' points to [6. Th~

School should have made a better fight.

The fo rwards, if they suffered by

co mpanson tn footwork, were superior at getti ng the ball. The outsides seemed to suffer from n ~ rv es . T hree of the tries were scored after perfect movements, but the Schoo~ handling on th e whole was worse than it was in any other match, Snatt being a speclal ?ffe nder. The School tackl in g was at times good, but the usual faults of bad marklllg and hesitation in falling were much in evidence. Smith was almost useless owing to a damaged side, but Gclsthorpe an d Gordon were good. The loss of Forsyth, alth ough Tomkins came out late to take his place, made a great difference to the defence. For .Guy's, Stranach and Roberts among the forwards, and Stringer and Jones were promment, in a fast and clever side. Guy's were playing five of their

first XV.

Mr. Coekrem's XV. - W. P. Vickery (back) ; L. B. Stringer, G. C. Covell, H. Millett. J . .E. Davies (three-quarters ); W. E. Fox, J. P. J ones (halves ) ; C. S. L. Roberts, W. S. Stranach, V. Glendinning, H. W. A. Davies, H. Gibb, R. Stout, J. L. Stewart, It,. B. Cockrem (forwards). The ScllOol.-A. B. Forsyth (back); H. de H . Smith, C. V. Snatt, R. E. Gordon, A. M. Gelsto rpe (three-quarters ); E. F. Housden, R. L. Gottwaltz (halves) ; R. C. Cumberbatch, R. Juckes, L. L. Foster, G. H . Claypole, G. A. T ownend, A. J. Lush, C. H . Trehane, S. W. Wayte (forwards).

KING'S

SCHOOL v. DOVER

Played at Dover on Satu rday, November ,6th. full

t~ am ,

COLLEGE. T he School were play ing their

with the exception of Cottrell and of Forsyth, who had recovered only

suffiCIently to be a spectator. His place at full- back was creditably taken by Watkins. Townend kicked off for the School, but Dover soo n had the ball back to our end wh ere play settled down for a few minutes. Dover kept the pace ve ry fast in our ba~ks had a !ot of¡ defensive work to do. They got toge ther much qUlcker than we dId and theIr forwa rds worked splendidly j but the on ly real Source of danger was on their left wing, Dixon bein g at first rather too much for Gel sthorpe. However, in less tha.n ten minutes the last-named managed to get past and scored far out after a fine run. Juckes failed with the kick. A few minutes later Gelsthorpe

.. :j," and our


THE

680

CANTUARIAN.

was alm ost in again, breakin g the corner flag in the attempt. Our forwar~s WC:C now heeling with great precision and th e play for the rest o f th e half was entire ly 111 our hands. Smith scored on the wing. and was followed three times by Go rdon, who swerved and feinted in beautiful style. All his trie s were converted by Snatt and 路the score at half路time was 21-0 in our favour. Play in the second half opened with a fi ne piece of work by o ur forwards , who took the ball from. half-way, leading to a try by Foster. The next thirty minutes were a repetition of the first half; we co ntinued to press and although Dover tack led hard they could not prevent four more tries, three of which were again scored by Gordon and one by Ge!sthorpe. Towards the en d of the game it became very dark, and, owing to an un fortunate stoppage of th e refe ree's watch, play was prolonged. for ten minutes past " ti me." During this period D over scored their si ngle try , whi ch, however, was thoroughly deserved . The final score 42 points (6 goals, 4 tries) to 5 points (I goal) was a record on their ground.

The School forwards played well througho ut and did good work in the open as well as in the serum. The backs were not called upon to do much defensive work but no serio us mistakes were made in that line. They fo und the ball difficu lt to hold at first, but soon settled down to their usual game, both combin ation and indiv idua l efforts were good . In attack , Gelsthorpe was rather hampe red by the attentions ,?f Dixon i but far away the best exhibition was that of Gordon, who repeated ly lert hi s opponents standing and \vent right through unaided . He played a most brill iant game. Dover Colleg,.-R. L. Duchesne (back) ; G. Dixon, G. C. H. Barnard, A. D. P.

Campbell, C. A. C. Wood (three-quarters); J. F. Follit, R. H. R. Parminter (halves R. H. Owen, H. L. Valenti, B. M. Heubach, H. Stewart, E. C. Mercer, G. W. Young, C. R. Diver, J. K. W. Wignall (forwards).

Tile Sc1lOol.-G. D . Watkins (back); H. de H. Smith, R. E . Gordo n, C. V. Snatt, A. M. Gelsthorpe (three-quarters) ; R. L. Gottwaltz, E. F. Housden (halves) ; R. . Cumberbatch, R. Juckes, L. L. Foster, G. H. Claypole, G. A. Townend, A. J. Lush, C. H. Trehane, S. W. Wayte (forwards). KING'S

SCHOOL v. WYE

COLLEGE.

This match was played on Cullen's on Tuesday, November 29th. H Oll Sci o ll co mmenced the scoring by depositin g a pass from Smith between the posts. J U~路 ki路1t improved . From this point the School contin ued to score steadi ly till half..til llil when the score was 30-flit. The three~quarters were with out Gordon, but T OlllkhlM

did as well as could be expocted and the outsides were satisfactorily fed.

Th ' W)'t'


THE

CANTUARIAN.

68 1

forwards appeared to be somewhat out of tra in ing an d the School pack had the ball when they lik ed. 'We continu ed to score in the second half, thou g h not so rapid ly as before. One of the \ ¡Vye three~quarters got th e ball from a line out in th ei r <1 25 ," and, using his pace, ran down the field scoring a try under the posts, to whi ch they added the major points. The School continued to Score quietly at stated interva ls, though by this time they were evid ently gettin g rather blas~ owing to lack of opposition, and the wh isle blew wi th the score at 52 points to 5, after a game whi ch did not prove very interesting from the spectator's point of view. All the outsides helped to com pile the total and Watkins, who was playing back in place of Forsyth , did what little he had to do quite satisfactorily.

The Scllool.-G. D. Watki ns (back) ; H . de H. Smith, G. L. Tomkins, C. V. Snalt, A. M. Gelsthorpe, (three-quarters) ; R. L. Gottwaltz, E. F. Housden (halves); R. C. C;umberbatch, R. Juckes, L. L. Foster, G. H. Claypole, G. A. Townend, C. H. Trehane, A. J. Lush, S. W. Wayte (forlYards).

SCHOOL NEWS. We congratulate the following on what successes membe rs of the VlLh have receiving their J st XV. Colours after the . gained, in the shape of scholarships and Dover matc h: - G. H . Claypole, G. A. ex hi bitions at the 'Varsities, und er his Townend, C. H . Trehane, A. J. Lush. able coaching. We wish him all luck in Also, G. F. Jucker., G. D . Watkins, N. E. hi s new post.

Ashenden, G. W. A. T odd, G. E . J. Gent, P. D. Baker, T . H. French, 2nd XV. i.~

'i(.

On Nov. 11th, Rev. Theodo re Wood

We regret to an noun ce that Mr. Porter is leaving us at th e end of th e term to

gave his annual lecture, which took the form of a very interesting and witty talk abo ut th e habits and general characte r

become VIth Form Master at Charter-

of spiders.

"

house, his old School, in succession to

Mr. T. E. Page.

We congratulate Mr.

Porter o n his promotion, but are very sorry to lose in him a master who has taken a g reat interest in the School cricket, and has done a g reat work in th e

Library this terlll.

It is needless to say

# oJt.

"

On Nov. (Qth, Major Pell, of the Staff College, Camberlcy, gave a most interesting and instructive lec ture all thi ngs military. H e made a special point of the duties of an advance g uard.


THE

682

CANTUARIAN.

We congratulate Mr. Wright on taking his B.A. at Oxford in November. ~~.

The Sermon on Sunday, Nov. 27th, was preached by Rev. E. L. A. Hertslet (O.K.S. 189,- , 897), and Chaplain to the Archbishop. 1,\

Entrance Scholarships were gained by th e foli owing : - A. Lindsey. £40, G. H. Clayton (King's School) £>5, O. W. M. Burton, £20, B. W. Galpin, (Junior King's School), £20, J. E. H . Coombs ( Rev. W. A. Renwick, St. Michael's, Tenbury). -Jf. %

'Ii-

* elected to were

The following King's Scholarships in December :-F. C. Gentry, K. C. Lillingston, A. Sargent. Proba~ tiouers :-(). 'vV. M. Burton, (Mr. Athawes, Broadstairs), A. Lindsey (Mr. Reynolds, South bourne), H .E. B. de Gruchy (King' s School), E~ C. Witt.

DEBATING The trial of H . Spence on Tuesday, November 15th, aroused considerable intt!rest and the court was crammed. The public were admitted at 6.20, and, some ten minutes after, the members of the jury were ushered into court. There was a perceptible hush as the priso ner entered followed by a titter of laughter at the cornparative sizes of the warders who esco rt ed him, one being the smallest member of the force, and the other standing six fcet thre e in his socks. All eyes were turned on th e prisoner who took his seat in th e dock and appearerl outwardly very calm, dressed in a suit of black, and wearing the gold-rimmed pince~nez which he usually affects.

*

Many congratulatio ns to W. T. B. H eslop on receiving a Commission of Second Lieutenant in the 3rd H ome Counties (Cinque Ports) Brigade, R.F.A. (T.F.)

SOCIETY. The way now being clear proceedings commenced. Mr. G. H . Claypole, jeweller, of Mercery Lane, was called as firSL witness by Mr. S. J. Maiden, senior counsel for the prosecution, who con .. tented himself with a few questions. Th jeweller was then subjected to a searchin g cross~ examination by Mr. Ryan, K. " M.P., who was leading for the defon 0: the witness created merriment by adn'litLing that his customers from the Kin g'" School invariably paid cash down. onsiderable amusement was caused in til court when P.C. Seabrooke was ollod , He appeared to be one of the typi ti l members of the force and wns mU '1I confused both by the questions of Ilr


THE

CANTUARIAN.

junior counsel for the defence, Mr. Northcote, and also by those of the Judge who enquired if he knew whether he was standing on his head or his heels at the time when the prisontr entered Mr. Claypole's shop. The Judge also expressed surprise that though P. C. Sea brooke had been in the force fifteen years he had no degree of merit. Sergeant Kid so n was then called and briefly examined by Mr. C. K. 1\I10wll, junior counsel for the prosecution. The prisoner, H . Spence, was th en called to the witness box and examined by Mr. Ryan. He explained the presence of the ring in his pocket by saying that a ri~g had been sent to him by his father for lllspection as it was a family present which was being despatched as a wedding present to his sister in Australia. H e had gone to Mr. Claypole's shop on Saturday afternoon. after Cathedral, and had looked at some match boxes there but had not bought any as they were more expensive than he cared .

he had had no reason to doubt his honour or his upright character. Dr. Spence (G. C. de Mattos) father of the prisoner, gave evidence on his son's behalf. H e had a large family, consisting of six sons and three daughters. He occasioned surprise by announcing that he allowed the latter £ '70 dress allo w ~ ance, while £100 was all he could afford for a wedding present. Hi s evidence was somewhat co ntradictory but amused the public. G. W. A. Todd, jewelier, Bond Street, gave evidence on technical grounds with regard to the ring. Mr. Ryan then made the closing speech for the defence.

The jury might say that the whole case was one of remarkable coincidence, but fact was stronger than fiction. He pointed out that no one commits a crime without a motive and asked what motive the prisoner could have had in this case. No r does anyo ne ru sh into a crime with~ out a thought of its consequences. Had The prisoner answered the questions the prisoner considered the consequences put to him without the sli O'htest trace of in this case? Emphatically no. Also agitation in cool and collected tOiles, and the prisoner's character was greatly in his thr.ol1ghollt the whole proceedings his favour. The Headmaster of the King's attItude was one brazen and calious School had spoken very favourably of his indifference to th e heinous charge brought past life. If anyone was capable of pronouncing a fair unprejudiced opinion against him. of the prisoner's character, it was surely The Rev. J. B. Sidebotham, head- the Headmaster who had known him master of the King's School was called and ~ntimat e ly in the last rour years. The gave evidence to the prisoner's characte r. Jury had a grave responsibility in making He (the prisoner) had bee n at the School their j~dgment . He~e was a boy of good for four years and throughout that time · ed ucatIOn, who was young, of a ripe with the exception ofa few minor offences impressionable age, whose character was


THE

CANTUARIAN.

not yet formed . If they brought in an adverse verdict th e prisoner would be shunned as an outcast fro m society and was likely to beco me a jail-bird and a thief. Mr. S. J. Maiden for th e prosecution pointed out that every thief had to begin his career of crime at some time and that this might be the first of prisoner. Eloquence must be put aside : facts mu st be dealt with. The character of the prisoner could not affec t the case. Only two witnesses had proved purchase of ring by prisoner's father. Their evidence was given vaguely. Could it be believed? He conclud ed with a final appeal to dispel anything except facts from their minds. The Judge in summing up applauded the intelligent attitude show n by all concerned throughout, and brie fly proceeded to go through the facts of the case. H e pointed out that the evidence was very contradictory and told the jury that th eir duty was to find the prisoner Guilty or Not Guilty. They must be deterred from an adverse judgment by any feelings about the shock to the prisoner's sys tem, or the disgrace to the School, but DRAMATIS

equally the prosecution must have proved gu ilt beyond any reasonable doubt before they co uld declare the prisoner guilty. He then said that they the jury might retire if they wished. The jury retired j a hum of excited conversation filled the densely crowded court roo m. During the preceding hours the te nsion had been extreme and thi s buzz of eager tal k was the reaction. \OVhen about te n minutes had passed the jury return ed and there was an emphatic call for silence by L. L. Foster, the Clerk of the court. The jury found the prisoner guilty and cast grave doubts on the veracit), of Dr. Spence's evidence. The Judge enquired whether th Probation Officer was present and, on a reply being given in the negativ informed th e Court that sente nce must be deferred. Proceedings closed at 9 p.m . with three chee rs for the Judge. We enclose a cast of th e parts :PERSONAE.

Mown,

His Worship lhe J lldgc

A. K.

Senior Counsel for the Prosecution

SIDNEV MAID1~N ,

Junio r

.,

..

II

...

Senior Counsel for the Defence '-' Junior Clerk of the Arraigns ..

" ...

E SQ.,

CHRISTOPHER

K.

C. N.

K.C .,

RVAN,

O.I<.S.

ESQ., K.C. M OWLI. , fo,'l.

ESQ.

P.

DOUCLAS NORTHCOTK, E SQ. SIR LESLIE FOS'I'KR.

Also Grand Jury, Common or Garden ditto, Plaintiff, Defendant, Sundry Witnesses, Audlcnc

I

~


THE

CANTUARIAN .

O.K.S .

J. H . D. Watson has been playing for the Edi nburgh Academicals against Oxford and in other matches.

We heartily congratulate E. K. Barber on rowing in winning trial eight at Ox ford.

68 5

NEWS.

Any who intend to be present and any who are prepared to put up one or more O.K.S., or who wis h to receive hospitality are requested to write as soon as possible to R. H. Brinsley-Richards, Esq., I I , Q uarry Street, Guildford.

<. "

No tickets are issued, but the sum of each will be collected from those present at the Dinner.

H. Gardner played for the Army in the first international trial, against the Varsities, but was unfortunately hurt after half-time.

" pleased

"

",," For Magdalen College. Cambridge, against Clare College, C. G. Williamson wo n the High Jump at 5 ft. 3 in., and the 1 00 yards; and was placed in three other eve nts. .x,. -If.

"

The O.K.S. Dinner will be held a t the Mon ico Restaurant, Piccadilly Circus, 011 Wednesday. J anuary 18th, 1911, at 7. 15 p.m. Dr. Galpin has kin dly consented to take the Chair.

7/-

.

"

We are very to see the Rev. W. H. Maundrell at Canterbury again. He has been appointed to H.M.S. Triumph on the Mediterranean station and leaves England on J anuary 9th. " <.

"

We should like to take this opportunityof thanki ng Mr. A. K. Mowll for his kindness in ,. inventing" a case and actin g as ] udge in the Mock Trial. 'If.*'k-

Congratulations to R. W. H. Glennie on his recent marriage.


686

TH E

CANTUAR IAN.

HARVEY SOCIETY .

, We are glad to record a very successful term with reference to the proceedings of this Society. The membe rship shews no sign of any decrease in num bers. Attendance at lectures has bee n well maintained t hroughout, averagin g forty to fifty at each lecture. The term opened with a lecture by the President on " the Condition of th e In te rior of the Ea rth" of which a report was incl ud ed in a previous iss ue. This was foll owed by a lecture on " Ants " by H . Spence. Arte r a brief apology for omi tting to d well upon t he mo re intricate details connected with such wide subj ects as the in teUi ge nce and social organisation of Ants, the lecturer went on to descri be briefly the fo ur periods of an ant's existence. A great part of h is lecture was taken up with a concise desc ri ption of va riou s species of ants, and he concluded his remarks with so me disti nctly striking examples of th e power of the ant to bite. C. W. Kid son commenced his lecture on Fern s with an apology fo r bei ng compelled, owing to the brie f time at his di sposal, to limit his remarks to British varieties. His lecture touched on many

of th e species most co mmonly fOlill d. H e was some what severe ly handictl \>Pml by his inabil ity to ob tain sui tab le S id(¡fi for his subject. Mr. Porter gave an. extremely inl r(,Mt in g lecture of his experie nces in No rwny. H e comm enced wi th an. outl ine f Lll tl physical features of th e cOllnt. ry. Lh, next took his audi ence on a tour rOllnd th e Fjords a nd rive rs of the co unt ry nnll co ncl uded wit h a deli ghtful e:< p d iti o l\ to the moun tains a nd t he l'vfidnig ht SUH, T he lecture was rende red doubly d ¡Iis- li tru' by the slides, whi ch, we ventur to thi nk, were am ong some of the very bus t l)vut shown by H arvey lecture rs. We shoul d like to ta ke this opportun ity of CKprt'8Ri nH our since re reg rets at his appl'on hln H departure. We lose in h im n IllON I in te n:.: sting and lIsefu l memb r r lIll' H arvey Socie ty. The series was co mp leted by tl IIW li t in stru ctive lecture by th e Re v. L. rl . ":VI1 I1 . on I f Ancient Physical T h rica." I II. subjec t embraced a wi de p ri od oXWlldiliM from th e ti me of T hales, 640 Jj . ' . , cl UWII to the day s of mod ern resenr h. "'h, lecturer dealt with the belio r Ihal molflill'


T HE

CANTUARIAN .

was the fu ndamental element and the doctrines which emanated from it, and in conclusion touched 011 recent Atomi c Theories. His lecture drew a large audience. the atte ndan ce numberin g well over fifty members. T he list of lectures shows how va ried

were the subjects deal t wi lh . We shoul d like to express our regret that G. H. Clay pole and E. A. F. Morris were unabl e to read their pape rs. th e former owing to pressure of work , the latter to ill- health. Both will take place at early dates next term.

ENTERTAINMENT.

Saturday, Dee. Srd, at S.ia p.m.

SOLO - P IANOFORTE . .. ...... . . .. . MRS. F IEJ.DI NG.

P ROG RAMM E .

RECIT AT ION ..... . . .. ... . . . ........... 1\1 R. EVERITT.

G LE E ..... . ... . . . " W h o

is

Syl via?" . ..... Maifarrm.

Lv. S T. , (o r P I ANOFORTE - O r . 43, No. 2 . ... Grie..r:. A L FORD. SO NG .. . .... . .. .. "To m o f D e vo n. " • .. . ..... Russell.

C. W.

KIDSON.

SOl,O-PIANOFORT E . . ... .. . ... ..... . .. . R. F . i\L \ SON . SO LO - 'CET.LO .... . . . ...... . . ..... MR . H . F I ELD I NG.

F OLK·SO NG.

.. ... ... Fnm cn.

CHORUS

SOLO-'CELLO ..

. ... •. i\"IR.

H. F n; I.DING.

S OLO- ·PI ANO I'ORT E .. . . . .... .... MRS. F I KJ.D1 NG. N URSE RV RHY ME.

CHORUS .• .. • . . ...... ElIglis/l .

RECITATION ..... . ... . . . . .. ... . . .. ..... . .. II. S I'gNCI{. T tu o ( w ilh a po logie s ) ..... . C . K. 1\10WLI., H . S I' I~NC F., W. PALL I S I~ R.


688

THE

CANTUARIAN.

"A LA BONNE HEURE: A MATUTINAL MEANDERING."

A is that an imal Potts in the morning. B is his bell which wakes us up yawning; C's the cold bath which freezes our to~s, D is the door through which th e wind blows. E is the energy which we possess, F is the frenzy with which we all dress; G is the gentleman shouting / f I'm going ! " H is the heat of th e tone we say" No" in. I, who am writing, am always in time, J we ignore because it won't rhym e. K are the kid dies who tremb le with fear, L is the levity rife at the rear. M are the monitors coming in late, N is the noise that they make wh ile they wait. O 's the Old Hall, the fi nest of spots, P is the porridge brought rouud by the Polls. Q are th e quarts of quinine we imbibe, R 's the re sult, which is hard to describe. S are the sixth, who are noted as such, T are the lunes (?) wh.ich eme rge from the hutch. U 's the unanimous rush up the stairs, V are the vacancies-Army Class-Prayers. W whimsical creatures who work, X those extraordi nary fellows who shirk . Y are their yawns which come thick and fa st, Z, just a letter ; t hank heavens:the last.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

O. T. C. We are called upon to write the history of the O.T.C. this term. Though not an uninteresting record , it contains few sensations, few purple patches. Filled by the climax provided by Tid worth, we have been co ntent during th e last three months to "tak' the low road" of consolidatio n and gradual advance. Perhaps the most striking success of the term has been gained by the band. B6t we should review the work first. On Nov. 8th, we e mbarked pro palria to Dover to cut off a Teutonic, we mean a Red, co nvoy which was making for F ol kes ton e. To the pu blic schools of East Kent, under the command of Capt. Fisher, of Dover, was allotted this heroic task. Forming the advance guard, we pushed for ward ti ll in close touch with the e nemy. Owing to a delay in com mun ications, for so me tim e we were not supported by the main body. The whole blue force, of which we formed a part, was about 650 strong, and stretched over a very wide front. We were ourselves on. th e central of three ridges running parallel to the sea coast betwee n Folkestone and Dover, and from our position we could hear (and see) battles in progress on our left and right. . The convoy, retreating along the valley road. in the shape of tlVO red flags, disappeared myste riously during the luncheon" standfast ." The attack on the central position was repelled for so me time. But a strong force, including most of our contin gent, taking advantage of a high hedge and a

wood, suddenly opened a heavy and en filading fire, unde r whi ch th e enemy was ordere-d to retreat. {; Cease fire" was so und ed shortly after, and the first part of the operations was at end. In the seco nd, unde r an entirely diffe re nt idea, we were in retreat and a t the same time kept up a rearguard action with the enemy. The movement was not well carried out. After the return to Canterburv, th e O. T. C. attended tea at Garwood's and the C.O. gave hi, impressions of th e day's work. The prizes offered fo r shooti ng were won by D . O. Fardell , I ; E. F. Housden, 2 ; J. H. Threlfall , 3 (Grade i.) ; C. N. Ryan (Grade ii. ) ; (Grade iii. ) The under lb signalling competition was Wall by R. J. Mowll, out of a very small entry. Mo re people should learn both this and morse; the competition for th e latte r will take place next term. They are subjects wh ich do not require imme nse practice, but are invaluable in field-work. The ba nd has improved immensely this te rm. It has already been out once or twice on parad e, and will we hope becqme a regula r department of t he Corps nex t term. Its numbers at present are 26 :-big drum (W. F . C. Palli,er), 5 side drums, 1 2 fifes and 8 bugle!;. 'We hope to see them in the honours list at camp next year.


69 0

HIE

CANTUARIAN.

CAMBR I DG E

Dear School, \<Ve have very little LO tell you of our doings, but flattered at the Edito r' s req uest fo r more, we try to spin that little out.

At a well at tended meeting held lately, Cambridge O.K.S. colours were proposed, al~d this proposal was unanimously adopted. Do not read into this a piece of exclusiveness j we shall be quite pleased to sec them taken up by O.K.S. generally. Vve remem be r man y un successful attempts to solve this problem at forme r O.K.S. meetings, and so feel a fl ush of joy at having achieved the impossible. Crock eights have come and gone no w j and , by the way, the training prod uced stran ge SIghts. such as Cowie run ni ng rou nel Parker's Piece at 6 a.m . and Townshend Ollt of bed befo re n oo l1 ; perhaps this has some connection with the pew ter pOLS they now so proudly

L ETT E R.

boast. T he rest of us have to be content with moral vi ctories. Williamson did some good things in the Magda le n Sports. taking oft', among othe r things, the hundred and high jump. Of Bellars we only know that he is an authority on sales of work and the Veto. Mo wll, our new Secretary, is not often see n; we believe he is overworking. Nightingale is in great demand ~ r quartets. \Ve had a nightmare vision of Moline one elec ti on ni ght, intoxicated with success, prodaiming the rights r the peo ple. Har ker is in comnHllli ca tion with Mr. Lloyd George about mcth cis of raising revenu e with out laxing th brain. \~'e we re very pleased to sc I< .. up for schols and call only wish more wo uld co me to swell our numlH' TS. '1'11(\ res ults are not yet out. \tV wi ff h Ih (1I11 all possible success. Yours si ncere ly, O.K .S. AMIJH I [H :h,


THE

CANT UARIAN.

CO RRE SPONDEN CEo N. 8 .-1 he Editors decline to accept auy respousitJility cOlmeeted 'llJitlt tIle ~/JiltiOIlS oj ~hei~ Correspon dents. N ame and address IIIUSt ahuay,; be J:ivtll, IIOt 'lt eessarti)' jor puobealloll , /ml (U a "if """d /<"Ult Personalities w ill invol1Je eertal1l njedioll. Letters should '" ,1t1l(Ualt lee ,,~vv ,. . . o

1V";tten

OIl

one side of tIlt paper only.

To 'lie Sellool. SCHOOL, You are a most uninterestin g lot of peopleo Don't you eve t write ~ny letters at all ? Haven't you any gn e.v-

DEAR

ances whatever ? If you haven't, for our sake, invent some. We remain, Your despairing servants, EDITORS CANTUARIAN.

NOTICES. vVe beO' to ack nowledge with th'a nks the receipt of the following Subscriptions :R ev. Dr. Galpin (J/b), K. V. Dodgson, Esq. (3/6), F. M. Furle)" Esq. (3/ 6), F. H. Bresse)" E sq . (3 / b), R. ~ . Little. E sq. (3/6), F . S. Porter, E sq. (3/ b" R. Brinsle),-Richards, Esq. (3/b) . M. O. D epree, Esq. (J / b), H. Poole, Esq. (3/6 ), A. R. Bell.fs, Esq. (3/6). C. G. WIlliamson, E sq. (3/6), B. C. Jerram, Esq. (3/ 6),

A. H . Cro wther, Esq . (3/ 6), Miss Wil kinson (3/6). D. A. F. Kernch, Esq. ( 10/-), B. H. Latter, Esq. (3/6), R . D. M. Daniel, E sq . (J/6), Rev. Peacoc ke, (7/-), R. E. Everitt, E sq. (3/6). D. V. Baco n. Esq . (J /6), R. J. Beardsworth, E sq. (3/6), Rev. Mosse, ( 3/6). [-I. T ownshend, Esq. (71-), I-I. [.1. H. Boys, E sq. . (3/ 6 ). R. S. Haskew. Esq. (3/6), D. H. Co wie, Esq. (J;6), IV. H. S. Redpath, Esq. (3/ 6), P. Godfrey, E sq. (3/ 6 ). J. C. PAGE, lion. Sec.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

OUR CONTEMPORARIES . We beg to acknowledge the receipt of the following :Elizabetlwll, C holmeldan , Glenalmond

Alleym(w, St. Edward's Selloot Chronicle, Ouscl (3), Sllirbomi(l1t, Brigllton Collr.ge jl1"a,~azi1lt, R eplollirm , TOllhridgian , Leoditm· st'all, flavor/em , Eastbourm'tw. Burian,

Clu'O!uCie, Lmu/llg College lJ£agazinc. Cm'limSl(lIl, Olavz'au, Ley's For/nightly (2), ' C.O.s., Stralld School J)fagazz"m, Cily of Vigontiall, Lorrello!lt(w (2). Blue (2), L ondon Scllool Magazine, Ntw Hall Radleian, Lily, Bradfield College Cltrollicle,

Cltrollicle.

ERR ATUM. Owing to a regrettable slip, for wh ich the Editors apologise, the name of A. J. Partridge was wrongly included in the .c Valete" of the last issue .

Gibbs and Sons, Print ers, Palace St reet, C:\ntcrlmry.


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The Cantuarian May 1909 - December 1910  

The Cantuarian May 1909 - December 1910