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Growing Concern

The

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A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E O H I O L A N D S C A P E A S S O C I AT I O N

CDL Training

June 20, 2017 / Indiana Wesleyan University PAGE 13

Plant I.D

July 14, 2017 / Davis Tree Farm & Nursery PAGE 7

OLA Scholarship Golf Classic August 3, 2017 / Mallard Creek Golf Course PAGE 22


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PR ES I DEN T’S COLUM N

CATHY SERAFIN

ASLA, RLA

Suncrest Gardens

LEAVING A LEGACY One of my goals in the president’s letter each month is to encourage the Landscape Ohio readership to focus on a topic, maybe explore a different viewpoint, or just become more aware of a situation. In the end, the goal is to relate the subject matter back to the landscape profession. This month, via some recent conversations with my husband Jeff, we are going to explore leaving a legacy. For me, in a somewhat odd way, this begins with not understanding lazy people – the ones who purposefully avoid work or move very slowly when called to action. Often the call for movement can be something enjoyable! As with the power of positive thinking, having energy to work or play is a contagious phenomenon. That said, maybe that lazy person has gotten stuck in the grind of being inactive. I will give them the benefit of doubt and hope that something sparks their will to move!

than motivated young person in our extended family. Instead of referring to her as lazy, Jeff simply stated that she needed to realize that when we are placed on this earth we have a duty to contribute to society. We do this daily as we work, raise our families, nurture employees and relationships, participate in organizations and sports, worship and volunteer. There are so many ways to offer our personal contribution to society. And when we offer them in a lasting manner, passed down to future generations, that becomes our legacy.

My husband Jeff almost always has an eloquent way to communicate what I describe in a very basic manner. On the topic of underperformers, we were recently discussing a less

As recently as 10 or 15 years ago, I didn’t understand why leaving a legacy was important. In fact, I thought it was a lofty notion, maybe something that extremely wealthy folks continued on page 6 The Growing Concern | June 2017 | 3


TAB LE OF CON TEN TS J U N E 2 0 1 7 W WW. OH I OLA N D SCA P E R S. OR G OH I O’ S P R OF E SSI ON A L G REEN I N D U ST R Y A SSOCI AT I O N OHIO LANDSCAPE ASSOCIATION 9240 Broadview Road Broadview Heights, Ohio 44147 Phone: 440.717.0002, or 1.800.335.6521 Fax: 440.717.0004 Web: www.ohiolandscapers.org and www.myohiolandscape.com EDITOR Rick Doll, Jr. REGULAR WRITERS Michael J. Donnellan, King Financial, Inc. Jim Funai, LIC, Cuyahoga Community College Shelly Funai, Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens Sandy Munley, Ohio Landscape Association Bobbie Schwartz, FAPLD, Bobbie’s Green Thumb Cathy Serafin, ASLA, RLA, Suncrest Gardens COVER: 2017 Landscape Ohio! Honor Award winner, J. Barker Landscaping Company, for their Garden Structure & Pavements submission, “A Private Residence in Richfield, OH.”

FEATURES

3 8 12 17 25 29 32 35 35

PRESIDENT’S COLUMN

Leaving a Legacy

PERENNIAL FOCUS

Asclepias Tuberosa: Milkweed

FISCAL FITNESS

Three Questions for Building and Maintaining a Portfolio

ADVERTISING INFORMATION Submission deadline: 10th of the month, prior to the month of publication. For advertising rates and ad specs, please call 440.717.0002, 1.800.335.6521, or email Rick Doll Jr. at rick@ohiolandscapers.org. DISCLAIMER The Ohio Landscape Association, its board of directors, staff and the editor of The Growing Concern neither endorse any product(s) or attests to the validity of any statements made about products mentioned in this, past or subsequent issues of this publication. Similarly, the opinions expressed in The Growing Concern are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Ohio Landscape Association.

FEATURE ARTICLE

OFFICERS President Cathy Serafin, ASLA, RLA

PLANT OF THE MONTH

President – Elect Marie McConnell

Communications & Events Manager Rick Doll, Jr.

FOR SAFETY SAKE

Treasurer Adam Capiccioni

Membership Coordinator Noreen Schraitle

5 Negative Effects of High Overtime Levels Carpinus Caroliniana: American Hornbeam Basic Practices of Roadside Mowing Operation

DIRECTIONS ADVERTISING INDEX WELCOME NEW MEMBERS

4 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Immediate Past President Bryan Taynor DIRECTORS Brian Maurer, LIC Domenic Lauria Doug Ellis James Funai, LIC Michael T. Ahern, LIC Steve Moore

OLA STAFF Executive Director Sandy Munley


C AL ENDAR OF EVENTS U P CO M I N G O L A MEETINGS , EDUC ATION SE MI N A R S, A ND O TH ER GREEN INDUS TR Y EVE N T S

JUNE

AUGUST 14, 2017 SNOW & ICE CLINIC

JUNE 20, 2017 CDL TRAINING

Held at St. Michael’s Woodside in Broadview Hts. Ohio. For more info call the OLA Office at 1-800-335-6521.

April’s class sold out almost immediately, so we our happy to offer a second opportunity to join us for Commercial Driver’s License Training. Learn the information you need to know to pass the state CDL test. See page 13 for more information.

JULY JULY 14, 2017 PLANT I.D. CLINIC This Plant ID Clinic is a hands-on training opportunity for you and your crews that will cover the basics of Plant ID for plants typically used in Zone 6 in Ohio. Many of the plants that will be covered are on the plant list for the Landscape Industry Certified Technician’s Test. Sponsored by Davis Tree Farm & Nursery. See page 7 for more information.

AUGUST AUGUST 3, 2017 OLA SCHOLARSHIP GOLF CLASSIC Join us at Mallard Creek Golf Club in Columbia Station for the OLA Scholarship Golf Classic! Proceeds from this event benefit our OLA Scholarship Fund. Registration and sponsorship opportunities are now available. See page 22 for more info.

SEPTEMBER SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 PLANT GEEK DAY Love plants? Join us for a fun day of plant related education and visit sponsor booths. Held at St. Michael’s Woodside in Broadview Hts., Ohio. For more info call the OLA Office at 1-800-335-6521.

SEPTEMBER 20, 2017 MEETING – NE Ohio Joins us for a Landscape Facility Tour of Brian-Kyles Landscapes of Distinction, located in Lorain, Ohio. For more info call the OLA Office.

OCTOBER OCTOBER 12, 2017 MEETING – Central Ohio

TEST DATES & APPLICATION DEADLINES JULY 19 WRITTEN TEST 2:30pm @ Ohio State ATI, Wooster 1328 Dover Rd, Wooster, OH 44691

JULY 20 WRITTEN TEST Day Long @ Ohio State ATI, Wooster 1328 Dover Rd, Wooster, OH 44691

JULY 20 HANDS-ON TEST Day Long @ Ohio State ATI, Wooster 1328 Dover Rd, Wooster, OH 44691

OCT. 3, 2017 WRITTEN TEST @ 9 AM 9:00am @ Ohio State ATI, Wooster Application Deadline: 09/12/17

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PR ES I DEN T’S COLUM N continued from page 3 had the luxury of imparting to their families as they left this world. As I age and mature, however, I seem to reflect more on life as I am driving, or on my nightly walks through our neighborhood. Now, (finally) I am starting to understand the value of leaving a legacy. When we die, positive or negative, we will leave a legacy to our children, families, friends, fellow workers, customers, the community and society. Leaving a legacy doesn’t always involve material things, like inheritances. Bruna Martinuzzi, of Claire Enterprises Ltd., imparts that ‘A legacy isn’t only about what you have earned, but also about what you have learned, bequeathing values over valuables.’ Sharing with others what we have gained through our life experiences is a tremendous legacy – a priceless gift. Chinese philosopher Lao Tzu shared with us this wonderful quote regarding leaving a legacy: ‘If you know when you have enough, you are wealthy. If you carry your intentions to completion, you are resolute. If you live a long and creative life, you will leave an eternal and creative legacy.’ As professionals within the landscape industry in Ohio, we are growing plants, supplying materials and creating and maintaining beautiful spaces for our customers. Our profession at work every day has a wonderful opportunity to leave a lasting landscape legacy for future generations to enjoy. My challenge to you over the next month is to examine what your legacy will be to your family, friends, society and the landscape profession. Thinking about what you want your legacy to be stimulates you to form a plan of action for creating a better self and your legacy for future generations. And while you are in that mode, take a moment to recognize and thank someone who has made you a better person by sharing their legacy and trademark on you. On a closing note, I would like to share a personal legacy my parents left for their children. My mom died young and my dad way too soon. Thirty-two and seventeen years later, I still miss them every day. When I visit them at a hillside graveyard above the Ohio River Valley, in a beautiful mausoleum they share with many of their friends and neighbors from our church, I thank them as I cry. I tell them how lucky I was to be their child and share with them that everything in me that is good, healthy, wise, funny,

6 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

loving and giving I learned from them. I learned it every day they were alive, through their work ethic, their family and church priorities, their unbelievable sense of humor, their giving and loving ways within the neighborhood and community, and especially their persistence in the face of adversity. As always, I would like to personally thank you for your membership in the Ohio Landscape Association, your participation and sponsorships of our educational, social and scholarship programs. You are a big part of growing the Landscape Profession in the State of Ohio into a stronger, more unified and powerful organization! Enjoy what promises to be a busy, exciting, surprising summer and always take time to enjoy your family and friends! Your OLA President, Cathy Serafin

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Acct. No. Exp. Date Name on Card Signature Billing Address + Zipcode for Card Last Three Digits on Signature Line Make checks payable and send to: Ohio Landscape Association, 9240 Broadview Rd, Broadview Hts., OH 44147 Register online, by mail, phone or fax • Phone 440-717-0002 or 1-800-335-6521 • Fax 440-717-0004 Website: www.ohiolandscapers.org


PEREN N I AL FOCUS

BOBBIE SCHWARTZ, FAPLD Bobbie’s Green Thumb Asclepias species produce some of the most complex flowers in the plant kingdom, comparable to orchids in complexity.

ASCLEPIAS TUBEROSA MILKWEED

It is not surprising, with so much emphasis on increasing Monarch butterfly populations, that the Perennial Plant Association has chosen Asclepias tuberosa as its 2017 Perennial Plant of the Year. This perennial is known for its ability to support insects, birds, and pollinators. The Milkweed family is composed of perennials that are found in the wild in most of the United States plus Ontario and Quebec. Some of these native American species have become valuable garden plants and others have been hybridized in order to offer more choices. The best-known member of the family is Asclepias tuberosa, commonly known as Butterfly Weed. Hardy from zones 4-9, it is slow to foliate in the spring but is easily identified later by its bright orange umbels that bloom in early June and on into July, if deadheaded, on two to three foot stems. The narrow leaves spiral up the hairy, stiff stems. Unlike other milkweeds, this one does not have milky sap in its

8 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

stems. If the flowers are left on the plant after blooming, additional interest is provided by the spindle-shaped seed pods which split open when ripe, releasing numerous silkytailed seeds for dispersal by the wind. If you do not wish to be the recipient of innumerable seedlings, these pods must be pruned off before they split. The flowers are long-lasting as cuts for arrangements and so are the pods. Cut the stems when more than half the florets are open; buds do not open well once the stem is cut. Place immediately in warm water and then later in cold water to eliminate the little sap from seeping out into the water. continued on page 11


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PEREN N I AL FOCUS

continued from page 8 As a perennial with a deep tap root, Asclepias tuberosa is droughtresistant and thus a valuable plant for the sunny, dry garden, meadows, prairies, or naturalized/native plant areas. It is also perfect for a butterfly garden since the flowers are a nectar source for many butterflies and the leaves are a food source for monarch butterfly larvae (caterpillars). For those who can’t abide orange, there are now cultivars such as ‘Hello Yellow’, a golden yellow, which is slightly shorter than the species, and ‘Gay Butterflies’ that is a mix of yellow, orange, and red-flowered forms.

combination, plant Salvia ‘Caradonna’ in front of it. The combination of orange and purple is smashing. If you are looking for a perennial for inclusion in a butterfly garden or a prairie garden, look no further. Asclepias tuberosa should be your plant of choice.

Bobbie Schwartz, FAPLD, owner of Bobbie’s Green Thumb in Shaker Hts., Ohio, is a landscape designer, consultant, freelance writer, and lecturer

This is a very low maintenance perennial, subject to no serious insect or disease problems. Happily, the deer usually ignore it.

whose specialties are perennial gardens and four season landscapes. In addition to being an Ohio Landscape Association (OLA) member, she is an active member of the Ohio Nursery and Landscape Association (ONLA)

Butterfly Weed combines well with yellow Rudbeckia ‘Goldsturm’ as well as some of the Rudbeckia species that are found in meadows and prairies. For an eye-opening

and Perennial Plant Association (PPA). Bobbie is a Past President of the Association of Professional Landscape Designers (APLD). She currently serves as chair of the ONLA Plant Selection Committee.

The Growing Concern | June 2017 | 11


FI SCAL FI TN ESS

MICHAEL J. DONNELLAN King Financial, Inc.

THREE QUESTIONS FOR BUILDING AND MAINTAINING A PORTFOLIO In a world of increased market risk, policy uncertainty and an outlook for lower long-term returns across asset classes, how well you build your investment portfolio matters like never before. It can mean the difference between a comfortable or a compromised retirement, a debt-free or an indebted college degree. Contrary to common belief, “portfolio construction” is not a simple matter of choosing securities—stocks for growth, bonds for income—and assigning some mix of the two. It’s important to understand how the various components work together, how they might be expected to perform over a given time horizon, and what risks might be embedded in them. And even that’s an oversimplification.

12 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Here are the three basic questions you should ask yourself as you embark on the process of constructing a portfolio that can address your financial needs and goals. And these should be the foundation for annual reviews to keep you on track. continued on page 14


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Daryl Lengyel is a former truck driver and the owner/president of CDL Training Consultants. CDL Training Consultants has been in business since 1990 and Daryl has been a valued member of the OLA for over 18 years. He is a former state test examiner who has been helping train employees on the steps to obtaining their CDL liscense for many years, specializing in commercial drivers license training and driver’s safety training. CDL Training Consultants is located in Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio.

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Cancellations made 8 to 14 days prior to the course start date will be subject to a 30% cancellation fee. NO refunds will be issued for cancellations 7 days or less prior to the course, no shows, or cancellations on the day of the course. If, for any reason, the course is cancelled, enrollees will be notified, and fees refunded in full. Register early as class size is limited and will sell out quickly. Payment Received Before 06/06/17

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Company Contact Address City State Phone (______)

Zip

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NAME OF ATTENDEE

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FOR MORE ABOUT THIS EVENT, OR TO REGISTER, VISIT WEBSITE The OUR Growing ConcernAT | January 2017 | 13 13 | Official Publication of TheINFORMATION Ohio Landscape Association OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG/EDUCATION/CDLTRAINING


FISCAL FI TN ESS

continued from page 12

WHAT AM I INVESTING FOR? Granted, this is a statement of the obvious, but many investors fail to orient their investments by objective. To begin, assess the following: • How much you have. • How much you need at some point in the future. • How much your investments need to earn to get you from point A to point B. The tougher question: Is my objective actually achievable? In other words, is that required rate of return possible given the time frame and expected market conditions you’re working under? Consider: How probable (or improbable) is it, and how much risk might you need to take in order to pursue that return. Ultimately, the answers to these questions will help you understand if your goal is a reasonable one, or if your time frame or expectations may need to be adjusted.

14 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

WHAT TYPE OF RISK AM I ABLE AND WILLING TO ACCEPT IN PURSUIT OF THOSE GOALS? In the industry, we often quantify risk as a mathematical concept, such as standard deviation. But we are keenly aware that, for investors, risk is emotional. And that can be hard to plan for. Often, the framing of risk can make all the difference. We often talk about what percentage loss a client can tolerate, but you should put that in hard dollar figures. Imagine that a $100,000 investment in an asset with an annualized level of volatility of 10% could easily undergo a drawdown of $10,000 in any given year. Assessing your tolerance for risk is probably not about whether 10% volatility feels OK to you. It’s about the more tangible question: Can I bear a loss of $10,000 in value at any moment in time?


Also understand the risk you are taking. Risk comes in many forms, from the volatility risk in the stock markets or interest rate risk, credit risk, liquidity risk, concentration risk and many more.

WHAT AM I WILLING TO PAY IN THIS PURSUIT? Portfolio costs come in two categories: fees (transaction costs or management fees) and taxes. Each of these eat into the returns a portfolio generates. That drag is intensified in times of low returns.

oriented. Working with a professional financial advisor can bring objectivity and expertise to the conversation. It might also bring some peace of mind: Research shows that investors who work with a financial advisor feel more confident and better prepared for their financial future. Your life goals deserve that much. No questions asked. As always, consult with your financial advisor for information specific to your individual situation. Michael J. Donnellan is President of King Financial, Inc. specializing in stock

Being wise about your cost budget means considering how low-cost exchange-traded funds (ETFs) might work together with high-conviction active strategies. In short: You want to consider where it makes sense to pay more for manager skill and high-conviction ideas vs. gaining broad market exposure with index-tracking investments.

selection and retirement planning. Feel free to contact him with any questions or comments at the M3 Wealth Management office at: 17601 W. 130th Street – Suite 1 in North Royalton, Ohio. Phone number (440) 652-6370 Email: donnellan@m3wealthmanagement.com Securities and advisory services offered through L.M. Kohn & Company

While these are three seemingly simple questions, they require hard thought to arrive at meaningful answers around which a productive investment portfolio can be built and

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F EATURE ARTI CLE

5 NEGATIVE EFFECTS OF HIGH OVERTIME LEVELS Overtime can be beneficial for both employees and companies. It provides the company with the flexibility to cover unexpected absences and changes in demand without hiring more staff – and – it gives employees extra income at a premium rate. However, overtime has its downsides, too. While many employees will happily take as much overtime as is available, there is growing scientific evidence that relying too much on overtime can lead to numerous risks, for both the individual and the company. Here are five consequences of relying on excessive amounts of overtime.

#1. INCREASED HEALTH PROBLEMS A considerable body of scientific work has explored the health problems associated with working excessive overtime. Some health problems that have been linked to working longer-than-normal hours include: • Lower-back injury in jobs with a lot of manual lifting • Higher blood pressure • Increased mental health issues • Increase in total and lost workday injury rates • Lower birth weight or gestational age in women • Heavy alcohol consumption among men • Higher suicide rates

Along with these risks, a study by Cornell University shows that approximately 10% of employees who work 50 to 60 hours per week report severe work-family conflicts. This number jumps to 30% for those who work more than 60 hours. In line with this train of thought, divorce rates also increase as weekly hours increase. These factors contribute, in turn, to both mental health and alcohol problems. A Canadian study showed that workers who increased their work hours from 40 hours or less per week to over 40 hours per week experienced an increase in tobacco and alcohol consumption, an unhealthy weight increase among men, and an increase in depression among women. continued on page 18 The Growing Concern | June 2017 | 17


F EATURE ARTI CLE continued from page 17

These health problems, along with the changes in lifestyle choices, contribute to the indirect costs of allowing excessive overtime to occur. They also lend themselves to higher health care costs, absenteeism, and an increase in turnover, all while productivity begins to decrease.

#2. INCREASED SAFETY RISK Long work hours have been linked to increased safety risk in several studies including:

• • • •

Safety and general job performance Impaired performance and lowered attention span An increase in job related errors 3x increase in accident rates after 16 hours of work

These additional safety problems are likely due to worker fatigue, which can be attributed to either a single long day, or the cumulative effect of multiple days of long hours.

18 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

A German study showed that employees who worked over 48 hours a week were 5 times more likely to have a driving accident (either while traveling to and from a job site, or while commuting to and from work). While working at night and during the early morning has been linked to an increased risk of transportation accidents, research also suggests that long work hours in themselves contribute to accident rates. As they become more fatigued, drivers become less cautious, execute more dangerous maneuvers, and exhibit more erratic driving patterns. Circadian data from shift work operations (not just transportation operations) shows that companies with more fatigue-related problems are also likely to have higher rates of overtime, emphasizing the effect that longer work hours can have on sleep quantity and quality.


#3. DECREASED PRODUCTIVITY Studies and reports also suggest that productivity decreases with increased overtime hours. In some instances, it’s been shown that performance can decrease by as much as 25% when 60 or more hours are worked in a week. The truth of the matter is that any job not governed by a continuous process can be affected by decreased productivity, and even process-driven work can suffer if reject rates and customer dissatisfaction increase due to diminished quality and performance linked to long hours. This performance decline is confirmed by the work of J. Nevison of Oak Associates. In his white paper, Nevison brings together scientific, business, and government data to demonstrate that little productive work takes place over and above 50 hours per week. Two other studies, also examined in the white paper, show that productive hours drop by an additional 10 hours when the number of consecutive long workweeks increases from 4 to 12, highlighting the cumulative effects that overtime can have. With this, data from 18 manufacturing industries in the U.S. shows that for most of industries, productivity (measured as output per hour) declines when overtime is used. On average, a 10% increase in overtime results in a 2.4% decrease in productivity (more output is achieved, but the number of hours worked increases as well — thus not as much output per hour is realized). The scientific literature gives the following reasons for the productivity limitations of longer and longer workweeks as:

• Fatigue — employees simply being too physically and mentally tired to perform at their best ability • As more time is provided, or available to complete a task, work rate slows and unproductive time increases • Concerns over work/family balance and health problems may lead to “presenteeism” — where the employee is physically at work, but his or her mind is not on the job • If employees are working long workweeks simply to be seen “putting in the hours,” it is likely that these hours are less productive In shift work operations, morale is lower in industries with higher overtime — companies with excellent to fair morale had overtime levels of 11.5%, versus 15.5% in those with poor or very poor morale.

continued on page 20 The Growing Concern | June 2017 | 19


F EATURE ARTI CLE continued from page 19

#4. MORE ABSENTEEISM & POOR MORALE

MANAGING OVERTIME

Excessive overtime can lead to absenteeism, as a result of poor health, fatigue, or people simply needing to take time off. Absences often need to be covered by replacement employees, often working overtime themselves, making the problem self-perpetuating.

To properly manage the direct and indirect costs associated with excessive overtime, employers should do the following: • Reduce unscheduled absences by addressing the root cause(s) of them. • Ensure staffing levels are appropriate and that they meet varying demand through the day, week, month and year. • Review policies and procedures to ensure that they do not encourage excessive overtime. • Take steps to increase productivity during the regular workweek.

It can also result in morale problems, which can be manifested as low productivity, absenteeism, turnover and labor issues. In Circadian’s Shiftwork Practices 2004, 31% of shift work companies with very high overtime levels (more than 10 hours per employee per week) had poor morale. Conversely, only 13% of companies with normal overtime amounts had poor morale. Morale was reflected in absenteeism levels: 54% of operations with high overtime also had absenteeism levels above 9%, compared with only 23% of operations with normal levels of overtime. This is not to say that all absenteeism is a result of employee response to overtime — companies with high absenteeism will often use overtime to fill vacancies. However, it is likely that the problem is self-perpetuating to some degree.

#5. INCREASED TURNOVER RATES It follows that another adverse effect of excessive absenteeism will be increased turnover, as the lack of work-life balance and fatigue, resulting from excessive overtime, finally catches up with some employees. Again, as with absenteeism, companies with high turnover are also likely to have high overtime, as other employees must work to make up for the vacated positions – if demand is to be met. Turnover, as a direct result of working excessive hours, is more likely in non-hourly positions, where the employees are not being paid a premium to work the extra hours.

FINDING SOLUTIONS While there are clearly a myriad of issues associated with employee overtime rates, there are a variety of ways to mitigate the negative effects of overtime. The proper solutions for managing overtime can vary based on industry, company size, work environment, and many other factors. It is key to recognize that overtime policies should be regularly assessed to determine their effectiveness and how they impact the needs of the employee, as well as the company.

CHOOSING LEVELS OF OVERTIME The appropriate level of overtime for any particular industry depends on a number of factors, including whether your employees must be paid an overtime premium, training and recruitment costs, safety and quality issues, and the cost of their benefits package. This story was taken from the CIRCADIAN® blog, the global leader in providing workforce performance & safety solutions for businesses that operate around the clock.

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PL ANT OF TH E M ON TH

JIM FUNAI, LIC Cuyahoga Community College

SHELLEY FUNAI, LIC Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens Carpinus Carolinian is a shade-loving tree, with a shallow, wide-spreading root system. It prefers moderate soil fertility and moisture.

CARPINUS CAROLINIANA AMERICAN HORNBEAM / BLUE BEECH / MUSCLEWOOD

Most plant nerds love to seek out plants that are new, lesser known, or exotic for their gardens and designs. There must be some dopamine-trigger in our heads that fires when we get to see unique plants – and we are always seeking that high. Now, as good horticulturists know, the concern of a plant being native vs. non-native is of far less concern in making responsible plant choices for the landscape, when compared to accessing the overall aggressiveness of a particular plant. We seek plants that have good durability, forgive us for our many sins in planting technique and location, and reward us with ornamental features – all while not being aggressive and bullying out other plants in the ecosystem. Native or not, who cares?

For the genus of Carpinus, horticulturists have long planted the European version, Carpinus betulus. A long time staple of the European gardens that our American gardens evolved out of, European Hornbeam will always be a great option in the garden, particularly for tall hedges or for the several great columnar cultivars. That said, there is something that the European species lacks that can only be found in our native species, Carpinus continued on page 26 The Growing Concern | June 2017 | 25


P LAN T OF TH E M ONT H continued from page 25 caroliniana, which the common name pays perfect homage to. Musclewood has one of the most interesting trunks, as it matures to a small tree of about 25 feet tall and slightly less in width. The trunk forms smooth ridges that resemble flexing muscles along the entire length, covered in a very smooth bark. While we often think of ornamental trunks as having some sort of flaky bark like a River Birch, Paperbark Maple, or the cool camo effects of Limber Pine or Kousa Dogwoods, Musclewood offers a unique take on ornamental trunks. It was a recent hike on the Buckeye Trail, following the shorelines of Westbranch Reservoir, where this plant really reentered our minds. (It’s sometimes easy to forget about the durability and suitability of many of our native trees and shrubs – perhaps a symptom of the “grass is always greener” mentality.) We found a beautiful grove of Musclewood running down a 30 foot hill towards the lake, exhibiting the ability to grow in the more gravely soil at the top of the slope all the way down to the often fully saturated soils near the lake shore. All of the trees were equally beautiful and full. Musclewood is a durable tree that typically spends time in the good, loose soils of our forests and will perform best in garden situations mimicking that. This is not the tree to select for a parking lot island (a clear downfall of the natives only mentality). This tree will be happy in full sun to bright shade and will reward with pleasant yellows, as well as some orange and reds in fall color. We have a cultivar in our home garden that gets consistent bright red foliage in fall called ‘Fireball,’ which may one day be more available in the market. One of the most effective uses of Musclewood could be incorporating them around a patio project, perhaps in a grouping of 3, where their mature sizes would provide a lower ceiling effect. In this scenario, not only would they provide shade, but could also be limbed up some to allow appreciation of the trunk and provide a window into garden space beyond. Throw some simple wide angle up lighting at the base of these trees and you’ll have a stunning night time effect for your client, providing something unique to the constant use of Serviceberry or River Birch for the same effects. Another good use for this plant is when helping to make the transition from the woods to the landscape. We’ve all certainly had plenty of clients who move into a neighborhood named after continued on page 28

26 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


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PL ANT OF TH E M ON TH continued from page 26 the species of forest tree we killed the most of to build another culde-sac. So, when your client on Crushed Oak Lane has a blank space between their house and the forest along the property line, think about using some small trees and shrubs that live in this area naturally. A sprinkling of some Musclewood could be part of that recipe, helping reduce the looming feeling of the grass ocean smashing into a mountain wall of trees. You’ll be pleasantly surprised at how some lower trees and shrubs can make this unnatural collision of man and nature seem more natural. Along with our discussion of this great native tree, we want to make sure we back-up our views of native vs. non-native plants, in order to keep the conversation moving in the right direction. (And perhaps we are aiming to alleviate a few of the emails from the angry, native-only campers.)

how many plants you are asked to put into that very situation each year. Now think about how many of those plants survive. We now face non-native landscape situations in our world all of the time – an inevitable result of our booming population growth. If we do not turn to the entire spectrum of possible landscape plants to evaluate them on their suitability to provide shade, stormwater interception, habitat, pollution mitigation, and carbon sequestration, then we won’t have to argue over native or non-native – there will be no plants left. When appropriate – yes – encourage great native plants. Just like in the few suggestions we made earlier, try out our wonderful and unique Carpinus caroliniana. You will without a doubt love it! Jim Funai is full-time faculty at Cuyahoga Community College, a NALP accredited associate of applied science in hoticulture degree program offering

Earlier, we mentioned that Carpinus caroliniana is not a good tree to plant in a parking lot island. This is where we find the arguments for native-only plants falls short. There are exactly 0.0 square feet of Ohio soil that evolved as infertile, compacted, poor horizon development soils that suffer from heavy salt loads and extreme temperature fluctuations. However, think for a moment

28 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

many paths to higher education in the green industry. He is pursuing a PhD in Landscape Engineering and Forestry and is a Licensed Arborist. Shelley Funai is Grounds Manager at Stan Hywett Hall and Gardens in Akron, Ohio, which offers a historic estate designed by Warren H. Manning and a beautiful manor house museum. She is Landscape Industry Certified in Ornamental Plant Care. Contact Jim and Shelley via email at hortsquad@gmail.com.


FOR SAFETY SAK E

BASIC PRACTICES OF ROADSIDE MOWING OPERATIONS As more cities turn to landscaping companies to maintain their roadways, it is important to conduct the job with safety in mind. The main goal of vegetation control along roadsides is to improve visibility of signs, pedestrians and other road users. Because the roadside mowing operation takes place both on and off the roadway, it is crucial for your crews to be highly visible to drivers as well. There are three general types of roadside mowing. Safety mowing is the most important and ensures that all signs and traffic control devices are visible. Transition mowing makes a smooth change from a narrow mowed width to a wide mowed width when different widths of right-of-way are mowed. Contour or selective mowing is saved for showing off landscaping or wildflowers and makes a natural blending of the roadside with native or planted growth. To help notify drivers that a mowing operation is on-going, warning signs such as MOWING AHEAD or ROAD WORK

AHEAD should be place a mile or two before the actual mowing work. Mount the signs on a sturdy portable support that won’t be knocked over easily. Move the sign as the work progresses. Use rotating yellow beacons on mower tractors and yellow flasher lights on roll bars. Mower tractors should have slowmoving-vehicle signs installed and orange flags or pennants on a whip to show the location of the tractor in high grass or over the edge of slopes. The headlights should be on at all times. continued on page 31 The Growing Concern | June 2017 | 29


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F FOR OR SAFETY E SAFETYSAK SAKE continued from page 29 Here are some of the basic do’s and don’ts when it comes to roadside mowing.

DON’Ts • Mow too often. This exposes the crews to traffic

DOs • Visually inspect the area before mowing. Check for

washouts and debris that could be thrown.

• Mow in the direction of oncoming traffic. It results • • • • •

in less impact if a missile is thrown out and also provides better visibility. Be sure the mower has a roll-over protection structure (ROPS) and wear the seat belt at all times. Ballast or weight the tractor, especially when mowing on a hillside or using a boom mower. Cover all V-belts, drive chains & power takeoff shafts. Refuel away from waterways. Wear protective equipment including safety glasses, a hard hat and reflective clothing.

• • •

hazards more than necessary and can damage the vegetation. Mow at the wrong time. Cutting at the right stage of growth reduces the frequency mowing is needed. Mow too short. The proper height helps maintain vegetation and can hide small litter objects as well. Mow steep slopes unless needed. Steep slopes increase the risk of mower accidents. Mow carelessly and scar trees and shrubs. Operators should strip grass from around the tree in a circle to avoid wounding it.

For more information on roadside mowing practices, VISTA Training offers an instructor kit that comes with a pre-planning checklist, a mower safety DVD, printable handouts, a written exam and operator evaluation sheets.

Originally published in the April 2017 issue of Total Landscape Care by Jill Odom. See more at: http://www.totallandscapecare.com

The Growing Concern | June 2017 | 31


D I RECTI ON S

SANDY MUNLEY

Executive Director The Ohio Landscape Association

WE HELP MARKET YOUR LANDSCAPE COMPANY The Ohio Landscape Association offers a variety of ways to get your business name in front of the public. Make sure you are taking advantage of these many cost effective opportunities. The first opportunity that I would like to draw your attention to is Landscape Ohio! Magazine – OLA’s consumer publication dedicated to promoting our members and the green industry. This magazine is published twice a year in partnership with Great Lakes Publishing. There is a Spring/Summer issue and a Fall/Winter issue. The Fall/Winter issue goes out in the September issues of Cleveland Magazine and Ohio Magazine to well over 200,000 readers! Great Lakes Publishing has once again agreed to offer members of the OLA special advertising rates. This is a great opportunity to let the public know about your company and the quality products and services you offer and is open to anyone associated with the landscape industry (i.e. landscape contractors, lighting and irrigation companies, material and equipment suppliers, garden centers, etc.).

32 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Display advertising is available at member discounted rates. As an added bonus, Landscape Ohio! Magazine will be available as an electronic magazine via the Internet at ohiolandscapers.org, myohiolandscape.com and clevelandmagazine.com. You can find all of the details on the Landscape Ohio! Magazine tab on our website OhioLandscapers.org, or you can contact Paul Klein at 216-377-3693 or klein@glpublishing.com. I have heard some very good feedback from the Spring/Summer issue. Don’t delay! The deadline to advertise or augment your member listing is July 10th. Another benefit of being a member of the OLA is a free basic listing in our public referral database on our award winning consumer website, MyOhioLandscape.com. All landscape (regular) members are asked for six (6) zip codes where they continued on page 34


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D I RECTI ON S continued from page 32

want referral work in and a list of services that they provide. Visitors to the site can type in the zip code of their property, check off the type of service(s) they are looking for, and, viola, up pops a list of OLA members that satisfied the criteria they entered. If you haven’t provided us with this referral information, please contact us in the OLA office so that we can send you the form you need to fill out, so that we have the correct information to add you to the referral system. Or, if you have changed the services you offer or the geographic area you serve, we need to know. You can also complete this information online quickly and easily by going to the Member Center of our industry website, OhioLandscapers.org. It is not unusual for us to get several phone calls from property owners in one day looking for landscape contractors to help with a variety of services in a variety of zip codes. We send these property owners to the consumer website. If they do not

have internet access, we go online for them and provide the information verbally. This service works for both residential and commercial properties, as the services are divided into those categories. Don’t forget, if you receive a call from a property owner that you cannot service, please provide them with the OLA consumer website address (myohiolandscape.com) so they will have access to this free referral service. For a fee of only $100 per membership year, you can augment your online presence with us as well. With this option, you will be able to add your logo, website address along with a more detailed description. Call us if you would like more information! These are only a couple of the ways OLA can help you market your company. We are proud to have you as a member and want you to be successful.

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WELCOME NEW MEMBERS!

The Ohio Landscape Association is delighted to welcome the following new members to the association:

REGULAR MEMBERS Akron Cleveland Elite Services A.C.E.S. 1948 Marwell Blvd., Suite 100 Hudson, OH 44236 (440) 735-3333 Marvin H.W. Smith Woodland Environment, Inc. 948 N. Old State Road Delaware, OH 43015 (614) 354-0768 Jeff Rupp

To become a member of the OLA, complete the online application process, or download the PDF version and mail or fax your application in. Both options can be found at http://www.ohiolandscapers.org/olamembership.html. You may also call the OLA office, Monday thru Friday, 9am – 5pm to speak with a staff member.

Irrigation Supply, Inc.

27

Mason Structural Steel, Inc.

19

Medina Sod Farms, Inc.

16

Middlefield MFG / Mentor MFG

10

MRLM Landscape Materials

35

National First Equipment, LLC

19

O’Reilly Equipment, LLC

5 24 6

Oliger Seed Company Premier Plant Solutions Shearer Equipment

33

The Snowfighters Institute

21

Sohar’s / RCPW, Inc.

20 Three-Z-Supply 2 Unilock 15

Valley City Supply

10

VanCuren Tree Services, Inc.

9

Zoresco Equipment Company

The Growing Concern | May 2017 | 35 The Growing Concern | June 2017 | 35


9240 Broadview Road Broadview Hts., OH  44147-2517

ENTER TODAY ENTER TODAY

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ST. MICHAEL’S WOODSIDE, 5025 EAST MILL ROAD, BROADVIEW HTS., OHIO 44147

SAVE THE DATE 08.24.17 Encouraging Professional Standards and Promoting the Green Industry

The Growing Concern June 2017  

The Official Monthly Publication of the Ohio Landscape Association

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