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OHIO

JULY 2019

COOPERATIVE

Living

Official publication of South Central Power Company | www.southcentralpower.com

King of Coasters The Beast turns 40

ALSO INSIDE A peek inside your co-op magazine Ohio’s man on the moon Country Concert packs ’em in


Concern for Community That’s the cooperative dierence.

We take care of our neighbors and communities through service projects like Operation Gratitude and Ronald McDonald House Charities.

ohioec.org/purpose


OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JULY 2019

INSIDE FEATURES 24 SHOWTIME The annual Country Concert brings big-name stars and tens of thousands of fans to rural Shelby County.

28 MOTHAPALOOZA Every other year, Ohio’s “moth-ers” gather at Shawnee State Forest to see a multitude of their favorite bugs.

30 WINK AT THE MOON

PHOTO BY W.H. “CHIP” GROSS

Neil Armstrong’s hometown of Wapakoneta celebrates the 50th anniversary of his “one small step.”

Cover image on most issues: When The Beast first opened at King’s Island in 1979, it was the longest and fastest roller coaster in the world. Now 40 years old, it still holds the title of the longest wooden coaster in the world at 7,359 feet. This page: The Armstrong Air and Space Museum in Wapakoneta is easily recognized by its signature white dome.

JULY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   1


UP FRONT

TEAMWORK WORKS C

ooperation among cooperatives is one of the principles upon which our industry is founded. Think of it as teamwork — sounds nice, but it’s more than just a neighborly way to conduct business. We’re more effective when we work together cooperatively to achieve common goals. Ohio Cooperative Living magazine is just one example that shows how team effort really works to hold down costs and improve the quality of our service. Member education and information is another cooperative principle. A cooperative is more effective when its members know what their cooperative is doing — when, where, and why. Nearly every electric cooperative has bylaws that require regular communication with its members. Ohio’s electric co-ops share information with their members by teaming with the statewide association to produce Ohio Cooperative Living. By collaborating with each other, co-ops share costs and retain a professional staff that produces a quality product at a much lower cost than any single co-op could on its own. Our editorial team works with the staff at your local distribution cooperative to find the perfect mix of information, education, and entertainment to put on these pages each month — and, like our readers, we’re consistently pleased with the result. This year, our team was honored for its work when Managing Editor Jeff McCallister and the staff of Ohio Cooperative Living earned the George W. Haggard Memorial Journalism Award from the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association. The commendation from our national association is an annual distinction that recognizes the best statewide co-op publication. Ohio Cooperative Living is just one way that electric cooperatives work together to share costs and to tell your collective stories. Our statewide association also provides services, such as training in the areas of job safety, professional development, and governance practices. We communicate peak alerts, when cutting back electric use for a few hours can reduce the cost of providing electricity all year. We share a government relations staff that advocates on behalf of electric cooperatives to elected officials who are considering laws and regulations that affect our business. By working together, we provide top-notch business services at a fraction of the cost. Check out our story on page 4 to get a behind-the-scenes look at the Ohio Cooperative Living team in action.

2   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JULY 2019

Pat O’Loughlin PRESIDENT & CEO OHIO'S ELECTRIC COOPERATIVES

By collaborating with each other, co-ops share costs and retain a professional staff that produces a quality product at a much lower cost than any single co-op could on its own.


MORE INSIDE

July 2019 • Volume 61, No. 10

DEPARTMENTS Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives 6677 Busch Blvd. Columbus, OH 43229 614-846-5757 memberinteract@ohioec.org www.ohioec.org Patrick O’Loughlin President & CEO Patrick Higgins Director of Communications Jeff McCallister Managing Editor Rebecca Seum Associate Editor Anita Cook Graphic Designer Contributors: Celeste Baumgartner, Colleen Romick Clark, W.H. “Chip” Gross, Catherine Murray, Damaine Vonada, and Margie Wuebker. OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING (USPS 134-760; ISSN 2572-049X) is published monthly by Ohio Rural Elec­tric Co­op­eratives, Inc. It is the official com­mun­ ication link be­tween the elec­­­­tric co­operatives in Ohio and West Virginia and their mem­bers. Subscription cost for members ranges from $5.52 to $6.96 per year, paid from equity accruing to the member. Nothing in this publication may be reproduced in any manner without written permission from Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc. All rights reserved.

4 POWER LINES

Behind the scenes: Award-winning Ohio Cooperative Living magazine takes a collaborative effort to produce.

OHIO

COOPERATIVE

Living

Official publication of your electric cooperative | www.ohioec.org

4

8 OHIO ICON

The Beast: King’s Island’s iconic wooden roller coaster turns 40.

JUNE 2019

10 CO-OP PEOPLE

Shooting stars: A pair of championship clay shooters sets up shop using power from Consolidated Cooperative.

8

12 WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE

Treasure in the trees Unique lodging in Knox County

ALSO INSIDE Managing the Cardinal Plant A ride on The Wilds side Cincinnati’s Lazarus lizards

Old-time canal boats: Several Ohio destinations offer a glimpse at the original interstate “highway” system.

15 GOOD EATS

Pack a picnic: ’Tis the season for a light, flavorful — and totally portable — meal on the go.

10

18 CO-OP SPOTLIGHT For all advertising inquiries, contact

Cheryl Solomon American MainStreet Publications 847-749-4875 | cheryl@amp.coop The fact that a product is advertised in Ohio Cooperative Living should not be taken as an en­dorse­ment. If you find an advertisement mis­leading or a product unsatisfactory, please not­ify us or the Ohio Attorney General’s Of­fi ce, Consumer Protection Sec­tion, 30 E. Broad St., Col­um­bus, OH 43215. Periodicals postage paid at Colum­bus, OH, and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to editorial and advertising offices at: 6677 Busch Boulevard, Columbus, OH 43229-1101

Cooperative members: Please report changes of address to your electric cooperative. Ohio Cooperative Living staff cannot process address changes.

Future leaders: With terrain that’s flat and rich, the agricultural heritage runs deep at Paulding-Putnam Electric.

19 LOCAL PAGES

News and important information from

12

your electric cooperative.

37 CALENDAR

What’s happening: July/August events and other things to do around the state.

40 MEMBER INTERACTIVE

Pack up the car: For many readers,

15

July means vacation time, and their pictures show they’re rarin’ to go.

Alliance for Audited Media Member Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

40 JULY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   3


POWER LINES

OHIO

BEHIND THE

SCENES

APRIL 2019

COOPERATIVE Official publication of your electric cooperative | www.ohioec.org

Living

The men behind the

power

Celebrating co-op lineworkers

ALSO INSIDE

An insider’s look at Ohio Cooperative Living magazine

L

arry and Gloria Brunk have a pretty good sense of what’s happening at their local electric cooperative. They’ve been members of Midwest Electric, in the northwest part of the state, for more than 45 years and like to keep up with the goings-on at the co-op.

Sasquatch watchers Giving vinyl a spin Scientist captains

OHIO

MAY 2019

COOPERATIVE

Living

Official publication of Washington Electric Cooperative | www.weci.org

“We read the co-op magazine every month,” Gloria Brunk says. “There’s so much in there. We read everything — about animals and insects, recipes, and places to visit, and we enjoy the tidbits about when people get promoted or retire from the co-op. There are times when I get it from the mailbox and don’t put it down until I’ve read the whole thing.”

Livin’ the lake life Camping and kayaking in co-op country

ALSO INSIDE Reconnecting city with country Moonshine goes legit Inside the National Veterans Memorial

OHIO

JUNE 2019

COOPERATIVE

Living

Official publication of your electric cooperative | www.ohioec.org

Ohio Cooperative Living magazine exists, very simply, as a way for electric co-ops around the state to get news to their members. While the staff does its best to provide entertaining, informative content about the state’s events, personalities, and history, it also serves as most co-ops’ official, legal means of informing members about such things as their annual meeting, capital credits, trustee elections, and more. “This magazine is like a guest in our readers’ homes,” says Jeff McCallister, the managing editor. “They welcome us every month, with both grace and enthusiasm, and we try to repay that hospitality by creating a magazine that’s worthy of their time.” Those efforts are being recognized not only by readers like the Brunks, but also by industry experts. Ohio Cooperative Living, in fact, was awarded the George W. Haggard Memorial Journalism Award at the 2019 4   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JULY 2019

Treasure in the trees Unique lodging in Knox County

ALSO INSIDE Managing the Cardinal Plant A ride on The Wilds side Cincinnati’s Lazarus lizards


National Rural Electric Cooperative Association annual meeting in Orlando. That award honors the co-op publication that demonstrates the “most forthright, concise, and balanced presentation of ideas advancing co-ops and their consumermembers.” It’s the highest award given to a statewide magazine by the NRECA. “This is an amazingly polished, professional magazine,” wrote one of the judges who awarded the Haggard. “The covers are beautiful … writing is strong, photography and artwork are powerful, with a story mix tailor-made to invite readers of all interests and ages.” Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives, the statewide association that provides services to the 24 distribution cooperatives that operate in Ohio, has published the magazine for 60 years — the first 58 under the name Country Living.

pages per month, with all the editions combined). Award-winning Graphic Designer Anita Cook creatively lays out the magazine, including many of the local sections, to ensure their style is consistent with the overall feel of the rest of the pages. Much of the statewide content is produced by contributors, including regulars such as Outdoors Editor Chip Gross and freelancer Damaine Vonada, who has written history- and travelrelated stories since 2002. The ever-popular recipe section is the work of Catherine Murray, a professional photographer who writes original recipes specifically for Ohio Cooperative Living before photographing them for the layout.

During the readership focus-group studies that led to the name change and redesign of the graphic look, researchers heard over and over that readers consider the magazine one of the best perks of their co-op membership, and data from scientific surveys back up the opinions of the focus groups. According to GfK MRI, one of the largest research firms in the world, 93% of those who get the magazine read all or part of at least three of the last four issues, which is a number nearly unheard of in the magazine industry. The magazine staff — in close collaboration with the staffs at the local cooperatives — actually produces 24 individual editions of each monthly issue, specific to each of the individual co-ops whose members receive the magazine. The co-op staffs are responsible for the local section in the center, which is different in each of the editions, while the threeperson statewide staff produces the rest. McCallister decides the overall content of the statewide pages and manages the business operations of the magazine. Associate Editor Rebecca Seum not only collects and manages all the content for the local cooperative pages, but also edits and proofreads every page (more than 200

Often the staff is working on two or even three months’ issues at the same time, as several steps in the production process overlap on the calendar. By the time readers see this, the July issue, work will be well underway on parts of the September magazine.

Ohio Cooperative Living staff, from left, Rebecca Seum, Jeff McCallister, and Anita Cook.

“There are so many pieces we have to fit together to be able to give our readers the best experience possible, but it’s worth it,” McCallister says. “Electric cooperative members have a genuine affection for Ohio Cooperative Living, and there’s not really anything that could make us more proud of the work we do.”

JULY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   5


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Make sure your bathroom ages as gracefully as you do.

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6   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JULY 2019


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OHIO ICON

at

KINGS ISLAND Mason

BY DAMAINE VONADA; PHOTOS COURTESY OF KINGS ISLAND

Location: The Rivertown area of Kings Island, a 364-acre amusement and water park in Warren County.

Provenance: With input from renowned wooden roller coaster designer John C. Allen, Kings Island personnel created and constructed The Beast during the late 1970s at a cost of $3.8 million (about $22 million today). The massive “terrain coaster” roars through the hills and ravines of 35 densely wooded acres. Building it required 650,000 boardfeet of southern pine lumber, 37,500 pounds of nails, 82,480 bolts and washers, and 2,432 cubic yards of concrete. Its awe-inspiring name was prompted by workers who called the coaster a “beast of a project.”

minute and 10 second ride time, The Beast runs at nearly 65 mph, leaps down drops as high as 141.5 feet, tackles eight sharply banked turns, and plunges through 1,022 feet of darkness in three different tunnels. It’s a little-known fact that: Since the day it opened in 1979, The Beast has provided more than 54 million rides. Its trains have logged upward of 900,000 miles, a distance comparable to traveling around Earth roughly 35 times.

Significance: Unleashed on April 14, 1979, The Beast made a colossal impression and was considered the nation’s ultimate roller coaster. It not only offered riders unprecedented thrills with its twists, turns, and tunnels, but also set new records as the world’s longest, highest, and fastest wooden roller coaster. Although its design and operation have been modified during the last four decades, The Beast remains a legendary coaster and an enormously popular Kings Island attraction. The American Coaster Enthusiasts honored The Beast with its Coaster Landmark Award in 2004.

Currently: In celebration of The Beast’s 40th anniversary this year, its three trains once again are sporting their original red, orange, and yellow colors. With 7,359 feet of track, The Beast still holds the Guinness World Records title for longest wooden roller coaster. During its 4

8   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JULY 2019

The Beast at Kings Island, 6300 Kings Island Drive, Mason, OH 45034. For additional information, call 513-754-5700 or visit www.visitkingsisland.com.


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JULY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   9


SHOOTING stars CO-OP PEOPLE

A pair of national-caliber shotgunners ply their trade at Eagle’s Nest

STORY AND PHOTOS BY W.H. “CHIP” GROSS

F

or years, competitive shooter and professional shotgun shooting coach Dan Bailey of Mount Vernon dreamed of building and owning his own commercial clay-target shooting range. That dream came true in the summer of 2017 when he and his wife, Peggy, opened Eagle’s Nest Sporting Grounds, an 85-acre, stateof-the-art shooting facility located near Mount Gilead in central Ohio, served by Consolidated Cooperative. “We offer three different courses for clay-target shooters,” says Bailey: “five-stand, sporting clays, and FITASC.” That’s pronounced Fee-task, and is the European equivalent of sporting clays.

10   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JULY 2019

Just how accomplished a shotgunner is Bailey? Among his many honors, he won the 2018 American FITASC National Championship last summer in Oklahoma by breaking an astounding 191 of 200 flying targets in one of the toughest clay-target sports in the world. For their range manager, the Baileys hired fellow shooting competitor Christina Loudenslager, who hails from central Michigan. “I met Dan at a FITASC event,” Loudenslager says. “After watching him shoot, I knew I wanted him to mentor me.” Bailey was reluctant to agree to the idea at first. “I wanted to make sure that Christina was serious about competitive


shotgun shooting and had the drive required to be successful,” he says. “I needn’t have worried; she’s just as competitive as I am, and we are constantly pushing each other to be better shooters. She even beats me every once in a while.” As with Bailey, Loudenslager has a long list of shotgunning competition wins under her belt. Suffice to say she is a fourtime All-American FITASC Team member and three-time AllAmerican Sporting Clay Team member. Loudenslager and Bailey both shoot 12-gauge, double-barrel, over-and-under, Italianmade Zoli shotguns. It’s been said that amateurs in any sport practice until they get it right, whereas professionals practice until they can’t get it wrong. Bailey and Loudenslager have adopted that intense approach to their shooting practice. When preparing for an upcoming competition, they force themselves to break five targets in a row — either singles or doubles — before moving on to the next shooting station. Also, they must break them in the same place every time along the target’s flight path. “We do that to build consistency,” Bailey says. “At times, we may shoot several cases of shells per day to accomplish it.” Once they’re satisfied, they then practice breaking targets in different locations along the target’s flight path, because during competition, they may or may not be able to break a target where they want. “For instance, on certain shooting ranges, a tree or other obstacle may be in the way, or the sun may be in our eyes. We try to practice for every conceivable target contingency,” Loudenslager says. Eagle’s Nest Sporting Grounds is semi-private, meaning that the club has regular members — about 100 and growing — but is also open to nonmembers, on a limited basis. “Nonmembers may shoot up to three times per year, and don’t need to be accompanied by a member,” Bailey says. “All shotgun shooters are welcome, and we have targets for all skill levels, from beginner to advanced competitor.” Eagle’s Nest Sporting Grounds is open year-round, seven days a week, from dawn to dusk for members; nonmembers may shoot five days per week, Wednesday through Sunday. For more information, go online to www.eaglesnestsportinggrounds.com or call 330-275-0083. W.H. “Chip” Gross (whchipgross@gmail.com) is Ohio Cooperative Living’s outdoors editor.

JULY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   11


WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE

take a ride on a

historic canal boat STORY AND PHOTOS BY W.H. “CHIP” GROSS

O

nly a few years ago, when Buckeye Lake in central Ohio was being drawn down for dam repair, workers made a historic find: Hidden in those murky depths was a sunken canal boat called the Black Diamond. “It’s the first archaeological-documented canal boat discovery in Ohio,” says Andy Sewell, historian with Columbus-based Lawhon and Associates, an environmental consulting firm associated with the dam project. Ohio’s historic canal era spanned nearly a century (1825 to 1913), but its heyday was the 23 years from 1827 to 1850. Described as “the ditch that brought the world to the wilderness,” canals literally transformed the Buckeye State from a struggling backwoods economy to an agricultural and industrial powerhouse. There actually were two canal systems: the Miami & Erie Canal in western Ohio, and the Ohio & Erie Canal in the central and eastern part of the state. The narrow, ribbon-like waterways — the Interstate Highway System of its time — connected the Ohio River with Lake Erie, providing a way for farmers to access larger markets with their products.

(Above) Canal boat ride at historic Roscoe Village.

Salt pork, lard, iron ore, coal, pig iron, whiskey, flour, lumber, and food staples were shipped south to New Orleans or east to New York and other large cities. Some cargo made it even as far as Europe. As a result, business boomed and life was good. Canal boats also hauled passengers, and the going fee of less than two cents per mile included meals and lodging. A typical trip from Cleveland on Lake Erie to Portsmouth on the Ohio River could take more than three days — that same trip today requires only about four hours by automobile.

12   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JULY 2019

(Left) The small cabins on canal boats made for cramped quarters.


Thousands of Irish and German immigrants — who didn’t seem to like each other much — provided most of the workforce that built Ohio’s canals, mostly using simple picks, shovels, and wheelbarrows. It was backbreaking work, and water-related diseases such as malaria were rampant. “It’s been said that one worker perished for each mile of canal built,” says Jim Vetter, a canal boat interpreter at the historic John Johnston Farm near Piqua. With more than 1,000 miles of canals in Ohio, that added up to a lot of suffering and death. The canals were built to exacting standards: 26 feet wide at the bottom, 40 feet wide at the waterline, and a minimum of 4 feet deep. These dimensions provided room for two canal boats to pass one another. The boats measured 60 to 80 feet long and 14 feet wide and could carry up to 80 tons of cargo. They were pulled by one to three mules or horses walking a towpath beside the canal.

(Above right) A canal boat on the Miami & Erie canal waits to load passengers and freight. (Left) A boat heading downstream drops its towline into the water to let another boat pass.

Because the 10-foot-wide towpath ran along only one side of the canal, protocol was such that the upstream boat had priority. The downstream boat was supposed to lower its towline into the water and let the other boat pass. But canal men, being the rough characters they were, often settled the question of who lowered their line with a fistfight. Continued on page 14

JULY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   13


Continued from page 13

The first train whistle that sounded in Ohio marked the beginning of the end for the canals. Railroads could haul freight and passengers faster than canal boats, and also ran year-round; canals were forced to shut down operation several months each winter because of ice. The final blow was the statewide spring flood of 1913 that damaged many of the canals beyond repair.

R

emnants of Ohio’s two canal systems remain today, and taking a ride on a replica canal boat gives a sense of the slower, more leisurely pace of life more than a century ago: 4 miles per hour, to be exact. The statewide speed limit for canal boats kept erosion-causing wakes to a minimum. You can enjoy an Ohio canal boat ride this summer at the following locations: Historic Roscoe Village, Coshocton Tickets are $8 for adults, $7 for seniors (ages 60+), $6 for students (ages 6–18), $5 for veterans/active duty with ID. Children 5 and under are free. https://roscoevillage.com/ attractions-activities/horsedrawn-canal-boat-rides

Providence Metropark (Grand Rapids) One-hour boat rides narrated by living history interpreters are $7 for adults, $6 for seniors (60 and over) and Metroparks members, $4 for children (3–12); ages 2 and under are free. https://metroparkstoledo.com/ features-and-rentals/canalexperience Canal Fulton Canalway Center (Canal Fulton) Tickets are $9 for adults, $8 for seniors and veterans, $5 for youth ages 6–17; children 5 and under are free. Arrive a half-hour early to watch the historical movie before the ride. http://cityofcanalfulton-oh. gov/departments/canal-boatoperations

John Johnston Farm, Piqua Farm admission is $9 for adults, $8 for seniors and military members, $4 for children and includes both the farmhouse tour and canal boat ride. www.johnstonfarmohio.com/ Exhibits/exhibits.php

COOPERATIVE

CALENDAR

PHOTO CONTEST

Ohio Cooperative Living magazine is looking for photos from Ohio and West Virginia electric cooperative members to use in its 2020 cooperative calendar. We’re interested in seasonal scenes from each month of the year — images that really “pop” and convey a sense of time and place. Photo subjects must be interesting and the shot well planned and framed. If their images are chosen for publication, amateur co-op photographers could earn $100 or more.

RULES

• One photo entry per member. • High-resolution, color, digital images only. • No prints, slides, or proof sheets — no snail mail! Send submissions by email attachment only to photo@ohioec.org. • Photo format must be horizontal and capable of filling an 8 x 11-inch image area. • Include an explanation of the photo — the where, what, when — as well as who took the shot. • Include your name, address, phone number, and the name of your co-op. • Shots featuring people who can be identified within the photo must be accompanied by a signed publication release.

Deadline for submission: Aug. 16 • photo@ohioec.org 14   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JULY 2019


GOOD EATS

Pack a picnic

’Tis the season for a light, flavorful — and totally portable — meal on the go. RECIPES AND PHOTOS BY CATHERINE MURRAY

JULY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   15


TOMATO ONION TART Prep: 10 minutes | Cook: 40 minutes | Servings: 6 2 large tomatoes 2 eggs, beaten 2 large yellow onions, thinly sliced ½ cup milk 1 tablespoon unsalted butter 1 teaspoon salt 1 8-inch pie crust ¼ teaspoon pepper 1½ cups shredded Swiss cheese Slice tomatoes and place onto towels to pull out excess moisture. Sauté onion in skillet with butter until soft and golden, approximately 10 to 12 minutes. Evenly line ungreased 9-inch pie pan or tart pan with pie crust. Bake crust at 425 F for 8 minutes on bottom or middle shelf of oven. Let cool. Spread alternate layers of onion, cheese, and tomatoes on top of pie crust, reserving ½ cup of cheese. Combine eggs, milk, salt, and pepper. Beat lightly, then pour over tart. Top with remaining shredded cheese. Cover loosely with aluminum foil and bake for 30 minutes, removing foil for last 5 minutes to brown cheese. Serve hot or at room temperature. Per serving: 293 calories, 18 grams fat (8 grams saturated fat), 21 grams total carbs, 2 grams fiber, 12 grams protein

MIXED BEAN SALAD (Shown on page 15) Prep Time: 10 minutes | Servings: 8 (as side dish) 15.5-ounce can kidney beans, ¼ cup olive oil drained and rinsed 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 15.5-ounce can garbanzo beans/ 1 tablespoon dried onions chickpeas, drained and rinsed ¼ cup lemon juice (approx. 2 lemons) 14-ounce can quartered artichoke 2 tablespoons chopped garlic hearts, drained ½ teaspoon salt 12-ounce frozen shelled edamame/ ¼ teaspoon pepper soybeans, thawed Toss together beans, artichoke hearts, and edamame in a large bowl. Whisk all dressing ingredients in a small bowl. Pour dressing over salad and toss. Adjust seasonings to taste. Keep refrigerated for up to 7 days. Per serving: 211 calories, 8 grams fat (1 gram saturated fat), 26 grams total carbs, 7 grams fiber, 10 grams protein

ANTIPASTO SKEWERS Prep: 15 minutes | Servings: 15 16-ounce can garlic and dill pepperoncini peppers 8 ounces fresh mozzarella pearls 6.5-ounce jar herbed artichokes 6 ounces large black olives 6 ounces large green olives 8 ounces cherry tomatoes 1 cucumber, cut into chunks

8 ounces fresh mushrooms 16 ounces focaccia bread, cubed 5 ounces salami or summer sausage, cubed 5 ounces cubed provolone wooden skewers balsamic vinegar reduction, optional Italian herbs, optional

Drain peppers, fresh mozzarella, artichokes, and olives. Cut mushrooms if they’re quite large; otherwise leave whole. Assemble skewers by alternating ingredients of your choosing. If you’re looking for more flavor, sprinkle with Italian herbs or balsamic reduction. Serve immediately. Per serving: 226 calories, 11 grams fat (5 grams saturated fat), 22 grams total carbs, 2 grams fiber, 10.5 grams protein

16   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JULY 2019


GOLDEN CARROT SALAD Prep: 10 minutes | Chill: 2 hours | Servings: 4 10 ounces shredded carrots 1 teaspoon grated ginger 1 cup crushed pineapple, drained 2 tablespoons lemon juice ½ cup golden raisins pinch salt 3 teaspoons rice wine vinegar 6 cups fresh spinach 2 tablespoons honey Shred carrots with a food processor attachment or a peeler. Combine all ingredients except spinach. Stir well and chill for a few hours. Store carrot mixture and spinach separately and assemble when ready to eat. Per serving: 152 calories, 0.5 gram fat (0 saturated fat), 38 grams total carbs, 4 grams fiber, 3 grams protein

JULY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   17


CO-OP SPOTLIGHT

PAULDING PUTNAM ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE

P

aulding Putnam Electric Cooperative (PPEC) straddles the state line in northwest Ohio and northeast Indiana, serving 13,063 consumer-members between both states. Their membership profile straddles a line as well, with 60% residential members and the rest commercial and industrial. Because of its flat, rich, open terrain — ground just right for farming — the area has a deep-rooted agricultural heritage. That same terrain also makes the area quite windy, and Paulding County is home to multiple wind turbines, many of which are served by PPEC. Companies like Amazon, General Motors, and Microsoft purchase energy from turbines there.

Diversity PPEC serves a diverse range of residential customers, providing reliable power to not only Century Farms and rural residents, but also to several urban neighborhoods located in New Haven, Indiana. PPEC’s strength in serving its residential members does not relegate larger members, such as Cooper Farms and Baughman Tile in Paulding County, or manufacturers, such as Steel Technologies, Silgan Plastics, and Whirlpool, all based in Ottawa, to any lesser level of service. Likewise, larger Indiana-based companies such as SDI La Farga and Superior Aluminum, both subsidiaries of OmniSource/ Steel Dynamics, enjoy the benefits of their PPEC membership as well.

A drive and a passion for community service In October 2015, PPEC employees discovered there was a waiting list of more than 400 veterans who hoped to go on an Honor Flight to see their armed service memorials in Washington, D.C. The employees set a goal to raise the needed funds to send 86 veterans on the trip. What happened next was pure patriotism at its core. Local communities joined the cause: Organizers held concerts to raise funds, kids built lemonade stands, and numerous local businesses partnered with PPEC — and soon the idea had snowballed into a community-wide effort. Before they knew it, PPEC employees and their many partners had raised over $170,000, enough to send 475 veterans on a trip they so rightfully deserved. The grassroots effort earned PPEC the National Co-op Purpose Award at the 2018 NRECA annual meeting.

18   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JULY 2019


SOUTH CENTRAL POWER COMPANY LOCAL PAGES

WANT TO SAVE ENERGY?

CALL SOUTH CENTRAL FIRST Are you considering changes to your home that you hope will lower your energy bill? Whether you’re looking at new windows, siding, insulation, HVAC, or appliances, or even considering installing solar, the energy experts at South Central Power Company are here to help. “Before you make a purchase or decision, a call to South Central can save you from investing in something that’s not going to provide the savings you were promised,” says Kyle Heavrin, South Central’s director of energy services and business development. “We hear from a lot of members who install new windows or solar panels with the promise of huge savings,” Heavrin says. “Sometimes, the savings aren’t what they are cracked up to be because of underlying energy efficiency problems with the home. New solar panels or windows aren’t going to make up for poor insulation or an improperly sized HVAC unit.” Instead of a sales pitch for one particular product, South Central can provide members with an overview of their home’s energy performance and make recommendations on how to implement the most cost-effective solutions.

Is rooftop solar right for you? We can help you answer this question by looking at: • The overall energy efficiency of the home/building • The age and pitch of the roof • The orientation of the sun in relation to the home/building • Tree coverage near the home/building • Weather patterns for the region

“We’re not here to sell you something. We’re here as a trusted energy advisor to help you make informed decisions.” – Kyle Heavrin

Questions to ask before signing up with a solar installer: • Is there a large, up-front payment required or are fees spread out over time? • Will I own the panels or will they be leased? • Are there any hidden costs, like replacing the roof?

“When we look at your energy use and your home, we’re not here to sell you something,” says Heavrin. “We’re here as a trusted energy advisor to help you make informed decisions. Whether you’re considering roof-mounted solar or something like new foam insulation, we’re only a phone call away with free, unbiased advice.”

• Are there ongoing maintenance fees? • Are there rebates or other financial incentives available? • Is the estimated energy savings worth the investment? • Is it more cost-effective to invest in other energy saving measures?

JULY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   19


SOUTH CENTRAL POWER COMPANY LOCAL PAGES

New security technology South Central’s home security division has an offer for you! Did you know South Central Power Company offers security system services? Whether you are a longtime security customer or just learning about the opportunity to obtain a security system through South Central, we have an exciting offer for you. In July, thanks to a special and limited-time promotion, you can take advantage of new technology and get a cellular communicator — no home phone line will be needed for security monitoring. For the low system price of $569 and a monthly cost of $39.95, you can get a state-of-the-art touchscreen system that includes: • Touch-screen alarm panel • 3 door/window contacts

July Promotion No phone line needed • Touch-screen alarm panel • 3 door/window contacts • 1 motion detector

• 1 motion detector • 1 alarm.com radio with app and home automation

• 1 key fob with panic feature

Interested in getting started with security or upgrading your existing system? Give us a call today for a free quote! Call 800-282-5064, ext. 6153 to get started.

• 1 alarm.com radio with app and home automation

20  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JULY LIVING • AUGUST 20192018

Limited time offer — call today!


Take advantage of texting and the South Central app South Central offers both an app and a text service. So what’s the difference, and why should you use these services?

South Central app

Outage alerts

Our new app is there for you, any time, day or night. Download our free South Central app to your smartphone or tablet for those times when you’re on the go.

What could be easier than sending a cellphone text message — “OUT” — to report an outage? When you use outage alerts, you can also get a restoration estimate by texting “STATUS” and a confirmation when power is restored.

The benefits Do you pay bills at the last minute? Log into the app to pay on your smartphone. Your account is credited immediately. You can also avoid late payments and fees by signing up for automatic payment. This free service allows South Central to automatically draft payment from your banking or credit card account on the bill due date. Have a question or request, but no time to call? Use the South Central app to request service or outdoor light repair or to ask questions about billing or a rebate. You can also report an outage and set up alerts when your bill is ready to pay or payment has been received. You can also analyze your energy use. In the South Central app, you’ll find energy management tools for comparing past bills and analyzing your home’s energy patterns.

How to sign up To sign up for an online account with South Central, start on our homepage and click “My Account” on the top right. If you’ve already created an account, just download the South Central app from Google Play or the App Store and log in using your “My Account” email address and password.

The benefits No more fumbling in the dark to report outages. Most people keep their cellphone handy and find it easy to report by text. Be assured, your outage report is immediately routed to our 24/7 dispatch center. It’s convenient. Even if you experience very few outages, sign up now. The service will be ready for you to use when you need it. No questions to answer. When you sign up for outage alerts, your service location is associated with your cellphone number, so we know who you are just from your text. Stay informed. When you report an outage through outage alerts, you can also request a status update of when power is expected to be back on as well as receive a text from us when your power has been restored.

How to sign up Signing up is easy! Here’s how: To receive text messages, text the key word “SCPOPTIN” to short code 85700. Make sure your cellphone number on file with us is current. There are two ways to add/update your phone number: Log in to your online account and, under Notifications/ Manage Contacts, enter your current cellphone number (if you haven’t registered your online account yet, go to My Account to do so). Call 800-282-5064 to speak to a representative to request the phone number be added to your account. Once your cell number is up to date, you can opt in. Please allow 24 hours after adding your cellphone number to your account.

JULY 2019 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  21


SOUTH CENTRAL POWER COMPANY LOCAL PAGES

South Central Power Company Foundation

2018 Statement of Operations Beginning balance from 2017 $216,050.20 2018 revenue

Other donations

$290.00

Grants refunded

$1,124.83 $590,218.91

Total funds available

$806,269.11

Expenses Grants

Scholarships

Miscellaneous

Total expenses

you

th p

4.54% h

$395,117.07

unger

$148,000.00

rog

education

ram

27.25%

s

8.85%

$1,378.17

scholarship

arts and culture

$544,495.24

Carryover balance to 2019

other

6.3 2%

$261,773.87

20.18%

human services

10.21%

first responders

SOUTH CENTRAL POWER COMPANY MISSION STATEMENT

MEMBER SERVICE CENTERS: LANCASTER

Our cooperative exists to deliver safe, reliable electric service that adds value to the lives of our members.

2780 Coonpath Road Lancaster, OH 43130

OFFICE HOURS

2100 Chickasaw Drive Circleville, OH 43113

CIRCLEVILLE

Monday–Friday 8 a.m.–5 p.m.

HILLSBORO

110 Danville Pike Hillsboro, OH 45133

HAVE A STORY SUGGESTION?

Email your ideas to: communications@southcentralpower.com Facebook “f ” Logo

CMYK / .eps

Facebook “f ” Logo

BARNESVILLE

37801 Barnesville Bethesda Road Barnesville, OH 43713 OPERATIONS FACILITY CANAL WINCHESTER

10229 Busey Road Canal Winchester, OH 43110

CMYK / .eps

CONTACT

Facebook.com/SouthCentralPower

800-282-5064 www.southcentralpower.com

Twitter: @SouthCentralPow Instagram: South_Central_Power_Company

22  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JULY 2019

ory

Total operating revenue

Awarded by C s t at an r G 11.75% 10.19%

$588,804.08

20 18

Operation Round Up

eg


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SHOWTIME! The annual Country Concert brings big-name stars and tens of thousands of fans to rural Shelby County BY MARGIE WUEBKER

M

Fans came there to enjoy headliners, old favorites, and newcomers to the country music scene, to camp out and have fun with friends, and to share their love for the music with a massive crowd. “It is so rewarding,” Barhorst often remarked to friends and family, “to watch thousands of people take a shared emotional journey through the power of a song.” Barhorst, who died in March 2015 at the age of 77, instilled a passion for continuing his legacy in his wife, Mary Jo, and their five sons — Tony, Brian, Mark, Scott, and Paul — who have assumed the challenge. The family will once again roll out the welcome mat this month for popular recording artists and appreciative fans alike, as Country Concert ’19 takes place July 11 to 13 at Hickory Hill Lakes, their 500-acre complex located along State Route 66 near Fort Loramie. This marks the 39th year of the event. Headliners include Chris Stapleton, Kid Rock, Thomas Rhett, Gary Allan, Dustin Lynch, and the Roots and Boots trio featuring Sammy Kershaw, Aaron Tippin, and Collin Raye. They are among 30 performers scheduled to appear during the weekend. The event, which drew folks from 47 states and seven countries in 2018, began on a decidedly smaller scale at the picturesque campground that the Barhorsts established in 1971 in the midst of Pioneer Rural Electric Cooperative territory. They hosted an annual

24   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JULY 2019

PHOTOS COURTESY OF PAUL BARHORST/COUNTRY CONCERT

ichael Barhorst never tired of standing near the covered stage in the natural amphitheater on his property in rural Shelby County, watching thousands of country music fans enjoy the Country Concert he organized every year.


Country music fans gather and camp at Hickory Hill Lakes near Fort Loramie each year for the Country Concert.

party to celebrate their wedding anniversary and to show their appreciation for seasonal campers with local talent and tasty food. In July 1981, the couple expanded their party into a full-day concert featuring three performers: Louise Mandrell, R.C. Bannon, and Johnny Russell. The overwhelming response paved the way for further expansion to the current three-day format that consistently brings between 20,000 and 25,000 fans per day. Paul Barhorst, who serves as president of the family corporation, spent 10 years planning concerts with his parents. He and his brothers also had a hand in many of the site improvements over the years. “The planning never stops,” he says. “We already have offers out for the lineup for the 40th anniversary concert in 2020.” Barhorst says he won’t release those names until later this year, but fans can expect the same careful planning that goes into the event every year.

Mike and Mary Jo Barhorst, who started Country Concert in the Hills, display the award they received in Nashville in 2015 recognizing their work in promoting country music over the decades.

“Dad and Mom believed the concert should feature a mix of new performers, established stars, and country legends,” he says. “Each year, we ask fans to complete surveys listing who they want to see here, and we try very hard to act on those requests. We want to put on as big a show as possible.” Fans, many of whom have come for decades, fondly recall “newcomers” Reba McIntire, Garth Brooks, Florida Georgia Line, Luke Bryan, and Kenny Chesney serving as opening acts before they attained headliner status. Country legends such as Johnny Cash and June Carter Cash, Kenny Rogers, Conway Twitty, and Tom T. Hall have also graced the stage. Fifteen miles of all-weather roads facilitate movement in, out, and around Hickory Hill Lakes. A state-of-the-art sound Kip Moore (left) will appear on opening night at the 2019 Country Concert, as part of his Room to Spare tour.

JULY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   25


Country Concert 2019 lineup July 11 Kid Rock Kip Moore Aaron Lewis Carly Pearce

July 12 Chris Stapleton Gary Allan Granger Smith (featuring Earl Dibbles Jr.) Chris Lane

July 13 Thomas Rhett Dustin Lynch Roots and Boots (featuring Sammy Kershaw, Aaron Tippin, and Collin Raye) Dylan Scott

tower and six jumbo screens ensure visitors don’t miss any of the action. When shows outgrew the original covered pavilion, the Barhorsts built a 109-foot-wide covered stage. Two more stages — the Saloon and the Home Grown Honky Tonk — have space for entertainment before each day’s show and between acts. The family has expanded parking facilities adjacent to the main stage several times, to accommodate the entertainers’ entourages. “In the early years, performers were lucky to have a bus,” Paul Barhorst says. “Now they come with 10 or 12 semis and six buses.” Organizations like the Fort Loramie Fire Department, the Newport Sportsmen’s Club, the Jackson Center Boosters, the Red Cross, and Shelby County Relay for Life step up each year to handle various assignments. The Fort Loramie High School football and volleyball teams clean up the grounds throughout the weekend. In exchange, the Barhorsts make generous donations to those groups, in addition to supporting other area charities. “It takes more than one person or one family to put on a concert,” Barhorst says. “It takes a community of people to make this happen. Dad and Mom took a leap of faith when it came to starting this tradition. We like to say Dad is sitting back and watching our efforts from the best seat in the house.”

Ashley McBryde

For more concert and ticket information, visit www.countryconcert.com.

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Mothapalooza

BY CELESTE BAUMGARTNER MOTH PHOTOS BY ALICE KAHN

“I’ve never been to Mothapalooza, and I’m looking forward to meeting some of the people I have been interacting with over the years,” she says.

I

n Ohio, there are an estimated 2,500 species of moths, compared to fewer than 140 butterfly species. An enthusiastic group of Ohio “mothers” (people who enjoy moths, rather than a maternal parent) is looking forward to celebrating these nighttime flyers during Mothapalooza, a bi-annual event taking place July 12 to 14 at Shawnee Lodge and Conference Center near West Portsmouth.

McCormac emphasizes the importance of moths to other native species. “When you add up those 2,500 species of moths and all the caterpillars, that’s bird food. If they suddenly went extinct overnight, we’d lose virtually all of our songbirds.” He adds, “We’re trying to educate people about the diversity of moths. Everyone comes away with a richer appreciation of moths, ecology, and the value of native plants.” For information, visit www.mothapalooza.org.

Participants can expect to see a “blizzard of moths,” says Jim McCormac, one of the event’s founders and organizers. The most popular events are the field trips. “We leave around 10 p.m. and often don’t get back until 3 a.m.,” he says. “Shawnee State Forest is one of the most biodiverse areas in the eastern United States because it’s got so many native plants. Native plants drive moth diversity, so we know it’s going to be good.” The organizers establish eight stations, with mercury vapor and ultraviolet lights shining on a sheet and a mothing expert to help with identification. The stations are set in different habitats, so they draw different species of moths.

As an adult, Kahn still appreciates the appeal of moths. Every night in the summer, she sets up her own lamps and sheet to draw moths. The next morning, or even during the night, she photographs them. Sometimes she posts online, looking for help in identifying her subjects.

28   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JULY 2019

PHOTO BY JIM McCORMAC

Alice Kahn, a member of Butler Rural Electric Cooperative, found an appreciation for moths one night at her grandmother’s house when she was a child. “She had a screened porch; I looked up and saw the biggest moth,” Kahn says. “It was beautiful, it was green, and it had long tails. It was a luna moth. That just impressed me.”

Judy Ganance (left) and Mary Ann Barnett examine some of the moths that were spotted (including a pandorus sphinx and an io, shown above) during the 2017 Mothapalooza.


“That’s one small step for man, a giant leap for mankind.” Limited Edtion Apollo 11 figurine commemorates the 50th Anniversary of man’s first moon landing

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WINKING AT THE MOON IN WAPAKONETA

Neil Armstrong’s hometown celebrates the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11. BY DAMAINE VONADA

T

he whole world watched on July 20, 1969, when Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong planted his left foot in the virgin lunar dust. That “one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind” rocketed Armstrong to instant immortality. As the first person to stand on a celestial body, Armstrong fulfilled the late

30   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JULY 2019

President Kennedy’s goal of putting an American on the moon and rendered the United States the winner in its space race with the Soviet Union. In Armstrong’s hometown of Wapakoneta, hordes of newscasters surrounded his parents’ house. As souvenir hunters pulled grass from their lawn, Stephen and Viola


Armstrong hosted a splashdown party on July 24, when their son and his crewmates, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins, returned to Earth. Stephen Armstrong even passed out cigars with wrappers reading, “It’s a boy and he landed safely.” Weeks later, 80,000 people descended on the town of 5,000 for Wapakoneta’s homecoming parade. Although it lacked the ticker tape featured in other Apollo 11 parades in New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles, Wapakoneta’s grand marshal was comedian Bob Hope, and the folks crowding Auglaize Street were close enough to the convertible carrying Armstrong that they could reach out and shake his hand. High above the bunting and flags, a giant photo of Armstrong was emblazoned with the caption “OUR HERO.” With 2019 marking the 50th anniversary of Armstrong’s “small step,” Wapakoneta will host a 10-day-long celebration July 12–21. Coinciding with the community’s annual Summer Moon Festival, the “First on the Moon” activities will commence with hot air balloons and culminate with a Wink at the Moon Concert (after Armstrong’s 2012 death, his family requested that people “think of Neil Armstrong and give him a wink” when looking at the moon). The 50th anniversary parade on July 14 will duplicate the 1969 parade route, saluting the out-of-thisworld feat that President Kennedy said would be “the measure of the best of our energies and skills.”

PHOTOS COURTESY OF NASA

Continued on page 32

July 20 marks the 50th anniversary of Wapakoneta native Neil Armstrong’s “one small step for a man.”

JULY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   31


COURTESY OF ARMSTRONG AIR AND SPACE MUSEUM

Continued from page 31

When then-Governor James Rhodes proposed a museum to honor the achievement, Wapakonetans raised much of the money needed to construct it. With futuristic architecture resembling a moon base, the Armstrong Air and Space Museum debuted on July 20, 1972, exactly three years after Armstrong landed in the Sea of Tranquility. Though ever the reluctant hero, he attended the opening ceremonies. Many of the 50th anniversary observances will revolve around the museum, which honors Armstrong and highlights Ohio’s contributions to aviation and space exploration. Fittingly enough, several space shuttle astronauts — including Ohioans Gregory H. Johnson and Donald A. Thomas — will join in the festivities.

The futuristic architecture of the Armstrong Air and Space Museum (above) was meant to resemble a moon base. The museum houses, among other artifacts, the Gemini 8 capsule that Armstrong flew in 1966.

The museum’s collection of Armstrong memorabilia includes such mundane items as his first grade lunch pail and his high school yearbook, which lists his extracurricular activities (band, glee club, student council) and contains the telling notation, “He thinks, he acts, ’tis done.” Also on display is the bicycle he rode to flying lessons — he obtained his pilot’s license before he got a driver’s license — as well as the Aeronca Champion in which he learned to fly. Two other aircraft Armstrong actually piloted — a rare experimental jet and the 1966 Gemini 8 space capsule that infamously spun out of control while docking — are there as well.

During July, Wapakoneta restaurants are featuring Apollo 11-themed fare such as CinnaMoon pancakes, and visitors can take an Armstrong driving tour to sites that include his family’s church, which kept a prayer vigil for his safe return throughout the mission, and the house — now graced by a historic marker — where Armstrong lived. “It’s a beautiful little house that conveys a sense of his all-American background and upbringing,” says Donna Grube of Auglaize and Mercer counties’ Greater Grand Lake Visitors Region.

COURTESY OF THE OHIO HISTORICAL SOCIETY

“Armstrong’s walking on the moon was a triumph,” says Grube. “People everywhere were joyous because mankind had made it to another place.”

More than 80,000 supporters turned out to honor Armstrong at a homecoming parade on Sept. 6, 1969.

32   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JULY 2019

While the euphoria that Wapakoneta’s newspaper captured in the headline “NEIL STEPS ON THE MOON” has waned, the town’s appreciation for Armstrong never has. In fact, the first man on the moon remains a steady presence in Wapakoneta: Armstrong images hang in Wapakoneta’s post office; there are streets in town called Lunar Drive and Apollo Drive; and the nearest airport is the Neil Armstrong Airport in nearby New Knoxville. “Armstrong is a major figure in history,” says Dante Centuori, the Armstrong museum’s director. “Wapakoneta retains the natural affection and pride that occurs when someone close to you accomplishes something significant.” For a schedule of 50th anniversary events and activities, visit www.firstonthemoon.org or www.greatergrandlakeregion.com. For information about the Armstrong Air and Space Museum,


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2019

JULY/AUGUST COMPILED BY COLLEEN ROMICK CLARK

CALENDAR CENTRAL

Appalachian artwork and folk music with outdoor education. 740-969-2873 or www.lilyfest.com. JUL. 13 – Hank Kabel Sarcoma 5K Walk/Run Fest, Fairfield Co. Fgds., Lancaster, 7:30 a.m.–3 p.m. An event to raise money and awareness for canine cancer and sarcoma. Silent auction and fest. Registration $25 in advance, $30 day of race. http:// hankkabelsarcomafoundation.com. Text questions to Amy Carpenter Kabel at 740-974-2811. JUL. 17–20 – Fireman’s Old Time Festival, Laurelville. Free entertainment nightly. Fish fry nightly. Car show Sat. noon–4 p.m. Grand Parade Sat. 6 p.m. 740-332-6033, www.laurelvillevfd.com or on Facebook. JUL. 18–21 – Miami Valley Steam Threshers Association THROUGH AUG. 3 – “Luminous: Encaustic Works by 69th Annual Show and Reunion, Pastime Park, Plain City. Barbara Vogel,” Zanesville Museum of Art, 620 Military $5, under 13 free. Displays and demos of steam engines, Rd., Zanesville, Wed./Fri./Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Thur. 10 antique tractors, and gas engines, plus kids’ games and a.m.–7:30 p.m. www.zanesvilleart.org. other family fun. 614-270-0007, mvstashow@gmail.com, or THROUGH AUG. 11 – CAPA Summer Movie Series, Ohio www.miamivalleysteamshow.org. Theatre, 55 E. State St., Columbus, Wed.–Sun. 7:30 p.m., Sun. matinee 2 p.m. America’s longest-running classic film JUL. 19–21 – A Palace Production of The Music Man, Marion Palace Theatre, 276 W. Center St., Marion. series. 614-469-0939 or www.capa.com. $12–$40. 740-383-2101 or www.marionpalace.org. THROUGH SEPT. 7 – Ohio Annual Art Exhibition, JUL. 19–21, 26–28 – City of Angels, Zanesville Zanesville Museum of Art, 620 Military Rd., Zanesville, Community Theatre, 940 Findley Ave., Zanesville, Fri./ Wed., Fri./Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Thur. 10 a.m.–7:30 p.m. Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2:30 p.m. Tony Award–winning musical www.zanesvilleart.org. comedy. 740-455-6487 or www.zct.org. THROUGH OCT. 26 – Delaware Farmers Market, N. JUL. 20 – Christmas in July, Dillon State Park, 5265 Sandusky St. (between William and Winter), Delaware, Dillon Hills Dr., Nashport, 11 a.m.–2 p.m. Christmas theme Wed. 3–6 p.m., Sat. 9–12 p.m. 740-362-6050 or www. crafts, campsite decorating, and more! http://parks. mainstreetdelaware.com/event/farmers-market. ohiodnr.gov/Dillon. THROUGH OCT. 26 – Zanesville Farmers Market, JUL. 21, AUG. 4 – Zanesville Memorial Concert Band Muskingum Co. Fgds., 1300 Pershing Rd., Zanesville, Performances, Zane’s Landing Park, west end of Market every Sat. 9 a.m.–12 p.m. June through September, the Street (along river), Zanesville, 7 p.m. Free. www.zmcb.org. market is also open every Wed. 4–7 p.m. at North 3rd Street. www.zanesvillefarmersmarket.org. JUL. 24–27 – Musicians Against Childhood Cancer, Cardinal Ctr. Campground, 616 St. Rte. 61, Marengo. THROUGH OCT. 27 – Rock Mill Weekends, Stebelton $40 single-day ticket, $120 for 4-day ticket; half-price Park at Rock Mill, 1429 Rockmill Place NW, Lancaster, for ages 11–15, free for ages 10 and under. Lineup every Sat. and Sun. 12–4 p.m. Free. Tour the restored features over 40 top artists. Proceeds benefit St. Jude 1824 gristmill, walk on the iconic Rock Mill Covered Children’s Research Hospital. 740-548-4199, macc@ Bridge, and enjoy Hocking River Falls. 740-681-7249 or musiciansagainstchildhoodcancer.com, or http:// www.fairfieldcountyparks.org. bluegrassclassic.com. JUL. 12–14 – Lilyfest, Bishop Educational Gardens, 13200 Little Cola Rd., Rockbridge, Fri. 10 a.m.–6 p.m,, Sat. JUL. 24–AUG. 4 – Ohio State Fair, Ohio Expo Ctr., 717 E. 17th Ave., Columbus, daily 9 a.m.–10 p.m. $6–$10, under 5 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Free admission and free. $5 parking. 888-646-3976 or www.ohiostatefair.com. parking. Must-see garden experience combines

WEST VIRGINIA

THROUGH OCT. 27 – Blennerhassett Voyage, North Bend State Park, 202 North Bend Park

Rd., Cairo. $130 package includes one night of lodging for two at North Bend, plus two tickets for a sternwheeler ride to and from Blennerhassett Island, a wagon ride tour of the island, a tour of the Mansion, and passes for the Blennerhassett Museum. 304-643-2931, www.northbendsp.com, or www. blennerhassettislandsatatepark.com. AUG. 1–3 – West Virginia Blackberry Festival, Clarksburg City Park, Nutter Fort, 11 a.m.–11 p.m. Blackberry dishes and other foods, arts and crafts, pet parade, 5K run, free concerts and entertainment, and fireworks on the 3rd. Kick off the festival by attending the Mark Mills Memorial Car Show at the Nutter Fort School parking lot, July 27, 10 a.m.–3 p.m. www. wvblackberry.com.

JUL. 26–27 – Night Fire Cruise and Civil War Reenactment/Encampment, Zane’s Landing Park, west end of Market Street, Zanesville. $15. Join us aboard the Lorena sternwheeler for a Civil War reenactment and encampment on the Mighty Muskingum. Night fire cruise Fri. 9:30 p.m. Rides begin Sat. at 10 a.m. 800-743-2303, 740-455-8282, or www.visitzanesville.com/Explore/ Destinations/133/Lorena-Sternwheeler. AUG. 1–3 – Goodtime Quilters Guild’s Annual Quilt Show, Ohio Christian University, 1476 Lancaster Pike, Circleville, Thur./Fri. 9 a.m.–5 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.–4 p.m. $6 daily, 3-day admission $10. 150 quilt displays, raffles, door prizes, silent auction, knife sharpening. www. goodtimequilters.org. AUG. 2–3 – Y-Bridge Arts Festival, Zane’s Landing Park, west end of Market St., Zanesville, Fri. 2 p.m. till dark, Sat. 11 a.m. till dark. Free. Contemporary arts and crafts, live entertainment, food and beverages, and hands-on activities for kids. http://ybridgeartsfestival.com. AUG. 2–4 – Dublin Irish Festival, Coffman Park, 5600 Post Rd., Dublin, Fri. 4 p.m.–midnight, Sat. 11 a.m.– midnight, Sun. 11 a.m.–8 p.m. $10–$15, under 13 free; $25 for 3-day pass. www.dublinirishfestival.org. AUG. 3 – Dresden Melon Festival, St. Rte. 208/ Muskingum Ave., Dresden, 9:15 a.m.–11 p.m. $1. Family activities, live music, food. 740-607-8780 or www. dresdenmelonfestival.com. AUG. 8–10 – All Ohio Balloon Fest, Union Co. Airport, 760 Clymer Rd., Marysville. Thur. pass, $20; includes 38 Special concert. Fri./Sat. pass, $10. 6 p.m. Nightly Launch, 9 p.m. Nightly Glow. Bring your own lawn chairs. 937-2435833 or www.allohioballoonfest.com. AUG. 10 – Food Truck and Family Fun Fest, Pickaway County Main Library Parking Lot, Circleville, 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Food trucks, children’s activities, and live music with Marty Hayes and X-Perience Music. 740-474-3636 or www. pickaway.com. AUG. 10 – Union County Master Gardeners Plant Sale, Armory Building at the Union Co. Fgds., 845 N. Main St., Marysville, 8 a.m.–noon. Sun and shade perennials, native plants, shrubs and trees, grasses, bulbs, and daylilies. 937-644-8117 or https://union.osu.edu. AUG. 11 – Lancaster Community Band Concert, Rising Park, Lancaster, 4 p.m. Free. 740-756-4430.

PLEASE NOTE: Ohio Cooperative Living strives for accuracy but urges readers to confirm dates and times before traveling long distances to events. Submit listings AT LEAST 90 DAYS prior to the event to Ohio Cooperative Living, 6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, OH 43229 or events@ohioec. org. Ohio Cooperative Living will not publish listings that don’t include a complete address or a number/website for more information.

Continued on page 38

JULY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   37


2019 CALENDAR

JULY/AUGUST

NORTHWEST

THROUGH OCT. 12 – The Great Sidney Farmer’s Market, 109 S. Ohio Ave., every Sat. 8 a.m.–noon. Fresh farm produce, homemade crafts, fresh baked goods, jams and jellies, plants, and flowers. 937-658-6945 or www.sidneyalive.org. THROUGH NOV. 1 – First Fridays Downtown, downtown Sidney. Participating shops and restaurants stay open later and offer a First Friday discount. 937-6586945 or www.sidneyalive.org. JUL. 19–20 – Pizza Palooza, Centennial Terrace, 5773 Centennial Rd., Sylvania, Fri. 5–11 p.m., Sat. 4–11 p.m. $6, C. (5–12) $4, under 5 free. One of northwest Ohio’s premier and largest events. Live music, a pizza-eating challenge, costumed characters, kids’ activities, and more. Pizza sold by the slice; $1.50 for cheese, $2 for specialty; whole pizza $10–$12. www.sylvaniachamber. org/chamber-events/ or find us on Facebook.

NORTHEAST

JUL. 12–13 – “Wine on Rails,” Lorain & West Virginia Railway, 46485 St. Rte. 18, Wellington, Fri. 7 p.m., Sat 6 p.m. Ride lasts approx. 1-1/2 hours. Enjoy an evening aboard the train as we roll though the countryside while tasting different wines from Matus Winery. Tickets available on website. 440-647-6660 or www.lwvry.org.​ JUL. 19–20 – Quilt Show: “Sew a Memory,” presented by the Mansfield Millennium Quilt Guild, Malabar Middle School, 205 W. Cook Rd., Mansfield, Fri. 9 a.m.–5 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.–4 p.m. $5. Merchant mall, raffle quilt, demos, Second Time Around Shop. Lunch available. Handicap accessible. 419-989-3460, 419-631-4941, or mansfieldquiltguild@gmail.com. JUL. 19–21 – Island Fest, Memorial Park, 112 Division St., Kelleys Island, Fri./Sat. 10 a.m.–10 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Free. A waterfront craft festival featuring Ohio artisans and local crafters, DJ, street dances, parade, and fireworks. Food and beer available for purchase. This year’s fest commemorates the 50th anniversary of Woodstock. 419-746-2360 or www. kelleysislandchamber.com. JUL. 20 – Rockabilly at the Railroad, Lorain & West Virginia Railway, 46485 St. Rte. 18, Wellington. Time of the event to be determined. Enjoy a train ride, food, and music at our 50s/60s-themed party. Dress in attire from 38   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JULY 2019

Continued from page 37

JUL. 27 – Good Ole Summertime Festival, downtown North Baltimore, 8 a.m.–midnight. Car show, craft/flea market, 5K run, golf tournament, games, live music, and food. Festival ends with fireworks display at the park. Find us on Facebook. JUL. 27–28 – Van Wert Railroad Heritage Weekend, Van Wert Co. Fgds., 1055 S. Washington St., Van Wert, Sat. 10 a.m.–4 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–3 p.m. $6; Scouts in uniform and kids 12 and under free. 2-day admission, $8. Over 200 vendor tables. All gauges and scales. Railroad memorabilia and railfan items. At least 12 model railroad layouts and displays. New this year: locomotive races. snapshotjan@hotmail.com, railcarman@frontier.com, or 260-760-1666. AUG. 1–4 – Northwest Ohio Antique Machinery Association Show, Hancock Co. Fgds., 1017 E. Sandusky St., Findlay. 419-722-4698 or www.facebook.com/ NorthwestOhioAntiqueMachineryAssociation. AUG. 3 – Annual Doll and Teddy Bear Show and Sale, Sauder Village Founders Hall, 22611 St. Rte. 2, Archbold, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $8. Features antique dolls and teddy bears, modern collectibles, accessories and supplies, doll appraisals and re-stringing, and doll-themed activities. 800-590-9755 or www.saudervillage.org. AUG. 3 – Defiance County Hot Air Balloon Festival, 20399 Airport Rd., Defiance. $10 per car. Tethered hot air balloon rides, marketplace for shopping, festival food, inflatables and carnival rides for the kids. 419-782-3510 or www.defianceballoonfest.com. the era and bring your classic cars! 440-647-6660, or www.lwvry.org. JUL. 21 – Hale Farm and Village Car Meet, Hale Farm and Village, 2686 Oak Hill Rd., Bath, 10 a.m.–2 p.m. $5– $10. Explore cars from car clubs, car enthusiasts, private collectors, and the Crawford Auto Aviation Museum. Admission includes access to living history museum as well. 330-666-3711 ext. 1737, cmoles@wrhs.org, or www. wrhs.org/events. JUL. 26–28 – F.A.R.M. Tractor Show, New London Rec Park, New London. Admission by donation. Featuring Oliver-Hart Parr and Cockshutt tractors. Antique tractors of all makes and models, gas engines, working demos, model train layout, operating sawmill, kiddie pedal tractor pull, tractor parade and tractor games, flea market, wagon rides, square dancing, Kiddie Power Wheels demo derby for ages 2–8. 419-541-6064. JUL. 27 – Hobo Day, Painesville Railroad Museum, 475 Railroad St., Painesville, 10 a.m.–8 p.m. $5 Adults, C. (3–12) $3, $12 Family (max. 2 adults, 3 children). Costume contest, free face painting, music 1–3 p.m. by the Miracle Band. Food and beverages available for small donation: 12–8 p.m., hamburgers and hot dogs; 4–8 p.m., hobo stew and hobo beans cooked over an open wood fire. And don’t forget it’s a day of railfanning! 216-470-5780, prrm@att.net, or www.painesvillerailroadmuseum.org. JUL. 27–28 – Zoar Harvest Festival, downtown Zoar, Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. $10, free for ages 12 and under. One of the nation’s most prestigious antiques shows, with more than 60 dealers from across the country. Artisan showcase tent; handmade folk art, furniture, and fine crafts; horse-drawn wagon rides; food and beverages; live music; and museum tours. https:// historiczoarvillage.com. JUL. 29–AUG. 4 – Columbiana County Fair, 225 Lee Ave., Libson. 330-424-5531 or www.columbianacountyfair.org. JUL. 29–AUG. 4 – Medina County Fair, 720 W. Smith Rd., Medina. 330-723-9633 or www.medina-fair.com.

AUG. 3 – “Veterans Helping Veterans,” VFW Post 8445, 712 N. Dixie Hwy., Wapakoneta, 9 a.m.–3 p.m., rain or shine. Registration 9 a.m.–noon; registration fee $10. Free to spectators. Any make, model, or year of cars, trucks, motorcycles, and antique tractors. Dash plaques to first 100. Awards, DJ, refreshments, 50/50 raffle. Proceeds benefit Honor Guard and local veterans. 440-796-3683 (Wanda Link) or rmheitk@ohiolink.net. AUG. 4 – Stryker Sportsman Club 3-D Archery Shoot, 02638 Co. Rd. 20, Bryan (1/4 mile north of St. Rte. 6 on the right), registration 9 a.m.–noon. 419-579-4878, 419212-1509, or find us on Facebook. AUG. 4 – “Unlikely General: ‘Mad’ Anthony Wayne and the Battle for America,” Fort Recovery State Museum, Community Room, 1 Fort Site St., Fort Recovery, 3 p.m. Free lecture by author Mary Stockwell. 419-375-4384, www.fortrecoverymuseum.com, or find us on Facebook. AUG. 6 – National Night Out, 109 S. Ohio Ave., Sidney, 5:30–10 p.m. Join 16,000 other communities to promote partnership with our local police to fight crime, drugs, and violence. 937-658-6945 or www.sidneyalive.org. AUG. 8–10 – Lincoln Highway “Buy-Way” Yard Sale, locations along and near U.S. 30 across the state, including Crawford, Wyandot, Hardin, Hancock, Allen, and Van Wert counties. www.historicbyway.com.

AUG. 1–3 – Community Hospice Giant Garage Sale, Tuscarawas Co. Fgds., 259 S. Tuscarawas St., Dover, Thur. 3–8 p.m. (First Choice Night, $5 admission), Fri. 9 a.m.–6 p.m., Sat. 8 a.m.–noon. Funds raised benefit Community Hospice, a nonprofit organization. 330-343-7605. AUG. 2–3 – Ohio Mennonite Relief Sale and Auction, Wayne Co. Fgds., 199 Vanover St., Wooster. 330-464-8867 or www.ohiomccreliefsale.org. AUG. 2–4 – Twins Day Festival, 9825 Ravenna Rd., Twinsburg. The world’s largest annual gathering of twins. 330-425-3652 or www.twinsdays.org. AUG. 3 – Free Speaker Series: Cindy McShane, Zoar Schoolhouse, 221 E. 4th St., Zoar, 11 a.m.–12 p.m. Historical interpreter Cindy McShane will present a first-person portrayal of Marie Tepe (aka French Mary), a forgotten Civil War hero and vivandière (sutler or canteen keeper) who served in at least 13 different battles and was one of only two women to be awarded the Kearney Cross for courage under fire. https://historiczoarvillage.com. AUG. 3–4 – Home and Garden Tour, 342 Union St., Mount Pleasant, Sat. 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun. 1–5 p.m. $15, Stds. $7. Visit the unique homes and gardens in this historic village. 800-752-2631. AUG. 4 – Chardon Arts Festival, Chardon Square (intersection of Rtes. 4 and 66), 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Free admission. Juried show hosts over 100 artists, both local and out of state, featuring works in a variety of mediums. http://chardonsquareassociation.org. AUG. 8–10 – Lincoln Highway “Buy-Way” Yard Sales, locations along and near historic U.S. 30 across the state, including through Columbiana, Stark, Wayne, Ashland, and Richland counties. www.historicbyway.com. AUG. 10 – Painesville Railroad Museum Fundraiser, Harry Buffalo, 2119 Mentor Ave., Painesville, 4–6 p.m. $20 in advance, $25 at the door. All-you-can-eat appetizers and drinks. Basket raffle, 50/50 raffle. Tickets are limited. Contact Staci Jacob at 440-812-3310 or stacijacob2008@ gmail.com, or Tom Pescha at 216-470-5780.


SOUTHWEST

or 6 for $5. For more information, call Connie Storer at 937-393-9758. JUL. 26 – Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass, Bluegrass Night at Fibonacci Brewing Company, 1445 Compton Rd., Cincinnati, 7–9 p.m. Free. Lively bluegrass music featuring lightning-fast instrumentals, close harmonies, and entertaining novelty songs. Craft beers and food available for purchase during the show. 513832-1422 or http://fibbrew.com. JUL. 26–28 – Annie Oakley Festival, Darke Co. Fgds., South Show Arena Area, 800 Sweitzer St., Greenville. Honoring Darke County’s most famous daughter. Shooting contests, fast draw competitions, bullwhip exhibitions, Little Miss and Mr. contests, food, car show, and more. www.annieoakleyfestival.org. JUL. 27–28 – Gathering at Garst, 205 N. Broadway, Greenville, Sat. 10 a.m.–10 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Living history encampment with reenactors representing eras ranging from the French and Indian War to the American Civil War. Antiques, live music and entertainment, arts and crafts, food vendors. 937-5485250 or www.gatheringatgarst.com. JUL. 29 – Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass, Haddix Hall (next to Hunter’s Pizzeria), 4165 St. Rte. 122, Franklin, 6–8 p.m. $5. Lively bluegrass music featuring lightning-fast instrumentals, close harmonies, and entertaining novelty songs. Food available on site. 937-746-5415, haddixmusic@ yahoo.com, or www.facebook.com/HaddixHall. AUG. 1–4 – World’s Longest Yard Sale, locations along U.S. 127 through Greenville. www.127yardsale.com.

AUG. 3 – Art in the Park, Tipp City Community Park, 225 Parkwood Dr., Tipp City, 12–8 p.m. A celebration of the arts complete with entertainment, artist vendors, food truck, and children’s art activities. 937-339-1044 or www. homegrowngreat.com/event/art-in-the-park. AUG. 9 – Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass, Oxford Community Ctr.,, 10 S. College Ave., Oxford, 6–9 p.m. Free. Enjoy an evening of lively bluegrass music and new art exhibitions. 513-524-8506, info@oxarts. org, or www.oxarts.org. AUG. 9–10 – Miami Valley Music Fest, Eagles Campground, 2252 Troy-Urbana Rd., Troy. Diverse music from some of the region’s best musicians and artists. www.miamivalleymusicfest.com. AUG. 9–15 – Miami County Fair, Miami Co. Fgds., 650 N. County Rd. 25A, Troy. $5 day pass; under 9 free. Competitions, entertainment, harness racing, tractor pulls, art exhibits, games and rides, and great food. 937-3357492 or www.miamicountyohiofair.com. AUG. 10 – “Down a River, Down a Beer,” 919 S. Main St., Piqua, 6–10 p.m. $30. Beer tastings (99 beer choices available), food trucks, and silent auction of beer memorabilia. www.mainstreetpiqua.com. AUG. 10 – Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass, McCoy’s Colerain, 6008 Springdale Rd., Cincinnati, 7–10 p.m. Free. Lively bluegrass music featuring lightning-fast instrumentals, close harmonies, and entertaining novelty songs. Food available on site. 513-237-4583 (Sherrie) or www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100010118115223.

a.m.–8 p.m. Enjoy fresh local roasted sweet corn. See antique tractors and gas engines or take part in the pedal tractor pull, corn hole tournament, and corn eating contest. Car and truck show Sat. 11 a.m.–3 p.m. www. mariettasweetcorn.com. JUL. 21 – “MADE on the Farm” Dinner, Adena Mansion and Gardens, 847 Adena Rd., Chillicothe. Social time 5 p.m., dinner 6:30 p.m. $50 Farm Bureau members; $60 nonmembers; under 13, $20. Benefits the student program MADE (My Attitude Determines Everything). Purchase tickets at Eventbrite.com by searching “MADE on the Farm” or by contacting the Ross County Farm THROUGH SEPT. 27 – Rise and Shine Farmers Market, Bureau office at 740-474-6284 or ross@ofbf.org. 2135 Southgate Pkwy., Cambridge, Fridays 8 a.m.–noon. JUL. 21 – Shakespeare on Sugarloaf: The Winter’s 740-680-1866. Tale, Sugarloaf Mountain Amphitheatre, 5968 Marietta JUL. 6 – Noah Cox Memorial Truck and Tractor Pull, Rd., Chillicothe, 8 p.m. Free. Performed by the cast of Athens Co. Fgds., 286 W. Union St., Athens. Pit and Tecumseh!, Shakespeare on Sugarloaf is a major initiative grandstand admission, $10; free for ages 5 and under. of The Scioto Society to provide free Shakespeare to Gates open 10 a.m., registration 12 p.m., pull begins 2 southern Ohio. www.tecumsehdrama.com. p.m. Proceeds go to the Noah Cox Memorial Fund. 740JUL. 26–28 – Frankfort Sunflower Festival, downtown 818-8439 or noahsmemorialpull@gmail.com. Frankfort, Fri. 5–10 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–10 p.m., Sun. 10 JUL. 10–14 – The Tree Course: “Mastering the Trees of a.m.–6 p.m. Free. Concessions, a car show, antique the Great Eastern Forest,” Highlands Nature Sanctuary, tractors, games, live music, a parade, and, of course, a 7660 Cave Rd., Bainbridge. This course will teach you to sunflower contest! www.sunflowerfestival.net. recognize the most widespread trees of the eastern U.S. Topics of forest ecology, natural history, and conservation JUL. 27 – Mud Ninja Extreme Challenge, J.L. Parker Farm, 2093 Pricer Ridge Rd., South Salem, 9 a.m. $55+. are imbedded in this thoroughly field-oriented curriculum. Registration required. 937-365-1935 or http:// An action-packed day of fun and excitement with over 25 obstacles –5 km of muddy insanity! www.mudninja.com. arcofappalachia.org/tree-course-home. JUL. 19–20 – Sweet Corn Festival, Muskingum Park, 300 block of Front St., Marietta, Fri. 5–9 p.m., Sat. 11

AUG. 1–3 – Antrim Community Fire Department Festival, Antrim, begins at 5 p.m. each night. Free admission. 740-498-6923. AUG. 2–3 – Deerassic Classic Giveaway and Expo, Deerassic Park Education Ctr., 14250 Cadiz Rd./U.S. 22, Cambridge. Please call for ticket information. Outdoor exhibitors, stage shows, raffles, prizes, food, and entertainment. 740-435-9500 or https://deerassic.com. AUG. 3–4 – Family and Friends Jubilee, Cambridge City Park Big Pavilion, Cambridge, Sat. 11 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun. church service 11 a.m.–1 p.m. 740-432-7590 (Carol Houston) or 740-255-5280 (Pam Porcha). AUG. 3–10 – Ross County Fair, Ross Co. Fgds., 344 Fairgrounds Rd., Chillicothe. www.rosscountyfair.com. AUG. 4 – Barton Polkafest, Fireman’s Field, 52176 Center St., Barton, 12–8 p.m., rain or shine. Sponsored by the Barton Vol. Fire Dept. Free admission. Polka bands, Polish foods and other concessions, raffles, kids’ games and face painting, door prizes, cash bar. 740-695-3029. AUG. 8–11 – Rivers, Trails, and Ales Fest, Muskingum Park, 300 block of Front St., Marietta. A full weekend of paddling, road and mountain biking, and enjoying fine local ales in Ohio’s #1 destination for outdoor adventure — Marietta! www.facebook.com/RTAfest/. AUG. 10–12 – Salt Fork Arts and Crafts Festival, Cambridge City Park, Cambridge, Fri. 12–8 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. A juried festival that showcases high-quality art in a variety of mediums. Entertainment, concessions, and programs for kids. 740705-6866 or www.saltforkfestival.org.

THROUGH AUG. 27 – Movies in the Park, The Park at Liberty Center, 7100 Foundry Row, Liberty, 8–11 p.m. Free. www.liberty-center.com. THROUGH SEPT. 26 – Uptown Music Concert Series, Uptown Park, Oxford, every Thur. 7–9:30 p.m. Free. 513523-8687 or www.enjoyoxford.org. JUL. 7 – Music at the Mound with Steve Free, Serpent Mound, 3850 OH-73, Peebles, 1 p.m. Join the acclaimed singer/songwriter for an open air concert. Free with $8/ vehicle parking fee. http://arcofappalachia.org/steve-free. JUL. 10, 17, 24, 31 – Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass, Vinoklet Winery, 11069 Colerain Ave., Cincinnati, 6:30–8:30 p.m. Free admission. Enjoy dinner and an evening of lively bluegrass music. Reservations recommended. 513-385-9309 or www.vinokletwines.com. JUL. 19–20 – Quilts of Highland County Quilt Show, Hillsboro High School, Hillsboro. Quilt raffle ticket $1

SOUTHEAST

JULY 2019  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   39


MEMBER INTERACTIVE

Load up the car! 1 2

1. My golden retrievers love to ride in the Jeep. Say the word “Jeep,” and I have a full load. Linda Harris Lorain-Medina Rural Electric Cooperative member

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2. A literal interpretation! Our son, Daniel, (middle) was a crew member on a C-141 that transported Vice President Dan Quayle’s car from Washington, D.C., to Columbus. Later, the Secret Service let my wife, Jane (left), and me ride in the car with Daniel to the Columbus airport. Bernard Paumier South Central Power Company member 3. T  his is a photo of our beloved dog, Maggie, who was excited to go to the park. My husband, Ray, is in the front seat. Jill Ann Ladrick South Central Power Company member

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5. M  y husband, Neal Thomas, at an old gas station with our 1960 Chrysler 300F. The trunk is so large, it can hold five full-size tires in it. Janice Thomas South Central Power Company member

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Send us your picture!

For October, send “Picking pumpkins” by July 15; for November, send “Thankful” by August 15. Upload your photos at www.ohioec.org/memberinteractive — and remember to include your co-op name and to identify everyone in the photos. 40   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JULY 2019

4. Our sweet C was so proud of herself for helping catch and load the broiler chickens in those crates before we took them to butcher. This was our first summer on our new homestead — we had no idea what we were doing and we were wildly unprepared! Jessica Arnold Hancock-Wood Electric Cooperative member

6. A picture of cousins Lane Gamble and Noelle Johnson in the car on their way to their next adventure! Renee Taylor-Johnson Butler Rural Electric Cooperative member 7. My grandson, Jayden, loading up his truck for his next project. Katie Grubba South Central Power Company member 8. My daughter, Camille, got tired of waiting to leave for a family vacation. She crawled into the back with a good book to help her pass the time. Chris Kemmerer South Central Power Company member


HERE’S A VALUE TO WAKE YOU UP

POUND OF COFFEE 1936 .......................................................................$0.14 2019 .......................................................................$8.08 PRICE INCREASE : $7.94

ELECTRICITY

1936 .......................................................................$0.05 2019 .......................................................................$0.11 PRICE INCREASE : $0.06 We know you like your coffee hot and your electricity affordable. For more than 80 years, we’ve helped keep it a stable value.

ohioec.org/energy


Profile for Ohio Cooperative Living

Ohio Cooperative Liviing - July 2019 - South Central  

Ohio Cooperative Liviing - July 2019 - South Central