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Oklahoma City Museum of Art Executive Staff Glen Gentele, President & CEO Carolyn Hill, Immediate Past President & CEO Hardy S. George, Ph.D. , Chief Curator Rodney Lee, Finance Director Kenneth H. Lindquist, Development Director

Editorial Staff Alison Amick, Associate Curator Chandra Boyd, Education Curator Jim Eastep, Membership Officer Nicole Emmons, Editor Brian Hearn, Film Curator Matthew C. Leininger, Registrar

Director’s Letter

Board of Trustees Officers Frank D. Hill, Chairman Virginia Meade Fox, Immediate Past Chairman Elby J. Beal, Chairman-Elect Leslie S. Hudson, Vice-Chairman Judy M. Love, Vice-Chairman Duke R. Ligon, Vice-Chairman Peter B. Delaney, Treasurer John R. Bozalis, M.D., Secretary *James C. Meade Katy Boren Frank W. Merrick William M. Cameron *Charles E. Nelson Teresa L. Cooper Maurice C. Nickell, D.D.S. *Marion DeVore Morris Permenter Theodore M. Elam John P. Porter *Nancy Payne Ellis Christopher P. Reen *Shirley Ford Marianne Rooney Preston G. Gaddis II Robert J. Ross David T. Greenwell Amalia Miranda Silverstein, M.D. Kirk Hammons Darryl G. Smette Suzette Hatfield Jeanne Hoffman Smith K. Blake Hoenig Denise Semands Suttles Joe M. Howell, D.V.M. Jordan Tang, Ph.D. The Honorable Willa D. Johnson Lyndon C. Taylor Penny M. McCaleb Wanda Otey Westheimer Katie McClendon Charles E. Wiggin Frank McPherson Marsha Wooden *Lifetime Trustee Donald W. Reynolds Visual Arts Center 415 Couch Drive Oklahoma City, OK 73102 (405) 236-3100 Fax: (405) 236-3122 www.okcmoa.com Readers’ comments are welcome. E-mail nemmons@okcmoa.com. Requests for permission to reprint any material appearing in this publication should be sent to the address above.

Carolyn Hill Immediate Past President & CEO

On the Cover

Inside Exhibitions..............................................................Pages 3-5 The Collection........................................................Pages 6-7 Calendar...................................................................Pages 8-9 Film.......................................................................Pages 10-11 Education...........................................................Pages 12-13 News....................................................................Pages 14-15

Mission statement The Oklahoma City Museum of Art enriches lives through the visual arts.

Palmer Hayden (American, 1890-1973). Nous Quatre à Paris (We Four in Paris), ca. 1930. Watercolor and pencil on paper, 21 ¾ x 18 1/8 in. (55.2 x 46 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Purchase, Joseph H. Hazen Foundation Inc. Gift, 1975 (1975.125) Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art


Archibald J. Motley Jr. (American, 1891-1981). Jockey Club, 1929. Oil on canvas, 26 x 32 in. (66.04 x 81.28 cm). Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Art & Artifacts Division, New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundations

Explore African American Art of the 1920s and 1930s

Harlem Renaissance opens February 5

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xplore African American art of the 1920s and 1930s and its lasting legacy with a oneof-a-kind exhibition held only at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art, February 5 through April 19, 2009. Organized by the Oklahoma City Museum of Art, Harlem Renaissance will include more than 100 paintings, sculptures, and photographs by artists such as Richmond Barthé, Aaron Douglas, Palmer Hayden, William H. Johnson, Malvin Gray Johnson, Jacob Lawrence, Archibald J. Motley Jr., James VanDerZee, and others. From the “vogue” of Harlem in the twenties to the Great Depression in the thirties, artists created innovative works which expressed the uniqueness of their experiences as African American artists, while participating in larger developments in American art. Harlem Renaissance marks the first exhibition of African American art at the Museum since Hidden Heritage: Afro-American Art, 1800-1950 in 1987. Organized thematically, Harlem Renaissance will explore a number of subjects, including Harlem as a literary center, portraiture and the “New Negro,” life in Paris and abroad, the influence of European modernism and African art, as well as images related to daily life, African American history, and the South. The exhibition also will examine the idea of Harlem and the Harlem Renaissance as a later artistic subject, through works by Romare Bearden and Faith Ringgold. Highlights include Aaron Douglas’s The Creation (1927), Palmer Hayden’s Nous Quatre à Paris (We Four in Paris) (ca. 1930), Archibald J. Motley Jr.’s Jockey Club (1929), and Faith Ringgold’s Jo Baker’s Bananas (1997). Illustrations for books and publications reveal Harlem as a literary and artistic center. The exhibition will include an original copy of The New Negro (1925), an important anthology edited by Alain Locke, in addition to James Weldon Johnson’s God’s Trombones: Seven Negro Sermons in Verse (1927), which features illustrations by Aaron Douglas. Harlem Renaissance also will explore

Exhibitions

The Collection Film

2008-2009 SEASON SPONSORS PRESENTING SEASON SPONSOR

Inasmuch Foundation SEASON SPONSORS

Allied Arts Foundation Chesapeake Energy Corporation Devon Energy Corporation Kirkpatrick Foundation Oklahoma Arts Council SandRidge Energy, Inc. MidFirst Bank • OGE Corporation Quest Resource Corp. Cox Oklahoma • The Oklahoman Thatcher Hoffman Smith Film Endowment EXHIBITION SPONSORS

National Endowment for the Arts MetLife Foundation Museum and Community Connections Oklahoma Humanities Council Global Health Capitol Chamber of Commerce EDUCATION SPONSORS

Sarkeys Foundation and Sonic, America’s Drive-In Arts Education Endowments

Education News




issues of representation in African American art, featuring portraits and portrait “types” by artists such as Winold Reiss and Malvin Gray Johnson. Harlem Renaissance will display the types of works artists created while living and traveling abroad. Throughout the twenties and thirties, numerous artists traveled to Paris where they received instruction, visited museums, and escaped the restrictions of segregation. Painted while living in the South of France, William H. Johnson’s Village Houses, Cagnes-sur-Mer (ca. 1928-1929)

also turned to history on numerous occasions throughout his career, depicting scenes from the life of important historical figures, such as Harriet Tubman in Daybreak – A Time to Rest (1967). The period’s lasting influence also will be explored in later depictions of the Harlem Renaissance and Jazz Age, through Romare Bearden’s Jazz: (Chicago) Grand Terrace – 1930s (1964) and Faith Ringgold’s Jo Baker’s Bananas (1997). In addition to painting and sculpture, the exhibit will highlight photography as an important medium of artistic expression during the Harlem Renaissance. Photographers such as James VanDerZee captured the people and activities of Harlem, while others, such as James Latimer Allen and author and Harlem enthusiast Carl Van Vechten, captured the likenesses of notable Harlemites and Renaissance figures. Harlem Renaissance also will display photographs of Oklahoma City’s African American community during this period, which includes musician Charlie Christian, the young author Ralph Ellison, and the area known as “Deep Deuce.” The exhibition will bring together key works from over 20 lending institutions. Lenders include the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Howard University Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; the National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C.; and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C. An audio tour, sponsored by AT&T Foundation, and catalogue will accompany the exhibit. This exhibition is supported by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Meta Vaux Warrick Fuller (American, 1877-1968). Ethiopia, 1921. Plaster full figure, bronze cast, 67 x 16 x 20 in. (170.18 x 40.64 x 50.8 cm). Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Art & Artifacts Division, New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundations

reflects the influence of European expressionism. The exhibit will show the influence of African art, through works such as West Coast artist Sargent Johnson’s copper Mask (1933) and Malvin Gray Johnson’s painting Self-Portrait (1934). During this period, many artists turned to their own lives and experiences for inspiration. Seeking to create accurate depictions of African American life and culture, artists portrayed a variety of subjects and styles. From urban life to folklore and the South, artists sought to be fresh and modern in their portrayals of life. Examples include Archibald J. Motley Jr.’s Saturday Night (1935) as well as William H. Johnson’s Jacobia Hotel (1930) and Landscape with Sun Setting, Florence, South Carolina (1930). Harlem Renaissance also will feature works related to African American history, which became an important theme among artists by the thirties and during the era of the Works Progress Administration (WPA). Artist Hale Woodruff’s Negroes with Jackson at New Orleans (1934) reflects this new interest and the stylistic influence of the Mexican muralists. Jacob Lawrence



Exhibitions

Romare Bearden (American, 1911-1988). Black Manhattan, 1969. Collage, 25 3/8 x 21 in. (64.45 X 53.34 cm). Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Art & Artifacts Division, New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundations. Art © Romare Bearden Foundation/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

The Collection Film

Education News


Related Events Members’ Preview Harlem Renaissance Wednesday, February 4, 2009 6 - 9 p.m. Gallery/Lobby

Teacher Workshop Harlem Renaissance Thursday, February 12, 2009 5 - 8 p.m. Education Center

Family Day

Harlem Renaissance Saturday, February 21, 2009 Noon - 4 p.m. Ground Floor

Performance

Jerome Braggs and Combo Sunday, February 29, 2009 2 p.m. 46th Star Auditorium, Downtown Library

Documentary Film

Been Rich All My Life, with personal appearance by director Heather Lyn McDonald Thursday-Sunday, March 12-15, 2009 Times vary Noble Theater

Book Discussion Faith Ringgold (American, b. 1930). Jo Baker’s Bananas, 1997. Acrylic on canvas with quilted border, 80 ½ x 76 in. (204.47 x 193.04 cm). Blanden Memorial Art Museum, Fort Dodge, Iowa. Purchase of Blanden Charitable Foundation, BCF 2002.02

DOWNTOWN LIBRARY PRESENTS “A Taste of Creativity from the Harlem Renaissance Period, 1920-1930s” In collaboration with the Oklahoma City Museum of Art, the Ronald J. Norick Downtown Library will present “A Taste of Creativity from the Harlem Renaissance Period, 1920-1930s.” This selection of programs features the art, literature, and music of the Harlem Renaissance. From February 8 through April 15, 2009, patrons can view a display of posters featuring artwork by prominent artists of the period. Additionally, on Sunday, February 29, 2009, 2:00 p.m., Jerome Braggs and Combo will share the music and celebrate the talent of Harlem Renaissance musicians in the 46th Star Auditorium. In March, the Library has planned two book discussions led by Dr. Rita Keresztesi, associate professor, American and Cultural Literacy, Theory, Media, and Cultural Studies, University of Oklahoma. On Saturday, March 7, 2009, 10:30 a.m., the featured title will be Not Without Laughter, the first novel written by Langston Hughes. When Washington Was in Vogue: A Love Story (A Lost Novel of the Harlem Renaissance) by Edward Christopher Williams, the first African American certified librarian, will be discussed on Saturday, March 28, 10:30 a.m. Book discussions will meet in the Friends Event Room at the Downtown Library, and selections will be available for purchase in the Museum Store at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art. To extend your learning experience, book discussion participants will receive passes to view the exhibition, Harlem Renaissance, at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art. For more information, or to register for the book discussion, please call (405) 606-3879.

Exhibitions

The Collection Film

Langston Hughes’ Not Without Laughter, discussion by Rita Keresztesi, Ph.D., University of Oklahoma Saturday, March 7, 2009 10:30 a.m. Friends Event Room, Downtown Library

Exhibition Lecture

“The Transatlantic Connection: New Negro Artists in Paris, 1922-1934,” lecture by Theresa Leininger-Miller, Ph.D., University of Cincinnati Wednesday, March 25, 2009 6:30 - 7:30 p.m. Noble Theater

Book Discussion Edward Christopher Williams’ When Washington Was in Vogue: A Love Story (A Lost Novel of the Harlem Renaissance), discussion by Rita Keresztesi, Ph.D., University of Oklahoma Saturday, March 28, 2009 10:30 a.m. Friends Event Room, Downtown Library

Last Call Friday

Celebrate the closing of Harlem Renaissance with cocktails, live music, guided tours, tastings, and more! Friday, April 17, 2009 5 - 8 p.m. Gallery/Lobby

Education News




Photo by Jim Meeks

A Fresh, New Look on the Second Floor Galleries Redesigned and Works Added

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he Museum’s eight, second floor galleries have been redesigned to include more artworks. These galleries now display highlights of the Museum’s permanent collection of seventeenth- through nineteenth-century European and American art as well as three new installations dedicated to twentieth-century American painting. The redesign followed the highly successful exhibition Roman Art from the Louvre, which was presented not only in the first floor special exhibition gallery but also in all eight galleries on the second floor. Many of the Museum’s treasured works were in storage during the exhibit. Now, after nearly six months, old favorites and new additions are presented on the freshly painted walls of the second floor. “We enjoyed the opportunity to re-envision our galleries, which have remained largely unchanged since the opening of the Donald W. Reynolds Visual Arts Center in 2002,” said Alison Amick, associate curator. “The reassignment of the second floor to Roman Art from the Louvre gave us the chance to bring a fresh, new design to the galleries and to include more works, highlighting many important pieces that have not been included in exhibits for years and allowing us to showcase many of our strengths in American realism of the 1960s through the 1980s.” Several new works are featured in the European Art Before 1900 gallery. Old favorites like Giuseppe Maria Crespi’s Portrait of a Woman Holding a Mask and Charles François Grenier de Lacroix’s Vue d’un port (View of a Harbor) will be hung alongside rarely seen pieces, including three early-seventeenth-century prints of holy sites in Jerusalem and a mid-sixteenth-century woodcut of Mount Sinai. Some of the greatest changes are in the American Scene Painting gallery. John

Sloan’s Two Black Crows, Hans Hofmann’s Provincetown, Number One, and Georgia O’Keeffe’s Calla Lily (Lily – Yellow No. 2) remain cornerstones. However, the gallery now features five selections from the Museum’s WPA Collection of 28 works, in celebration of the 75th anniversary of the New Deal. These works include Yvonne Twining’s Rainy Day, Dorothy Varian’s Portrait of Eugenie, and Cameron Booth’s rarely exhibited work The Bridge. A new acquisition—John Steuart Curry’s Sunset—also is included in the gallery. Along with Grant Wood and Thomas Hart Benton, Curry is considered one of the three major regionalist painters of the 1930s. “The Curry fills a need for a regionalist painting in the American Scene Painting gallery,” said Hardy George, chief curator. “This pure, landscape painting is different from the baptisms, the preaching of the gospels, and the circus scenes usually associated with Curry; it captures the extraordinary effect of a Midwest sunset.” Two new Post-War American Realism galleries complete the changes to the second floor. In an effort to present more works from the collection to the public, the curators have selected works by Bay Area Figurative artists, David Park and Elmer Bischoff, from the 1950s, and social realist works by Jack Levine and Robert Gwathmey. Other movements and artists represented include the new realism of Philip Pearlstein, the pop art of Robert Indiana, and the photorealism of Don Eddy and Janet Fish, whose work The Ox Bow has seldom been seen outside the collection vault. Many of the works found in this section were gifts of the Westheimer Family, Beaux Arts, or were purchased as part of the Washington Gallery of Modern Art acquisition in 1968.

English Silver Enhances British Gallery Exhibit Meade Family Loans Masterworks

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Exhibitions

The Collection Film

Photo by Jim Meeks

ourteen English silver masterworks from the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries enhance the Museum’s redesign of its British art gallery. On loan from the James C. and Virginia W. Meade family, these works significantly add to the eighteenth- and early-nineteenth-century portrait, landscape, and genre paintings on display. “The curators, aware that one of the finest collections of English silver had been assembled by a local family and anxious to interpret the British gallery in greater depth and scope, are very grateful to the Meade family for the loan of these exceptional masterworks of English silver,” said Carolyn Hill, president and CEO. “They assist greatly in illustrating English history, design, and craftsmanship and enhance the display and interpretation of the paintings.” Among other interesting pieces, the loan includes a hot water kettle that belonged to George Fairfax and his wife, Sarah (Sally), who were close friends and neighbors of George Washington. Members of the Meade family participating in this generous loan include James C. and Virginia W. Meade, Virginia Meade Fox, and Sarah E. Meade.

Education News


Museum of Art, A Place of Learning and Discovery Purchases greatly enhance collection

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he Oklahoma City Museum of Art’s collection serves as both a repository of art for the community and an educational resource. “The collection creates exhibits which may be used as laboratories to illustrate academic and theoretical facts and ideas,” said Carolyn Hill, president and CEO. “It is a practical teaching aid.” With this goal in mind, in recent years, the Museum of Art has sought to develop and grow its collection. It began this process in 2006 with the completion of the Museum’s first Collections Management Policy & Collections Plan, a guide defining the collection’s strengths and highlighting its areas of greatest need. “The majority of the collection has been donated,” said Hill. “But over the last few years, the Museum has begun proactively collecting according to its collections plan and management policy. We seek to fill voids, to create depth, and to elevate the quality of the collection, and the Museum has been extremely fortunate in recent months.”

Mark Ruwedel (American, b. 1954). Kettle Valley #44, 2002. Gelatin silver print, 7 1/2 x 9 1/2 in. (19.05 x 24.13 cm). Purchase with funds from the Museum Acquisition Trust, 2008.111

regionalist painter John Steuart Curry’s Sunset, a dramatic and unique work by the artist, is a welcome addition to the Museum’s holdings of late-twentieth-century American painting, made possible with funds provided by the James C. and Virginia W. Meade Collections Endowment, Mr. and Mrs. Sam P. Shelburne, and Beaux Arts Trust. In addition, American photographer Mark Ruwedel’s Tunnel Series, a portfolio of 12 gelatin silver prints, adds to the Museum’s collection of photography, which includes 210 works by Brett Weston and 12 other portfolios by artists such as Edward S. Curtis, Lucien Clergue, and Edward Steichen. These purchases were made with the help of several financial sources, including the Museum’s acquisitions trust and collections endowments, each dedicated solely to the purchase of works for the collection; funds donated from the Beaux Arts Ball; and funds contributed specifically for the purchase of these works. “The Museum is ever mindful of its funding sources,” said Hill. “Any purchase is done with great prudence by the curators, who select the works, the collections committee, who approves the choices, and finally the board, who votes on the course of action. It is a laborious and disciplined process, and in this instance, we couldn’t be more pleased with the outcome.”

Luis Jiménez (American, 1940-2006). Study of a Classical Horse and a Modern Horse, 1994. Lithograph, 41 3/4 x 29 1/2 in. (106.045 x 74.93 cm). Purchase with Pauline Morrison Ledbetter Collections Endowment earnings, supplemented by Museum Acquisition Trust funds, 2008.104

Not only was the Museum selected as the Oklahoma museum to receive 50 artworks as part of The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States national gifts program but also it was selected by the Ossorio Foundation to receive eleven works by American assemblage artist Alfonso Ossorio. These gifts have strengthened the Museum’s collection of contemporary American art and encouraged active collecting to create the best possible environment for their displays. “We are eager to enhance and build our collection, and we have studied the market, including galleries and auction houses, to review possible acquisitions that would advance our collection and fulfill our vision to present great art for everyone,” said Hill. To that end, the Museum’s initiative has paid off. Through careful planning and preparation, the Museum of Art has made three distinct purchases, recently. Six lithographs by American sculptor and printmaker Luis Jiménez increase the Museum’s print collection with works such as Study of a Classical Horse and a Modern Horse, which show his skill as a draftsman and printmaker. American

Exhibitions

John Steuart Curry (American, 1897-1946). Sunset, 1934. Oil on Masonite, 20 x 26 in. (50.8 x 66.04 cm). Purchase with funds provided by the James C. and Virginia W. Meade Collections Endowment, Mr. and Mrs. Sam P. Shelburne, and Beaux Arts Trust, 2008.100

The Collection Film

Education News




January 1

Enriching Lives Through the Visual Arts!

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The Museum is open until 9pm

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

museum IS CLOSED FOR New Year’s DAY!

FILM • Harvard Beats Yale 29-29, 5:30 & 8p

SATURDAY

6

TUESDAY

13

TUESDAY

20

TUESDAY

7

WEDNESDAY

TUESDAY SCHOOL • Chinese Lanterns, 4-5p

The Museum is open until 9pm

THURSDAY

9

The Museum is open until 9pm

DROP-IN ART • Spectacular Snowflakes, 1-4p FILM • Harvard Beats Yale 29-29, 5:30 & 8p

EXHIBIT • Tour de Quartz closes FILM • Harvard Beats Yale 29-29, 2p

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11

School • Things That Go!, 10-10:45a • Things That Go!, 11-11:45a DROP-IN ART • Watercolor Winterland, 1-4p FILM • Ballast, 5:30 & 8p

School • Impressionistic Landscape Painting, 1-4p • Impressions of Van Gogh, 2-4p FILM • Flow: For Love of Water, 2p

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SATURDAY

FRIDAY

4

SUNDAY

SUNDAY

SCHOOL • Hands in Clay, 6-9p FILM • Ballast, 7:30p

FILM • Ballast, 5:30 & 8p

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15

THURSDAY

16

FRIDAY

School • Impressionistic Me!, 10-11a • Glassblowing Two-Day Intensive, 6-9p

SCHOOL • Hands in Clay, 6-9p Film • Happy-Go-Lucky, 7:30p

LAST CALL FRIDAY • American Impressionism: Paintings from The Phillips Collection, 5-8p FILM • Happy-Go-Lucky, 5:30 & 8p

School • Introduction to Impressionism, 10-11a • Landscape Painting, 10a-noon • Glassblowing One-Day Intensive, 10a-4p DROP-IN ART • Snowman Puppets, 1-4p FILM • Happy-Go-Lucky, 5:30 & 8p

EXHIBIT • American Impressionism: Paintings from The Phillips Collection closes school • Impressionistic Pastels, 1-4p • Impressions of Van Gogh, 2-4p FILM • Happy-Go-Lucky, 2p

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25

WEDNESDAY

WEDNESDAY School • Puddle Art, 10-10:45a • Glassblowing Two-Day Intensive, 6-9p

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WEDNESDAY

The Museum is open until 9pm

The Museum is open until 9pm

The Museum is open until 9pm

SATURDAY

The Museum is open until 9pm

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SCHOOL • Hands in Clay, 6-9p FILM • Beautiful Losers, 7:30p

SCHOOL • Homeschool Art: Mixed Media, 1-2:30p FILM • Beautiful Losers, 5:30 & 8p

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The Museum is open until 9pm

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SATURDAY

The Museum is open until 9pm

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SCHOOL • Hands in Clay, 6-9p FILM • Let the Right One In, 7:30p

SCHOOL • Homeschool Art: Mixed Media, 1-2:30p FILM • Let the Right One In, 5:30 & 8p

SCHOOL • Making Music, 10-10:45a • Making Music, 11-11:45a • Make a Mobile!, 10a-noon DROP-IN ART • Cool Collages, 1-4p FILM • Beautiful Losers, 5:30 & 8p

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SATURDAY SCHOOL • Valentine Love Bugs, 10-11a • Junk Sculpture, 10a-noon DROP-IN ART • Snowball Sculptures and More, 1-4p FILM • Let the Right One In, 5:30 & 8p

SUNDAY

SUNDAY School • Creature Creations, 2-4p FILM • Don Carlo, 2p


February

The Museum is closed on Mondays. Museum Cafe is open 11am-3pm.

1

SUNDAY School • Pop-Up Cards with a Heart, 1-4p FILM • Let the Right One In, 2p

3

TUESDAY

4

WEDNESDAY School • Sgraffito!, 10-11a event • Harlem Renaissance Members’ Preview, 6-9p

5

The Museum is open until 9pm

THURSDAY

6

The Museum is open until 9pm

FRIDAY

EXHIBIT • Harlem Renaissance opens School • Hands in Clay, 6-9p FILM • Oscar® Tune-up, 7:30p

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8

SCHOOL

SCHOOL • Basics of Printmaking, 1-4p • Pop-up Valentines, 2-4p FILM • Oscar® Tune-up, 2p

SATURDAY

SCHOOL • Homeschool Art: Mixed Media, 1-2:30p FILM • Oscar® Tune-up, 5:30 & 8p

• • • •

Marble Rolling Abstract Art, 10-10:45a Marble Rolling Abstract Art, 11-11:45a Chinese Brush Painting, 10a-noon Glassblowing - Level 1, 10a-2p

DROP-IN ART

• President’s Day Hats, 1-4p

SUNDAY

FILM

• Oscar® Tune-up, 5:30 & 8p

EVENT

10

TUESDAY

11

WEDNESDAY

School • Valentine Window Art, 1010:45a

12

The Museum is open until 9pm

13

• Omelette Party, 7p-midnight

The Museum is open until 9pm

14

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

TEACHER WORKSHOP • Harlem Renaissance, 5-8p FILM • Oscar® Tune-up, 7:30p

SCHOOL • Homeschool Art: Mixed Media, 1-2:30p FILM • Oscar® Tune-up, 5:30 & 8p

School • Glassblowing - Level 1, 10a-2p DROP-IN ART • Valentine’s Day Cards, 1-4p FILM • Oscar® Tune-up, 2, 5:30, & 8p

15

SUNDAY School • Creative Collage, 1-4p • Portrait Drawing, 2-4p FILM • Oscar® Tune-up, 2p

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19

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

21

22

SCHOOL • Snowman Sculpting, 10-11a • Glassblowing Two-Day Intensive, 6-9p Friends’ Lecture • “Andrew Wyeth’s World,” 6p

SCHOOL • The Art of Wine, 6-9p FILM • Oscar® Tune-up, 7:30p

SCHOOL • Homeschool Art: Mixed Media, 1-2:30p FILM • Oscar® Tune-up, 5:30 & 8p

FAMILY DAY • Glassblowing - Level 1, 10a-2p • Harlem Renaissance, noon-4p FILM • Oscar® Tune-up, 5:30 & 8p

EVENT • Jerome Braggs and Combo @ the Downtown Library, 2p SCHOOL • Studio Sampler, 1-4p • Three-Dimensional Sculpture, 2-4p FILM • Oscar® Tune-up, 2p

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26

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SCHOOL • Mardi Gras Necklaces, 10-11a

SCHOOL • Glassblowing Two-Day Intensive, 6-9p

School • Watermedia for the Serious Beginner, 6-9p FILM • Oscar® Tune-up, 7:30p

SCHOOL • Homeschool Art: Mixed Media, 1-2:30p FILM • Oscar® Tune-up, 5:30 & 8p

School • Glassblowing - Level 1, 10a-2p • Portrait Drawing, 10a-noon DROP-IN ART • Mardi Gras Masks, 1-4p FILM • Oscar® Tune-up, 5:30 & 8p

TUESDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

WEDNESDAY

The Museum is open until 9pm

The Museum is open until 9pm

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The Museum is open until 9pm

The Museum is open until 9pm

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SUNDAY


Fri. – Sat., Jan. 2 – 3, 5:30 p.m. & 8 p.m.; Sunday, Jan. 4, 2 p.m.

Sunday, Jan. 11, 2 p.m.

Flow: For Love of Water

Harvard Beats Yale 29-29

Harvard Beats Yale 29-29 is a gripping play-byplay account of the wildly unpredictable 1968 football match, interwoven with the players’ unguarded recollections of the socio-political environment of the time. The two Ivy League squads, both of which entered the contest undefeated, included members of both the paramilitary ROTC and the antiwar SDS; at Harvard, the team also included actor Tommy Lee Jones (who reminisces about his roommate Al Gore), while Yale’s star quarterback became the inspiration for B.D., the jock character in Garry Trudeau’s Doonsbury comic strip. Director: Kevin Rafferty USA 2008 NR 105min. HDdigital Thursday, Jan. 8, 7:30 p.m.; Fri. – Sat., Jan. 9 – 10, 5:30 p.m. & 8 p.m.;

Ballast

Ballast is Lance Hammer’s stunning, emotionally powerful feature-film debut. Shot entirely with non-professional actors in the winter light of a rural Mississippi Delta township, the film demonstrates how a man’s suicide radically transforms three characters’ lives. Marlee is a single mother struggling to scratch a living for herself and James, her 12-yearold son, who has begun to stumble under drug and violence pressures. So when the opportunity to seek safe harbor at a new home arises, she grabs it, though the property is shared by Lawrence, a man with whom Marlee has feuded bitterly since James’s birth. With circumstances thrusting them into proximity, a subtle interdependence and common purpose emerge for Marlee and Lawrence as they navigate grief, test new waters, and tentatively move forward. Director: Lance Hammer 2008 USA 96min. NR HDdigital

Irena Salina’s documentary investigates what experts label the most important political and environmental issue of the 21st century - the world water crisis. The film builds a case against the growing privatization of the world’s dwindling fresh water supply with an unflinching focus on politics, pollution, human rights, and the emergence of a domineering world water cartel. Interviews with scientists and activists intelligently reveal the rapidly building crisis, at both the global and human scale. The film also gives viewers a look at the people and institutions providing practical solutions to the water crisis and those developing new technologies, which are fast becoming blueprints for a successful global and economic turnaround. Director: Irena Salina USA 2007 NR 83min. HDdigital Post screening discussion of water issues will be led by World Neighbors staff. Copresented by:

For film updates visit

www.okcmoa.com/film 10

Exhibitions

The Collection Film

Thursday, Jan. 15, 7:30 p.m.; Fri. – Sat., Jan. 16 – 17, 5:30 p.m. & 8 p.m.; Sunday, Jan. 18, 2 p.m.

Happy-Go-Lucky

Poppy (Sally Hawkins) is a free-spirited school teacher who brings an infectious laugh and an unsinkable sense of optimism to every situation she encounters, offering us a touching, truthful, and deeply life-affirming exploration of one of the most mysterious and most elusive of all human qualities: happiness. Poppy’s ability to maintain her perspective is tested as her commuter bike is stolen. However, she enthusiastically signs up for driving lessons with Scott (Eddie Marsan), who turns out to be her nemesis -- a fuming, uptight cynic. As the tension of their weekly lessons builds, Poppy encounters even more challenges to her positive state of mind: a fiery flamenco instructor, her bitter pregnant sister, a troubled homeless man, and a young bully in her class, not to mention that she has also thrown out her back, begging the question -- glass half full or half empty? Director: Mike Leigh 2008 Great Britain 118min. R 35mm Thursday, Jan. 22, 7:30 p.m.; Fri. – Sat., Jan. 23 – 24, 5:30 p.m. & 8 p.m.

Beautiful Losers

Beautiful Losers is a feature documentary film celebrating the independent and D.I.Y. spirit that unified a looseknit group of American artists who emerged from the underground youth subcultures of skateboarding, surf, punk, hip hop and graffiti. Developing their craft with almost no influence from the “establishment” art world, these groups and the subcultures they sprang from have now become a movement that has been transforming the worlds of art, fashion, music, film, and pop culture. The film features a selection of leading artists like Ed Templeton, Stephen Powers, Geoff McFetridge, Mike Mills, Shepard Fairey, Harmony Korine, Barry McGee, and Margaret Kilgallen, who speak about what happens when the outside becomes “in.” Directors: Aaron Rose & Joshua Leonard 2008 USA 90min. NR 35mm

Copresented by:

Education News


Season Premiere La Scala Opera in HD Don Carlo

Don Carlo is possibly the most intense, deep, nuanced, rich, and masterful work of the “mature” Giuseppe Verdi. It is also the Verdi opera that exists in the most versions. The version of this “Grand Opera” that will officially inaugurate the 2008-09 La Scala Opera Season is the 1884 Four Acts version that Verdi reduced and changed into Italian from the original 1867 Five Acts version in French. The story is based on conflicts in the life of Carlos, Prince of Asturias, after his betrothed Elisabeth of Valois was married instead to his father Philip II of Spain as part of the peace treaty ending the Italian War of 1551-1559. Conductor: Daniele Gatti. Stage director: Stephane Braunschweig. Approximate running time: 3hrs. plus one intermission SPECIAL PRICE: $20 Adults/ $18 Members, Students, Seniors. Advance tickets go on sale Tuesday, January 13, 2008. Call 405-278-8237, Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 29, 7:30 p.m.; Fri. – Sat., Jan. 30 – 31, 5:30 p.m. & 8 p.m.; Sunday, February 1, 2 p.m. A fragile, anxious boy, 12-year-old Oskar is regularly bullied by his stronger classmates but never strikes back. The lonely boy’s wish for a friend seems to come true when he meets Eli, also 12, who moves in next door to him with her father. A pale, serious young girl, she only comes out at night and doesn’t seem affected by the freezing temperatures. Coinciding with Eli’s arrival is a series of inexplicable disappearances and murders. Blood seems to be the common denominator. But by now a subtle romance has blossomed between Oskar and Eli, and she gives him the strength to fight back against his aggressors. In Swedish with English subtitles. Director: Tomas Alfredson 2008 Sweden 114min. R 35mm

Exhibitions

by Brian Hearn, film curator

T

Sunday, January 25, 2 p.m.

Let the Right One In

The Gloom, Glamour and Glory of the Golden Guy he movie awards season is in full swing, but it already has shadows cast over it as the economy continues to slide towards oblivion while the threat of another labor strike, this time the actors, looms over Hollywood. Two thousand eight has been a tough year, particularly for art house film, with several distributors running on fumes, folding their tents or being absorbed into their larger costcutting corporate parents. For example, specialty film labels Warner Independent, Picturehouse (founded by OKC native Bob Berney), Paramount Vantage, even the independent stalwart New Line Cinema have given up the ghost in the onslaught of mass media consolidation. Furthermore, there have been precious few breakout independent, documentary, or foreign language films at the box office this year. A few bright spots include the French thriller Tell No One, American independents The Visitor and Rachel Getting Married, documentaries Religulous, Man on Wire, and Gonzo. Now with the calendar year winding down, film critics groups are spitting out their top tens, while many of the best films are set to release around the lucrative holiday film-going season. Never mind the doomsday scenario; there are plenty of worthy contenders to contemplate for this 81st round of Academy Awards® hosted by Hugh Jackman. The Best Picture race is quite interesting in its diversity this year. The frontrunners at the time of publication include Milk, Gus Van Sant’s biopic about San Francisco gay activist Harvey Milk; the exotic Mumbai-set Cinderella story Slumdog Millionaire; Ron Howard’s film adaptation of stage play Frost/Nixon; the uber-profitable (over half a billion at the box office!) comic book sequel The Dark Knight; and what I believe is the odds on favorite, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, starring Brad Pitt as a man who ages in reverse. Still some Best Picture long shots linger like Pixar’s latest animated smash Wall-E, which hopes to prove that an animated film can be equally considered for Best Picture. Veteran director Jonathan Demme has a chance with the intimate and authentic Rachel Getting Married featuring a fine ensemble cast sure to score in the acting categories. John Patrick Shanley’s film adaptation of his own Tony award winning play, Doubt, must be considered on the strength of its lead actors Meryl Streep and Phillip Seymour Hoffman. Similarly, powerful acting duos, by Kate Winslet and Leo Dicaprio in the period drama Revolutionary Road and Kate Winslet again with Ralph Fiennes in The Reader, will merit consideration if not nominations in other categories. Other notable award contenders in this year’s race, both sung and unsung, are Melissa Leo’s gut-wrenching performance as a single mother in Frozen River; Mickey Rourke’s gritty return to form in the title role of The Wrestler; Benicio del Toro as revolutionary icon Che Guevara in Steven Soderbergh’s four-hour epic; the ageless Clint Eastwood’s double threat with Changeling and Gran Torino; Woody Allen’s attractive comeback hit Vicky Cristina Barcelona; British director Mike Leigh’s uncharacteristically upbeat film Happy-Go-Lucky; the old-fashioned star vehicle as well as the biggest movie ever from down under, Australia; and lastly, all eyes will be on whether Heath Ledger wins a posthumous golden guy for his haunting portrayal of The Joker. The irony would be palpable, begging George Bernard Shaw’s question, “Suppose the world were only one of God’s jokes, would you work any the less to make it a good joke instead of a bad one?” Regardless, the Oscars® will be a curious event this year, perhaps muted somewhat by gloom but simultaneously buoyed by the glamour and glory of gold.

Oscar® Tune-Up

It’s time for our seventh annual “tune-up” for the biggest night in the movie business. The 81st Academy Awards® will be handed out on Sunday, February 22, 2008. The Museum’s film program will again present many of the year’s acclaimed titles in the Noble Theater. Nominated films from the acting, screenwriting, foreign language, documentary and short film categories will screen throughout the month of February. Oscar® Tune-up titles will be announced shortly after the nominations are revealed on Tuesday, January 22. For the latest film schedule visit www.okcmoa.com/film

The Collection Film

Education News

11


Museum School

Museum School classes and workshops fill quickly. The following offerings still had spots available at the time this publication was printed. For descriptions or a complete listing of classes and workshops, visit www.okcmoa.com/ education/museumschool. Pre-registration is required. To register by phone, call (405) 236-3100, ext. 213.

ADULT CLASSES Ages 14-adult

IMPRESSIONISTIC LANDSCAPE PAINTING Sunday, January 11, 1-4 pm $20 members/ $25 nonmembers (materials provided) IMPRESSIONISTIC PASTELS Sunday, January 18, 1-4 pm $20 members/ $25 nonmembers (materials provided) HANDS IN CLAY Thursdays, January 8-February 5, 6-9 pm (5 classes) $100 members/ $125 nonmembers (materials provided) GLASSBLOWING TWO-DAY INTENSIVE Wednesdays, January 14 and 21, 6-9 pm $78 members/ $96 nonmembers (materials provided) GLASSBLOWING ONE-DAY INTENSIVE Saturday, January 17, 10 am-4 pm $78 members/ $96 nonmembers (materials provided) BASICS OF PRINTMAKING Sunday, February 8, 1-4 pm $20 members/ $25 nonmembers (materials provided)

WATERMEDIA FOR THE SERIOUS BEGINNER Thursday, February 26, 6-9 pm $20 members/ $25 nonmembers (materials provided) STUDIO SAMPLER Sundays, February 22-March 15, 1-4 pm (4 classes) $70 members/ $90 nonmembers (materials provided) POP-UP CARDS WITH A HEART Sunday, February 1, 1-4 pm $20 members/ $25 nonmembers (materials provided) CREATIVE COLLAGE Sunday, February 15, 1-4 pm $20 members/ $25 nonmembers (materials provided) GLASSBLOWING TWO-DAY INTENSIVE Wednesdays, February 18 and 25, 6-9 pm $78 members/ $96 nonmembers (materials provided) GLASSBLOWING – LEVEL 1 Saturdays, February 7-March 7, 10 am-2 pm (5 classes) $244 members/ $298 nonmembers (materials provided) THE ART OF WINE Thursday, February 19, 6-9 pm $40 members/ $50 nonmembers (materials provided)

CHILDREN’S CLASSES

CHILDREN’S CLASSES

THINGS THAT GO! Saturday, January 10, 10-10:45 am

LANDSCAPE PAINTING Saturday, January 17, 10 am-noon

THINGS THAT GO! Saturday, January 10, 11-11:45 am

IMPRESSIONS OF VAN GOGH Sunday, January 18, 2-4 pm

PUDDLE ART Wednesday, January 21, 10-10:45 am

MAKE A MOBILE! Saturday, January 24, 10 am-noon

MAKING MUSIC Saturday, January 24, 10-10:45 am

CREATURE CREATIONS Sunday, January 25, 2-4 pm

MAKING MUSIC Saturday, January 24, 11-11:45 am

CHINESE BRUSH PAINTING Saturday, February 7, 10 am-noon

MARBLE ROLLING ABSTRACT ART Saturday, February 7, 10-10:45 am

POP-UP VALENTINES Sunday, February 8, 2-4 pm

MARBLE ROLLING ABSTRACT ART Saturday, February 7, 11-11:45 am

PORTRAIT DRAWING Saturday, February 28, 10 am-noon

Ages 15-36 months (with parent) $7 members/$9 nonmembers (materials provided)

VALENTINE WINDOW ART Tuesday, February 10, 10-10:45 am

CHILDREN’S CLASSES

12

Exhibitions

Ages 10-13 $10 members/$15 nonmembers (materials provided) IMPRESSIONS OF VAN GOGH Sunday, January 11, 2-4 pm

IMPRESSIONISTIC ME! Wednesday, January 14, 10-11 am

JUNK SCULPTURE Saturday, January 31, 10 am-noon

INTRODUCTION TO IMPRESSIONISM Saturday, January 17, 10-11 am

PORTRAIT DRAWING Sunday, February 15, 2-4 pm

CHINESE LANTERNS Tuesday, January 27, 4-5 pm

SGRAFFITO! Wednesday, February 4, 10-11 am

JANUARY – DEBBIE LANGSTON 3 Spectacular Snowflakes 10 Watercolor Winterland 17 Snowman Puppets 24 Cool Collages 31 Snowball Sculptures and More

CHILDREN’S CLASSES

Ages 3-5 (with parent) $7.50 members/$10 nonmembers (materials provided)

VALENTINE LOVE BUGS Saturday, January 31, 10-11 am

Join our guest artists in the Education Center every Saturday from 1 to 4 p.m. as they help families create extraordinary works of art inspired by the Museum’s collection, exhibitions, and special occasions throughout the year. No advance registration is required for you and your children to drop in and make and take a unique creation home with you! Free with paid Museum admission.

Ages 6-9 $10 members/$15 nonmembers (materials provided)

SNOWMAN SCULPTING Wednesday, February 18, 10-11 am MARDI GRAS NECKLACES Tuesday, February 24, 10-11 am

THREE-DIMENSIONAL SCULPTURE Sunday, February 22, 2-4 pm

FOR HOMESCHOOLERS

Ages 6-13 $45 members/$55 nonmembers (materials provided) HOMESCHOOL ART: MIXED MEDIA Fridays, January 23-February 27, 12:30 pm (6 classes)

FEBRUARY – LINDA BUSHA 7 Presidents’ Day Hats 14 Valentine’s Day Cards 28 Mardi Gras Masks

The Collection Film

Education News


FRIENDS’ LECTURE “Andrew Wyeth’s World”

LAST CALL FRIDAY American Impressionism: Paintings from The Phillips Collection

Programs

Anne Classon Knutson, co-cuator of Andrew Wyeth: Memory and Magic Wednesday, February 18, 2009 Reception: Lobby, 6 p.m. Lecture: Noble Theater, 6:45 p.m.

Friday, January 16, 2009 5 - 8 p.m.

Join us in celebrating the closing weekend of American Impressionism: Paintings from The Phillips Collection! Bring your friends to enjoy a cocktail and mingle to the sounds of The Heather Nelson Trio. Take a guided tour of the special exhibition with Museum curators and spark your creativity with hands-on art activities, inspired by the art of the American impressionists. Also included will be informative wine tastings provided by the Museum Cafe and coffee seminars led by Starbucks™ coffee masters. Exciting door prizes will be given away, and other fun surprises are being planned, so be sure not to miss this event! Admission is free for members and $12 for nonmember adults. (Seniors and students are $10.) Use your Allied Arts OKCity Card and receive two-for-one admission!

Anne Knutson was guest curator for the exhibition Andrew Wyeth: Memory & Magic, which opened at the Philadelphia Museum of Art in 2006. She also is a contributing author of a book by the same name. Join Knutson as she discusses the life and work of Andrew Wyeth, whose career has spanned seven decades and has produced a wealth of technically stunning paintings and drawings that have won him a huge popular following. She also will discuss why widespread acceptance among critics, art historians, and museum curators continues to elude Wyeth. Friends’ lectures are free to museum members at the Friend, Friends, and Sustainer membership levels. Seating is limited to 250, and reservations are recommended. Prices are $15 for general membership levels and $20 for nonmembers per ticket on the day of the lecture. For more information, contact Jim Eastep at 236-3100, ext. 215.

DON’T MISS...

KING TUT

FAMILY DAY Harlem Renaissance

Visit The Dallas Museum of Art March 4, 2009, with the Oklahoma City Museum of Art and Journey House Travel.

Saturday, February 21, 2009 Noon - 4 p.m.

Photo by Eckie Prater

In celebration of Harlem Renaissance, the Oklahoma City Museum of Art presents a Family Day on Saturday, February 21, 2009. From noon to 4:00 p.m., families can visit the Museum of Art to view the exhibition and enjoy fun-filled activities for all ages, including hands-on art, face painting, minitours, scavenger hunts, door prizes, and live performances, inspired by the dances and Jazz music of the Harlem Renaissance era. All activities are included in the price of Museum admission: $12 adults, $10 students/seniors, and free to members and children ages 5 and under. Sponsored by

Contact Brenda Kelly (405) 463-5811 or brenda@journeyhouse.com to reserve your spot. Image: Canopic Coffinette of Tutankhamun

TEACHER WORKSHOP Harlem Renaissance

Thursday, February 12, 5-8 p.m. $10 Registration Fee (materials and boxed meal provided) Maximum enrollment is 40 participants. Join us for an in-depth study of the special exhibition, Harlem Renaissance. You’ll hear background information from guest speakers and participate in hands-on activities developed by art educators to take back to your classroom and share with students. Educators receive a full-color resource guide, complete with lesson plans, aligned with PASS skills, and a staff development certificate for their participation. Pre-registration is required. To register by phone, please call (405) 236-3100, ext. 213, or download a registration form at www.okcmoa.com.

Exhibitions

The Collection Film

Education News

13


Museum Board Honors Carolyn Hill

Named Collections Endowment Established In recognition of Carolyn Hill, retiring Museum president and CEO, her years of dedication to and accomplishments on behalf of the Oklahoma City Museum of Art, the Museum’s board of trustees has established the Carolyn A. Hill Collections Endowment. This endowment fund, to be held at Oklahoma City Community Foundation, will provide annual income, in perpetuity, for the purchase of art for the Museum’s permanent collection. The Museum is now accepting gifts or pledges of support in recognition of Ms. Hill to this endowment fund. Gifts may be made via payment to the Museum, through cash, credit card transaction, or the Carolyn Hill with Board Chairman Frank Hill transfer of appreciated stock. To date, $137,000 in gifts and pledges has been received, towards a goal of $250,000. To make your gift in recognition of Carolyn’s service to the Museum, or to address any questions you may have, please contact the Museum’s development office at (405) 278-8286. Gifts are tax-deductible as allowable by law, and donors to this fund will be acknowledged in the Museum’s annual report and on the Museum’s Web site, www.okcmoa.com.

Museum’s Annual Report Going Green! In an effort to be more eco-friendly, the Museum will no longer print its annual reports. The 2007-2008 Annual Report is offered on its Web site at www.okcmoa.com/aboutokcmoa/publications/annualreports. If you would like a copy of the annual report mailed to you or would like to pick one up while you’re visiting the Museum, please call or e-mail Leslie A. Spears, communications manager, at (405) 278-8206 or lspears@okcmoa.com.

The Museum has launched its mobile Web site. Visit us at okcmoa.mobi!

14

Exhibitions

Museum Awarded First NEA Grant

MetLife Foundation Matches Grant & GlobalHealth provides bussing The Museum has been awarded its first grant from the National Endowment for the Arts in support of Harlem Renaissance. “The Museum’s curatorial staff, in its development of Harlem Renaissance, crafted a winning application to the NEA,” said Development Director Ken Lindquist. “It focused on the exhibit’s scholarship, loans from an impressive list of nationally recognized art museums, and public programs developed in cooperation with Oklahoma African American organizations, businesses, and institutions.” A stipulation of this $25,000 grant was that the Museum match the funds, dollar for dollar. Seeking the matching funds for this grant, the Museum applied to the national MetLife Foundation Museum and Community Connections grant program. The Museum was one of over 70 applicants to this funding program and one of 16 museums to be awarded support in the amount of $25,000. In addition to this grant, local support has been received from GlobalHealth, which will underwrite a portion of school bus transportation, Museum admission, and docent-led tours for visiting school groups to Harlem Renaissance, February 5 through April 19, 2009.

Join Museum’s Facebook fan page The OKCMOA has a fan page on the fast-growing social networking site Facebook. So far more than 500 people from all over the country have signed up to be fans of the Museum. The fan page offers Museum updates and a way to find people you may know. Facebook gives people the power to share and makes the world more open and connected. Millions of people use Facebook everyday to keep up with friends, upload an unlimited number of photos, share links and videos, and learn more about the people they meet. For more information, visit www.facebook.com.

The Collection Film

Education News


2008 – 2009 Annual Fund Campaign Half Way to Goal Member Support Can Assure Campaign Success With six months to go for this fiscal year’s campaign, which ends on June 30, 2009, the Museum has reached 50 percent of its funding goal of $462,000. As of December 31, 2008, 211 gifts, ranging from $25 to $20,000, had been received, of which 94 were from first time donors to the campaign and 32 were increased gifts over a donor’s previous support of this campaign. These gifts, grants, and pledges support the Museum’s operations, education, film, and exhibition programs and are greatly appreciated, especially in this time of economic uncertainty. Now, the Museum must look toward the next six months to fulfill its campaign goal. “If each of the Museum’s 4,500 household members were to give an average of only $50.90, or more, the Museum would be assured of meeting its budgeted goal for this campaign and the much need support of Museum programs,” said Ken Lindquist, development director. Annual fund support may be directed toward education, film, special exhibition programs or the Museum’s area of greatest need. All donations will be recognized in the Museum’s Annual Report. Donors of $1,000 or more are enrolled in the Sustainer’s Circle, with their names placed on the Donor Wall in the Museum lobby and with an invitation to the annual donor reception hosted by the board of trustees on the Museum’s roof terrace. Gifts are tax-deductible as allowable by law, made payable by cash, credit card, or appreciated stock, and may be pledged over the next six months. All gifts will help the Museum fulfill its mission, enriching lives through the visual arts.

Saturday, February 7, 2009 7 p.m. to midnight Coca-Cola Bricktown Events Center

Oklahoma City

MUSEUM OF ART Contact Information Visitor Services (405) 236-3100, ext. 237 Administrative Offices (405) 236-3100, ext. 0 www.okcmoa.com

Museum Admission Members, Free Adults, $12 Seniors (62+), $10 College students (with ID), $10 Children (ages 6-18), $10 Children (ages 5 and under), Free Tours (15 or more), $10 per person School Tours (15 or more), $3 Audio Tours, $3.50 ($2.50 members)

Museum Hours.

Tuesday, Wednesday, & Saturday, 10am-5pm Thursday & Friday, 10am-9pm Sunday, noon-5pm Closed Mondays and Major Holidays

Film Admission Members, $5 Adults, $8 Seniors (62+), $6 College students (with ID), $6

Membership (405) 236-3100, ext. 215 or 200

Facility Rentals

Purchase tickets online at okcmoa.com/omelette party!

(405) 236-3100, ext. 207

Group Tours (405) 236-3100, ext. 207

Gift Annuities Support the Museum & Provide for the Donor In these days of unsure returns on investments, gift annuities are increasingly attractive, offering the donor: • a guaranteed life income, a portion of which is tax-free, based on the age of the donor at the time of the gift, and • a charitable deduction at the time of the gift. The Museum, working with the Oklahoma City Community Foundation, would like to extend the opportunity for you to make a lasting difference to the Museum, through a Charitable Gift Annuity. In addition to a guaranteed life income, a portion of this income will be tax-free for a number of years, based on life expectancy, and you will receive a charitable deduction in the year the annuity is established. Gift annuity options include single and two-life contracts. When the contract ends, the annuity assets will be used to benefit the Museum.

Exhibitions

This win/win opportunity benefits the donor(s) and the Museum. A representative of the Oklahoma City Community Foundation would be pleased to provide you with a gift calculation, including the income tax charitable deduction for one or two lives and a statement of the annual income tax impact over the life of the annuity, in confidence, and at no obligation. If needed, the representative will also work with your professional advisor to find the option that best fits your charitable and financial goals. For more information, please contact Joe Carter, director of planned giving at the OCCF, (405) 606-2914, j.carter@occf.org, or visit their Web site at www.occf.org. Please give this giving option your consideration as we work together to fulfill the Museum’s mission, enriching lives through the visual arts. For other planned giving options and information, please contact the Museum’s development office at 278-8286.

The Collection Film

School/Teacher Programs (405) 236-3100, ext. 212

Museum School School Tours/Reservations (405) 236-3100, ext. 213

Museum Store (405) 278-8233

Museum Cafe (405) 235-6262 Sunday Brunch, 10:30am-3pm Monday, 11am-3pm Tuesday-Saturday, 11am-10pm

OKCMOA offers docent-guided and self-guided tours to pre-scheduled adult and school groups of 15 or more. Call (405) 236-3100, ext. 207 (adults tours) or ext. 213 (school tours) for details.

Education News

15


nonprofit org. U.S. Postage PAID Okla. City, OK Permit No. 647

Oklahoma City Museum of Art DONALD W. REYNOLDS VISUAL ARTS CENTER

415 Couch Drive Oklahoma City, OK 73102 (405) 236-3100 www.okcmoa.com Address Service Requested

Enriching Lives Through the Visual Arts!

Passport to Paris

Nineteenth-Century French Prints from the Georgia Museum of Art

Julius Shulman

Museum Cafe urban. elegant. unforgettable.

Valentine’s Day is just around the corner. Call and make your reservations in the Museum Cafe. (405) 235-6262

Monday 11:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.; Tuesday-Saturday 11:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m. High Tea Tues.-Thurs., 3:00 to 5:00 p.m.; Sunday Brunch 10:30 a.m.-3:00 p.m.

Oklahoma Modernism Rediscovered

For more information, call (405) 235-6262. Make reservations or view menus at okcmoa.com/cafe

April 30 - June 7, 2009

Museum Store surprising. sophisticated. special.

• Books & Multimedia • Jewelry, Apparel, & Accessories • For Home & Office • Prints & Posters • For Kids of All Ages • From OKCMOA Collections & Exhibitions • Complimentary Gift Wrap • Personal Shopper Service • Gift Cards for All Occasions Christen Conger, store manager (405) 278-8232

SUPPORT THE ARTS FEBRUARY IS ALLIED ARTS MONTH. CALL 405-278-8215 TO PURCHASE YOUR OKCITY CARD TODAY.

TheViewJanFeb2009  

January / February 2009 FOR MEMBERS AND FRIENDS OF THE OKLAHOMA CITY MUSEUM OF ART

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