Fall Into Festive

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INSIDE COVER With fall weather on its way in (or so we’re told), the year’s scorching season gives way to hoodie and festival season. By Matt Dinger

NEWS 5

COMMENTARY Robin Meyers

EAT & DRINK Autumn cocktails Azteca 10 COVER Gazedibles 6 8

ARTS & CULTURE 12 COVER Fall festivals 14

Manhattan Film Fest

16 BEST OF OKC BALLOT 19

OKG Picks

MUSIC 25

Steve Vai advance

27 COVER Oklahoma International 28

Bluegrass Festival Live music

THE HIGH CULTURE 29

Strain reviews

FUN 30 31

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VOL. XLIV NO. 19 EDITOR & PUBLISHER Matt Dinger | mdinger@okgazette.com ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Kelsey Lowe | kelsey.lowe@okgazette.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR Berlin Green | bgreen@okgazette.com ADVERTISING advertising@okgazette.com 405-528-6000 CIRCULATION MANAGER Patrick Hanscom | phanscom@okgazette.com CONTRIBUTORS D. Collin Hudson Evan Jarvicks Kendra Michal Johnson Robin Meyers Adrienne Proctor

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COMMENTARY

Student loan forgiveness and hypocrisy REACTIONS TO PRESIDENT JOE BIDEN’S STUDENT LOAN FORGIVENESS PLAN SHOW THAT NOT ALL DEBT IS CREATED EQUAL IN AMERICA. By Robin Meyers

No sooner had President Biden announced his plan to forgive a portion of student loans, especially for middle class and poor fa m i lies, t ha n Republica ns started lecturing all of us on the importance of paying back what we owe. Never mind that this was a campaign promise, or that the cost of higher education has made borrowing to access the American Dream a necessity for millions, Republicans took it to be yet another sign that the Democrats are socialists, and that loan forgiveness is, to quote Mitch McConnell, “a slap in the face to working Americans who sacrificed to pay their debt or made different career choices to avoid debt.” Then he sa id somet hing a l most too hy pocr it ic a l to believe. He called it, “a wildly unfair redistribution of wealth toward higher-earning people.” Isn’t t hat ex ac t ly what Republicans do best, including the $2 trillion tax cut under T r u mp t h at b enef ite d t he wealthiest Americans, and made it possible for those who pay almost no taxes to pay even less? The fact is that some of the richest people on the planet, along with most major corporations, pay no federal income tax at all. In other words, they don’t pay what they owe. Representative Jim Jordan, always quick to stoke the culture wars, put forth this profound question: “Why should a machinist in Ohio pay for the student loans of a jobless philosophy major in Los Angeles?” Ah yes, the poor philosophy major who seeks the truth and knows that the “unexamined life is not worth living” — he is the tired trope of the useless college degree, and will end up asking, “Do you want fries with that?” The truth, of course, which is stranger than fiction these days, is that philosophy majors fall in the middle of

the earnings hierarchy after graduation and include some of the most remarkable and transformative human beings on the planet. So, what about the complaint that millions of Americans won’t benef it f rom t his prog ra m because they already paid off their debts or never took on student loans in the first place? Well, for starters, they are to be commended. Paying what you owe is important and good for those who were able to do so. But let’s be clear: many students had all or most of their tuition paid by their parents, or they attended college on academic or athletic scholarships. So, if they had to borrow at all they borrowed less. All debt is not created equal, nor is the capacity to repay it. Most of the debt relief in Biden’s plan went to the young and to Black and brown families. None of them expected to receive this gift from their government when they signed the papers. Nor did they have any control over the increasingly unaffordable costs for tuition, room, and board. Republicans have consistently voted to reduce the share of state support going to higher education, even as they poured more and more money into sports complexes and luxury sky boxes, often in states where coaches are the highest paid of all state employees. So, when it comes to moral lessons about “paying what you owe,” let’s get real, or as Joan Rivers used to say, “Can we talk?” The rich have myriad ways to not pay what they owe, which is how they get richer. They take small salaries offset by big dividends, so they don’t have to pay taxes on their income like the rest of us. In other words, they don’t pay what they owe. When they go bankrupt, they have lawyers to negotiate debt relief not available to the rest of us so that, you guessed it, they don’t

The Rev. Dr. Robin Meyers, photo provided.

have to pay what they owe. They hide money in offshore accounts to avoid paying what they owe. When the pandemic hit, many took PPP loans they didn’t need, and then had those loans forgiven. It was common in those days to hear business owners talk about “free money.” What more, this well-intentioned effort to keep businesses afloat and their employees from starving ended up being abused and has suffered from more corruption and fraud than any program in American history. In other words, some of the wealthiest Americans lined up for this free money, and then did not have to pay back what they owed. Of 743 billion approved, 743 billion was forgiven, including interest. Oklahoma’s “fighter” against a l l t h ings Democratic a nd demonic, Markwayne Mullin, took a PPP loan of $988,700 and had it forg iven. Dozens of Republican lawmakers took millions in PPP loans and had them forgiven. So, it is just fine for the government to help business owners at taxpayer’s expense, but not college students? When many of them went to college, the cost was a fraction of what it is today precisely because the state share of higher education was much higher. And they all support free hig her education for those serving in the military, but the rest of us bear those costs as well. Given the number of self-professed Christians in Oklahoma, you would think that this unexpected debt forgiveness for stu-

dents might be seen as something we talk about all the time in church — namely grace. From time to time, all of us get more than we deserve. Or we might read the parable of the Eleventh Hour Worker, where Jesus tells the story of a rich man who paid those who worked for just one hour as much as he paid those who had worked all day. They complained that this was unfair, but as it turned out, the owner had not underpaid anyone. He had just overpaid some. He asked, “Am I not allowed to do what I choose with what belongs to me? Or are you envious because I am generous?” What if we could just be happy for these kids, and this little bit of good fortune. They will have more money in their pockets now, and that will benefit all of us. The Rev. Dr. Robin Meyers is pastor of First Congregat ional Church UCC in Norman and retired senior minister of Ma y f lower Congregational UCC in Oklahoma City. He is currently Professor of Public Speaking, and Distinguished Professor of Social Justice Emeritus in the Philosophy Department at Oklahoma City University, and the author of eight books on religion and American culture, the most recent of which is, Saving God from Religion: A Minister’s Search for Faith in a S k e p t i c a l A g e . Visit robinmeyers.com

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EAT & DRINK

A toast to the end of summer AS THE TEMPERATURES COOL AND THE SEASONS BEGIN TO CHANGE, THESE TWO COCKTAILS OFFER A FINAL TASTE OF SUMMER FOR THOSE HOLDING ON TO THE HOTTER MONTHS.

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EAT & DRINK

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FAMILY-OWNED AZTECA MEXICAN GRILL CELEBRATES FIVE YEARS OF FOOD, FAMILY AND FESTIVITY. By Evan Jarvicks

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An assortment of baskets adorn the ceiling of Azteca Mexican Grill’s dining room, all turned upside-down. It is a striking part of the family-owned Oklahoma City restaurant’s everchanging interior which boasts authentic Mexican artwork, handcrafted goods, and rotating seasonal themes in decor. Like everything about Azteca, the baskets carry a special meaning that represents the care that owners Alejandrina Camarena and Raul Perez strive to bring to every meal. “For most cultures, [baskets are] the representation of food storage or abundance,” Camarena said. “When you turn them upside-down, it means that you are pouring blessings and abundance into the room. I choose to believe that is true.” Having just celebrated its fifth anniversary in August, Azteca has become an increasingly favored option for OKC Mexican food lovers since stepping into the former San Marcos location near May Avenue and the Interstate 44 Service Road. The menu appeals to Tex-Mex traditions — chips and queso, enchiladas, rice and beans — while offering more authentic coastal cuisine staples like its caldo siete mares and seafood ceviche. Diners looking to straddle the line between different and familiar would do well to try Azteca’s mole enchilada or milanesa dishes. Both are excellent options amidst a thoughtfully chosen selection of entrées. Azteca’s menu has been fine-tuned over the past five years, with items being added, removed, or upgraded more often than the average restaurant. The costilla de cerco (pork ribs), for instance, did not start as an official menu item. It was introduced as a temporary special that experimented with sauce preparations before landing into the configuration that is sold today. The owners pay close attention to the preferences of their customers and see change as an opportunity to best accommodate them. As another example, the “Azteca Fit” menu was created especially for those with certain dietary needs while also serving as a reminder that authentic Mexican food

Alejandrina Camarena and Raul Perez, photo provided.

is not inherently unhealthy. “[Our menu] consists of gluten-free, vegan, vegetarian, and keto options,” Camarena said. More flexible eaters, however, might consider Azteca’s quesabirria, one of the kitchen’s recent additions, which has proven especially popular in the wake of America’s obsession with birria tacos. Packed with cheese and served with consomme, the quesabirria is a crisp, juicy indulgence that bursts with flavor in each bite. While restaurateurs Camarena and Perez are cognizant of food trends like birria, some of their best items have been around from the outset. One standout, Azteca’s torta ahogada, is not only a scrumptious (and very filling) sandwich with a rancherasoaked bun that would make a French dip envious. It is also a signature dish from the home country. “Torta ahogada is one of the specialties of my native Guadalajara. We have it on our menu as a tribute. The fusion of tomatoes, vinegar, cumin, oregano, and garlic is full of flavor,” Camarena said. “The drowned sandwich was invented in the 1900s and is a very popular dish among Hispanics.” Guadalajara, Mexico, is where it all started for Camarena and Perez, who are married with two children. Camarena had been living and working in Oklahoma City for a while to support her family back home before they met. While visiting Guadalajara, she and


Azteca tacos and salsa, photo provided.

Perez became acquainted, and, like a grand gesture in a romance novel, he followed her back. “I came here to make a life with her,” Perez said. The family has taken to Oklahoma City with contagious enthusiasm. In addition to happily serving diners at Azteca, the business has engaged with the community in charitable ways. It has used its platform to work with local homeless outreach program Sandwiches with Love, and it is also an Adopt-a-Highway sponsor for the stretch of Interstate near the restaurant. “We are part of a society that needs each other,” Camarena said. “We are able to cultivate relationships with honesty and respect, and we receive the same and more from Oklahoma City.” It is rare to visit Azteca without seeing Camarena on-site, who makes a point to greet guests and has a striking memory for returning parties. She often sports colorful, traditionally threaded dresses, as if to remind patrons that every day at Azteca is an occasion to dress up. Just as OKC is a home away from home for her family, she offers the same welcome to her guests. While there is plenty of festive energy at Azteca, the restaurant adds a special touch for celebratory reservations like birthday parties or graduations. Tables are pushed together and covered with a vibrant tablecloth. Much like the restaurant’s clay dishes that carry much of the cuisine from day to day, the blanket-like cloth is an offering that the average commercial enterprise would veto lest it becomes irreparably stained or damaged. As a local business whose bottom line extends beyond profits, however,

Azteca is pleased to share its cherished traditions — in this case, estamos de manteles largos — with its guests. The feeling is mutual. Not only does Azteca have a loyal customer base that grows every year, but the community that the owners have helped shape in their corner of the city has given back. When COVID19 hit in 2020, the restaurant was one of many to strike hardship, and it weathered the storm. “When the governor announced that the dining room needed to be closed due to COVID, those were scary moments because we were not a to-go restaurant, but the next day, the community started to call,” Camarena said. While the restaurant would work to establish patio dining areas to help lessen the blow of quarantine, it couldn’t have sustained the year without an influx of take-out orders. Under a makeshift car-side delivery system, customers kept the business afloat. “I w ill never forget it,” Camarena said. With five years of passionate restaurant work behind them and a steady foundation of clientele built, one might assume the owners would be ready to coast on their success, but instead, they continue to seek ways to improve Azteca. It is a perpetual quest. “I will run out of ways when I get tired of this place,” Camarena said, “and I don’t think that can be possible.”

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GAZEDIBLES

Fair fight Oklahoma Gazette was invited out to judge 15 wildly varied flavors in the 11th Annual Great TASTE of a Fair contest just before the fairgrounds opened its gates this season. From comfort foods to “what the hell is THAT?” items, there’s a cornucopia on offer from deep fried to freeze dried this year. By Matt Dinger Photos Berlin Green

The Bacon Habit

The Urb Express

The Gilty Pleasure

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instagram.com/theurbexpress

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From the food stand that brought you chocolate-covered bacon comes this year’s winner of the “slice of savory” category, the coconut shrimp bowl. The coconut-encrusted crustacean is served with chunks of mango and sweet chili sauce over rice in a coconut shell, hitting all of the notes at once. If you’re trying to stay true to the brand, The Bacon Habit also offers its popular cheesy bacon bombs, which are doughcovered pepper jack cheese chunks wrapped in bacon and deep fried.

If that wasn’t enough bacon for you, the second place finisher in the savory category also offers a honey pepper hotdog rich in flavor and saturated fat. The quarter-pound Nathan’s beef coney is served with pepper jack, honey mustard and honey pepper bacon. They also have a variety of burgers with fries and chicken sandwiches both sweet and spicy up for grabs.

No, that’s not a misspelling. A gilt is a young female pig and this food stand is serving them up hot atop a bed of rich macaroni and cheese drizzled with a tangy barbecue sauce. The Gilty Mac and Cheese is balanced with pulled pork that falls apart in your mouth, though if you’re looking for something comparable on a bun, try the Gilty Pleasure instead, or their superb cowboy nachos if you’re looking for something else entirely.

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Project Krave

The Original Minneapple Pie Gram’s Sweet Treats

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This stand took home the blue ribbon in the “sweetest of the sweet” category with the apple pie churro bites, which are exactly as they sound except they taste even better than you’re imagining. The apple pie filling is mouth-watering, but the caramel sauce pushes it over the top. Project Krave plays both sides, with its piled tots and fries as well as Philly cheesesteaks if you need to balance out your taste buds.

The OG pie stand is back in action this year serving up — you guessed it — apple pies both naked and a la mode. This year, they upped their game and brought the Minneblueberry Pie, which boasts the same great crust as the pumpkin and apple pies served with a scoop of vanilla ice cream (or cinnamon, if you prefer). It’s really no surprise that these pies took home second place in the sweetness category.

The freeze-dried Milk Duds definitely take the cake as far as the most novel dessert on offer this year at the fair, with the filling-pulling chocolate-coated caramels reduced to its core essence. Imagine a puffed cheese ball made of caramel and you get the idea. Fortunately, Gram’s Sweet Treats also has a brick-andmortar location in southwest OKC so if this delectable confection makes your sweet tooth sing, you can try out more of their fare without the fair.

S ’ D E EAT T S ’ D E T E T O V

The Pioneer Wagon The corn dog, along with roasted corn and cinnamon rolls, is a true fair staple, but you’ve never had one quite like this. Instead of your standard beef or pork fare, this one is filled with alligator meat (or rattlesnake meat, we hear) for a familiar favorite with an unfamiliar twist. This one earned them the gold in the “new to the scene” category, but make sure to check up the runners-up at Cutie Pies Concessions with their banana split pie or the chicken bacon ranch waffle stick over at Waffle Chix.

VOTE

TED’S TACOS AND CANTINA

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COVER STORY

Season’s celebrations AUTUMN IN OKLAHOMA MEANS A PLETHORA OF FESTIVALS CELEBRATING THE DIVERSITY OF THE STATE’S CULTURAL INTERSECTIONS.

Foodie Fest Oct. 8 Hot on the heels of the opening of the lower portion of Scissortail Park comes Foodie Fest, an OKC Black Eats event formerly known as the Black Foodie Summit, to be held in the upper portion of the park Oct. 8. “We had a great following, great participation with Black-owned businesses and minority chefs so I was having conversations with my peers and they were asking about opportunities for them to be involved in the Black Foodie Summit,” founder Apollo Woods said. “So the intersection became, how can we create a very culturally-forward opportunity that doesn’t alienate my core audience of Black-owned restaurants and chefs that includes other minority and ethnic groups? So Foodie Fest came about … We have three that are coming from out of state, but what’s most interesting about what we’re doing is the majority of the businesses are women-owned, the majority are minority owned,” Wood said.

Foodie Fest takes place during OU-Texas weekend and the festival will have an eightfoot by ten-foot screen so that the game can be watched while visitors enjoy the event. A total of 57 vendors will be on hand, the overwhelming majority of which will be selling food. “We have a range of food from pan-African to comfort food to soul food to barbecue American style. Latin, Vietnamese, vegetarian. We have a lot of food. We are emphasizing Oklahoma-based local businesses at Foodie Fest because the emphasis is about stimulating the local economy and driving local spending to those local businesses. The spirit of Foodie Fest is about how we bring attention to our diverse food scene in the city. We have a lot of events that happen in Oklahoma City and I felt like what we didn’t have was a platform that showcases culturally inclusive cuisines from across the diaspora. I mean, we

have a Puerto Rican food cart. I’m excited about Puerto Rican food. I’ve never had Puerto Rican food in Oklahoma City,” Woods said. Visit okcblackeats.com

Plaza Fest Oct. 1 Plaza Fest almost sounds redundant since the whole district is basically a big party on the weekends anyway (even more so the second Friday of each month with LIVE! on the Plaza), but the Oct. 1 festival is the biggest celebration of the year. More than two dozen artist vendors will be setting up shop while Plaza Walls Mural Expo coincides with the festival, with 43 artists working on live paintings throughout the day. Two stages will also provide live entertainment from noon until 10 p.m. and there will be comedy until dark and a drag show after dusk inside The Press. A kids area will also be open throughout the day. Big Biang Theory, Burger Punk, Catfish Bayou, GimmeSugar, Let’s Do Greek and Wondervan Pops are all confirmed food trucks this year. Visit plazafest.org.

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Greek Festival

Oklahoma Land Rush Metal Detecting Weekend

Sept. 30 - Oct. 2

Sept. 23-25

After two long years of waiting out the pandemic for the best gyros in the city, the Greek Festival returns to Saint George Greek Orthodox Church Sept. 30 - Oct. 2. In addition to the gyro (roasted meat on a vertical spit), there will also be souvlaki (pork kabobs), soutzoukakia (meatballs), pastichio (Greek lasagna with layers of beef and noodles with a creamy top) and saganaki (“flaming cheese,” or Greek cheese topped with cognac and set alight before being doused with freshly-squeezed lemon). While the rich dishes are the centerpieces of this festival, it started as a bake sale to benefit the church, so there will also be baklava (a flaky and nutty pastry sweetened with honey), and melomakarona (a nut-filled dough covered in a honey syrup), kourabiedes and koulouria (butter cookies). Ouzo, an anise-based liquor, as well as Greek wines, cognac and Alfa brand beer will also be enjoyed while Greek band To Kefi and three dance troupes wearing traditional Greek garb will be performing throughout the day. Partial proceeds will benefit

the Brendon McLarty Memorial Foundation, which puts emergency inhalers into schools. Visit saintgeorgeokc.org.

Don your brown fedora and bring your treasure-hunting gear (most importantly a metal detector) and join the hunt for buried coins, relics and prize tokens. There are thousands of dollars worth of coins up for grabs at this festival (formerly known as the Red River Treasure Shootout). The three-day event festival includes a parade, car show, movie night, shootouts and reenactments in McAlester Sept. 23-25. The main event takes place at 2 p.m. on Sept. 24 with a kids treasure hunt held at 10:30 a.m. The second annual Moonshine Hunt takes place the night before at 9 p.m. Nothing will be buried in that hunt, but light sources are not allowed. There will also be an unburied treasure hunt throughout the city the duration of the festival. Visit the Oklahoma Land Rush Detecting Weekend page on Facebook for more information.

Czech Festival

Honobia Bigfoot Festival

Oct. 1

Sept. 30 - Oct. 1

Originally a festival to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the city of Yukon, the Czech Festival has continued for more than half a century, becoming a tradition of its own. Always held on the first Saturday in October, that happens to be Oct. 1 this year and kicks off with a 10 a.m. parade on Yukon’s Main Street. Following the parade, the Oklahoma Czech Building becomes the center of attention, with more than 150 vendors, live polka and carnival rides in addition to traditional Czech dishes like the kolache (a fruit-topped pastry) and the klobasy — a grilled sausage — sandwich. The day concludes with the Oklahoma Czech Royalty Coronation Ball at the Czech Hall. Visit czechfestivaloklahoma.com.

If you’re a skeptic, you’ll find a host of people to fill you in with first-hand accounts of their encounters with the large primates in the wilds of their respective necks of the woods at the Honobia Bigfoot Festival & Conference. Held on the Grounds of the Kiamichi Mountains Christian Mission Sept. 30 and Oct. 1, admission to the festival is free. Speakers begin at 10 a.m. both days, concluding by about 5 p.m. Both nights will also feature storytelling at sundown and if you decide to stay the night on the beautiful grounds, $10 tent camping is available as well as three dorms provided free of charge. Visit honobiabigfoot.com

COVER STORY OKGA Z ET TE .COM | S EP T EM B ER 2 1 , 2 0 2 2

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ARTS & CULTURE

Movies without borders OKCMOA JOINS MORE THAN 400 VENUES HOSTING THE 2022 MANHATTAN SHORT FILM FESTIVAL. By Kendra Michal Johnson

AmericAn BAnjo museum Presents:

Sept 24th Bricktown 2nd Annual

Banjo Bash

Paul & Theresa Poirier

in Bricktown Between reno & Sheridan acroSS froM the aMerican

Banjo MuSeuM

Featuring:

OK Original Music,

Arts & Crafts, local vendors, and more!

Featuring:

kyle dillinghaM & horSeShoe road

edgar cruz

don VaPPie’S creole jazz trio

alan Munde

12PM to

8PM and Many More!

FREE

able for viewing at the host venues during the festival showings. “If you don’t go to the venue, you missed it,” Manhattan Short Film Festival Founder Nicholas Mason said. “You’ll never see it again. You’ll just hear about it. Because people always talk about it. For the next six months, you’ll be in the bank and they’re talking about it. They’ll be in a supermarket and hear someone talking about a certain thing they saw.” Unlike other festivals, the Manhattan Short Film Festival places its emphasis on public participation. Mason said he realized the importance of this when he witnessed the public’s response to when Little Terrorist, which had won the Manhattan Short Film Festival, was nominated for an Oscar in 2005. “I saw then that even though it

Outdoor Festival in the Heart of OKC!

americanbanjomuseum.com/ bricktownbanjobash

YOUR DAILY INTEL BRIEFING

ON-AIR, ONLINE AND ON-DEMAND

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W hat began as “a screen mounted to the side of a truck in Mulberry Street,” according to its founder, has exploded over nearly 25 years into a global event spanning six continents, with more than 400 venues participating. And from Sept. 23 through Oct. 2, the Oklahoma City Museum of Art will be a part of that number. “OKCMOA has a longstanding relationship with the Manhattan Short Film Festival that stretches back more than a decade,” the museum’s Head of Film Programming and Theatrical Operations, Lisa Broad, said. “I’m not sure when the museum first started serving as a venue for the Manhattan Short Film Festival, or exactly how the partnership came about. The earliest mention of the festival at OKCMOA that I’ve found dates to 2005-2006.”

S EP T EM B ER 2 1 , 2 0 2 2 | OKGA Z ET TE .COM ART S & CULTURE

Manhattan Film Fest Freefall, photo provided.

During the ten day event, the OKC metro community will have multiple opportunities to watch the festival’s 10 finalist short films in one of several back-to-back viewings and then cast a ballot for their favorites. “The Manhattan Short Film Festival has been described as ‘the world’s first global film festival,’” Broad said. “It creates a connection between filmmakers and audiences that transcends linguistic and national barriers. This year’s ten finalists were selected from more than 800 submissions from 70 different countries.” The short films are only avail-

was called ‘Manhattan Short Film Festival’ that the people owned it,” he said. “It was their film festival. And I went ‘Ah, this is it.’ And that was when the festival found itself. So it wasn’t necessarily going back to them saying ‘the bigger the celebrity gets to judge it, the bigger the festival.’ It was: ‘It’s the public that creates stars.’ And it’s not about celebrity, and it was about letting the public have an opinion.” From then on, that focus was front and center. “I think it’s an exciting opportunity to be a part of something that unites film lovers in so many different places,” Broad said. “The


Manhattan Film Fest Freefall, photo provided.

voting process encourages us to think deeply and critically about the artistic merits of each short film and performance, which can help to make us more engaged film viewers. It also provides material for fun post-film debates between friends who attend the festival together.” She said the process of preparing for the event at OKCMOA has been relatively challenge-free. Meanwhile, the festival’s international organizers have had to overcome several major challenges, starting with the impact of a global pandemic on the collective experience of watching and discussing films in community events. “I think on the first year we lost like 80 percent,” Mason said. “Last year it got back to about 50.” Mason created a virtual festival in February, named Manhattan Short Online, to keep the festival going. The online event lines up as just a few weeks before the Oscars each year. Meanwhile in 2022, the Manhattan Short Film Festival itself is back to its in-person global scale, but military and political conflict in Eastern Europe has disrupted previous venues and attendees’ ability to participate. “We’re gonna do it in Belarus, but I just hope the people there don’t get put in jail, who were showing it. I mean, that’s a challenge,” Mason said. He said one of the most fundamental aspects of the festival is how it unites film lovers together around common human themes and needs across the globe. “In Russia, there were 40 cities involved,” he said. “I mean, like, what American film festival could sell out 40 cities of Russia in the past?” Mason said the festival’s partner in Russia is unable to help do the festival this year. “So this year, the greatest challenge defeated us because the g reatest cha l lenge is t hat Vladimir Putin is doing what Vladimir Putin does, and the only person that’s content with that is him,” Mason said. Despite the conflict, the festival’s resurgence after many of its

venues nearly had to close encouraged him, as 180 United States venues are bouncing back from nearly closing during a pandemic to host the Manhattan Film Festival this year, he said. The event is a fan favorite at the museum, Broad said. “The Manhattan Short Film Festival is one of our most popular annual programs and it’s exciting to see the OKCMOA film community unite around this event and show their support for the festival and the Museum,” she said. This year’s selections include The Big Green; The Blanket; Don vs Lightning; Fetish; Freedom Swimmer; Freefall; Love, Dad; Save the Bees; Treatment; and Warsha; and the short films’ content includes animation, documentary storytelling, and HDR LED Wall filming techniques. “Each film selected as a finalist is automatically Oscar-qualified, which means that it can be nominated for an Academy Award in one of the three short film categories,” Broad said. “It’s always exciting to see a film featured in the Manhattan Short Film Festival return to the theater as part of our annual Oscar-Nominated Shorts program, and it gives everyone who attended the festival something to root for during the ceremony.” Showings at OKCMOA are scheduled for 5 p.m. and 8 p.m. Sept. 23; 2 p.m., 5 p.m. and 8 p.m. Sept 24; 12:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. Sept. 25, and 7 p.m. Sept. 29, according to the museum website. Additional dates and times may be added. Tickets are $10 for adults, $8 for seniors, $8 for 13-18 year-olds, and $6 for children age 12 or younger. Parents may wish to look over the short film summaries on manhattanshort.com, as some address challenging themes, including 9/11 and the fetishization of Asian women. Visit okcmoa.com.

ART S & CULTURE OKGA Z ET TE .COM | S EP T EM B ER 2 1 , 2 0 2 2 15


NOMINATION BALLOT Oklahoma City’s original and longest-running readers’ poll, Best of OKC, is back for its 38th year! We need your input in telling us the best our city offers, so nominate your favorites RIGHT HERE or at bestofoklahomacity.com until Monday, October 3, 2022. STAY TUNED FOR THE RUNOFF BALLOT PUBLISHING OCTOBER 19!

1.

BEST LOCAL CRAFT BREWERY

2.

BEST LOCAL TAP ROOM

17.

BEST MEXICAN RESTAURANT

34.

BEST DIVE BAR

18.

BEST LATIN RESTAURANT (NOT MEXICAN)

35.

BEST NATIONAL OR REGIONAL RESTAURANT *

19.

BEST ITALIAN RESTAURANT

20.

BEST WESTERN EUROPEAN RESTAURANT, NOT ITALIAN (DANISH, ENGLISH, FRENCH, GERMAN, IRISH, SCOTTISH, SPANISH, ETC.)

3.

4.

BEST COCKTAIL (AND THE RESTAURANT/BAR THAT SERVES IT) 21.

BEST MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANT

36.

BEST LOCAL COVER BAND

22.

BEST INDIAN RESTAURANT

37.

BEST LOCAL ORIGINAL BAND OR SINGER

23.

BEST EASTERN ASIAN RESTAURANT (CHINESE, JAPANESE, THAI, VIETNAMESE)

38.

24.

BEST NEW RESTAURANT (TO OPEN AFTER 8/1/21)

39.

25.

BEST FINE DINING RESTAURANT

40. BEST VISUAL ARTIST

26.

BEST NEIGHBORHOOD BAR

41.

BEST LOCAL ANNUAL EVENT OR FESTIVAL

27.

BEST NEW BAR (TO OPEN AFTER 8/1/21)

42.

BEST CHARITY EVENT

28.

BEST PATIO DINING

43.

BEST FREE ENTERTAINMENT

29.

BEST DINER

44. BEST BAR/CLUB FOR LIVE MUSIC

30.

BEST RESTAURANT

45.

BEST PLACE FOR KARAOKE

31.

BEST CHEF

46.

BEST CONCERT VENUE

BEST BREAKFAST (EX: SINGER/SONGWRITER, RAPPER, HIP-HOP GROUP)

5.

BEST BRUNCH

6.

BEST LATE-NIGHT EATS

7.

BEST BURGER

8.

BEST TACO

9.

BEST SANDWICH SHOP

10.

BEST BARBECUE

11.

BEST PIZZA PLACE

12.

BEST STEAKHOUSE

13.

BEST SUSHI

14.

BEST SEAFOOD

15.

BEST RESTAURANT WITH VEGAN OR VEGETARIAN OR GLUTENFREE MENU OPTIONS

32.

BEST PRE- OR POST- EVENT SPOT TO GRAB A DRINK

47.

BEST PUBLIC MURAL (GIVE INTERSECTION AND ARTIST)

16.

BEST DESSERT RESTAURANT, SHOP OR BAKERY

33.

BEST LGBTQ+ BAR OR CLUB

48.

BEST PLACE TO BUY LOCAL ART

BEST PERFORMING ARTS GROUP (EX: THEATER COMPANY, DANCE COMPANY, ORCHESTRAL GROUP)

BEST LOCAL RADIO PERSONALITY, TEAM OR SHOW

FOR YOUR BALLOT TO BE COUNTED: You must fill out at least 30 categories. Oklahoma Gazette must receive your ballot (one per envelope) by mail no later than Monday, October 3, 2022.

16

S EP T EM B ER 2 1 , 2 0 2 2 | OKGA Z ET TE .COM

The ballot may NOT be typewritten, photocopied or hand-delivered. There cannot be multiple hand writings on the ballot.

Make sure your selections are locally owned (unless otherwise noted) and your choices do NOT appear on the ballot more than three times. All contact information must be complete.


49.

BEST ART GALLERY

65.

BEST GARDEN SHOP

50.

BEST MUSEUM

66.

BEST PLACE TO FIND UNIQUE GIFTS

51.

BEST LOCAL DISTRICT

67.

BEST TATTOO OR BODY PIERCING SHOP

52.

BEST CASINO

68.

BEST BOOKSTORE OR COMIC SHOP

53.

BEST PLACE TO BUY LIQUOR

69.

54.

BEST VAPOR SHOP

70.

55.

BEST CREDIT UNION OR BANK*

71.

56.

57.

58.

59.

BEST PLACE TO BUY JEWELRY

BEST CLOTHING BOUTIQUE

BEST NEW RETAIL ESTABLISHMENT (TO OPEN AFTER 8/1/21)

64.

83.

BEST PROCESSER

84.

BEST DISPENSARY

85.

BEST DISPENSARY FOR FLOWER

86.

BEST DISPENSARY FOR EDIBLES

87.

BEST DISPENSARY FOR CONCENTRATES

88.

BEST NEW DISPENSARY TO OPEN AFTER 8/1/21

89.

BEST HEAD SHOP (NON-DISPENSARY)

90.

BEST HEALTH AND BEAUTY CANNABIS- INFUSED PRODUCT (AND WHO MAKES IT)

BEST HOSPITAL*

BEST SPA (NO INJECTIONS USED)

62.

63.

72.

74.

BEST PLACE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION

BEST GROWER

BEST PLASTIC SURGEON

BEST MEDICAL SPA (BOTOX, FILLER, ETC.)

61.

82.

BEST NONPROFIT

73.

60. BEST NAUGHTY BUSINESS

BEST LOCAL PARK

BEST PLACE TO VOLUNTEER

BEST THRIFT, VINTAGE OR CONSIGNMENT STORE

BEST PET-FRIENDLY PATIO

81.

75.

BEST YOGA STUDIO

76.

BEST PILATES OR BARRE STUDIO

91.

BEST EDIBLE PRODUCT LINE

77.

BEST HEALTH NUTRITION STORE

92.

BEST CONCENTRATE

78.

BEST ALTERNATIVE HEALTHCARE PRACTITIONER

93.

BEST CANNABIS VAPE CARTRIDGE

79.

BEST PLACE TO GET FIT*

80.

BEST HOTEL*

BEST LOCAL GROCER, DELI, OR SPECIALTY FOOD SHOP

BEST LOCAL FLORIST

*allows voting for national establishments that support the local economy.

CONTACT INFORMATION+ (required for your votes to be counted)

NAME:

MAIL YOUR BALLOT TO: OKLAHOMA GAZETTE’S BEST OF OKC P.O. BOX 54649 OKLAHOMA CITY, OK 73154

PHONE NUMBER: EMAIL: +We use this information for verification and keep it confidential. OKGA Z ET TE .COM | S EP T EM B ER 2 1 , 2 0 2 2 17


SEPTEMBER 30 OCTOBER 1 & 2

FRIDAY-SATURDAY 10AM-10PM SUNDAY 11AM -4PM 145TH & N. PENNSYLVANIA

IT’S ALL GREEK TO ME! BENEFITING THE OKLAHOMA CHARITY OF: Brendon McLarty Memorial Foundation

~Fun~ ~Food~ ~Entertainment~ Scan t

ets! ick

o

hase c r u p t

FOOD Authentic Greek dinners and a la carte favorites Grandma's "Yiayias" recipe prepared pastries

ENTERTAINMENT Live Greek Music by TO KEFI Greek Band Accompanied by our Greek Islanders, Opa and Agape Dancers Hourly Church Tours

SHOPPING Greek Gifts - Clothing - Art

Cookbooks - Jewelry - Religious Items

PURCHASE ONLINE Dinner Tickets Include Family-Free Admission Pastries, Imported Groceries

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK: @OKCGREEKFEST Purchase tickets online at:

GREEKFESTOKC.COM

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S EP T EM B ER 2 1 , 2 0 2 2 | OKGA Z ET TE .COM ART S & CULTURE


OKG PICKS are events recommended by Oklahoma Gazette editorial staff members For full calendar listings, go to okgazette.com.

BOOKS Bicycling with Butterflies: Author Talk with Sara Dykman author will be discussing and signing her book about her travels across the USA and Mexico as she followed the migration of monarch butterflies on a bicycle, 1-3 p.m., Oct. 1. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com. SAT, OCT 1 Chickasaw Press book signing authors Wiley Barnes, Trey Hays, Mary Ruth Barnes, Stanley Nelson, and Phillip Carrol Morgan published by Chickasaw Press will be reading and autographing their books, 11a.m. - 1p.m., Sept. 24. Best of Books, 1313 E. Danforth Road, 405-340-9202, bestofbooksok.com. SAT, SEPT 24

Pearl (2022, USA, Ti West) a prequel to the movie X, this is the origin story to how Pearl upbringing and desire to live glamorously turned her into a vicious murder, Sept. 21-29. Rodeo Cinema, 2221 Exchange Ave., 405-235-3456. WED-THU, SEPT 21-29 The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975, USA, Jim Sharman) car trouble strands young couple Brad and Janet at mad scientist Dr Frank-N-Furter’s castle in this musical sendup of sci-fi and horror films, Sept. 16 through Oct. 31. The Boom, 2218 NW 39th St., 405-601-7200, theboomokc.com. FRIMON, SEPT 16-OCT 31 See How They Run (2022, USA, Tom George) when plans for a movie come to a halt due to the murder of a pivotal member of the cast, Inspector Stoppard and Constable Stalker must solve the case of this mysterious whodunit, through Sept. 29. Rodeo Cinema, 2221 Exchange Ave., 405-235-3456. WED-THU, THROUGH SEPT 29

Dale German and Richard Mullins book signing local authors will be autographing their books, Teddy Bear by Dale German and Real Oklahoma Outlaws, Katheryn and A Requiem for Judith by Richard Mullins, 6-8 p.m., Sept. 23. Deer Clan Books, 3905 N. College Ave, 405-495-9005. FRI, SEPT 23

HAPPENINGS

Ginny Myers Sain book signing young adult author will be autographing her newest novel, Secrets So Deep the story of a 17-year-old girl returning to a theatre camp after 12 years to find out what really happened the night her mother drowned, 6 p.m., Sept. 29. Best of Books, 1313 E. Danforth Road, 405-340-9202, bestofbooksok.com. THU, SEPT 29

Cocktail Cruise see the Boathouse District, the Wheeler Ferris wheel and more on the sunset cruise with a full cash bar, Fridays and Saturdays through Sept. 30. Regatta Park Landing, 701 S. Lincoln Blvd., 405-702-7755, okrivercruises.com. FRI AND SAT, THROUGH SEPT 30

Lara Bernhardt book signing supernatural suspense and women’s fiction author will be autographing her book Red Rain, the story of a woman who overcomes grief and finds friendship, 3-4 p.m., Sept. 24. Full Circle Bookstore, 1900 Northwest Expressway, 405-842-2900, fullcirclebooks.com. SAT, SEPT 24

FILM Bodies Bodies Bodies (2022, USA, Halina Reijn) a group of young adults throw a hurricane party at a remote mansion when the night takes a turn for the worst after one of the party games turn deadly in this fresh and funny take on a whodunit, through Sept. 29. Rodeo Cinema, 2221 Exchange Ave., 405235-3456. SAT-THU, THROUGH SEPT 29

Bird Box Building help the park rangers build bird houses that will be displayed and used around the ground, all supplies will be provided, 9-10 a.m., Sept. 24. Scissortail Park, 300 SW 7th St., 405-4457080, scissortailpark.org. SAT, SEPT 24

Coffee and Cars OKC the largest monthly gathering of car enthusiasts across the state, featuring automotives of all types spanning from classics to hotrods, exotics to luxuries, sports to supers, there is something for every car lover, first Saturday of every month, 8 p.m. Chisholm Creek, 13230 Pawnee Dr., 405-728-2780, coffeeandcars.com. SAT, OCT 1 Czech Festival celebrate Czech culture with a parade, traditional food, music, dancing and craft beer, Sat., Oct. 1. Yukon Czech Hall, 205 N. Czech Hall Road, 405-324-8073, czechhall.com. SAT, OCT 1

Dungeons & Dragons & Brews join in on an afternoon of adventuring while playing the fantasy tabletop role-playing game and enjoying local craft beer, 1 p.m., Sundays. Vanessa House Beer Co., 118 NW 8th St., 405-517-0511, vanessahousebeerco. com. SUN, ONGOING Farmers Market at Scissortail Park a morning market featuring local sourced options such as, pasture-raised meats, fresh produce and cultivated mushrooms, plants, eggs, raw honey, breads and baked goods, assortments of specialty prepared food and beverage producers, as well as highquality artisan from almost 60 vendors., 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Saturdays through Oct. 29. Scissortail Park, 300 SW 7th St., 405-445-7080, scissortailpark.org. SAT, THROUGH OCT 29 Fourth Friday on Film Row an evening of live music, food, games, and local vendors to shop from, 6-10 p.m., Sept. 22. The Paramount Room, 701 W. Sheridan Ave., 405-887-3327, theparamountroom. com. THU, SEPT 22 Fright Fest featuring kid friendly activities during the day such as a trick-or-treat selfie trail, little maze and costume contest, and after dark thrilling activities for the brave like coaster riding at night, light shows, stunt shows and the haunted clown cove, Thursdays-Sundays. through Oct. 31. Frontier City, 11501 N. I-35 Service Road, 405-478-2140, frontiercity.com. THU-SUN, THROUGH OCT 31 GoldenEye N64 Tournament in celebration of the 25th anniversary of the game release, this tournament tests the participants skills to see who will come out on top, 7 p.m., Sept. 28. Up-Down OKC, 1629 NW 16th St., 405-673-7792, .UpDownArcadeBar.com/Oklahoma-City. WED, SEPT 28 Guided Garden Explorer Tour free tour of the Gardens led by the horticulture team focusing on flowering perennials, shrubs, and trees, 1 p.m. every second Friday and 10 a.m. every last Saturday of the month. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com. FRISAT, ONGOING Guthrie Haunts a haunted house covering over 30,000 square feet of indoor and outdoor space full of scares, frights and things that go bump in the night, Fridays & Saturdays through Nov. 5.

Lucky Leaf Cannabis Expo a two day event with canna industry experts, businesses, over 100 exhibitors, various speakers and more, Sept. 22-23. Oklahoma City Convention Center, 100 Mick Cornett Dr., 405-768-4037, luckyleafexpo.com. THU-FRI, SEPT 22-23 Monarch Festival features monarch-related crafts for kids, seed bomb-making, demonstrations in the pollinator garden and garden experts to help answer questions, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Sept. 24. Mollie Spencer Farm, 1001 Garth Brooks Blvd., facebook. com/molliespencerfarm. SAT, SEPT 24 Monarchs in the Park a celebration of the monarch butterfly and other pollinators in Oklahoma with games, crafts, plant sales, educational stations, story time and more, noon-4 p.m., Oct. 2. Andrews Park, 201 W. Daws St., 405-292-9731, monarchsinthepark.org. SUN, OCT 2 Oklahoma City Spirit Fair a two-day event featuring spiritual services such as energy checks and aura readings, local crafters and vendors selling crystals, stones and more along with educational panels and workshops, Sept. 24-25. Reed Conference Center, Sheraton Hotel, 5750 Will Rogers road, 405-455-1800, spiritfair. com/home. SAT-SUN, SEPT 24-25 Oklahoma State Fair enjoy carnival games and rides, live music, bull riding, stage shows and more, through Sept. 25. Oklahoma State Fair Park, 3220 Great Plains Walk, 405-948-6700, okstatefair.com. THROUGH SEPT 25 Plaza District Festival a daylong annual event showcasing performing and visual arts with live music, vendors and children’s activities,11 a.m.-10 p.m., Oct. 1. Plaza District, 1618 N. Gatewood Ave., 405-426-7812, plazadistrict.org. SAT, OCT 1 Red Dirt Treasure Shootout Metal Detecting Festival bring a metal detector to hunt for buried coins, relics and prize tokens as well as a shot a S10,000 in gold coins at this 3 day festival including a parade, car show, movie night, shootouts, reenactment and more, Sept. 23-25. Southeast Expo Center, 4500 West Highway 270, McAlester, 405-764-3859, cityofmcalester.com. FRI-SUN, SEPT 23-25 photo Shutterstock Spoke Street Night Market a family friendly event featuring over 25 pop-up vendors, food trucks, drinks and more, 7-10 p.m., Sept. 30. Wheeler Park, 1120 S. Western Ave., 405-297-2211, wheelerdistrict.com. FRI, SEPT 30

Don’t Worry Darling (2022, USA, Olivia Wilde) a 1950s housewife living in an experimental utopian community with her husband starts to worry that his company might be hiding some disturbing secrets, Sept. 23-29. Rodeo Cinema, 2221 Exchange Ave., 405-235-3456. FRI-THU, SEPT 23-29

Viva Las Sisu Casino Night enjoy a Vegas-style evening with imaginative cocktails, American classic dishes, silent auction and casino tables benefiting Sisu Youth Services, 7-10 p.m., Sept. 30. 21c Museum Hotel, 900 W. Main St., 405-982-6900, sisuyouth. org/vivalassisu. FRI, SEPT 30

Geo (2022, USA, Darren Miller) based on true events, a young skateboarder with a traumatic brain injury strives to get back on his board after his near-fatal accident, 7:30 p.m., Oct. 2. Tower Theatre, 425 NW 23rd St., 405-708-6937, towertheatreokc. com. SUN, OCT 2

Wicked Forest of Terror a haunted forest full of bloodcurdling screams, jump scares, and more, Thursdays-Sundays. through Oct. 31. Wicked Forest of Terror, 9420 W I-40 Service Road, wickedforestofterror.com. THU-SUN, THROUGH OCT 31

FOOD

The Godfather (1972, USA, Francis Ford Coppola) the classic mafia masterpiece of the Corleone mafia family, 6 p.m., Sept. 22. Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive, 405-236-3100, okcmoa.com. THU, SEPT 22

Eastside Fresh Market a weekly farmer’s market with vendors selling fresh produce, homemade desserts, plants and other unique products, Tuesdays. through Nov. 1. Oklahoma County OSU Extension Center, 2500 NE 63rd St., 405-713-1125, okiemgs. okstate.edu. TUE, THROUGH NOV 1

Manhattan Short Film Festival film lovers from all over the world watch and cast their votes for Best Film and Best Actor from the Final Ten Manhattan Short finalists, Sept. 23 - Oct. 2. Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive, 405-2363100, okcmoa.com. FRI-SUN, SEPT 23-OCT 2

McNellie’s Harvest Beer Festival celebrating its 12th year, this festival features over 60 breweries that will be sampling new, one-off and hard to find brews, 2-6 p.m., Oct. 1. ONEOK Field, 201 N Elgin Ave., Tulsa, 918-744-5998, beerfests.com/events. SAT, OCT 1

Moonage Daydream (2022, USA, Brett Morgen) a biographical documentary of David Bowie exploring his creative and musical journey throughout his life, Sept. 30-Oct. 9. Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive, 405-236-3100, okcmoa.com. FRISUN, SEPT 30-OCT 9 Movie at The Pumpkin Patch: Hotel Transylvania (2012, USA, Genndy Tartakovsky) Dracula, who operates a high-end resort away from the human world, goes into overprotective mode when a boy discovers the resort and falls for the count’s teenaged daughter, 8-10 p.m., Sept. 24. Chisholm Creek, 13230 Pawnee Drive, 405-728-2780, chisholmcreek.com. SAT, SEPT 24

Guthrie Haunts Scaregrounds, 4524 Riverside Circle, 405-243-7671, Guthriehaunts.com. FRI & SAT, THROUGH NOV 5

Norman Brewtoberfest features Norman breweries, wineries, food trucks, vendors games, live music and more, 4-10 p.m., Sept. 23. Reaves Park, 2501 S. Jenkins Ave., 405-366-5472, visitnorman. com. FRI, SEPT 23

Scissortail Park Takes Flight the grand opening celebration of the completed

32 acres of the Lower Park featuring new trails, basketball, futsal and pickleball courts, soccer fields and new Nature Playground, Sept. 23-25. Scissortail Park, 300 SW 7th St., 405445-7080, scissortailpark.org. FRI-SUN, SEPT 23-25 Photo provided/ Steve Johnson

Oklahoma Derby Day Wine Festival sample wines from 7 local wineries and receive a souvenir, stainless steel wine tumbler with ticket purchase, 3-7 p.m., Sept. 25. Remington Park, 1 Remington Place, 405-424-9000, remingtonpark.com. SUN, SEPT 25 continued on page 20

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continued from page 19 Skydance Brewing Co. 1-Year Anniversary Party celebrate with hourly beer releases, lawn game tournaments, food trucks, love music and college football games on the big screens, 1 p.m.midnight, Oct. 1. Skydance Brewing Co., 1 N.E. 7th St., Ste. A, 405-768-2154, skydancebrewing.com. SAT, OCT 1 Sunrise Yoga + Brunch at The Harvey Bakery begin with an hour-long power flow yoga class led by Alyssa Danley of 405 Yoga on the patio followed by coffee and cinnamon rolls, 8-9:30 a.m., Sat., Oct. 1, Harvey Bakery & Kitchen, 301 NW 13th St., 405-531-0813. SAT, OCT 1

YOUTH Become a Junior Park Ranger children will learn about conservation, park rules, safety and wildlife management to earn their Junior rank, 2-3 p.m., Sept. 25. Scissortail Park, 300 SW 7th St., 405445-7080, scissortailpark.org. SUN, SEPT 25 The Fungus Among Us learn about the role of mushrooms in the ecosystem and what edible ones can be found in Oklahoma, 1-2 p.m., Sept. 24. Scissortail Park, 300 SW 7th St., 405-445-7080, scissortailpark.org. SAT, SEPT 24 Myriad in Motion: Jump and Shout recommended for ages 4-8, this morning class will teach kids different exercises to a fun playlist and the power of teamwork to complete relay races and an obstacle course, 8:30 and 9 a.m., Saturdays. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com. SAT, ONGOING Nature Story Time & Sing-a-Long join park rangers as they read books and sing songs about the outdoors and wildlife, 10-11 a.m., Sept. 24. Scissortail Park, 300 SW 7th St., 405-445-7080, scissortailpark. org. SAT, SEPT 24

park.org. SAT, SEPT 24

PERFORMING ARTS African Drumming and Dance Workshop: Meditation in Action participants will learn about West African drumming and dance and the benefits that it brings for reducing stress and enhancing a sense of well-being, Sept. 30-Oct. 2. Modern Dance Arts, 1423 24th Ave. S.W., 405-329-8982, moderndancearts.com. FRI-SUN, SEPT 30-OCT 2 Garrett Barbee/Cepeda Cheeks/Tommy York Jr a live stand-up comedy performance, 7 p.m., Sept. 22. The Vanguard, 222 N. Main St., Tulsa, 918-5616885, thevanguardtulsa.com. THU, SEPT 22 Gary Gulman a live stand-up comedy performance, 8 p.m., Sept. 23. Tower Theatre, 425 NW 23rd St., 405-708-6937, towertheatreokc.com. FRI, SEPT 23 Hamlet written by William Shakespeare, this tragedy tells the story of the Prince of Denmark and his struggle with life and death after the ghost of his murdered father tells Hamlet to avenge him by killing the new King, who is also Hamlet’s uncle, Sept. 9-24. Oklahoma Shakespeare’s Black Box Theater, 2920 Paseo St., 405-235-3700, oklahomashakespeare.org. FRI-SAT, THROUGH SEPT 24 Jo Koy a live stand-up comedy performance, 8 p.m., Sept. 23. Paycom Center, 100 W. Reno Ave., 405-602-8700, paycomcenter.com. FRI, SEPT 23 Kevin James a live stand-up comedy performance, 8 p.m., Sept. 29. River Spirit Casino Resort, 8330 Riverside Parkway, Tulsa, 918-299-8518, riverspirittulsa.com. THU, SEPT 29 Leanne Morgan a live stand-up comedy performance, 7 p.m., Sept. 30. The Tulsa Theater, 105 Reconciliation Way, Tulsa, 918-582-7239, bradytheater. com. FRI, SEPT 30

Outdoor Preparedness Class kids 8 and up will learn how to pack your backpack, set up a tent and prepare for emergencies when out in the wilderness, 10-11 a.m., Sept. 25. Scissortail Park, 300 SW 7th St., 405-445-7080, scissortailpark.org. SUN, SEPT 25

Mike Speenberg a live stand-up comedy performance, 8 p.m., Sept. 21-23; 7 & 9:30 p.m., Sept. 24. Loony Bin Comedy Club, 8503 N. Rockwell Ave., 405-239-4242, loonybincomedy.com. WED-SAT, SEPT 21-24

Plant Education and Scavenger Hunt learn to identify the different species of plants, flowers, shrubs, and trees by completing a scavenger hunt, 1-2 p.m., Sept. 25. Scissortail Park, 300 SW 7th St., 405-445-7080, scissortailpark.org. SUN, SEPT 25

Rick Gutierrez a live stand-up comedy performance, 8 p.m., Sept. 28-30; 7 & 9:30 p.m., Oct. 1. Loony Bin Comedy Club, 8503 N. Rockwell Ave., 405-239-4242, loonybincomedy.com. WED-SAT, SEPT 28-OCT 1

Youth Hooked on Fishing children will be taught basic fishing skills such as casting and knot tying with actual fishing time, rods, reels and bait provided, 9-11 a.m., Sept. 24. Scissortail Park, 300 SW 7th St., 405-445-7080, scissortail-

Sketch-Hybrid Comedy Show a live stand-up comedy performance with three comedians, 7 p.m., Sept. 21. Ponyboy, 423 NW 23rd St., 405-602-5985, ponyboyokc.com. WED, SEPT 21 Sunday Gospel Brunch a comedy performance

Anthem Brewing 10th Anniversary Party celebrate with 10 brand new

beers created by the staff, live music, lawn games, food trucks and more, noon-10 p.m., Sept. 24. Anthem Brewing Company, 908 SW Fourth St., 405-604-0446, anthembrewing.com. SAT, SEPT 24 Photo provided

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Bricktown Banjo Bash an outdoor music festival focusing on Oklahoma original artists such as Edgar Cruz, Lucas Ross, Don Vappie and many more along with local craft and food vendors, noon-8 p.m., Sept. 24. American Banjo Museum, 9 E. Sheridan Ave., 405-604-2793, americanbanjomuseum.com. SAT, SEPT 24 Photo Shutterstock over brunch hosted by Kitty Bob and Norma Jean as they mix a farcical church service with skits, singalongs, and drag, noon & 1:30 p.m. The Boom, 2218 NW 39th St., 405-601-7200, theboomokc.com. SUN, ONGOING Theatre Crude Fringe Festival a 10-day festival showcasing live performances from various disciplines including comedy, magic, dance, horror, improv and more from artists across the country, Sept. 15-24. Jewel Box Theatre, 321 NW 36th St., 4055211786, jewelboxokc.com. THU-SAT, THROUGH SEPT 24

ACTIVE Dallas Stars vs Arizona Coyotes ice hockey game, 7 p.m., Sept. 27. BOK Center, 200 S. Denver Ave.,Tulsa, 918-894-4200, bok.centertulsa.com. TUE, SEPT 27 Free Yoga in the Park an all-levels class on the Devon Lawn; bring your own water and yoga mat., 6 p.m. Tuesdays and 9 a.m. Saturdays. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com. TUE & SAT, ONGOING Myriad in Motion: Yoga bring your mat and water for an all-levels yoga class with instructors from YMCA, 6 p.m. Tuesdays and 9 a.m. Saturdays. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com. TUE & SAT, ONGOING

2000 Remington Place, 405-424-3344, okczoo.com. THROUGH OCT 30 Chihuly Then and Now: The Collection at Twenty an exhibition celebrating the 20th anniversary of the Chihuly collection at OKCMOA showcasing five decades of glass and painting telling the story of his groundbreaking career featuring never before seen works in Oklahoma City, through June 18, 2024. Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive, 405-236-3100, okcmoa.com. THROUGH JUNE 18, 2024 Copper Snakes features paintings by Kees Holterman with characters exploring memories that transformed, repaired and renewed experiences in everyday life, through Oct. 15. Artspace at Untitled, 1 NE Third St., 405-815-9995, 1ne3.org. THROUGH OCT 15 Creative Market an afternoon of shopping local artists works with live music, artist demos, kid’s activities, cash bar and more, noon-5p.m., Sept. 24. Artspace at Untitled, 1 NE 3rd St., 405-815-9995, 1ne3.org. SAT, SEPT 24 Destination Oklahoma features works from five different Oklahoma artists throughout the state, depicting the distinct cultural backgrounds in various media types, such as ceramics, photographs, video, painting and more, through Oct. 17. Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center, 11 NW 11th St., 405-951-0000, oklahomacontemporary.org. THROUGH OCT 17

Sunset Kayak Experience a sunset paddling excursion with a guided tour through the Stinchcomb Wildlife Refuge, 8-9 p.m., every other Wednesday. Lake Overholser Boathouse, 3115 E. Overholser Drive, 405-552-4040, riversportokc.org/lake-overholser. EVERY OTHER WED, ONGOING

The Elevate at 21c a program that presents exhibitions for local artists in the community which currently features works by Virginia Sitzes and a collaboration between Denise Duong and Gabriel Friedman, through Jan. 31, 2023. 21c Museum Hotel, 900 W. Main St., 405-982-6900, 21cmuseumhotels. com. THROUGH JAN 31

Wheeler Crit cheer on Oklahoma’s top cyclists at this weekly race around the Wheeler District, 5:30 p.m., Tuesdays, through Nov. 4. The Big Friendly Brewery & Taproom, 1737 Spoke St., 405-492-3785, thebigfriendly.com. TUE, THROUGH NOV 4

Highlights from the Rose Family Glass Collection this private curated collection showcases a broader look at the Studio Glass movement that began in the 1950s in America and continues to present date, through Jan. 15, 2023. Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive, 405-236-3100, okcmoa.com. THROUGH JAN 15, 2023

Zumba at Scissortail Park participate in a weekly free class at the Sky Rink Event Pavilion, 9-10 a.m., Saturdays, through Oct. 29. Scissortail Park, 300 SW 7th St., 405-445-7080, scissortailpark.org. SAT, THROUGH OCT 29

VISUAL ARTS

In Living Color featuring works of 3 artists, Brent Learned, Katie Henderson and Rebecca Wheeler, through Oct. 29. JRB Art at The Elms, 2810 N. Walker Ave., 405-528-6336, jrbartgallery.com. FRI-SAT, OCT 29

Art for a Cause browse and purchase works from local artists and bid in the silent auction with portions of the proceeds going to REAL Single Moms organization, 6-8 p.m., Sept. 29. Paseo Arts and Creativity Center, 3024 Paseo St., 405-525-2688, thepaseo.org. THU, SEPT 29

Jose Dávila features sculptures in which the artist has balanced industrial materials in precarious ways off of fabricated construction, through May 2023. Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center, 11 NW 11th St., 405-951-0000, oklahomacontemporary.org. THUSAT, THROUGH MAY 2023

Bricklive Animal Paradise features statues of endangered animals with the entire installation being made of almost two million toy building blocks, through Oct. 30. The Oklahoma City Zoo,

The Light features paintings by Eliseo Casiano that combine family history with symbolism to showcase his cultural lineage, Aug. 20-Sept. 24. Artspace at

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ZOOBrew enjoy local and national craft beers and other libations, live animal shows, lawn games and live music at this fundraiser for the Oklahoma City Zoo, 4 p.m., Sept. 30. The Oklahoma City Zoo, 2000 Remington Place, 405-424-3344, okczoo.com. FRI, SEPT 30 Photo provided continued from page 21

405-521-2491, okhistory.org. TUE-MON, ONGOING

Untitled, 1 NE Third St., 405-815-9995, 1ne3.org. AUG 20 THROUGH SEPT 24

The SuperNatural an exhibit features works from several artists focusing on a new world whose shape and matter will be determined by human activity. 21c Museum Hotel, 900 W. Main St., 405-982-6900, 21cmuseumhotels.com. THROUGH FEB 28, 2023

Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel: The Exhibition Rome viewers can get a face-to-face experience with a reproduction of the original work, Thursdays-Sundays, through Dec. 5. Sail & The Dock, 617 W. Sheridan Ave., 218-355-8467, chapelsistine.com/exhibits/oklahoma-city. FRI-SUN, THROUGH DEC 5 Of the Earth: Creating First Americans Museum view the architectural history of the museum being constructed from the stage of construction to the people involved in its creation, ongoing. First Americans Museum, 659 First Americans Blvd., 405594-2100. ONGOING OKLA HOMMA the signature exhibition of the museum, features works of art, interactive media, and film from all 39 tribes in Oklahoma as of today depicting stories with ancestral origins, collective histories, sports and more, ongoing. First Americans Museum, 659 First Americans Blvd., 405-594-2100. ONGOING One Hundred Years of Revolution: French Art from 1850 to 1950 features works arranged in chronological order to show how the French artists changed from creating realistic depictions of the world to abstract compositions over a 100 year period, through Feb. 19, 2023. Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive, 405-236-3100, okcmoa.com. THROUGH FEB 19, 2023 Pancakes and Booze an underground pop-up art show featuring nation leading emerging artists, craft beer and free pancakes, 8 p.m.-midnight, Sept. 24. OKC Farmers Market, 311 S. Klein Ave., 405-486-0701. SAT, SEPT 24 Perception and Technique in Abstract Art features works covering two different techniques of abstract styles through various artists, through Jan. 15, 2023. Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive, 405-236-3100, okcmoa.com. THROUGH JAN 15, 2023 Robert Rauschenberg: Pressing News features work by Robert Rauschenberg from his Currents exhibition in which he collaged together headlines, photographs, advertisements, and articles from national newspapers, through Feb. 27, 2023. Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, 555 Elm Ave., 405-3253272, ou.edu/fjjma. THROUGH FEB 27, 2023 Selections from In Citizen’s Garb: Native Americans on the Southern Plains an exhibit displaying modern gelatin silver prints made from glass plate negatives of Indigenous people in the Lawton and Fort Sill area from 1889 to 1891, ongoing. Oklahoma History Center, 800 Nazih Zuhdi Drive,

Synesthesia Factory Obscura’s newest immersive art experience focusing on color and textural elements while guests open their senses to discover what colors sound and smell like. Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, 555 Elm Ave., 405-325-3272, ou.edu/ fjjma. THROUGH JUNE 4, 2023 Synonymy features works by Aaron Cahill as he explores the connection between asymmetry and balance, Sept. 8-Oct. 2. DNA Galleries, 1709 NW 16th St., 405-525-3499, dnagalleries.com.THROUGH OCT 2 Traditional Cowboy Arts Exhibition and Sale a showcase of saddle making, bit and spur making, silversmithing and rawhide braiding, Sept. 30-Jan. 2. National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, 1700 NE 63rd St., 405-478-2250, nationalcowboymuseum. org. FRI-SAT, THROUGH JAN 2 Visual Art Show featuring works by Vincent Ciarlo, Jared Power, Heidi Ghassempour, Austin Tackett, Jess Morgan, 7 p.m., Sept. 24. The Sanctuary, 2828 NW 10th Street. SAT, SEPT 24 What Would They Have Wanted? featuring works by Sylvie Mayer that focuses on the process of grieving, the associated ceremonies and coming to terms with loss, Sept. 29-Oct. 22. Artspace at Untitled, 1 NE 3rd St., 405-815-9995, 1ne3.org. THUSAT, SEPT 29-OCT 22 WINIKO: Life of an Object, Selections from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian reflecting on the Native belief that their cultural materials hold the spirit of their makers and those who wore or used them this exhibit features of over 100 items that have been returned to the 39 tribes of Oklahoma after being taken from them in the early 1900s, ongoing. First Americans Museum, 659 First Americans Blvd., 405594-2100. ONGOING

Visit okgazette.com/Events/AddEvent to submit your event or email them to listings@okgazette.com. Sorry, but phone submissions cannot be accepted. Submissions must be received by Oklahoma For OKG Gazette no later than noon on Wednesday live music fourteen days before the see page 28 desired publication date. Submissions run as space allows, although we strive to make the listings as inclusive as possible.

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Safe in sound LEGENDARY GUITARIST STEVE VAI BRINGS INVIOLATE TOUR TO OKLAHOMA CITY. By Adrienne Proctor

Legendary rock guitarist and composer Steve Vai relaunched his 54-city tour this fall — with an Oct. 7 stop in OKC — after it was waylaid by the omicron variant of COVID-19 earlier this year. He spoke with the Oklahoma Gazette over Zoom to discuss the upcoming tour and what it’s like playing for live audiences again. His exclusive interview is below: Oklahoma Gazette: Tell me about The Inviolate Tour. Are you excited to finally get to perform live again? Steve Vai: During lockdown, I discovered that I really love this touring life. I’ve been doing this for over 40 years. I’ve played in places that no other American artist has, like Siberia and China. I started doing this when I was 21 years old. I was just a young, stupid American. But there’s so much culture to learn about when

OKG: Have you ever played in Oklahoma City before? Vai: Many times. OKG: What do you love about the local audiences here? Vai: In Oklahoma City, I love the simplicity. One thing I’ve learned while touring, is every new place you go, there’s a collective consciousness. It’s in the air, and it varies from state to state. In Oklahoma, I always get a peaceful vibe. People seem to really enjoy living life there. Southern audiences are always very engaged. Other places aren’t as animated or “rowdy,” if you will. There’s a touring culture, too. It’s been a great experience to travel with my band. They’ve been with me for twenty years, and there are no secrets. It’s a brotherhood. I’ve got Dave Weiner (guitar/keys), Philip Bynoe (bass), and Jeremy

Steve Vai, photo provided.

a big project. During lockdown, I just kept thinking, “Man I wanna get back on tour.” I canned other projects and started working toward going on this tour. OKG: You’ve been in the music industry for so long. How have you watched it change and evolve? Vai: Absolutely. The landscape of artistry has changed. Changing technology and how we make music has affected everyone. How we utilize technology is what determines our quality of life. It’s all about perspective. Technological changes in the music industry have led to a lot of blaming, criticizing, and victimizing. This mindset creates great suffering. I choose to look at evolving technolog y and say, “How can this serve me?” It’s really all about perspective. OKG: We have social media now and everything is visible. Has that changed how you work as an artist?

Steve Vai, photo provided.

you travel. When I tour, I take a bicycle with me, or I go run, and I love the exposure to the various cultures. I love to learn about the cuisines, history, and the people of each new place. I like experiencing the diversity of culture. There are many elements of touring that I love. OKG: You’ve toured the world! Vai: I have! I’ve traveled more than any politician.

Colson (drums). I’m really lucky to have had the same band for all this time. OKG: How did you prepare to launch this tour? Vai: I thrived during the pandemic. It’s a state of mind, and I’ve been making the best of it. I experimented with certain guitar techniques, and just focused on playing music that I felt my audience could embrace. This tour was

Vai: There is this mindset that social media is destroying everything, and that social media is our real lives, and it’s not. People believe what they want to believe, and it’s true that our attention is being robbed. But social media isn’t the real world. It’s a worldwide platform that doesn’t reflect reality. When you see it as a tool, then you have a mental shift. There are those who can adapt and say, “What’s missing?” When you can do that, then you’re an innovator.

OKG: Live performance kind of demands that we step away from distractions. It gives us a chance to focus and be present. Vai: Yes, it does. There’s great value in living in the present moment. It’s simpler and more powerful. That’s why I love live performance. You’ve got to give attention to what you’re playing and focus on the current moment. OKG: What are you hoping your audience will experience during this tour? Vai: I’m going to go out and project myself and create an atmosphere of sharing. I see myself as more of a service provider than anything else. Throughout my career, leading up to tours, there’s usually a flood of pressure and excitement, as well as figuring out the logistics. When that’s all taken care of, I can just get on stage and create this experience. When I’m performing, I can focus and get into the zone. I can feel the music f lowing through my body. In that moment, everything f lows beautifully. That ’s the biggest attraction to playing live, to me. It creates an atmosphere of sharing, and we’re all in it together. It’s totally glorious. Steve Vai’s Inviolate Tour stops in OKC on Oct. 7 at Tower Theatre. Visit towertheatreokc.com

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Is your grass still blue in ‘22? THE OKLAHOMA INTERNATIONAL BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL RETURNS TO GUTHRIE FOR ITS 25TH YEAR.

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Well it’s just about that time of year once again when many a bluegrass bard, bone playin’ chicken pickin’ troubadour, and countryfied crooner will all be finding their way to Guthrie. That’s right folks, it’s almost time once again for The Oklahoma International Bluegrass Festival. Michael Clevela nd & Flamekeeper, The Grascals, The Kruger Brothers and Frank Solivan & Dirty Kitchen are your headliners, with almost two dozen other acts performing over the three-day event.

This year is a big one as it marks the first quarter-century of the annual festival. It all started with a grant to incorporate the festival as a non-profit. From there they took it from just an idea, and turned it into a reality. Kenny Parks joined the board of directors in 1996 and still serves on it to this day. “It has been run well and so passionately by all of the volunteers for so many years. For instance, we have many volunteers that have been with us for over twenty years now, and they did this for reasons of their own personal passions pertaining to our mission statement,” Parks said. “That mission is to provide financing for opportunities for children to be exposed to music. We have an annual music scholarship that has given over $250,000 since we began. The youth recipients can use the funds for music lessons and other things related to pursuing their interest and passion for their musical education. They might want to go to a musical work-

people can just sign up to perform. All you have to have is the ability and desire to sign up and perform on a stage in front of a crowd. And the crowd is always ver y recept ive because we get everything from young kids to 90-year-old men that play there. And hopefully that (From top to bottom) Frank Solivan & Dirty builds their confiKitchen, Michael Cleveland and Flamekeeper, and The Kruger Brothers. Photos provided. dence in performing shop somewhere live in front of a crowd. We’ve even or pay for their had the Turnpike Troubadours lessons.” perform here about three times,” D o u g Parks said. Hawthorne got The Red Dirt Rangers are the only involved through band that has played every single one his career with the of the Oklahoma International Ok l a hom a Bluegrass Festivals. Department of “Now that is a ‘true blue’ Oklahoma To u r i s m & band,” Parks said. Recreation. “We also do another event called “I just hapThe Random Band Jam on Friday pened to be sitting night on the main stage. “So they put in Oklahoma State Representative out jars where you can put your name Joe Hutchinson’s office one day when in the jar of the instrument that you three-time World Champion Fiddle want to play that evening. At some Player, Byron Berline walked in. He point in the day a committee pulls the said he had an idea to start an internames out of these jars randomly and national bluegrass festival in puts together who will play with whom Oklahoma,” Hawthorne said. in their band that has been randomly “Byron was moving from Los formed. Then their names get put on Angeles back to Guthrie at the time a poster, and the players are required and he is the one who actually started to show up and they can decide on a the Oklahoma International few songs to play and rehearse for Bluegrass Festival. Representative about an hour or so before their perHutchinson pointed at me and said, formances,” Parks said. ‘Well there’s your guy, he can help you Come on out and be ready to hear make this happen.’’’ and enjoy some world class pickin’ Guthrie was chosen after a senate and grinnin’ in Guthrie. Stay the resolution as the home of the festival, night if you’d like because a lowParks said. priced campground is available to Vince Gill and Ricky Skaggs are festival goers. both honorary members of their And remember, It don’t mean a Board of Directors, Parks said. thang if it ain’t got that twang. “We’ve had as many as nine Visit oibf.com hundred a year come through our children’s tent. We have a very dedicated woman that has been running it for ten years. The organization is all run by volunteers,” Parks said. “There is also a large tent where

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Los Tigres del Norte, The Criterion. REGIONAL MEXICAN McKee Brother Jazz Band, Bourbon Street Bar. JAZZ Punk Rock Social Night, Blue Note. PUNK Ric Float, Ponyboy. DANCE RR Williams/Groucho/Modern Issue, The Vanguard, Tulsa. ROCK Sabertooth/A Weighted World/ Chronic Nostalgia, S&B Burger Joint, 9th St. METAL

These are events recommended by Oklahoma Gazette editorial staff members. For full calendar listings, go to okgazette.com.

COUNTRY The Damn Quails/Ryan Culwell, Blue Note. FOLK Dead Poet Society/BRKN Love, 89th Street—OKC. ROCK

WEDNESDAY, SEP. 21

The Front Bottoms/Motherfolk/Mobley, Cain’s Ballroom, Tulsa. ROCK

Daniel Burgess, The Deli. ROCK

Gunpowder Junkies, Hollywood Corners. ROCK

Dinosaur Jr/Ryley Walker, Cain’s Ballroom, Tulsa. ROCK

Kristen Stehr and Borderline, Remington Park. COUNTRY

Kendrick McKinney Trio, 51st Street Speakeasy. JAZZ

Kyle Dillingham, Oklahoma State Fairgrounds. BLUEGRASS

Middle Sister, Oklahoma State Fairgrounds. FOLK

Kyle Rainer/Blake Turner, River Spirit Casino Resort, Tulsa. COUNTRY

Mike Wilson, River Spirit Casino Resort, Tulsa. VARIETY Scorpions, BOK Center, Tulsa. ROCK

Cadillac Blues Assembly, Belle Isle Restaurant and Brewery. BLUES Dokken/George Lynch, Sugar Creek Casino, Hinton. METAL The Grisly Hand/Matt Jewett, Blue Note. COUNTRY Kat Lock/Sarafina Byrd/Carly Gwin & The Sin, The Deli. ALTERNATIVE Keith Urban, Paycom Center. COUNTRY Killer Queen, Tower Theatre. TRIBUTE Kyle Earnhart/Marcy Priest/Ben Brock/Wyatt Zane, Rodeo Opry. SINGER/SONGWRITER

Sophia Massad/Ramsey Thornton, Ponyboy. ALTERNATIVE

Mike Oregano, JJ’s Alley Bricktown Pub. REGGAE

Thomas Rhett, BOK Center, Tulsa. SINGER/ SONGWRITER

Mike Wilson, River Spirit Casino Resort, Tulsa. VARIETY

SUNDAY, SEP. 25

Muscadine Bloodline/James Tucker, Cain’s Ballroom, Tulsa. COUNTRY

Andrew Bird/Iron & Wine/Silvana Estrada, The Jones Assembly. INDIE Brent Giddens, River Spirit Casino Resort, Tulsa. COUNTRY

Polkadot Cadaver/Dog Will Hunt, 89th Street—OKC. ROCK Satsang, Beer City Music Hall. AMERICANA

Henry Rollins, Cain’s Ballroom, Tulsa. ROCK

Street Kings, Hollywood Corners. COVER

Melissa Hembree and The Union, Frankie’s. SINGER/SONGWRITER

Sydney Lee, Ponyboy. DANCE

No Whiners Aloud, Mojo’s Blues Club. BLUES Tin Can Gramophone/Hosty, The Deli. FOLK

Lazuli, Ponyboy. DANCE

Wax/iMayday!/Potluck1Ton/Joey Cool/Celtixx/Spadez, The Vanguard, Tulsa. PUNK

McKee Brother Jazz Band, Bourbon Street Bar. JAZZ

Whirligig, Cain’s Ballroom, Tulsa. ALTERNATIVE

SATURDAY, OCT. 1 49 Winchester, Ponyboy. COUNTRY Aaron Newman Trio, Bedlam Bar-B-Q. AMERICANA The All-American Rejects, River Spirit Casino Resort, Tulsa. ALTERNATIVE

Midnight Star, Oklahoma State Fairgrounds. R&B

MONDAY, SEP. 26

Clutch/Helmet/Quicksand/JD Pinkus, Diamond Ballroom. ROCK

The Wednesday Band, The Deli. COUNTRY

Mike Blakely/John M Greenberg, The Blue Door. SINGER/SONGWRITERS

The Aints/Bailey Gilbert & Friends, The Deli. AMERICANA

Cole Swindell, Cain’s Ballroom, Tulsa. COUNTRY

THURSDAY, SEP. 22

Miss Brown To You, UCO Jazz Lab. JAZZ

Amigo the Devil, Beer City Music Hall. SINGER/ SONGWRITER

Vibro Kings, Hollywood Corners. ROCK The War on Drugs, The Criterion. ROCK

The Bellamy Brothers, River Spirit Casino Resort, Tulsa. COUNTRY Country Music Group Therapy/Biscuits & Groovy, The Deli. COUNTRY DJ Ecog, River Spirit Casino Resort, Tulsa. VARIETY El Perro, Blue Note. ROCK Joel Forlenza, Othello’s Italian Restaurant, Norman. INSTRUMENTALISTS King Calaway/Alec Miller, Oklahoma State Fairgrounds. COUNTRY Shelly Phelps and The Storm, Bourbon Street Bar. BLUES Short & Broke/The BlueRays/JL Jones, Mojo’s Blues Club. BLUES

Rainbows Are Free/Helen Kelter Skelter/Sisteria, The Vanguard, Tulsa. METAL

SATURDAY, SEP. 24 The Beach Boys, Civic Center Music Hall. ROCK Beppe Gambetta, The Blue Door. SINGER/ SONGWRITER

Full of Hell/ Blood Incantation/Vermin Womb/Mortuous/God is War, 89th Street— OKC. METAL

DJ Reni, Ponyboy. DANCE Eyehategod/The Obsessed/Savage Master, 89th Street—OKC. METAL

TUESDAY, SEP. 27

H.O.G/Sunny on the Mic/Siccway/Doshia/ Steph Simon/Yung Caco & DLO/AUTO54MATIC/Manifess/DJ YG/J Hustle/Kie/Hollywood, The Vanguard, Tulsa. METAL

Brandon Clark, River Spirit Casino Resort, Tulsa. ROCK

Jeffery Smith, UCO Jazz Lab. JAZZ

Classic Rewind/Lacy Saunders, 79th St. Sound Stage Productions. ROCK

Bruce Benson & Studio B, 51st Street Speakeasy. BLUES

Josh Sallee/The Confused, Beer City Music Hall. RAPPER

Darlin Darla/Glenn & Jillian Sulley/Terry Wilson/Bryanna Swan/Brandon Bolt, Rodeo Opry. COUNTRY

Caleb McGee, The Deli. BLUES

Etowah Road, Hollywood Corners. ROCK Gasolina, Tower Theatre. REGGAETON

Warbringer/Heathen/Misfire/Shame in Nothing, 89th Street—OKC. METAL

The Get Down/D’Elegantz, River Spirit Casino Resort, Tulsa. DANCE

FRIDAY, SEP. 23

Heart to Gold, 89th Street—OKC. PUNK

Chris Janson, River Spirit Casino Resort, Tulsa.

Barrett Lewis, Red River Music Hall. ROCK

Dinosaur Boyfriend/Rat Fink/Photocopy, 51st Street Speakeasy. ALTERNATIVE

Judah & The Lion/Smallpools, Cain’s Ballroom, Tulsa. FOLK

Jack White, The Criterion. INDIE John Mark McMillan/Zach Winters Music, Beer City Music Hall. SINGER/SONGWRITER

Koe Wetzel, Paycom Center. COUNTRY

WEDNESDAY, SEP. 28

Lonesome Heroes/Clancy Jones, Blue Note. AMERICANA

The Adam Larson Quartet, UCO Jazz Lab. JAZZ

Owen Pickard/Kelcie Pickard/Midnight Hollow/Maddox Ross/John Riley, Rodeo Opry. COUNTRY

Drug Church/Soul Glo/Grandpa Vern, 89th Street—OKC. ALTERNATIVE Felina Rivera, The Deli. SINGER/SONGWRITER

Samantha Crain, Tower Theatre. SINGER/ SONGWRITER

Kendrick McKinney Trio, 51st Street Speakeasy. JAZZ

SUNDAY, OCT. 2

Mike Wilson, River Spirit Casino Resort, Tulsa. VARIETY

Tin Can Gramophone/Hosty, The Deli. FOLK

MONDAY, OCT. 3

DJ Ecog, River Spirit Casino Resort, Tulsa. VARIETY Resurrection: A Journey Tribute, Tulsa Expo Square, Tulsa. TRIBUTE RR Williams/Dog Company/The Shame/ Spacecowboy, Blue Note. ROCK Shelly Phelps and The Storm, Bourbon Street Bar. BLUES Shelter in Place/The Walk-In/Until Now/7THALO/Black Crown, The Vanguard, Tulsa. ROCK Short & Broke/The BlueRays/JL Jones, Mojo’s Blues Club. BLUES Wheeler Walker Jr., Tower Theatre. COUNTRY

FRIDAY, SEP. 30

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No Whiners Aloud, Mojo’s Blues Club. BLUES

The Wednesday Band, The Deli. COUNTRY

Country Music Group Therapy/Biscuits & Groovy, The Deli. COUNTRY

mezzo-soprano Caitlin McKechney discovered that there is an audience for opera outside the theatre thus beginning Opera Cowgirls. Now a group of 5 women, these ladies merge opera with the Grand Ole Opry by mixing operatic melodies with country instruments and style. Hear this one-of-a-kind group at 7 p.m., Sept. 23 at The Deli, 309 White St., Norman, 405-329-3534, thedeli.us/WP. FRI, SEPT 23 Photo provided

Hosty, The Deli. ELECTRIC

MSG, Hollywood Corners. COUNTRY

THURSDAY, SEP. 29

Opera Cowgirls, after opening for a rock band with the Habanera from Carmen,

Karina/Protozoa/Raymond Owen/ Techno Cowboy, The Sanctuary. TECHNO

The Aints/Bailey Gilbert & Friends, The Deli. AMERICANA Winona Forever/Lust Online/Mad Honey, The Sanctuary. INDIE

TUESDAY, OCT. 4 Bruce Benson & Studio B, 51st Street Speakeasy. BLUES Caleb McGee, The Deli. BLUES A Day to Remember, The Zoo Amphitheatre. ROCK

Live music submissions must be received by Oklahoma Gazette no later than noon on Wednesday seven days before the desired publication date. Late submissions will not be included in the listings. Submissions run as space allows, although we strive to make the listings as inclusive as possible. Visit okgazette.com to submit your lisitngs or email listings@okgazette.com. Sorry, but phone submissions cannot be accepted.


THE HIGH CULTURE STRAIN REVIEWS

Strain name: Bubble Bath Grown by: Altvm Acquired from: Platinum Leaf

and euphoric effects for those times when you really want to unwind and decompress — much like its name suggests.

Date acquired: Aug. 25th Physical traits: Frosted light green and orange Bouquet: gassy with hints of floral notes Review: This stylish new dispensary opened this summer along Western Avenue on the stretch near Good Times and Zuma. The budtender without hesitation produced this gorgeous flower when asked his favorite on-shelf strain. Altvm — the growing arm behind Electraleaf and Oklahoma’s Cookies operation — has won numerous awards for their flower and show no signs of slowing. This trichome-encrusted cross between The Soap and Project 4516 is bursting gas and smokes far smoother than expected by the rich aroma when ground. Billed as an indica-dominant hybrid, Bubble Bath provides relaxing

Strain name: Forbidden Zkittlez Grown by: Emerald Technologies Acquired from: Classen Kush House Date acquired: Sept. 14 Physical traits: frosted light green, orange and purple Bouquet: earthy, fruity and gassy Review: A stop into Classen Kush House always guarantees a vast selection designed to fit any budget. A longtime fan of Forbidden Fruit, I selected the Forbidden Zkittlez which crosses Forbidden Fruit, Mendo Royal, and California Black Rosé to make a relaxing body high without being too heady. With undertones of sweet fruits and spiced grapes that fill your mouth with their heavy sugary pungency with each puff, this flower has a delectable flavor. Emerald Technologies isn’t a household name in the cannabis industry yet, but they speak loudly.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22 Homework: Fantasize about an adventure you would love to treat yourself to in the spring of 2023. Newsletter.FreeWillAstrology.com ARIES (March 21-April 19):

Even when your courage has a touch of foolhardiness, even when your quest for adventure makes you a bit reckless, you can be resourceful enough to avoid dicey consequences. Maybe more than any other sign of the zodiac, you periodically outfox karma. But in the coming weeks, I will nevertheless counsel you *not* to barge into situations where rash boldness might lead to wrong moves. Please do not flirt with escapades that could turn into chancy gambles. At least for the foreseeable future, I hope you will be prudent and cagey in your quest for interesting and educational fun.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20):

In 1946, medical professionals in the UK established the Common Cold Unit. Its goal was to discover practical treatments for the familiar viral infection known as the cold. Over the next 43 years, until it was shut down, the agency produced just one useful innovation: zinc gluconate lozenges. This treatment reduces the severity and length of a cold if taken within 24 hours of onset. So the results of all that research were modest, but they were also much better than nothing. During the coming weeks, you may experience comparable phenomena, Taurus: less spectacular outcomes than you might wish, but still very worthwhile.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

Here’s a scenario that could be both an invigorating metaphor and a literal event. Put on rollerblades. Get out onto a long flat surface. Build up a comfortable speed. Fill your lungs with the elixir of life. Praise the sun and the wind. Sing your favorite songs. Swing your arms all the way forward and all the way back. Forward: power. Backward: power. Glide and coast and flow with sheer joy. Cruise along with confidence in the instinctive skill of your beautiful body. Evaporate thoughts. Free

yourself of every concern and every idea. Keep rambling until you feel spacious and vast.

counsel is always relevant for you, dear Virgo, it will be especially so in the coming weeks.

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):

I’m getting a psychic vision of you cuddled up in your warm bed, surrounded by stuffed animals and wrapped in soft, thick blankets with images of bunnies and dolphins on them. Your headphones are on, and the songs pouring into your cozy awareness are silky smooth tonics that rouse sweet memories of all the times you felt most wanted and most at home in the world. I think I see a cup of hot chocolate on your bedstand, too, and your favorite dessert. Got all that, fellow Cancerian? In the coming days and nights, I suggest you enjoy an abundance of experiences akin to what I’ve described here.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):

For 15 years, Leo cartoonist Gary Larson created *The Far Side*, a hilarious comic strip featuring intelligent talking animals. It was syndicated in more than 1,900 newspapers. But like all of us, he has had failures, too. In one of his books, Larson describes the most disappointing event in his life. He was eating a meal in the same dining area as a famous cartoonist he admired, Charles Addams, creator of *The Addams Family*. Larson felt a strong urge to go over and introduce himself to Addams. But he was too shy and tongue-tied to do so. Don’t be like Larson in the coming weeks, dear Leo. Reach out and connect with receptive people you’d love to communicate with. Make the first move in contacting someone who could be important to you in the future. Be bold in seeking new links and affiliations. Always be respectful, of course.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):

“Love your mistakes and foibles,” Virgo astrologer William Sebrans advises his fellow Virgos. “They aren’t going away. And it’s your calling in life—some would say a superpower—to home in on them and finesse them. Why? Because you may be able to fix them or at least improve them with panache—for your benefit and the welfare of those you love.” While this

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Tips for making the most of the next three weeks: 1. Be proud as you teeter charismatically on the fence. Relish the power that comes from being in between. 2. Act as vividly congenial and staunchly beautiful as you dare. 3. Experiment with making artful arrangements of pretty much everything you are part of. 4. Flatter others sincerely. Use praise as one of your secret powers. 5. Cultivate an open-minded skepticism that blends discernment and curiosity. 6. Plot and scheme in behalf of harmony, but never kiss ass.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

Poet Mary Oliver wrote, “There is within each of us a self that is neither a child, nor a servant of the hours. It is a third self, occasional in some of us, tyrant in others. This self is out of love with the ordinary; it is out of love with time. It has a hunger for eternity.” During the coming weeks, Scorpio, I will be cheering for the ascendancy of that self in you. More than usual, you need to commune with fantastic truths and transcendent joys. To be in maximum alignment with the good fortune that life has prepared for you, you must give your loving attention to the highest and noblest visions of your personal destiny that you can imagine.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Tips to get the most out of the next three weeks: 1. Use your imagination to make everything seem fascinating and wonderful. 2. When you give advice to others, be sure to listen to it yourself. 3. Move away from having a rigid conception of yourself and move toward having a fluid fantasy about yourself. 4. Be the first to laugh at and correct your own mistakes. (It’ll give you the credibility to make even better mistakes in the future.) 5. Inspire other people to love being themselves and not want to be like you.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

Capricorn poet William Stafford wrote, “Saying things

you do not have to say weakens your talk. Hearing things you do not need to hear dulls your hearing.” Those ideas are always true, of course, but I think it’s especially crucial that you heed them in the coming weeks. In my oracular opinion, you need to build your personal power right now. An important way to do that is by being discriminating about what you take in and put out. For best results, speak your truths as often and as clearly as possible. And do all you can to avoid exposing yourself to trivial and delusional “truths” that are really just opinions or misinformation.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

You are an extra authentic Aquarius if people say that you get yourself into the weirdest, most interesting trouble they’ve ever seen. You are an ultra-genuine Aquarius if people follow the twists and pivots of your life as they would a soap opera. And I suspect you will fulfill these potentials to the max in the coming weeks. The upcoming chapter of your life story might be as entertaining as any you have had in years. Luckily, imminent events are also likely to bring you soulful lessons that make you wiser and wilder. I’m excited to see what happens!

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

In a poem to a lover, Pablo Neruda wrote, “At night I dream that you and I are two plants that grew together, roots entwined.” I suspect you Pisceans could have similar deepening and interweaving experiences sometime soon—not only with a lover but with any treasured person or animal you long to be even closer to than you already are. Now is a time to seek more robust and resilient intimacy.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes / daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.


PUZZLES NEW YORK TIMES MAGAZINE | UPS AND DOWNS By Tracy Gray| Puzzles Edited by Will Shortz | 0911

bygone muscle cars Give an elbow bump to, say 72 Free of fizz 73 *Lateral-breaking pitches 75 Skulk 76 Maker of the world’s first quartz watch 77 Javanese dyeing technique 78 Potala Palace city 79 One of seven represented in the Pleiades 80 *Glide down from above 81 Sleigh driver’s need 82 Sound of an ungraceful landing 84 ____ card 85 Fashion house whose logo is two interlocking C’s 87 Like the Carolina Reaper pepper 88 Visionary 91 Title for Baltimore 92 Crow language family 95 Sounds of hesitation 96 da-DUM 99 On pins and needles 101 Homebrewer’s sugar 103 Cartoonish villains 106 ‘‘Little ol’ me?’’ 107 Woodard of ‘‘Clemency’’ 109 Article in Aachen 110 ‘‘Where ignorance is bliss, ____ folly to be wise’’: Thomas Gray 111 ‘‘Eh .?.?. I’ll pass’’ 112 It’s a banger in Germany 114 *Portrayer of Scrooge in 1951’s ‘‘A Christmas Carol’’ 116 Surgical seam 118 Unagi and anago, for two 119 What parallel lines never do 120 It beats scissors 121 Passionate 122 Secretary, e.g. 123 ____ Noël 124 Place to wallow 125 Butterfly garden bloomers

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ACROSS 1 7 10 14 18 19 21 22 23 24 25 27

Exfoliants Foofaraw Cookout chuckouts Thickener used in desserts Like favorite radio stations, perhaps Calico calls Memo starter N.F.L. Hall-of-Famer Yale ____ Backpacker’s snack Big huff? Have an outsize presence ‘‘I didn’t need to know that!’’

28 What a net might attach to 30 Flying Cloud of old autodom 31 Jazz clarinetist Shaw 32 Soaring shot 33 Some Six Nations members 35 *Mount Everest scaler 37 Hogs 39 *Went out of control 40 A.M.A. members: Abbr. 42 Marketing experiment comparing two variants 44 Some red marks 45 Big lugs 48 Say ‘‘Whomever did this …,’’ say

49 Alice who wrote ‘‘The Color Purple’’ 51 Org. with a sizable registry 54 Yellow jacket, for one 55 Syrup brand since 1902 57 Word before Roger or Rancher 58 To a profound degree 60 *’’Cinderella’’ meanie 62 Field trip conveyances 63 Middle van Pelt child in ‘‘Peanuts’’ 64 Use Tinder, say 65 Airs 69 Big exporter of pistachios 70 Features of some

1

Places

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 20 26 29 34 36 38 41 43 46 47 50 51 52 53 56 57 59 61 62 64 65 66 67 68 70 71 74

‘‘Mad Money’’ host Jim Eye part with rods and cones Kind of port Boot-camp exercises performed on all fours Narrow groove One for the roadie Most beloved Dominated, informally Pico de gallo herb Not yet in stock Soup bases Highway heavyweight ____ mode Like toum or agliata sauce Forest between Champagne and Lorraine Cousin of kvass Plant pore ‘‘____ Miz’’ Early computer acronym O.E.D. part: Abbr. Some rideshares They may be hidden behind paintings Knot-tying and lashing, to a sailor Like some short tennis matches Install, as sod Record-player annoyances Actor Guinness Improvised comment ‘‘Colette’’ actress Knightley Comedian Wyatt of ‘‘Problem Areas’’ Porter, for one Derby cocktail Bad Brains and Bikini Kill, for two Muckety-mucks Colorful bird named for its diet Not easily moved Ocho menos cinco Buttonholes, basically Actor/activist George Seattle’s W.N.B.A. team Absolutely wrecks K Reason to do a ‘‘stupid human trick’’ X Tangential topics

78 79 80 81 83 85 86 87 89 90 93 94 97 98 100 102 104 105 108 113 115 117

Allow to access ‘‘I am,’’ in Latin Incomplete dentures Ball game that all players might lose Lacks Place to wear muck boots One roasted or toasted More raspy Dramatize, as a historical event Teller, maybe ‘‘That time is fine for me’’ Lack of musicality Teeny-tiny Word after ring or water Side-to-side movement Pastoral skyline features Tyler of ‘‘Whose Line Is It Anyway?’’ Places for hoses and hoes Oatmeal glob Judgy sound Jupiter’s realm, in myth Pic on a pec, say

Stumped? Call 1-900-285-5656 to get the answers to any three clues by phone ($1.20 a minute).

SUDOKU HARD | N° 976184474 Fill in the grid so that every row, column and 3-by-3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9. www.printmysudoku.com Grid n°976184474 hard

VOL. XLIV NO. 19

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NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE ANSWERS Puzzle No. 0828 which appeared in the September 7 issue.

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