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OHIO

JANUARY 2020

COOPERATIVE Official publication of your electric cooperative  |  www.ohioec.org

Dogs’ best friend Road-tripping for rescues

ALSO INSIDE BrewDog’s accommodations

Ohio’s historic Big Buck Club

Healing, growth for the incarcerated


Building the next generation of

LEADERS

We’re building the next generation of leaders by supporting their education and through programs like college scholarships, the Washington, D.C., Youth Tour, Be E3 Smart energy curriculum for middle school classrooms, and energy efficiency demonstrations. Contact your electric cooperative to learn more about its youth programs.

ohioec.org/purpose


OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JANUARY 2020

INSIDE FEATURES 8 IN THE DOGHOUSE A hotel inside a brewery? It makes perfect sense at the North American headquarters of BrewDog, the Scottish beermaker.

24 DOGS’ BEST FRIEND A Zanesville man goes a long way to connect homeless dogs to new, loving families.

30 HEALING INSIDE Horizon Prison Initiative promotes growth and community-building among those who are incarcerated.

34 WHAT’S IN A NAME? The remarkable life and legacy of Mary Harris, the “Whitewoman” of Roscoe Village fame. Cover image on most issues: Greg Mahle of Zanesville poses with some of his best friends after a long trek that brought the pups from homelessness in the South to forever homes nearly 2,000 miles away in Connecticut.

JANUARY 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   1


UP FRONT

vision

Electric co-ops look to another year of progress ahead.

O

hio’s electric cooperatives are looking forward to another year of progress in 2020 toward our goal of providing you with safe, reliable, affordable, and environmentally responsible electric service. We are thankful to have had another successful year in 2019. Following are some of the initiatives we have planned for 2020: • Continue to grow and expand our workforce development efforts to be sure we have well-trained employees to safely and efficiently provide the services you require. • Improve the efficiency and reliability of our power plant operations, focusing our efforts on reducing costs and improving the performance of our Cardinal, Mone, and Greenville power generation plants.

Pat O’Loughlin

• Work with other utilities across Ohio to improve the reliability and security of the high-voltage grid that delivers power to your cooperative.

PRESIDENT & CEO OHIO’S ELECTRIC COOPERATIVES

• Work with state and federal representatives to develop plans and funding sources to improve broadband services across rural Ohio.

We encourage members of electric cooperatives to educate themselves on where candidates stand on issues and, most importantly, get out to the polls and make a wellconsidered vote — both in the March primary and in the general election in November.

• For the third time, cooperatives around the state will be sending a team of lineworkers to Guatemala to bring electricity to two villages that up to now have never experienced the safety, comfort, and convenience that electric service provides to everyday life. Our previous two efforts have been emotional and extremely gratifying to everyone involved. Those involved have been changed by their experiences, and we look forward to another successful mission. Finally, 2020 will again be an important election year, which will have real consequences here in Ohio and across the country. We hope and pray that the leaders we elect will represent our interests and the interests of the country ahead of their personal ambitions. We encourage members of electric cooperatives to educate themselves on where candidates stand on issues and, most importantly, get out to the polls and make a well-considered vote — both in the March primary and in the general election in November. Wishing you a happy, healthy, and prosperous 2020!

2   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JANUARY 2020


JANUARY 2020 • Volume 62, No. 4

MORE INSIDE Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives 6677 Busch Blvd. Columbus, OH 43229 614-846-5757 memberinteract@ohioec.org www.ohioec.org Patrick O’Loughlin President & CEO Patrick Higgins Director of Communications Jeff McCallister Managing Editor Rebecca Seum Associate Editor Anita Cook Graphic Designer Dava Hennosy Editorial Intern Contributors: Margaret Buranen, Colleen Romick Clark, W.H. “Chip” Gross, Catherine Murray, Jamie Rhein, Karen Sottosanti, Damaine Vonada, Margie Wuebker, and Patty Yoder. OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING (USPS 134-760; ISSN 2572-049X) is published monthly by Ohio Rural Elec­tric Co­op­eratives, Inc. It is the official com­mun­ ication link be­tween the elec­­­­tric co­operatives in Ohio and West Virginia and their mem­bers. Subscription cost for members ranges from $5.52 to $6.96 per year, paid from equity accruing to the member. Nothing in this publication may be reproduced in any manner without written permission from Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc. All rights reserved.

DEPARTMENTS 4 POWER LINES

Growth trend: Some co-ops must evolve from their all-rural roots when former farmland suddenly develops into bustling suburbs.

6 CO-OP SPOTLIGHT

Hancock-Wood Electric Cooperative: From Findlay to Kelleys Island, the co-op works to be a partner in the area’s economic development.

12 WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE

Trophy collection: Ohio’s historic Buckeye Big Buck Club is the legacy of a late ODNR wildlife officer.

Cheryl Solomon American MainStreet Publications 847-749-4875 | cheryl@amp.coop The fact that a product is advertised in Ohio Cooperative Living should not be taken as an en­dorse­ment. If you find an advertisement mis­leading or a product unsatisfactory, please not­ify us or the Ohio Attorney General’s Of­fi ce, Consumer Protection Sec­tion, 30 E. Broad St., Col­um­bus, OH 43215. Periodicals postage paid at Colum­bus, OH, and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to editorial and advertising offices at: 6677 Busch Boulevard, Columbus, OH 43229-1101

Cooperative members: Please report changes of address to your electric cooperative. Ohio Cooperative Living staff cannot process address changes. Alliance for Audited Media Member

12

14 CO-OP PEOPLE

Cutting edge: A New Bremen-area artist produces sculptures with a roar and a shower of sawdust.

16 GOOD EATS For all advertising inquiries, contact

6

Tried and true: Looking back at some of the standby comfort foods that were mainstays on meal plans of yesteryear.

14

19 LOCAL PAGES

News and information from your electric cooperative.

37 CALENDAR

What’s happening: January/February events and other things to do around the state.

16

40 MEMBER INTERACTIVE

Slumber party: Sleepovers are a source of fun festivities to get us through those long winter nights.

40

Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

JANUARY 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   3


POWER LINES

RURAL-TO-SUBURBAN SHIFT BRINGS CHANGES TO ELECTRIC CO-OPS BY KAREN SOTTOSANTI

4   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JANUARY 2020


The demographic shift brings changes, including new members who are joining an electric co-op for the first time — many of whom have never previously even heard of co-ops. “We continually beat the drum among our members about what the co-op is,” says Phil Caskey, president and CEO of Consolidated Cooperative, which serves eight counties in north-central Ohio. Caskey says that many residents of suburban areas, as well as former suburbanites who move into rural areas, are unaware of the differences between electric co-ops and large, privately owned electric utilities. In addition, rural co-op members tend to have a better understanding of the coop’s place in the community, he says. Cindy Brehmer, for example, experienced the servicefirst business model of electric co-ops for the first time when she moved from Illinois to Pickerington, Ohio, in 1999 and became a member of South Central Power Company. One day, the electricity suddenly switched off in the home she shares with her partner, Doug Baden. “I thought it was a breaker,” she says, “because when I went to other parts of the house, the power was on.” After checking the breaker box and finding nothing amiss, Brehmer and Baden called the co-op, which serves 24 counties across wide areas of southern and eastern Ohio — including much of Fairfield County. The technician who investigated the unusual problem discovered that part of the buried electrical line to the 1970s-era home had rotted away. “He had it fixed within 24 hours,” Brehmer says. The co-op has helped her family in other ways, too. Baden’s health suffers if the electricity is out and he cannot use the CPAP machine that keeps him breathing at night. Since they alerted the co-op and filled out a medical need form, Brehmer says, “the longest we’ve ever had our power out was two hours.” Even as recently as 1999, large areas of Fairfield County were sparsely populated farmland. Since then, however, once-tiny villages such as Pickerington and Canal Winchester have seen exponential growth, and Rick Lemonds, president and CEO of South Central Power Company, says the co-op has made changes designed to

improve communications with members, including newer and younger members who have only recently become part of the co-op’s demographic. “Up until three years ago,” he says, “our primary means of face-to-face communication with members was our annual meeting.” However, that meeting was always held in the same location — and on a weekday — so many members couldn’t attend because they were at work. Now, Lemonds says, the co-op is “bringing the meetings to members” by holding district meetings in different locations at night, complete with barbecue dinners and entertainment. Meeting attendance has increased by 30%, he says. “A lot of people were very appreciative. We’re encouraged by that.” Union Rural Electric Cooperative, which serves suburban areas just outside of Marysville city limits, as well as extremely rural areas elsewhere in Union County, is another co-op that has made changes to account for an increased number of non-rural members. When the membership was mostly rural, says President and CEO Anthony Smith, members often visited the co-op’s main office to pay bills and attend to other business. Now, he says, “We don’t get as much walk-in traffic as we used to. Everyone wants to do business online.” So, members can now pay their bills on the co-op’s website. Caskey, Lemonds, and Smith agree that the rural and suburban members of their territories have somewhat different needs and expectations. Rural members are more accepting of aboveground lines, the managers say, and they understand that storms sometimes lead to power outages that are difficult to restore. Suburban members, on the other hand, usually prefer buried lines — often for aesthetic reasons — and they have lower tolerance for those inevitable outages. To accommodate the needs of both the rural and suburban areas of their service territories, Consolidated Cooperative, South Central Power Company, and Union Rural Electric Cooperative all have robust websites and a strong social media presence, which they use to communicate with members. In addition, all three co-ops have made it possible for members to pay their bills through apps on their smartphones. In early 2019, South Central Power Company released its own dedicated app for members’ use. “We converted our entire billing system,” Lemonds says, “so our members will be able to use technology to do business with the co-op.” Brehmer, for one, is grateful for the efforts her co-op makes to serve its members. “They are always nice and always helpful,” she says. “I like to give credit where credit’s due.”

JANUARY 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   5

PHOTO BY MIKE CAIRNS | INFINITEIMPACTSTUDIOS.COM

S

ince electric co-ops were first established during the 1930s, they have served mainly rural areas of the United States. As the decades passed and the country’s geographic distribution of population changed, some electric co-ops whose membership was once entirely rural now count more densely populated areas — suburbs, or even nearly urban areas in some cases — as parts of their service territories.


CO-OP SPOTLIGHT

HANCOCK-WOOD ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE

S

erving more than 11,000 members in portions of 10 counties, Hancock-Wood Electric Cooperative is located in the northwestern quadrant of the state, roughly centered around the city of Findlay. HancockWood has a quirk to its service territory, though: Kelleys Island in Lake Erie is served by the cooperative, receiving electricity from two underwater cables that run from the mainland to the island.

Diverse consumer base Findlay has been named the No. 1 “micropolitan” (a city between 10,000 and 50,000 people) five years in a row by Site Selection magazine for its ability to attract new business and expand existing ones. Hancock-Wood Electric Cooperative works to be a partner in driving economic development in Findlay and the surrounding region. Employees establish and maintain strong ties with local and state government officials and cultivate relationships with business partners. Like most Ohio electric cooperatives, Hancock-Wood serves farms and homes in its rural territory. Over the years, though, it has seen an increase in suburban development and has several notable commercial members. A few of the largest: • Keystone Foods, which, among its many accounts, supplies chicken to Tyson and hamburger patties to McDonald’s; • Mars Petcare, which makes some of the most recognizable pet-food brands in the country; • Grob Systems, a German company whose Bluffton plant is its North American headquarters. Grob makes machines and automation for the automotive, aerospace, medical, and die/mold industries, including for Honda.

Modern home, linked to the past The cooperative office is outfitted with state-of-the-art equipment designed to provide its members with the best possible service. Staff are alerted to outages in seconds, and crews are dispatched to correct the problem. The warehouse is hung with banners reminding employees and visitors of pivotal moments of the cooperative’s history, including the 1967 merger with Lake Erie Electric Cooperative that brought Kelleys Island to the service territory, and the blizzard of 1978, during which every single member of the cooperative experienced an outage and every single one was restored within six days.

Helping communities Hancock-Wood employees demonstrate the cooperative principle of Concern for Community by volunteering and donating to numerous local charities, such as Habitat for Humanity, schools, churches, and community events. The coop also has distributed grants and Operation Round Up funds totaling nearly $500,000 in the last decade to individuals and organizations in need.

6   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JANUARY 2020

Co-op Spotlight appears regularly in Ohio Cooperative Living to give a glimpse into the land and the people of Ohio’s 24 electric cooperatives.


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JANUARY 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   7


IN THE

DOGHO

Hotel in a brewery? At BrewDog, it makes perfect sense. BY JAMIE RHEIN, PHOTOS COURTESY OF BREWDOG

8   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JANUARY 2020


USE I

t wasn’t too long ago that the area along Gender Road, south of Route 33 near the Franklin-Fairfield county line, was farmland as far as the eye could see. There was the bucolic village of Canal Winchester nearby and Columbus just a bit farther up the road. When BrewDog, the irreverent brewery and pub chain, decided to expand its operations into the United States, its management looked at the spot and saw nothing but possibility — with more than 50 breweries in the Columbus area and almost 300 in Ohio, this is craft beer country. More importantly, it’s also within a day’s reach of nearly half the U.S. population.

JANUARY 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   9


The thing about BrewDog: It doesn’t do anything in a small way. The Scotland-based company not only set up its U.S. headquarters at the Canal Winchester location, it’s created a sensory powerhouse destination for people who love beer. Soon came a taproom-style restaurant and then, in 2018, a 32-room hotel called the DogHouse that has been named one of Time magazine’s “100 Greatest Places to Stay.” It’s clear from the very start that an overnight stay at the BrewDog complex is not your everyday experience. Here, dogs are welcome (in some of the guest rooms), beer is a celebration, and ingenuity is everywhere. Visitors are greeted with a mural of neon sea creatures, including a bright blue shark and a pink octopus, which is a BrewDog staple, painted by Scottish artist Craig Fisher. The octopus, its tentacles winding around guest room windows, visually joins the hotel with the taproom. The beer celebration begins at check-in. Instead of a reception desk, there’s a bar — back-lit by a reddishorange neon “Welcome to Hotel BrewDog” sign — and a subtle scent of fermentation wafting over from the connected OverWorks sour beer facility. Guests even receive a complimentary beer upon arrival. Those who feel like hanging out a bit may strike up a conversation over a brew or two. For Keith Miles, longtime BrewDog fan, “This is my go-to place for beer friends who come to Columbus.” The hotel’s on-tap sour-beer bar is a major draw. His friend, David Priggie, who hails from Minneapolis, was on his fourth BrewDog visit. While they were enjoying sour Cosmic Crush Cherry, another hotel guest settled in for a can of Vermont Vampire, a black/ Cascadian dark ale, and joined the conversation. Turned out he was from Sao Paolo, Brazil — site, by the way, of another BrewDog bar.

10   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JANUARY 2020


Heading to a guest room doesn’t mean leaving the beer behind. The hotel’s second- and third-floor hallways overlook OverWorks’ stacks of wooden barrels and foeders of fermenting deliciousness. You can carry your brew anywhere on the BrewDog property, and what’s more, you don’t even need to go to the bar to get one. The guest rooms feature both locally hand-crafted furniture and beer. The furniture, by Columbus’ Edgework Creative, provides upscale digs. The beer is always within arm’s reach — either from a kegerator filled with a beer of your choice, a small recessed refrigerator with 12 mixed cans of international favorites, or another fridge next to the rainfall shower so you can pop a cold one while you lather up. Beer is even included as a toiletry ingredient. Soap, shampoo, and body lotion are specially formulated

by Glenn Avenue, another Columbus company, from BrewDog’s Elvis Juice, a grapefruit-infused IPA. The concept works. At BrewDog, people, and often dogs, mingle everywhere — at the hotel’s bar, at the DogPark where pooches and people play, the outside patio, and in DogTap, the taproom restaurant where board games and an arcade entice people into family-friendly fun in between bites of American pub fare. Dogs can dine with owners outside on the patio. “We want you to experience not just the beer, but the atmosphere and the people around you,” says Amy Schwarzenberg, hotel manager.

As a DogHouse bonus, hotel guests get a free tour of BrewDog’s museum, which showcases beer history and beermaking how-to. Add in a beermosa — BrewDog’s Hazy Jane IPA and orange juice — with the complimentary breakfast in the morning, and it’s an experience that’s hard to leave. DogHouse Columbus, 96 Gender Road, Canal Winchester, OH 43110. For more information, call 614-908-3054 or visit www.brewdog.com.

JANUARY 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   11


WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE

TROPHY COLLECTION Ohio’s historic Buckeye Big Buck Club is the legacy of a late ODNR wildlife officer. STORY AND PHOTOS BY W.H. “CHIP” GROSS

Merrill Gilfillan, founder of the Buckeye Big Buck Club

I

t was 1977, and as a young state wildlife officer, I had just been assigned to duty in Morrow County in north-central Ohio. Also living in the county, I soon learned, was Merrill Gilfillan, a long-retired wildlife biologist and outdoors writer who had worked for the Ohio DNR, Division of Wildlife — the same state agency I was working for. I had heard of Gilfillan’s stellar professional reputation, so I decided to pay him a visit. I had no knowledge of his wry sense of humor when I knocked on his door. He seemed genuinely pleased to meet me and invited me into the living room of his home in Mount Gilead saying, “Sit anywhere you’d like.” Yet as I started to sit down in a straight-backed wooden chair, he quickly stopped me. “No, don’t sit there!” he cautioned. “That’s the preacher’s chair.” Thinking he must be deeply religious and was saving that particular chair for a certain man of the cloth, I sank into an overstuffed rocker across the room as Gilfillan explained his logic. “That wooden chair’s the most uncomfortable chair in the whole house,” he said. “I only keep it around for the

12   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JANUARY 2020

preacher to sit on when he comes to visit — don’t want him staying too long, ya know.” Merrill Gilfillan was the founder of the Buckeye Big Buck Club (www.buckeyebigbuckclub.org), an Ohio trophy deer management program begun in 1957 and since copied many times over by other state naturalresource agencies. Today, 63 years later, the BBBC is still going strong, and according to the organization’s current president, Jerry Weingart, the club maintains the same four goals it started with. “We exist to encourage trophy hunting by Ohio deer hunters, establish and maintain a permanent record of Ohio’s trophy deer taken by fair chase, foster wise


extirpated from the Buckeye State due to unregulated hunting circa 1904. But the return of quality deer habitat, coupled with scientific wildlife management, allowed deer to return, and regulated hunting began during the 1940s. Today, hunting generates more than $853 million annually for the state’s economy, most of that from the sport of deer hunting. Ohio has also become well known and respected nationally for its many large bucks of trophy antler size. The public is welcome to attend the annual BBBC gathering and banquet, this year scheduled for Saturday, Feb. 8, at the Ashland University Convocation Center in Ashland. The display of trophy white-tail deer mounts at the gathering is nothing short of spectacular. If you’re a deer hunter, you owe yourself a visit to a BBBC meeting at least once during your life, official member or not. Despite the difference in our ages those many years ago, Merrill Gilfillan and I became fast friends. He died in 1996, but the continuing outdoor legacy he left Ohio deer hunters in the form of the Buckeye Big Buck Club is immense. Thanks, Merrill … and I hope you weren’t assigned a “preacher’s chair” in heaven. W.H. “Chip” Gross (whchipgross@gmail.com) is a member of Consolidated Cooperative and Ohio Cooperative Living’s outdoors editor.

management of Ohio’s deer resource, and promote a positive relationship between deer hunters and landowners,” he says.

Vicki Mountz has two entries in the BBBC and is a life member. She took this Buckeye Big Buck in October 2007, the deer weighing an estimated 275 pounds.

There are only two ways to become a BBBC member: Take a trophy whitetail buck with antlers measuring at least 140 total inches for a typical head or 160 total inches for a nontypical head. It’s much easier said than done. Of Ohio’s 400,000 yearly deer hunters, only about 500 to 700 are inducted into the BBBC annually, with a total of some 20,000 members on the roster since the club’s inception. During the early 1900s, deer hunting was not permitted in Ohio, the last white-tailed deer having been

JANUARY 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   13


Cutting

CO-OP PEOPLE

New Bremen-area sculptor produces art with a roar and a cloud of dust. BY MARGIE WUEBKER

T

im Kuenning looks at a bark-covered log and envisions a design — a majestic eagle, a plump jack-o’-lantern, a bowlegged cowboy with saddle in hand, a hungry seagull perched on a dock waiting for lunch to swim by. Soon, his vision materializes amid a shower of sawdust. The New Bremen-area woodcarving specialist — he prefers that title over “chainsaw artist” — has spent more than four decades honing his art. From a whimsical pumpkin to a 51/2-foot eagle permanently on display at the Pentagon, his sculptures reveal his singular ability to carve away extraneous material and bring forth natural beauty using only a chainsaw and a blowtorch. “I carve things in all shapes and sizes,” he says. “However, people are happiest when I do eagles.” Kuenning, a member of St. Marys-based Midwest Electric, remembers watching a chainsaw artist — a Stihl factory representative — demonstrate how to make rustic chairs and larger-than-life mushrooms with well-placed swipes of the blade. “I told my wife I could do better than that, and I went to work proving it,” he says. “There has been a lot of practice during the ensuing years — it’s something you have to learn on your own, because no one offers classes on the subject.” The retired village of Minster electric department lineman has traveled across the country putting on chainsaw demonstrations for the chainsaw manufacturer, Poulan. He has also performed product testing for the company. A commanding general from the National Guard Readiness Center approached Kuenning at a national bass tournament, admiring the eagle he was carving as the winner’s trophy.

14   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JANUARY 2020


edge The man wanted to commission a much larger eagle for display at the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. They reached an agreement rather quickly, but finding the right log turned out to be a much longer process. Kuenning, who sees no need to cut a healthy tree, ultimately found a 200-year-old white oak log measuring 8 feet tall and 5 feet in diameter that had been felled after showing signs of dying. The owner, who lived in the St. Marys area, donated the wood after learning of its intended purpose. “The first cuts are the most crucial because you run the risk of taking away too much,” Kuenning says. “The carving only involved a couple of days, but the finishing work took considerably longer.” A military helicopter ferried the eagle to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, where it was loaded into a military transport plane for the trip to its permanent home. Kuenning visits area festivals and county fairs to demonstrate his carving. He sells finished products, ranging from Block O’s to portly piglets, to the highest bidders, with the proceeds benefitting charity. His two sons and several grandchildren also enjoy making chainsaw sculptures and frequently assist with the demonstrations. “We always draw crowds,” he says, “but I couldn’t tell you whether there are five people or 500 people. All my concentration has to be focused on the tip of the saw, or there could be problems.” Of course, he does make mistakes from time to time, but nothing goes to waste. Those mistakes, he says, go into the family’s “workburning” stove.

JANUARY 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   15


GOODGOOD EATS EATS

TRIED AND true

Revisit some classic dishes that were mainstays on meal plans of yesteryear. RECIPES AND PHOTOGRAPHS BY CATHERINE MURRAY

16   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JANUARY 2020


CHICKEN A LA KING (from page 16) Prep: 15 minutes | Cook: 25 minutes | Servings: 8 2 pounds chicken breast 2 red bell peppers, diced 1 teaspoon salt 8 ounces mushrooms, sliced 1/2 teaspoon peppercorns 1 teaspoon paprika 4 cloves garlic, peeled and sliced 1 teaspoon salt 2 bay leaves 1/2 teaspoon black pepper 3 sprigs fresh thyme 1 cup heavy cream 1/4 cup unsalted butter 2 to 3 cups chicken broth (reserved from poaching chicken) 1 medium onion, diced 11/2 cups frozen green peas 1/4 cup flour In a large pot, arrange chicken in a single layer. Add 1 teaspoon salt, peppercorns, half the garlic, bay leaves, and thyme. Add enough water to cover chicken by 1 inch. Bring to a boil, then simmer on medium-low for 15 minutes or until chicken is cooked through. Set chicken breasts aside to cool and reserve remaining broth, straining out the whole herbs. Cut chicken into small pieces. In a large skillet over medium-high heat, melt butter. Add onions and remaining garlic; cook until soft. Add flour. Stir constantly for 2 to 3 minutes, until flour mixture is lightly browned. Mix in red peppers, mushrooms, paprika, 1 teaspoon salt, and pepper; cook another 2 minutes. Turn heat to mediumlow. Slowly add heavy cream, then 2 cups of broth, stirring until smooth. Bring to a low simmer, cook 4 to 5 minutes, stirring often. If sauce becomes too thick, stir in more broth. Add diced chicken and peas, cooking until warmed through. Serve over egg noodles, biscuits, rice, or bread. Per serving: 292 calories, 14 grams fat (7 grams saturated fat), 13 grams total carbs, 2.5 grams fiber, 28 grams protein.

AMBROSIA SALAD Prep: 15 minutes | Servings: 8 1 cup green grapes, cut in half 10-ounce jar maraschino cherries, drained and cut in half 15-ounce can mandarin oranges, drained

20-ounce can pineapple tidbits, drained 1/2 cup sour cream 1 cup shredded sweetened coconut 11/2 cups fruit-flavored mini marshmallows

Reserve some fruit and marshmallows for garnish. In a large bowl, mix together fruit. Fold in sour cream, then coconut and marshmallows. Garnish with reserved pieces. Salad can be refrigerated for up to 3 days in an air-tight container. Per serving: 173 calories, 6.5 grams fat (5 grams saturated fat), 30 grams total carbs, 3 grams fiber, 2 grams protein.

CLASSIC CHEESE BALL Prep: 15 minutes | Chill: 1 hour | Servings: 10 8 ounces cream cheese, softened 1/2 teaspoon dried parsley 3 tablespoons sour cream 4 ounces freshly grated sharp cheddar cheese 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 1/2 cup unsalted pecans, 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder chopped small 1/4 teaspoon onion powder Place cream cheese, sour cream, Worcestershire sauce, garlic powder, onion powder, and parsley in a large mixing bowl. Blend with an electric mixer until well incorporated. Add shredded cheddar and mix until cheddar is evenly distributed. Scrape sides of bowl and gather mixture into one lump. Cover and chill 30 minutes. Shape into a ball using a spatula and greased hands. Place pecans on a wide plate. Pressing gently, roll cheese ball through pecans to cover entirely. Cover and refrigerate until ready to eat. Let rest at room temperature for 20 minutes before serving. Per serving: 256 calories, 26 grams fat (7 grams saturated fat), 3 grams total carbs, 2 grams fiber, 4 grams protein.

JANUARY 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   17


SUCCOTASH Prep: 10 minutes | Cook: 15 minutes | Servings: 8 (side dish) 16 ounces lima beans 1/4 teaspoon pepper 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 teaspoon paprika 1 small onion 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder 8 ounces okra 1 teaspoon thyme 1 garlic clove, minced 3 teaspoons chives 1/2 cup red pepper, finely diced 3 tablespoons unsalted butter 3 cups corn 10 ounces cherry tomatoes, halved 1 teaspoon salt NOTE: Lots of herbs work well in this dish. Switch out the thyme and chives for tarragon, parsley, or basil. As a summer dish, take advantage of fresh ingredients. Frozen and dried ingredients work equally well in winter. For a more modern version, swap the lima beans for edamame and omit the okra. Pairs well with meatloaf, grilled chicken, pulled pork, or tofu tacos. Place lima beans in a small pot and cover with water. Bring to a boil, then reduce to medium, cooking 7 minutes. Drain beans and set aside. In a large skillet with olive oil, sauté onion, okra, and garlic over medium heat until tender, about 6 minutes. If the mixture starts to stick, add a little water to the pan. Stir in lima beans, red pepper, corn, and herbs. Cook another 2 to 3 minutes. Add cherry tomatoes and stir in butter until melted. Serve hot. Per serving: 193 calories, 7 grams fat (3 grams saturated fat), 27 grams total carbs, 6 grams fiber, 7 grams protein.

18   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JANUARY 2020


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24   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JANUARY 2020


Zanesville man goes a long way to connect homeless dogs to loving families. STORY BY MARGARET BURANEN; PHOTOS BY LARRY CRAWFORD

O

n 28 Mondays a year, Greg Mahle climbs into his semitractor-trailer in Zanesville and heads south on a mission through Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi to give formerly homeless dogs the loving homes they deserve. One of his first stops on the weeklong, 4,200-mile journey is Shaggy Dog Rescue in Houston, where he finds dogs waiting for him that have been saved from overcrowded shelters across the Lone Star State. Mahle gets the dogs into kennels, which are then secured — three shelves high — along the walls of his custom-built, air-conditioned trailer. Though they don’t realize it, the dogs have taken their first step toward much better lives, thanks to Rescue Road Trips, the nonprofit organization Mahle founded. From Houston, Mahle and his relief driver travel to shelters and veterinary clinics in Louisiana and Mississippi to pick up more dogs. Mahle says that a typical run carries “80 to 100 dogs and sometimes a few cats.” All of the dogs are healthy and attractive. Labs, assorted terriers, German shepherds, Chihuahuas, beagles and other hounds, and mixed-breeds large and small all get quick goodbye hugs from shelter volunteers or foster parents who have cared for them, and Mahle continues on his way. He drives the dogs to Connecticut and other northern states, where adoptive families or foster parents will be waiting for all of them. On Thursday evening of mission week, the big white truck — emblazoned with “Rescue Road Trips Saving Lives Four Paws at a Time” on its sides — stops near Birmingham, Alabama, where volunteers are waiting to ease the stress of the long journey with a walk and cuddle for each dog. They get another walk, treats, and attention from more volunteers on Friday evening in Allentown, Pennsylvania. From both stops, volunteers post photos of the dogs on the Rescue Road Trips Facebook page. Social media lets the dogs’ former caretakers in the South see how the dogs are doing on the trip, while giving a sneak peek to the people who will foster or adopt them in the North.

JANUARY 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   25


The dogs are never left unattended. Mahle and his relief driver take turns sleeping — Mahle sleeps in back with the dogs. Finally, on Saturday morning, the truck rolls in to Rocky Hill, Connecticut, for “Gotcha Day,” which is livestreamed on Facebook. People shed happy tears as Mahle announces each dog’s name to the waiting crowd and Facebook viewers all over the country. Kids grin and hold “welcome home” signs they’ve made for their new dogs. “I get most of the glory and recognition, but it’s not just me,” Mahle says. “Adella [his wife] is every bit as invested as I am. So are Debbie [his mother-in-law] and the office

26   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JANUARY 2020

staff and the volunteers. Rescue is a big chain with the final link being the adopter. We all have to pull together to get this dog to its forever home.” Mahle started transporting rescued dogs from southern states to the North in 2005, when he received a distress call from his sister. She operates Labs4Rescue in Connecticut, a group of volunteers who foster Labrador retrievers until carefully screened families adopt them. When the group’s driver couldn’t finish a trip, Mahle stepped in to drive the van full of Labs the rest of their way. He began driving more often and eventually started transporting dogs for other rescue organizations, too.


For Mahle, the most difficult part of each trip is “the grueling labor. I leave on Monday and don’t get home until Sunday. Walking dogs, taking care of them, lifting them in and out of kennels, loading supplies — it’s hard work.” That’s balanced, though, by the best part of his long week: “the thousand dog kisses I get on every trip,” he says. “Just getting to put my hands on the dogs, to feel their love. You build attachments. They have feelings for me, and I have feelings for them.” The days between trips are busy, too. Cleaning and sanitizing the trailer, booking dogs from various rescue groups, and paying endless bills (salaries, license fees, supplies, truck maintenance and fuel, etc.) takes a lot of time. Mahle says that despite the thousands of dogs he and other groups have transported from overcrowded southern shelters to loving homes in the North, the problem of homeless dogs isn’t decreasing and “won’t be solved in my lifetime.” Because that’s too overwhelming to think about, Mahle explains, “I focus on the small victories, not the large problem. I think about how rescues are making a tremendous difference to the individual dogs.” For more information, go to www.rescueroadtrips.org or visit the group on Facebook.

JANUARY 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   27


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Healing INSIDE

Horizon Prison Initiative promotes growth and community-building among those who are incarcerated. BY PATTY YODER

30   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JANUARY 2020


M

arcus Freed climbs the steps to London Correctional Institution, a medium-security prison 30 miles west of Columbus. He’s carrying only his driver’s license, prison ID, and a clear bag filled with program materials. Once inside, he hands the items to a security officer who searches the bag, then waits for the OK to step through the metal detector. The officer unlocks a door to a second secure area, where Freed presents his license again, and another officer confirms his identity and unlocks a gate so Freed can make his way to the D4 dormitory and begin his volunteer work. It’s a routine Freed has performed thousands of times volunteering for Horizon Prison Initiative, Prison Initiative volunteer Marcus Freed, left, and Horizon graduate Silas Galdamez, right, but he doesn’t think twice about Horizon have stayed in touch since Galdamez was released from prison in 2014. For several years, Freed has the extra steps required just to traveled to El Salvador to help Galdamez build hundreds of wheelchairs for people in need. get there. The retired guidance The idea behind Horizon is for incarcerated men counselor spends 30 or more hours a week at the prison and women (Horizon also has a program at the Ohio supporting Horizon’s program coordinator, Richard Reformatory for Women in Marysville) to gain insights Boone; more than 30 Outside Brother volunteers; and into how they got to prison, heal from trauma, and 56 incarcerated men working to change their lives. Many discover a greater purpose for their lives. At the people never step foot in a prison, but Freed says he feels beginning of the program year, incoming participants called to be there. are assigned to an eight-person family unit and live “People in prison are just like you and me,” he says. “They just made a decision they have to live with for the rest of their lives.”

as a family until graduation 10 months later. They take classes to develop social and emotional skills — tolerance, accountability, conflict resolution, how to

JANUARY 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   31


“It was a breakthrough,” Clay says. “I got a chance to go all the way back to what made me who I was. All my anger and attitude toward everyone else went out the door, and I decided to change me.”

Horizon graduate James Clay was released from prison in 2017. Today, in addition to working full time and taking college classes, Clay speaks to groups around the state about justice, incarceration, and living as a returning citizen. The former Marine sports dog tags that read “James ‘Battle Tested’ Clay.”

rely on someone and be relied upon — and practice using those skills within their Horizon families. They learn about different faith traditions and respecting people who have different backgrounds and beliefs. A powerful component of the program is a trauma-healing workshop, which addresses both the trauma the men have endured and trauma they have caused. Getting to the root of their pain, Freed says, helps participants open up emotionally and start to connect with others. “When people start to heal from trauma, they look for a larger purpose,” he says. “They’re not just thinking about themselves anymore. They’re thinking about how they can help others.” Freed shared the story of Silas Galdamez, a former drug dealer who graduated from the Horizon program. After Galdamez finished his prison sentence, he returned home to El Salvador and looked for ways to give back to the community. He began volunteering with a group that delivers donated wheelchairs to people who need them. Galdamez’s job is to adjust the wheelchairs to fit each recipient. Since 2015, Freed has traveled to Central America eight times to help Galdamez, customizing hundreds of wheelchairs and helping a local school become more accessible for students with disabilities. Horizon Prison Initiative also had a profound effect on James Clay, who joined the program begrudgingly after a friend persuaded him to go. Eighteen months into his nine-year sentence, the former Marine wanted to put all of his energy into fighting his case — not taking classes about feelings. The trauma-healing workshop changed his mind.

32   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JANUARY 2020

From that point forward, Clay fully embraced Horizon, serving as an encourager and peer advisor to new participants until his release in 2017. Today, the father of seven lives in Dayton, where he works full time, takes evening classes at Sinclair College, and spends time with his family. Despite his busy schedule, Clay takes every opportunity to speak to groups around the state about his prison experience. He wants to build a career as a professional speaker so he can advocate for programs like Horizon and share his story to inspire others. “I am looking to motivate people so they understand that no matter what they’re going through, they can overcome it,” Clay says. “Look at me. I was at the bottom of the social ladder, but I no longer allow labels to tell me who I am.” Horizon Prison Initiative is a 501(c)(3) organization based in Columbus. With seven full- and part-time staff and around 30 volunteers, the nonprofit works with 56 men at London Correctional Institution and 80 women at the Ohio Reformatory for Women. For more information, visit www.horizonprisoninitiative.org.


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Mary Harris’ early presence in Ohio inspired a unique nomenclature that still exists today in Roscoe Village. STORY AND PHOTOS BY DAMAINE VONADA

L

ike the tip of an iceberg, the name of Whitewoman Street hints at considerably more than it reveals. The street forms the heart of Coshocton’s Roscoe Village, a restored 1830s canal town and living-history attraction where tourists often ask how it got such an eyebrow-raising name. The short answer is that the street honors Mary Harris, a woman of European descent who lived in the Ohio Country. But that merely skims the surface of her story. In all probability, Harris was the first white person to reside in Ohio, and her presence was so extraordinary that it was noted on international maps and occasioned a nomenclature — including White Woman’s River, White Woman’s Town, White Woman’s Rock, and, of course, Whitewoman Street — that is particular to the Coshocton area. The reenactors who stroll Whitewoman Street during Roscoe Village events often include Alice Hoover, a Coshocton resident and history buff known for her meticulously researched first-person portrayals of women. When depicting Mary Harris for schoolchildren or other groups, Hoover wears moccasins and fringed clothing and begins her presentation in French before transitioning to English. “Do you wonder why,” her Mary Harris character asks the audience, “I was speaking French, but I look like an Englishwoman and am dressed like an Indian?” Hoover then explains the three cultures and the enormous geopolitical force that shaped Harris’ life: the protracted, multinational fight for the rich but raw land beyond the Alleghenies that culminated in the French and Indian War. “Mary Harris was in the crosshairs of that whole struggle,” Hoover says. For Harris, that struggle began in Massachusetts in 1704, when Mohawk Indians and French soldiers attacked a remote Puritan settlement at Deerfield. They killed dozens of English colonists and forced some 100 captives to endure a 300-mile march to Canada. Among the ordeal’s survivors was Mary

34   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JANUARY 2020

Alice Hoover of Coshocton portrays a full cast of women as a historical reenactor. Her repertoire includes Mary Harris, who likely was the first person of European descent to live in the Ohio Country. Harris’ presence inspired the naming of Whitewoman Street in Coshocton’s Roscoe Village (opposite page).

Harris, a servant girl who was about 9 years old at the time. She was taken to Kahnawake, a mission village of Christian Mohawks near Montreal, where she likely was adopted by an Indian family. The French, at the time, intended to establish a glorious “New France” stretching from the Gulf of St. Lawrence on the east coast of Canada to the Gulf of Mexico, and French colonists increasingly sparred with their English counterparts over control of territory and the fur trade. The crucially located prize they both claimed was the Ohio Country. Enter Christopher Gist, a frontiersman hired to survey the Ohio Country for a group of British-backed real estate investors from Virginia. According to a journal


Gist kept, he spent much of December 1750 near present-day Coshocton at a Wyandot village on the Tuscarawas River. Gist wrote that in January, he went 5 miles west “to White Woman’s Creek [now the Walhonding River] on which is a small Town; this White Woman was taken away from New England, when she was not above ten Years old by the French and Indians.” Gist also recorded that she “has an Indian husband and several children,” and “Her name is Mary Harris.” It’s not clear why Harris was living there, though her family was in the fur trading business, which thrived in the area. Scott Butler, a Coshocton native who has authored books about its frontier years, theorizes that White Woman’s Town might have been used both to bolster French influence with the Indians and to monitor English encroachments. By 1756, when the French and Indian War was underway, Harris had returned to Kahnawake. Robert Eastburn, a British prisoner of war, was housed with her, and in a 1758 account, he described her as “very kind.” Harris presumably spent the rest of her days in Kahnawake and perhaps even witnessed the French surrendering Montreal to the British in 1760.

“It’s utter bilge,” declares Butler, who, like Hoover, wants to clear Harris’ name. Their quest — via his writing and her portrayals — is conveying accurate information about the woman whom Butler considers the “first lady” of Ohio. “It’s important to get out the facts and not just accept false legends,” Butler says. “The history is far better than the legends.” Scott Butler’s book, Mary Harris, “The White Woman” of the Ohio Frontier in 1750: The True Story, the False Legends, and More is available for sale at Coshocton’s Johnson-Humrickhouse Museum, 740-622-8710; www.jhmuseum.org.

Folks around Coshocton called the Walhonding “White Woman’s River” well into the 1800s, and in the Roscoe canal port, the trail that led to that river became Whitewoman Street. Interestingly, Harris’ reputation suffered during the heyday of the dime novel in the late 1800s and early 1900s, when tall tales — including that she murdered her husband and jumped to her death from a ledge dubbed White Woman’s Rock — became the slanderous stuff of legend.

JANUARY 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   35


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36   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JANUARY 2020

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2020 CALENDAR

JANUARY/FEBRUARY COMPILED BY COLLEEN ROMICK CLARK

JAN. 25 – Prom Dress and Accessories Consignment Sale, downtown Sidney, 10 a.m.–2 p.m. Gently used prom dresses and accessories at great prices. 937-658-6945 or www.sidneyalive.org. JAN. 25–26 – Lima Symphony: “Mozart by Candlelight,” Sat. 7:30 p.m., Trinity United Methodist Church, 301 W. Market St., Lima; Sun. 4 p.m., St. John’s Catholic Church, 331 E. Second St., Delphos. $20, Stds. $10. An exquisite evening of Mozart and candlelight awaits as two local sanctuaries open their doors to the experience of music as it was performed during Mozart’s lifetime. 419-222-5701 or www.limasymphony.com. JAN. 17–19 – Camp Perry Open: Civilian Markmanship FEB. 1 – Ice-A-Fair, 685 Main St., Vermilion, 11 a.m.–7 Program, 1000 N. Lawrence Rd., Port Clinton. Open to air p.m. Free. A daylong winter event for the entire family, rifle and air pistol competitors of all ages and skill levels. featuring glittering ice sculptures on display and ice Spectators welcome. 419-635-2141 ext. 731, kharrington@ carving demos throughout the day. Ends with the thecmp.org, or http://thecmp.org. towering Fire & Ice display. 440-963-0772 or www. JAN. 17–19, 24–26 – The 25th Annual Putnam County mainstreetvermilion.org. Spelling Bee, Encore Theater, 991 N. Shore Dr., Lima, Fri./ FEB. 1–2 – Tri-State Gun Show, Allen Co. Fgds., 2750 Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. Six awkward tweens (all played by Harding Hwy., Lima (2 miles east of Lima on St. Rte. 309), adults) vie for the coveted spelling championship in this Sat. 8:30 a.m.–4 p.m., Sun. 8:30 a.m.–3 p.m. $6, free fast-paced, Tony Award–winning comedy. 419-223-8866 for members, under 18 free. Over 400 tables of modern or www.amiltellers.org. and antique guns, edged weapons, and sportsmen JAN. 19 – Wild World of Animals, Veterans Memorial equipment. 419-647-0067 or www.tristategunshow.org. Civic and Convention Ctr., 7 Town Square, Lima, 2 FEB. 6–9 – Greater Toledo Auto Show, Seagate p.m. Explore the fascinating world of the wildlife we Convention Ctr., 401 Jefferson Ave., Toledo, Thur. 3–9 share with the planet. The show educates in fun and p.m., Fri. 12–9 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–9 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–5 memorable ways, presenting animals ranging from p.m. $8, Srs./Stds. $6, under 10 free. Displays of the leopard, mo≠≠nkey, wolf, and badger to the critically latest and greatest models and automotive technologies endangered red ruffed lemur and more. 419-224-1552 from more than 20 different manufacturers. www. or www.limaciviccenter.com. toledoautoshow.org.

FEB. 7–8 – Winterfest BG Chillabration, downtown Bowling Green. An annual community-wide festival featuring a Frozen Swamp Tent, ice garden, ice-carving demos, live bands, horse-drawn carriage rides, and more. 419-353-9445, www.gobgohio.com, or search @ WinterfestBG on Facebook. FEB. 8 – Lima Symphony: “Mad Love,” Veterans Memorial Civic and Convention Ctr., 7 Town Square, Lima, 7:30 p.m. $15–$30. Join us for soaring melodies, romantic angst, and wildly virtuosic piano technique, all cast in a form that is symphonic in scope. Conducted by Andrew Crust. 419-224-1552 or www.limaciviccenter.com. FEB. 13 – Get the Led Out: A Celebration of the “Mighty Zep,” Veterans Memorial Civic and Convention Ctr., 7 Town Square, Lima, 7:30 p.m. $15–$50. GTLO captures the essence of the recorded music of Led Zeppelin and re-creates the songs in all their depth and glory on the concert stage. 419-224-1552 or www. limaciviccenter.com. FEB. 14–16 – HBA House & Home Show and Green Living Expo, SeaGate Convention Ctr., 401 Jefferson Ave., Toledo, Fri. 3–8 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $10 at door, $5 in advance, under 12 free. Talk directly to the experts about your dreams of updating the inside of your home, sprucing up your curb appeal, or building a brand-new home … all under one roof! www. toledohba.com or www.toledohomeshow.com.

NORTHEAST

trains to buy, sell, or trade. 440-665-0882 (Ed Mularz), emularz1124@aol.com, or www.greatlakestca.org. JAN. 26 – Make Someone Happy: The Songs of Comden and Green, Hanna Theatre, Playhouse Square, 1519 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, 3 p.m. $35–$55. The multimedia live concert showcases songs from the legendary writing team of Betty Comden and Adolph Green, Broadway’s “merry pranksters.” 216-241-6000 or www.playhousesquare.org. JAN. 31–FEB. 9 – The Great Big Home and Garden Show, IX Center, 1 I-X Center Dr., Cleveland. $10–$15, C. (6–12) $5, under 6 free. See website for hours and schedule of events. Explore more than 600 exhibits, meet industry experts and home professionals, and enjoy unique feature displays such as the garden showcase. 440-248-5729 or www.greatbighomeandgarden.com. FEB. 2 – Model Railroad and Toy Show, Medina Co. Fgds. Community Ctr., 735 Lafayette Rd. (St. Rte. 42), Medina. $6. 330-948-4400 or www.conraddowdell.com. FEB. 8 – Winter Hike for Health, Malabar Farm State Park, 4050 Bromfield Rd., Lucas, 9 a.m.–noon. Free. Meet at the visitors center. 419-774-4772 or http://parks.ohiodnr. gov/malabarfarm.

NORTHWEST

JAN. 16–MAY 31 – “Tying the Knot: The History of Bridal Fashion,” McKinley Presidential Library and Museum, 800 McKinley Monument Dr. NW, Canton. Exhibit explores wedding fashions from the 1860s to the present day. Learn more about the history behind timeless wedding traditions, such as the bouquet toss, wedding cakes, the engagement ring, the role of the best man, and more! 330-455-7043 or www. mckinleymuseum.org/events. JAN. 16–20 – Cleveland Boat Show, I-X Ctr., 1 I-X Center Dr., Cleveland, Thur./Fri. 12–9 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–9 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Mon. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $14, Srs. $12, under 13 free. Visit the “Boating Experience” Pavilion, try

scuba diving, view the 5,000-gallon aquarium, and much more. Don’t miss the Lake Erie Market and Twiggy the Water-Skiing Squirrel! www.clevelandboatshow.com. JAN. 17–18 – Appalachian Music Festival, Mohican Park State Lodge, 1098 Ashland Co. Rd. 3006, Perrysville, Fri. 5–9 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–9 p.m. Free. A weekend of acoustic music, tasty country cooking, workshops, a gospel sing, and much more. 419-938-5411 or www. mohicanlodge.com. JAN. 19 – Flea Market of Collectables, Medina County Fgds. Community Ctr., 735 Lafayette Rd. (St. Rte. 42), Medina, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. $2. Early bird special admission, 6–9 a.m., $3. A treasure trove of vintage items and collectables. 330-948-4300 or www.conraddowdell.com. JAN. 24–26 – Cleveland Motorcycle Show, I-X Center, West and East High Bay, One I-X Center Dr., Cleveland, Fri. 3–8 p.m., Sat. 9:30 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $17, under 12 free. $10 parking. 216-265-7005 or http:// motorcycleshows.com. JAN. 25 – TCA Great Lakes Division Train Meet, UAW Hall, 5615 Chevrolet Blvd., Parma, 10 a.m.–3 p.m. Adult $6, Family $8, kids admitted free. Free parking. All-gauge show including O, S, HO, N, Z, and large scale. Over 175 tables and many operating displays. New and old

Continued on page 38

JANUARY 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   37


2020 CALENDAR

JANUARY/FEBRUARY Continued from page 37

JAN. 25 – Beginner’s Grafting Workshop, Dawes Arboretum Greenhouse Classroom, 7770 Jacksontown Rd., Newark, 8:30–11:30 a.m. $30 members/$40 non-members. Learn and practice the art and science of grafting in this hands-on workshop led by the Arboretum’s propagator. Rootstock and scion wood are provided; you may bring your own scion wood, if appropriate rootstock is available. Participants will take home the material they graft. Register at 800-443-2937 or www.dawesarb.org. JAN. 25–26 – Scott Antique Market, Ohio Expo Ctr., Bricker and Celeste Bldgs., 717 E. 17th Ave., Columbus, Sat. 9 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Free admission; $5 parking. 800 exhibit booths. info@scottantiquemarket. com or www.scottantiquemarkets.com. JAN. 26 – Popovich Comedy Pet Theatre, Marion Palace Theatre, 276 W. Center St., Marion, 4 p.m. $20– $28, Stds. $12. Popovich and his team of furry friends aim to entertain animal lovers of all ages. 740-383-2101 or www.marionpalace.org. FEB. 2 – Advanced Grafting Workshop, Dawes Arboretum Greenhouse Classroom, 7770 Jacksontown Rd., Newark, 8:30–11:30 a.m. $30 members/$40 non-members. Continue on your path of learning the art and science of grafting with this hands-on workshop with the Arboretum’s propagator. Rootstock and scion wood are provided; you may bring your own scion wood, if appropriate rootstock is available. Attendees will take home the materials they graft. This program is intended for those who have participated in previous grafting workshops. Register at 800-4432937 or www.dawesarb.org. FEB. 3 – Introduction to Beekeeping, Franklin Park Conservatory, 1777 E. Broad St., Columbus, 6–8 p.m. $15–

$20. If you have ever wanted to explore the possibility of becoming a beekeeper, here is your chance! Join us as we explore the world of beekeeping and learn how to host your own apiary. Sample honey from Orchard Lane Apiary located in Clintonville. www.fpconservatory.org. FEB. 7–9 – AAA Great Vacations Travel Expo, Ohio Expo Ctr., Kasich Hall, 717 E. 17th Ave., Columbus, Fri. 12–7 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–7 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–4 p.m. $8, under 17 free; $4 for AAA members. Talk one-on-one with travel experts. Find vacation packages to fit every budget and interest. Fun activities for the whole family. www. aaagreatvacations.com. FEB. 7–9 – Columbus Fishing Expo, Ohio Expo Ctr., Bricker Bldg., 717 E. 17th Ave., Columbus, Fri. noon–8 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–7 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $12, Srs. $10, under 18 free. Military/first responders with ID, $10. Three days of sport fishing education and fun, with educational seminars, speakers, and activities to expand your knowledge of fishing. 614-361-5548 or www. columbusfishingexpo.com. FEB. 8 – Sweethearts Hike, Hocking Hills State Park, St. Rte. 56, South Bloomingville, 5–7 p.m. Meet at Ash Cave parking lot. Free. Take your sweetheart for a romantic stroll to Ash Cave in the soft light of dusk, then enjoy a cozy fire and refreshments. 740-685-6841 or www. hockinghills.com. FEB. 14 – Tommy James and The Shondells, Marion Palace Theatre, 276 W. Center St., Marion, 7:30 p.m. $40–$60. The group performs their hits, such as “Crystal Blue Persuasion,” “Crimson and Clover,” “Mony Mony,” “I Think We’re Alone Now,” and “Draggin’ The Line.” 740383-2101 or www.marionpalace.org.

bluegrass from the Coal Cave Hollow Boys and alternative bluegrass performed by Charlie Woods and Deep Hollow. www.majesticchillicothe.net. JAN. 19 – Bridal Showcase, Pritchard Laughlin Civic Ctr., 7033 Glenn Hwy., Cambridge, 12–3 p.m. $5. For prospective brides and prom attendees. Caterers, DJs, photographers, realtors, hair salons, makeup artists, and more will be available with ideas to make your special day memorable. 740-439-7009 or www.pritchardlaughlin.com. JAN. 25 – Country on the Carpet, Pritchard Laughlin Civic Ctr., 7033 Glenn Hwy., Cambridge, 7 p.m. $6 in JAN. 11 – Conway Turley, Majestic Theatre, 45 E. Second advance, $8 at door. Put on your dancin’ shoes — or St., Chillicothe. If you enjoy Twitty, Jennings, and Haggard, boots! — for a night full of country and bluegrass music. 740-439-7009 or www.pritchardlaughlin.com. you’ll love Turley’s traditional country music show. www. majesticchillicothe.net. JAN. 25 – Don McLean, Peoples Bank Theatre, 222 Putnam St., Marietta, 8 p.m. Starting at $52. One of the JAN. 18 – “Digging the Past” Archaeology Day, most revered and respected songwriters in American Campus Martius Museum, 601 Second St., Marietta, history, McLean composed mega-hits like “American Pie,” 9:30 a.m.–4 p.m. Original artifacts from the prehistoric “Vincent (Starry, Starry Night),” and “Castles in the Air.” to the historic period will be displayed by local collectors www.peoplesbanktheatre.com. and others from throughout the state. Programs offer hands-on activities and demonstration, and the chance JAN. 31 – Doug Stone: Accoustic Concert, 45 E. to handle real dinosaur bones! 740-373-3750 or www. Second St., Chillicothe. Stone performs his hits such campusmartiusmuseum.org. as “I’d Be Better Off (in a Pine Box),” “A Jukebox and a Country Song,” and “Too Busy Being in Love.” www. JAN. 18 – An Evening of Bluegrass, Majestic Theatre, majesticchillicothe.net. 45 E. Second St., Chillicothe. Features both traditional

FEB. 8 – Contemporary Gun Makers and Allied Artists, Campus Martius Museum, 601 Second St., Marietta, 9:30 a.m.– 4 p.m. Features the work of several dozen traditional gunmakers from around the Ohio Valley as well as several other craftsmen who work in the manner of the 18th and 19th centuries. Also featured: horn makers, hunting bag makers, leather workers, tinsmithers, cabinet makers, and other allied trades. 740-373-3750 or www. campusmartiusmuseum.org. FEB. 8 – Winter Hike, Burr Oak State Park, 10220 Burr Oak Lodge Rd., Glouster, 10 a.m.–1 p.m. Free. Join fellow outdoors enthusiasts for a hike through the forest. Hike lengths are 3, 5, and 8 miles. Enjoy free bean soup and cornbread after the hike at the lodge. All hikes begin at 10 a.m. 740-767-3570 or http://parks.ohiodnr.gov/burroak. FEB. 15 – Great Backyard Bird Count, Burr Oak State Park, 10220 Burr Oak Lodge Rd., Glouster, 9:30 a.m.– noon. Take part in a global citizen science project! We’ll identify and count all the birds we see on a 1.5-mile hike. Data submitted helps scientists track changes in the abundance and distribution of birds, as well as birds’ migration patterns. Binoculars provided or bring your own. Meet at the nature center. 740-767-3570 or http:// parks.ohiodnr.gov/burroak.

CENTRAL

JAN. 14, FEB. 11 – Inventors Network Meetings, Rev1 Ventures for Columbus, 1275 Kinnear Rd., Columbus, 7 p.m. Educational presentations and discussion about the invention process. Meetings held the 2nd Tuesday of each month. 614-470-0144 or www.inventorscolumbus.com. JAN. 18 – Hocking Hills Winter Hike, 20160 St. Rte. 664 S., Logan, continuous starts 9–11 a.m. Free. See the beauty of Hocking Hills in the winter as you hike 6 miles from Old Man’s Cave to Ash Cave, with a stop at Cedar Falls for refreshments. Transportation provided back to parking area. 740-685-6841 or www.hockinghills.com. JAN. 24 – Gas Pump Jockeys, Marion Palace Theatre, 276 W. Center Street, Marion, 7:30 p.m. $16. Rev your engines and race to the May Pavilion to hear the songs of the ’60s and ’70s. 740-383-2101 or www. marionpalace.org. JAN. 24–26 – Johnson’s Log Home and Timber Frame Show, Ohio Expo Ctr., Rhodes Bldg., 717 E. 17th Ave., Columbus, Fri. 1–7 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. An expo for log home, timber frame home, and rustic furniture enthusiasts. 866-607-4108 or www. loghomeshows.com.

SOUTHEAST

38   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JANUARY 2020


SOUTHWEST

JAN. 15, 22; FEB. 5, 12 – Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass, Vinoklet Winery, 11069 Colerain Ave., Cincinnati, 6:30–8:30 p.m. Enjoy dinner and an evening of lively bluegrass music. Reservations strongly recommended. Vinoklet was top prize winner in two categories at the 2019 Ohio Wine Competition. 513-385-9309, vinokletwinery@fuse.net, or www. vinokletwines.com/post/2018/09/30/bluegrasswednesdays-spaghetti-meat-balls.

WEST VIRGINIA

JAN. 17–19, 22–26 – The Ford Cincinnati Travel, Sports, and Boat Show, Duke Energy Convention Ctr., 525 Elm St., Cincinnati. Check website for hours and updated schedule of events. Find everything you need to plan your next outdoor adventure, from boats, campers, ATVs, and motorcycles to adventure sports equipment. www.cincinnatiboatshow.com. JAN. 25 – TCA Ohio River Chapter Train Meet, American Legion Hall, 11100 Winton Rd., Cincinnati (Greenhills), 10:30 a.m.–2 p.m. Contact Dan Miller at 513256-9955 or steamsparkles@aol.com. JAN. 25–26 – Lebanon Antique Show and Sale, Warren Co. Fgds., 665 N. Broadway, Lebanon, Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–4 p.m. $6 online, $8 at door; one ticket good for both days! More than 50 vendors featuring 18th-, 19th-, and early 20th-century American and Continental furnishings and decorative arts, as well as textiles, jewelry, primitives, folk art, and fine art. www. harmonmuseumohio.org. JAN. 28 – Christopher Chaffee and Friends: Drawing Room Chamber Concert, Troy-Hayner Cultural Ctr., 301 W. Main St., Troy, 7:30 p.m. www.troyhayner.org/music.html. JAN. 17–19 – Huntington RV and Boat Show, Big Sandy Superstore Arena, 1 Center Plaza, Huntington, Fri. 5–9 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–9 p.m., Sun. 12–5 p.m. Features new products and services for travelers, campers, boaters, and outdoor recreation enthusiasts. 304-757-5487 or www. bigsandyarena.com. JAN. 25 – Honey Bee Expo, West Virginia University– Parkersburg, Rte. 47, Parkersburg. $20 if registered by Jan. 6; $25 at door; age 12 and under, $8. All-day conference dedicated to the promotion of beekeeping.

Workshops for all levels of beekeeping from beginning to advanced. Keynote speaker is Dr. Jim Tew. Vendors will be present with products and supplies. Detailed information and schedule will be posted at www.movba.org.

The Power of Dreams Through Honda’s History of Innovation.

Submit listings AT LEAST 90 DAYS prior to the event to Ohio Cooperative Living, 6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, OH 43229 or send an email to events@ ohioec.org. Ohio Cooperative Living will not publish listings that don’t include a complete address or a number/website for more information.

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2019 Shows

2019 Shows

DEC 21 & 22

PLEASE NOTE: Ohio Cooperative Living strives for accuracy, but urges readers to confirm dates and times before traveling long distances to events.

Experience

Make sure you’re included in our calendar!

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FEB. 1–2 – Greater Cincinnati Fly Fishing Show, Oasis Conference Ctr., 902 Loveland-Miamiville Rd., Loveland, 9 a.m.–4 p.m. Fly fishing education, tying equipment, magazines/books on fly tying, fishing kits, training services by professionals, and technical support. https://10times.com/fly-fishing-show. FEB. 8–9 – Jungle Jim’s Big Cheese Festival, Oscar Event Ctr., 5440 Dixie Highway, Fairfield, 12–5 p.m. $15 adults, $2 kids; VIP tickets available. The ultimate homage to fromage! Sample amazing cheeses plus a variety of meats, olives, and other appetizers as well as fabulous beers and wines. 513-674-6055 or www.junglejims.com/ bigcheesefest. FEB. 14, 15 – Valentine Dinner and a Show, Troy-Hayner Cultural Ctr., 301 W. Main St., Troy, 5:30 p.m. Spend a magical evening wining and dining with your sweetheart, with entertainment provided by renowned magician Jason Hudy. www.troyhayner.org/music.html.

2020 Shows JAN 25 & 26 FEB 22 & 23

MAR 28 & 29

DEC 12 - 15

2020 Shows JAN 9 - 12 FEB 6 - 9 MAR 12 - 15

APR 9 - 12 MAY 7 - 10 JUN 11 - 14

Visit HondaHeritageCenter.com for hours and information. Admission is free. 24025 Honda Parkway / Marysville, Ohio 43040 937.644.6888

JUL 9 - 12 AUG 6 - 9 SEP 10 - 13

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JANUARY 2020  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   39


MEMBER INTERACTIVE

1

Slumber party

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1. Our granddaughters, Alizah and Jazmin, having a slumber party with Nannaw and Pappaw. Katie Grubba South Central Power Company member 2. Our grandchildren, Jeffrey, Trevor, Tori, T.J., and Jaime, having a slumber party at our home. Patty and Larry Quaglia South Central Power Company members

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3. Four of our seven grandkids — Jack, Eli, Mallory, and Samuel Warner — at our summer family gettogether at our home at Lake Seneca. Cousins “sleeping” in their tent. Patty and Rocky Warner North Western Electric Cooperative member 4. My dog and cat, Redd and Mr. Bits, very comfortable at their slumber party! Becky Stofan Guernsey-Muskingum Electric Cooperative member 5. Our “furbabies” enjoying their own slumber party. Julie Wilhelm Tricounty Rural Electric Cooperative member

Send us your picture! For April, send “Easter egg hunt” by Jan. 15; for May, send “It’s not easy being green” by Feb. 15. Upload your photos at www.ohioec.org/ memberinteractive — and remember to include your co-op name and to identify everyone in the photos.

40   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JANUARY 2020


She makes a mean latte — but look elsewhere for energy advice.

The energy advisor at your local electric cooperative is the most reliable source of energy information. We’ve been your trusted source of energy advice for more than 80 years. Contact your cooperative for energy-saving tips that will work for you.

ohioec.org/energy


Profile for Ohio Cooperative Living

Ohio Cooperative Living - January 2020 - Statewide