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Growing Concern

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A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E O H I O L A N D S C A P E A S S O C I AT I O N

Dormant Pruning Clinics November 13, 2019 / Hilliard, Ohio / PAGE 7 November 19, 2019 / Avon, Ohio / PAGE 7

OLA Annual Meeting: Making Sense of Your Numbers November 21, 2019 / St. Michael’s Woodside / PAGE 13


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PR ES I DEN T’S COLUM N

ADAM CAPICCIONI Ohio CAT

GRATITUDE Sandy Munley (Executive Director), Domenic Lauria (President Elect) and I recently attended a two-day association-based leadership event – The Great Lakes Nursery and Landscape Leadership Counsel’s Annual Conference – during which we participated in roundtable discussions focused on strategic planning, workforce development and effectively communicating with our membership. We did so in hopes that we could come to some understanding of how our association aligns with others when it comes to these topics of interest. On my way home from the conference (held on Mackinac Island in Michigan), I couldn’t help but think how enlightening it was to spend time with our neighboring associations. The sharing of ideas, debating of ideologies, and building of relationships which will benefit us all in the future was truly awesome! It really impressed upon me that our industry has so much raw talent, and not just in our own state. To be asked to take part in a nine association forum (Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Ontario, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin), and to see the commitment each organization has as stewards of this industry, is encouraging and humbling. The ideas we came up with and results we hope to reap will hopefully encourage our current board members, and you –

the future leaders of this organization – to go outside of your comfort zones and play an even larger role on our association’s team and, of course, within the family of professionals we’ve created, who truly care for one another and want to make a difference in our communities, as well as our industry. Thank you to both Sandy and Domenic for taking time out of your busy schedules and personal lives to be a part of our industry’s history by taking the steps necessary towards making a difference in our association. Speaking of thanks, I feel it’s pertinent to discuss the concept of gratitude and how we might be able to invoke a bit of it, especially at this time of year. continued on page 6 The Growing Concern | November 2019 | 3


TAB LE OF CON TEN TS N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 9 WWW. OH I OLA N D SCA P E R S. OR G OH I O’ S P R OF E SSI ON A L G REEN I N D U ST R Y A SSOCI AT I O N OHIO LANDSCAPE ASSOCIATION 9240 Broadview Road Broadview Heights, Ohio 44147 Phone: 440.717.0002, or 1.800.335.6521 Fax: 440.717.0004 Web: www.ohiolandscapers.org and www.myohiolandscape.com DESIGNER / EDITOR Rick Doll, Jr. REGULAR WRITERS Adam Capiccioni, Ohio CAT Michael J. Donnellan, King Financial, Inc. Jim Funai, LIC, Cuyahoga Community College Shelly Funai, Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens Sandy Munley, Ohio Landscape Association Bobbie Schwartz, FAPLD, Bobbie’s Green Thumb COVER: Landscape Ohio! merit award winner, BrightView, for their submission in the Best use of Color category.

FEATURES

3 PRESIDENT’S COLUMN Gratitude

8 PERENNIAL FOCUS

What’s New in Perennial Garden Design

14 FISCAL FITNESS

Comparing ETFs to Mutual Funds

18 FOR SAFETY SAKE

Pressure Washer Safety Tips

24 PLANT OF THE MONTH

Thujopsis dolabrata: False Arborvitae

26 FEATURE ARTICLE

Brick Paver Installation Methods

30 DIRECTIONS 31 WELCOME NEW MEMBERS 31 ADVERTISING INDEX 4 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

ADVERTISING INFORMATION Submission deadline: 10th of the month, prior to the month of publication. For advertising rates and ad specs, please call 440.717.0002, 1.800.335.6521, or email Rick Doll Jr. at rick@ohiolandscapers.org. DISCLAIMER The Ohio Landscape Association, its board of directors, staff and the editor of The Growing Concern neither endorse any product(s) or attests to the validity of any statements made about products mentioned in this, past or subsequent issues of this publication. Similarly, the opinions expressed in The Growing Concern are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Ohio Landscape Association. OFFICERS President Adam Capiccioni

OLA STAFF Executive Director Sandy Munley

President – Elect Domenic Lauria

Communications & Events Manager Rick Doll, Jr.

Treasurer Brian Maurer, LIC Immediate Past President Marie McConnell DIRECTORS Doug Ellis Dr. James Funai, LIC Philip Germann Stephanie Gray, LIC Cameron Maneri Joshua Way


C AL ENDAR OF EVEN TS UPCO M I N G OLA MEETINGS , EDUC AT I ON SE MI N A R S, A N D OT H E R G R E E N I N D UST R Y EV ENT S

NOVEMBER 2019

DECEMBER cont...

JANUARY cont...

NOVEMBER 13, 2019 DORMANT PRUNING (Central Ohio)

DECEMBER 13, 2019 LANDSCAPE OHIO! AWARDS ENTRY DEADLINE

JANUARY 31 - FEBRUARY 9, 2020 OLA DISPLAY AT THE GREAT BIG HOME & GARDEN SHOW

Don’t miss the opportunity to become an award winning landscape contractor. Entries for the 2019 program are due in the OLA office by 5pm on Dec. 13. For rules, regulations and entry information go to ohiolandscapers.org. landscapeohioawards.html. Questions? Contact OLA at 440.717.0002. See outside, back cover.

Explore this year’s One-tank Trips themed gardens created by some of Northeast Ohio’s top landscapers. If you are interested in volunteering to help staff the garden during show hours, please contact the OLA at 440.717.0002 as soon as possible. Spots do fill up quickly. This is a great opportunity to help promote the industry, our association, and your company to the general public.

Dormant Pruning of Landscape Plants is a half-day, hands-on clinic and a timely training opportunity for you and your crews to learn the proper pruning techniques. Held at Premier Plant Solutions in Hilliard, Ohio. See page 7.

NOVEMBER 19, 2019 DORMANT PRUNING (NE Ohio) Dormant Pruning of Landscape Plants is a half-day, hands-on clinic and a timely training opportunity for you and your crews to learn the proper pruning techniques. Held at Willoway Nurseries in Avon, Ohio. See page 7.

JANUARY 2020 JANUARY 16, 2020 OLA MEETING (NE Ohio) SPEAKER – TBD

NOVEMBER 21, 2019 OLA ANNUAL MEETING (NE OHIO) MAKING SENSE OF YOUR NUMBERS

Join us for our first meeting of the new year. Held at St. Michael’s Woodside. Sponsorship opportunities available.

Join us at our 2019 Annual Meeting as small business experts, Adam Sonnhalter and Jack Mencini (Maximum Value Partners Business Coaching & Consulting), help you make sense of your numbers. Held at St. Michael’s Woodside. Sponsorship opportunities still available. For more info call the OLA Office at 440.717.0002. See page 13.

JANUARY 23, 2020 QUICK ENHANCEMENT RENDERING – TENTATIVE

DECEMBER 2019 DECEMBER 12, 2019 STONE VENEER CLINIC (NE Ohio) This hands-on clinic will teach the basics of mixing mortar, installing and grouting stone veneer. The techniques you will learn can be applied to both manufactured and natural stone. The demand for veneers has increased and this is a great opportunity to learn how to apply it in house. Sponsored and hosted by Mason Steel. See page 23.

Save the date. More information to come.

JANUARY 20 - 30, 2020 SET-UP OF OLA DISPLAY AT THE GREAT BIG HOME & GARDEN SHOW If you are interested in volunteering to help construct this year’s OLA garden please contact the OLA at 440.717.0002 as soon as possible and we will forward your information on to our Garden Committee’s chairperson. This is a great opportunity to work alongside others in the industry , as well as contribute to the association.

MARCH 2020 MARCH 9 & 10, 2020 FOREMAN TRAINING Foremen have to walk the fine line in working side by side with employees while having to direct, motivate and critique them. In this seminar, they will learn how to more effectively handle tight deadlines, tight margins and increase customer satisfaction. Held in both NE and Central Ohio. More info to come.

MARCH 26, 2020 23rd ANNUAL LANDSCAPE OHIO! AWARDS GALA Join Ohio’s landscape community for an elegant, fun-filled evening of celebrating as we reveal the 2019 Landscape Ohio! award winners. This annual landscape competition was created to increase awareness of quality landscaping and how it improves our environment. More info to come.

The Growing Concern | November 2019 | 5


PR ES I DEN T’S COLUM N continued from page 3

By definition, the word gratitude can involve many different concepts, like: recognition, honor, grace, acknowledgement, and indebtedness – to name a few. I’m sure we can all agree that the essence of the word though is to be grateful, or thankful, for that which we are fortunate enough to have. That said, is it really any wonder why we observe Thanksgiving at this time of the year? Does it not give us all an opportunity to reflect back on the goals we met and potentially those yet to be achieved?

And for those moments when you’re backed into the conversation corner, or asked some dreaded, prying question like, “So, when are you two going to get married,” or “When are you two going to start having kids,” try having a few canned “thankful” responses on tap. Always keep in mind that just because someone asks you a question doesn’t mean that you’re obligated to answer it, especially if it’s something that makes you uncomfortable. Find a way to frame your answer to these types of questions in a manner that gently moves the conversation along, instead of letting it become a conversation stopper. Usually, deflecting and talking about something you’re thankful for can do just that!

While holding conversations during the upcoming holiday, I’d like to suggest a bit of a deviation from the norm in 2019. Instead of beginning conversations with something you’d normally talk about, i.e., sports weather and/or politics, try initiating conversations centered on the experiences you and your family and/or friends have had throughout the year. You can – by all means – establish the topic, but perhaps wait for them to ask follow-up questions. Or better yet, start by inquiring about their lives. “Aunt Martha, how are you enjoying volunteering at the library?” This is an excellent way to not only lighten the mood, but to refocus people on the true meaning of the holiday without them even knowing it.

Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours!

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As always, our board, our staff and I want you to know that – as an OLA member – whether you are a contractor member, associate member, student member, or an affiliate member, you are all considered our family and we are truly grateful for your participation in this wonderful organization.

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DORMANT PRUNING CLINIC

The most important landscape maintenance practice is the control of plant size by the correct method of pruning to retain the natural branching characteristics of the plants and integrity of the landscape design. Dormant Pruning of Landscape Plants is a half-day, hands-on clinic and a timely training opportunity for you and your crews to get back to the basics and learn the proper way to prune in time for winter and early spring pruning. GENERAL INFORMATION: This seminar will include a lecture as well as hands-on training. Attendees will need to bring their own notepad and pen, hand pruning shears, a small pruning saw, and long handle lopping shears, and will need to dress appropriately for outdoor practical training.

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Gail joined the Hidden Creek Team in 2014, bringing with her over 15 years of experience in Horticulture, Sales, Project, and Operations Management, and Employee Development. She has an Associate’s Degree in Landscape and Turfgrass Management from Owens Community College and has spent time working out of state in Michigan and Delaware gaining knowledge of Golf Course and Retail Garden Center operations, and Residential and Commercial Landscape Management. Gail grew up on a 500- acre farm in Northwest Ohio which cultivated her love of the outdoors.

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PEREN N I AL FOCUS

BOBBIE SCHWARTZ, FAPLD Bobbie’s Green Thumb In the spring, Anemone blanda white and blue and Narcissus ‘Tiny Bubbles’ augment the blooms of Arabis caucasica.

WHAT’S NEW IN PERENNIAL GARDEN DESIGN PART 2 / CHANGES IN EMPHASIS Previously, homeowners had large lots so there was room for a spring garden, a summer garden, an autumn garden, a rose garden, etc. Now, however, lots are smaller and there is more emphasis on using limited space better by either selecting plants with more than one season of interest or finding a way to plant more than one type of plant in the same space. For instance, bloom time can be extended or enhanced by planting bulbs. Try planting spring bulbs between clumping perennials or ornamental grasses. Early blooming bulbs will create a colorful space between grasses that have been cut back while others will double the color if planted among early blooming perennials like Arabis or Phlox subulata. Summer blooming bulbs such as lilies can also augment

perennials. In the fall, I love seeing the looks of disbelief when Colchicum and Crocus speciosus bloom behind my Lavender and in my Parsley. Small trees with more than one season of interest are a blessing for those with limited space. An excellent example is Acer palmatum ‘Viridis,’ the foliage of which is reddish in continued on page 11

8 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


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The Growing Concern |

October 2019 | 9


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PEREN N I AL FOCUS continued from page 8 spring, bronzy-green in summer, and bright orange in fall once the temperatures drop. Perennials and ornamental grasses should also be chosen for multi-season interest. Do they have long-lasting, different deadheads that can be a focal point or can provide food for birds and insects? Do they have interesting foliage shapes or sizes or colors? Today’s buzz word in the design world is sustainability. We need to preserve our natural resources, especially water. Therefore, it behooves us to design xeriscapes. This does not mean that the landscape will look like a desert. Many of our common plants will get root rot if they receive too much water. The one caution I would offer is that soil amendment will be a necessity unless the site for which you are designing has perfect drainage. Adding an enlarged aggregate such as Haydite or Turface MVP will increase drainage considerably. Some areas have more than adequate or too much moisture. They are ideal sites for stylized meadow or prairie gardens (meadows are usually wetter). The perennials best suited to such sites tend to be tall and late blooming and fare best when mixed with ornamental grasses that are often native to these sites. Where drainage is poor and rain water tends to collect, we designers can take advantage of such conditions by designing rain gardens. It is incumbent upon us to make them just as beautiful as other types of gardens we design. All too often, rain gardens look weedy and are unattractive. How many of these changes have you incorporated into your designs? Bobbie Schwartz, FAPLD, owner of Bobbie’s Green Thumb in Shaker Hts., Ohio, is a landscape designer, consultant, freelance writer, and lecturer whose specialties are perennial gardens and four season landscapes. In addition to being an Ohio Landscape Association (OLA) member, she is an active member of the Ohio Nursery and Landscape Association (ONLA) and Perennial Plant Association (PPA). Bobbie is a Past President of the Association of Professional Landscape Designers (APLD). Bobbie’s new book, Garden Renovation: Transform Your Yard into the Garden of Your Dreams, was published in November 2017 by Timber Press.

The Growing Concern | November 2019 | 11


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OLA MEETINGS SERIES

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DATE & LOCATION NOVEMBER 21, 2019 ST. MICHAEL’S WOODSIDE 5025 EAST MILL ROAD BROADVIEW HEIGHTS, OH AGENDA REGISTRATION / NETWORKING FOOD / CASH BAR 6:00 PM TO 7:00 PM OLA ANNUAL MEETING 7:00 PM TO 7:30 PM PROGRAM 7:30 PM TO 9:00 PM COST TO ATTEND MEMBERS: NO CHARGE NON MEMBERS: $30 REGISTER TO ATTEND BY NOVEMBER 14, 2019

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Making Sense of Your Numbers Being a business owner can be a bit overwhelming at times. You are faced with dozens of decisions on a daily basis, many of which you are dealing with for the first time. Everything from sick employees to spikes in new business to cash flow pinches and family squabbles. How are you supposed to have all the answers? Join us at our 2019 Annual Meeting as small business experts, Adam Sonnhalter and Jack Mencini (Maximum Value Partners Business Coaching & Consulting), help answer some of these questions and more... For close to two decades, Jack and Adam have been concentrating on helping small businesses achieve the kind of success they never before thought was possible. As coaches and entrepreneurs, they have lived and experienced the trials and tribulations that come with developing their own businesses and want to share that information with you.

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In his first career, Jack Mencini worked 17 years for several large publicly traded corporations, which exposed him to business throughout the world, before breaking away to the world of entrepreneurs. Since, Jack has owned and operated 16 companies, including five troubled companies, which he bought, fixed up and subsequently sold. The other companies were started from scratch and included one that made the Weatherhead 100 list of fastest growing companies in Northeast Ohio.

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F I SCAL FI TN ESS

MICHAEL J. DONNELLAN King Financial, Inc.

COMPARING ETFs TO MUTUAL FUNDS ETFs have revolutionized investing. Their phenomenal growth has afforded investors new opportunities to gain precise exposure to an array of asset classes, from sectors and industries to emerging markets and commodities. ETFs combine the benefits of other investment vehicles — like the diversification of index mutual funds and the real-time liquidity of stocks. Incorporating ETFs into portfolios starts with a question: ‘What does the investor need?’ Like a craftsman uses a specific tool for each task, specific ETFs can be used to diversify portfolios or target market segments covering a wide range of asset classes.

The closing value of mutual fund shares is calculated at the end of the trading day. If you buy or sell a mutual fund during the trading day today, you receive your purchase or sales price the next morning. After 4pm EST prices are calculated after the next day closing prices.

PRICING

TAX CONSEQUENCES

ETFs trade all day long at their market price, just like stocks. Investors buy and sell shares continuously throughout the day. ETFs captures the precise movement of market at time of purchase/sale.

The investor decides when to sell ETF shares, and any associated capital gains tax is paid at the time of final sale, offering greater control on the timing of tax consequences. However, changes in an ETF’s underlying index could trigger the sale of securities which, in addition to transaction costs, may trigger capital gains distributions. In this scenario, any realized gains or losses are passed on to ETF shareholders. To ensure tax efficiency, ETF managers attempt to limit these types of transactions as much as possible.

Mutual funds are priced at the end of the trading day. Shareholders purchase and redeem shares at the closing value of the fund. The price or net asset value (NAV) is the value of the fund’s assets, less liabilities, divided by the total number of shares outstanding.

14 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

continued on page 16


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F I SCAL FI TN ESS

continued from page 14 The investor decides when to sell a mutual fund share. To deliver cash in the amount of an investor’s position, the fund may sell a portion of a fund’s security holdings, which may generate a realized taxable gain. Taxes on those gains are absorbed by all shareholders in the fund.

FEES AND EXPENSES The average expense ratio for index ETFs is lower than that of index mutual funds. ETFs historically have had a lower average expense ratio — 0.53% versus 0.81% for mutual funds. --Morningstar Direct. Data as of 07/31/2019. Average Prospectus Net Expense ratio for index ETFs and open-end Index mutual funds as defined by Morningstar.

MINIMUM INVESTMENT With ETFs, there is no minimum investment requirement. An investor can purchase as few as one ETF share. Mutual funds may require investment minimums of $1,000 or more.

TRANSPARENCY Generally, the securities held within an ETF are known. As portfolio compositions are posted daily, there is no need to wait for the end of the quarter to review the fund’s holdings. Why does this matter? Investors have all the information needed to make informed investments—holdings are fully disclosed so investors understand their investments.

16 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

TRADING FLEXIBILITY ETF shares can be bought and sold through a brokerage account, the same as stocks. ETF shares can be bought and sold at their current market price anytime during the trading day. Why does this matter? Since ETFs can be traded intraday, they can be bought and sold in response to market movements. Additionally, unlike many mutual funds, there are not minimum holding periods for ETFs. Because they trade intraday, ETFs can be bought long or sold short. As always, consult with your financial advisor for information specific to your individual situation. Michael J. Donnellan is President of King Financial, Inc. specializing in stock selection and retirement planning. Feel free to contact him with any questions or comments at the M3 Wealth Management office at 17601 W. 130th Street – Suite 1 in North Royalton, Ohio. Phone number (440) 652-6370 Email: donnellan@m3wealthmanagement.com. Securities and advisory services offered through L.M. Kohn & Company, Registered Broker/Dealer, Member FINRA/SIPC/MSRB, 10151 Carver Rd. Suite 100 – Cincinnati, Ohio 45242, (800) 478-0788 * King Financial Inc. does not provide legal or tax advice, consult an attorney or tax professional regarding your specific situation. The information herein is general and educational in nature and should not be considered legal or tax advice. ** Scenarios illustrated are hypothetical in nature, results may vary. Past performance is not indicative of future results.


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The Growing Concern | November 2019 | 17


F OR SAFETY SAK E

PRESSURE WASHER SAFETY TIPS Contrary to popular belief, fall can be a great time to make money in the landscaping and lawn care world, with plenty of options out there to keep you and your staff busy during the leaner months. In addition to fall clean ups, the hanging of decorative lights, irrigation winterization, aeration & overseeding, and so on, pressure washing is a fairly cost effective way to stay engaged with your clients as you make your way through the months ahead. It’s important to remember that pressure washers are powerful machines, capable of cleaning large areas quickly and efficiently. As such, the risks associated with them can be catastrophic – up to, and including death. In 2017, OSHA reported over 800 instances of pressure washer related injuries. Thankfully, pressure washer injuries are 100% preventable. To ensure your safety, and the safety of those around you, while using your pressure washer, utilize the safety tips listed below.

NEVER AIM THE WAND AT ANYONE Always keep the wand pointed downward until you’re comfortable with the strength of pressure. Remember, some nozzles out there are very capable of etching concrete, meaning

they WILL do damage to your body. Even if there is no visible damage, the power from a pressure washer can cause internal tissue damage. Pressure washers are not toys and should not be treated like squirt guns.

WEAR PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT We’ll repeat ourselves: 0-degree nozzles can, and will, damage concrete! Sneakers and jeans won’t stand a chance. Your feet, hands, and eyes are at high risk of being injured. Not only from the high-pressure water spray but also from flying debris. A huge majority of pressure washer injuries are preventable simply by wearing proper safety gear. We recommend boots, gloves, long pants, safety glasses, and hearing protection. continued on page 20

18 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


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FOR SAFETY SAKE

continued from page 18

DON’T OPERATE A GAS POWERED PRESSURE WASHER IN ENCLOSED SPACES

PROTECT YOUR EQUIPMENT

Pressure washer engines emit carbon monoxide, which is very dangerous to inhale. Carbon monoxide poisoning can cause, among other things, nausea, dizziness, and headaches. Only pressure wash in well-ventilated areas. If you need to use a pressure washer in an enclosed space, it is highy recommend that you use an electric pressure washer. Save the gas-powered pressure washers for outdoor use.

Store pressure washers in a clean, dry, well-ventilated place that is away from sparks. When storing your pressure washer in an unheated area, be sure to winterize it before the first frost. If storing in an enclosed space where employees may be present for long periods of time, remove all gasoline from the engine. Protect your pump by using AR Pump Saver if you will be storing your pressure washer for more than three months, or if it will be subjected to freezing temperatures.

AVOID LADDERS & WORKING AT HEIGHTS

PRESSURE WASHER INJURY ASSESSMENT

The force of a pressure washer is easily underestimated. The kickback can easily cause you to lose your balance and fall. Instead of ladders, use extension lances, wands, and attachments to clean up high.

Any device that produces over 100 PSI has the potential for serious injury. Immediate acknowledgment and treatment of a pressure washer injury is crucial. Assess any injuries, including wounds, muscle function, and blood flow. Remove any objects that are in the way of caring for any visible wounds. Put pressure on the wound to stop bleeding. Gently clean around the wound with soap and clean water. Pat the wound dry and apply a clean adhesive bandage or dry, clean cloth to cover the wound.

BE AWARE OF YOUR SURROUNDINGS Check around the area you’ll be cleaning to ensure your safety. Consider all possible hazards before starting your pressure washer, including everything from children to pets, obstacles you could trip on such as hoses, and uneven or slippery surfaces. Then, while you’re pressure washing, remain aware of your surroundings for any changes that may turn hazardous.

SELECT THE RIGHT NOZZLE It might look cool to carve designs in wood or concrete, but spray tip nozzles can be very dangerous. Start out with the largest degree spray tip you have and adjust from there.

ELECTRIC SHOCK Water is an excellent conductor of electricity. Never spray an electrical outlet and always check any electrical cords for damage before use, exercising extra care when using an electric pressure washer.

20 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Persons who have been injured by high-pressure spray are urged to seek professional medical treatment as soon as possible. Not all pressure washer injuries are immediately obvious or even visible. Internal injuries may be present even if no external wound is apparent. Medical professionals can assess injuries more appropriately and provide appropriate medical treatment such as a tetanus shot, antibiotics, or referral to a specialist. This article was originally posted on the Vortexx Pressure Watcher blog, located at https://vortexxpressurewashers.com/blog/. Vortexx Power Washers are made in Detroit, Michigan, with a retail network of over 600 dealers from coast to coast.


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Company Contact Address City State Phone (______)

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3 23 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association REGISTER ONLINE AT CEU’S OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG/EDUCATION/STONECLINIC.HTML


PL ANT OF TH E M ON TH

JIM FUNAI, LIC Cuyahoga Community College Thujopsis Dolabrata, False Arborvitae

SHELLEY FUNAI, LIC Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens

THUJOPSIS DOLABRATA FALSE ARBORVITAE

Why do we call an Evergreen that looks like another the “false” one? There’s Pseudotsuge, or False Tsuga (Douglas fir), Chamaecyparis, which is False Cypress, and this month’s plant, Thujopsis, or False Arborvitae. Instead of “false,” it may make more sense to say, “Looks a lot like,” no? Perhaps it is just easier to say. Thujopsis is actually easily distinguishable from true Thujas in that it has much stouter branches, holding distinctly pointed terminal buds. The leaves in general are larger and will be wider than they are long. Flip the branch over and the stomata are so numerous that you will see distinct white lines on every leaf, giving the plant an almost two-tone look, like a Swamp White Oak. This is a monotypic genus which means there is only one species in the genus of Thujopsis (T. dolabrata) with a few naturally occurring varieties. Often, we find that a monotypic genus – think of Ginkgo (which is non-native) – will suffer very few pest issues. This plant is no exception. Planted in the correct conditions, this is a plant that you may never need to come back to for maintenance.

24 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Growing to a height of 10 to 15 feet is a safe bet for the Ohio garden, though with age in its native setting of Japanese forests, it can reach upwards of 50 feet tall (of course that is after 100+ years). The species is found in very well drained soils and must be planted in such. Heavy clay will likely cause death. It is most common on sandstone based soils with slight acidity, but seems to be tolerant of neutral to somewhat alkaline soils. It is most suited to a full morning sun, lasting into the afternoon, but will benefit from some late afternoon shade. In truth, the plant does fine in full sun, but it is heat that tends to upset it, which late afternoon shade can help with. Engelbert Kaempfer, a German naturalist, explored much of Russia, Persia, India, South-East Asia, and Japan in 1683-1693 and made a lot of important discoveries of plants for the western


world. There are a good number of plants bearing his name to some extent in honor of the explorations. During one trip back to Japan in 1712 Kaempfer “discovered” and collected samples of Thujopsis from forests on Yake-yama Mountain. However, it was not until another explorer, Thomas Lobb sent a cutting in 1853 back to his employer, John Veitch of Veitch Nurseries that the plant was able to be produced for western gardens. We think this history is an important part of telling the story of the plants we utilize to this day. Think of the determination to build our industry these early plant explorers had, traveling insane distances to help build biodiversity in our landscapes. True, some of the introductions turned out to become major issues, but so many more turned out to be garden gems. With a much longer history in English garden design, Thujopsis can be found throughout many European gardens. Over here in the Midwest we are obsessed with Thuja plicata because it grows fast and deer will leave it alone, so everyone is seeking dwarf forms of it without considering (it seems) the value of other lesser known Evergreens. It is important to note that the most beautiful specimens are going to be found in the cooler/moister parts of Europe and great examples can be found in Ireland, Wales, Western Scotland, and Southwest England. Thujopsis can also be a rock star in the Pacific Northwest. The big trick to keeping it happy here is consistent soil moisture (do not allow extended drought in the soil) and protection from harsh winds in winter.

Now if the larger form is not what you need, we have a perfect solution. To borrow the most perfect description from Bill Hendricks, Thujopsis dolabrata ‘Nana’ will “somewhat resemble a large moss.” It really does look like the little moss buttons that grown on shady sides of the roof around here. Staying under 3 foot x 3 foot, this little round mass of soft, wide foliage makes a great accent plant in a more formalized shrub border. Perhaps if the orientation of the house is just right, this is a great option right in the front landscape for a plant that “self-meatballs” and will not require any maintenance. There is also a form we have only found in Europe called ‘Aurea’ which has a great gold form, similar to a more stout Gold Mop. We have yet to locate a source for the plant in the US, but it will stay on our list of “dream plants” to collect over the years. We do hope you will consider the strong foliage effect this plant offers and suggest starting out with ‘Nana’ in place of perhaps some boxwoods (ensure proper cultural requirements) and see if you can expand the plant palate you are working with! Jim Funai is full-time faculty at Cuyahoga Community College, a NALP accredited associate of applied science in hoticulture degree program. He is pursuing a PhD in Landscape Engineering and Forestry and is a Licensed Arborist. Shelley Funai is Grounds Manager at Stan Hywett Hall and Gardens in Akron, Ohio, which offers a historic estate designed by Warren H. Manning and a beautiful manor house museum. She is Landscape Industry Certified in Ornamental Plant Care.

The Growing Concern | November 2019 | 25


F EATURE ARTI CLE

Brick, concrete, permeable, interlocking and stone pavers are popular paving options for exterior plazas, walkways, driveways and mass transit applications. These pavers are durable, offer many patterns and design options, are able to withstand vehicular traffic and maintain their integrity in demanding exterior freeze/thaw climates. For the purposes of this comparison, the most common type – brick paving – will be featured. Brick pavers should be specified to perform in the intended application according to the following industry standards: • •

Pedestrian paving brick – meeting ASTM C 902 (pedestrian – minimum. 2 3/8 inches thickness) Light traffic paving brick – meeting ASTM C902 (pedestrian and residential vehicular – minimum. 2 3/8 inches thickness) Heavy vehicular paving brick – meeting ASTM C1272 (heavy commercial vehicular – minimum 3 1/8 inches thickness)

WEATHER CLASSIFICATIONS • Class SX – exposed to water and freezing • Class MX – exposed to water but not freezing • Class NX – interior only TRAFFIC CLASSIFICATIONS • Type I – for areas that expect extensive abrasion – sidewalks, driveways in public areas • Type II – for areas that expect intermediate pedestrian traffic – residential sidewalks and driveways • Type III – for areas that expect low pedestrian traffic – residential floors and patios

26 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

There are three basic types of setting options for these types of pavers in demanding traffic bearing applications: • • •

Sand Set – Type F Bitumen Set – Type R Fixed Mortar Set – Type R

There are advantages and disadvantages to the three methods. A specifier will need to make an informed decision concerning the area of use and the amount of long-term maintenance that will be required for each of the systems. The following is a comparative analysis of the three methods:

SAND SET PAVERS Sand set pavers have the lowest initial cost of the three options. The setting system can be altered, depending on the level of traffic that will be exposed to the installation system. The installation starts with grading and compacting the soil under the pavers. A geotextile drainage layer can be placed over the soil to help facilitate drainage. Next, a layer of aggregate (3/4-inch) is placed and compacted well over the soil (up to 95 percent of standard Proctor density as specified in ASTM D-698 or to ASTM D 1557 for areas subjected to vehicular traffic). continued on page 28


Outdoor Structures AMISH CRAFTED AFFORDABLE DURABLE EASY TO INSTALL

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F EATURE ARTI CLE continued from page 26

The aggregate layer is then “rough screeded” to get the level of this layer close to the design level. This layer can be adjusted, depending on how robust the setting system is intended to be, i.e., heavy vehicular traffic requires 8 to 12 inches of aggregate base. Pedestrian traffic areas generally require 4 to 6. This base layer serves as the support for the sand set paving system. In addition, the aggregate base facilitates water run-off and drainage. Next, the sand layer is used to bed the pavers. The sand layer (meeting ASTM C 33 or CSA A23.1 (coarse, clean masonry sand) can range in thickness from 1- to 2-inch thickness. The sand layer is placed, compacted and screeded to the desired height. The pavers are then dropped into the sand layer. The pavers are tamped/compacted into place and finished to the desired height with a vibrating plate compactor capable of exerting 3,000 to 5,000 psi of centrifugal compactions force operating at 75 to 90 hertz. A plastic or rubber mat should be used on the compactor to avoid damage. Generally, at least two passes are made to seat the pavers. Masonry sand is swept into the paver joints to fill the joints. This process helps secure the pavers in place. The pavers are then compacted again until the joints are full. Polymeric sand can be used for this process and is generally worth the cost. Polymeric sand will harden and set firm once exposed to moisture. It stands up better to point loads within the joints and resists “washout,” when compared to traditional sand swept joints. Second generation/high-performance polymeric sands provide even superior performance and resist erosion and blow-out, and help prevent weed growth. In addition, these polymeric sands are permeable, allowing rainwater and oxygen to permeate. Possibly the most critical issue with sand set pavers is the edge restraints. Edge restraints can range from typical paver edging strips and spikes to poured concrete curbs and sidewalks. Most sand set paver issues arise from the fact that the edge restraints are not designed to withstand the “pushing” and “movement” that traffic will place on them. The edges can push out, which in turn causes the paving system to sink. It is to be expected that sand set pavers will require periodic ongoing maintenance to fix areas that have moved, dipped to vehicular patterns. Ongoing long-term maintenance costs should be factored into the life cycle analysis of sand set paving systems.

28 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Advantages of sand set pavers: • Economical • Low initial installation cost • Designed to accommodate minor movement without failure • Easily repaired • User-friendly installation materials • No off-gassing of installation products • Easy access to repair underground utilities • Can be designed as a permeable pavement Disadvantages of sand set pavers: • May require a thicker base for heavy duty applications • Edge restraints commonly experience problems with movement and “blowout” • Pavers can show traffic patterns • Tree roots can disturb installation • Drifting of pavers can occur • On-going maintenance is required • Traditional sand filled joints can experience erosion during periods of heavy rain and maintenance • Of the three systems, sand set pavers have the highest life cycle cost • No installation warranties apply

BITUMEN SET PAVERS Bitumen set pavers are considered the middle ground as far as cost is concerned. A suitable concrete base or a 3- to 6-inch bituminous binder base placed over a compacted aggregate base (8 inches) is required for this installation system. Once the concrete base is poured and properly cured, a layer of asphaltic bitumen is placed over the slab followed by a 2 percent modified neoprene tack coat layer. This layer acts as an adhesive as the pavers are dropped into place. Once the pavers are set into place, the joints are filled in similar fashion to the sand set pavers with traditional masonry sand or polymeric sand. For better and longer term joint performance, second generation/ high performance polymeric sands can also be used with the bitumen installation method. The bitumen layer is not considered a permanently fixed system in that the bitumen does allow some movement to take place. However, this method also requires good edge restraint to prevent paver separation and edge blow out. In addition, over time, vehicular traffic patterns can still reflect in the finish layer as the bitumen can experience long term fatigue.


F EATURE ARTI CLE

Advantages of bitumen set pavers: • Mid-grade initial installation cost • Designed to accommodate minor movement Disadvantages of bitumen set pavers: • Edge restraints commonly experience problems with movement and “blowout” • Pavers can show traffic patterns due to long term bitumen fatigue • Drifting of pavers can occur • Little tolerance for paver thickness variations • On-going maintenance is required • Traditional sand swept joints can experience erosion during periods of heavy rain or maintenance • Bitumen can give off a “petrol” odor • Bitumen is not considered to be an environmentally friendly product • Bitumen can off-gas (volatile organic compound) • Bitumen is not a user-friendly product (labor generally does not like this method) • No installation warranty in effect

MORTAR SET PAVERS Of the three installation types, the mortar set system is considered to be the most permanent fixing system. The mortar set system typically requires a concrete base and aggregate drainage layer beneath the concrete slab. Once the concrete slab is in place and properly cured (e.g. 28 days at 70??F), the mortar setting system can be placed. The thick bed methods (bonded or unbonded) or the bonded thin bed method can be used for this application.

PAVER PROTECTION Exterior pavers can be exposed to any number of potentials spills, oils, contaminants and other types of soiling as well exposure to impact and scuffing damage. To help protect the pavers from this potential damage, they can be sealed/treated with durable acrylic, scuff resistant coatings that provide a barrier against staining, damage from de-icing salts and abrasion. The coatings come in a variety of finish types including brilliant high gloss, wet look finish, color enriching finish and no gloss finish type. Some of these sealer types will deepen and enhance the inherent color of the paver, while drying to a clear finish that will not leave the surface slippery. Brick and other types of masonry paving can add character to any space. The versatility of the modules, patterns, colors, textures and joint and paver finishes can create endless design options to fit any condition, use and customer taste. Proper installation and finishing techniques can result in durable long term performance and design for years. Article written by Arthur Mintie, Director of Technical Services for LATICRETE International, Inc. LATICRETE is a family-owned, customer focused, world-wide manufacturer marketer of green flooring and facade materials, used in residential, commercial and industrial applications. This article appeared on the Masonry Contractors Association of America (MCAA) at https://www.masoncontractors.org and on the Masonry Magazine blog, located at https://www.masonrymagazine. com/blog

Mortar set pavers are permanently fixed in place and require little long-term maintenance. Of the three paver setting methods, mortar set pavers have the lowest life cycle cost. Advantages of mortar set pavers: • Low maintenance required • Low life-cycle cost • Resistant to point loading • Resistant to fatigue and reflecting traffic patterns • Resistant to edge blow out • User-friendly installation materials • Installation materials do not give off gas • Long-term manufacturer performance warranties can apply • No weeds will grow in between the joints Disadvantages of mortar set pavers: • High initial installation cost • Repairs are the most difficult and expensive continued on page 33 The Growing Concern | November 2019 | 29


D I RECTI ON S

SHOWING YOUR WORK Based off of what I’ve seen via the numerous projects posted to social media this year, you have all been very hard at work, and it shows! There are some beautifully executed hardscape and planting installations out there, along with some incredibly well-maintained landscapes, which you are rightfully proud to share. While it’s no surprise to me that OLA member companies do some amazing work, the extent to which you’ve refined your craft might not be 100% obvious to all of those potential clients who are looking to hire a contractor for 2020 and beyond. That’s where we can help! Have you ever thought that your projects might be considered award-winning? Or, that they might be featured in some of Ohio’s most-read magazines? Our Landscape Ohio! Awards Program does just that, giving you the opportunity to showcase your company’s talents to not only your peers, but to thousands of potential clients state-wide! It is not difficult to enter. There’s no reason to be intimidated to give it a try. And, even if you’ve entered in the past, there’s nothing to keep you from entering again! Right now is the time of year when you should begin to pull your entries together. Find the photos that best depict your projects and simply tell the story of what you did and why you did it. What was your client’s vision? What problems did you help them solve? And most of all, how did you make their dream become a reality? If you’re thinking this might be the year, and you aren’t sure where to begin, I am happy to help. Most companies call several times when entering their first projects – as do seasoned vets – so there is no reason to be shy! There are no dumb questions, so ask away!

30 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

SANDY MUNLEY Executive Director

After we collect all of the entries – for which the deadline is December 13th, 2019 – they will be organized into a presentation which is judged (anonymously) by a panel of your peers. Once the winners are chosen, those projects then become the focus of one of our industry’s most spectacular evening events, the 2019 Landscape Ohio! Awards Gala. With each entry (win or lose) you get two tickets to the Awards Gala, which will be held on March 26th at Windows on the River in the Flats of Cleveland. This event is a wonderful, upscale celebration of our profession that includes a cocktail hour, elegant dinner and an Academy Awards-style presentation! It is truly a great way to get inspired for the spring season. We do not announce the winning projects in advance, so the suspense adds to the fun and excitement. In addition, winning projects are featured in the May issues of Cleveland Magazine and Ohio Magazine in a feature section called Landscape Ohio Magazine – just in time for the beginning of the season. Also, some entries will be chosen to grace the cover of the magazine you are holding in your hand right now, for all of your peers to see. For those of you who may be holding off on entering, now that we’ve moved to a larger venue, we will be opening up Gala registration to companies that are not entered in the awards program. This is a great opportunity to get your feet wet, see the type of projects that win, and share a fun night out with the industry! Please join us!


ADVERTI SI N G I N D E X OLA’s NEW MEMBERS The Ohio Landscape Association is delighted to welcome the following members:

STUDENT MEMBERS Auburn Career Center  Peter Brent  Tyrelle Early  Christian Eveland  Ryan Ford  Declan Goerndt  Shayla Grimmer  Annelise Holbert  Cooper Jochum  Raymond Johnson  Grace Kimpton  Dae’Shawn Lockett

Andrew Marcelli  Anthony Narducci  Tanner O’Brien  Quentin Piotrowski  Alex Shields  Veronica Shockey  Emily Speck  Tyaeh Taylor  John Trebec  Camden Weidenaar  Garrett Young

Gates Mills Environmental Center  Jacob Balog  Evan Mastrangelo  Daniel Breskvar  Chris Occhionero  Jacob Burton  Trevor Puglis  Michael Jones  Eric Rodriguez  Caleb Kautz  Zach Trivisonno Portage Lakes Career Center  Skyler Bray  Aleah Hartley  Abby Buck  Aaron Knipp  Ethan Cambier  Dylan Lee  Maria Caplinger  Renn Sivert  Hannah Fuhry  Jay Smith

2020 COMMITTEE MEETINGS OLA committees are a great way for members to get more involved with the association. We are always looking for new volunteers to help on our Awards, Education, Golf, Programs, Legislative, Membership & Workforce Development committees! At our January meeting, we will be filling out our committees for the 2020 year. If you, or someone on your team is interested in joining a committee, please have them call the OLA office. Committee involvement is also a great stepping stone towards working on the OLA board. For more info, call the OLA office at 440.717.0002, or email us at info@ohiolandscapers.org.

10

Abraxus Salt

17

Art Form Nurseries

2

Botson Insurance Group, Inc.

27

Davis Tree Farm & Nursery, Inc.

17

Frank Brothers

21

Klyn Nurseries, Inc.

12

Mason Structural Steel, Inc.

12

Millcreek Gardens

6

MRLM

12

O’Reilly Equipment

10

ONLA

9

Premier Plant Solutions

15

Salt World

15

Sohar’s / RCPW, Inc.

22

Unilock

27

Valley City Supply

19

VanCuren Tree Services, Inc.

21

Zoresco Equipment Company The Growing Concern | November 2019 | 31


9240 Broadview Road Broadview Hts., OH  44147-2517

11/19

Get the recognition your company deserves...

ENTER TODAY!

Ohio’s most prestigious landscape enhancement awards program. 9240 Broadview Road Broadview Heights, Oh 44147 Phone: 440.717.0002 Toll Free: 1.800.335.6521 Fax: 440.717.0004 OhioLandscapers.org MyOhioLandscape.com

DEADLINE TO ENTER DECEMBER13, 2019

RULES, REGULATIONS & ENTRY FORMS AVAILABLE @ OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG

Profile for Sandy Munley

The Growing Concern November 2019  

The Official Monthly Publication of the Ohio Landscape Association

The Growing Concern November 2019  

The Official Monthly Publication of the Ohio Landscape Association