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November 15 – 17, 2017 Columbus, OH


Got-Autism EMPOWER • INSPIRE

Got-Special

KI D S

Vis it ou r on -s ite sto re at Bo oth # 42 0 Sh ow thi s ad to re ce ive a fre e gif t! Shop online www.Got-SpecialKIDS.com or call 888-237-4988


Inspiring Change for People with Disabilities

Inspiring Change. It’s just two simple words, and yet this phrase is so powerful. Ask yourself why you’re here at OCALICON 2017. Is it to be inspired? Is it to inspire others? Is it to learn something new that might change your perception, your actions, or maybe even your life? Or is it to share something that might change someone else’s perception, actions, or life? Maybe it’s a little bit of each? That’s the concept behind OCALI’s new tagline: Inspiring Change for People with Disabilities. It’s important to remember that we are all part of inspiring change. It’s not a one-way street, but more of a constant cycle – we inspire each other to change in ways that are significant – and sometimes we are completely unaware that it’s happening at all. Families are inspiring change. Individuals are inspiring change. Teachers, administrators, aides, and assistants are inspiring change. Medical providers are inspiring change. The list goes on and on – and the possibilities are truly endless. As we convene over the next 3 days, take time to ask yourself how you’re part of inspiring change, and to notice when you have been inspired to change how you believe, think, or act as a result of your time here. You’ll meet people, learn about resources, and hear stories that will leave you forever different – that’s the power of connection that we all seek at OCALICON each year. Thank you for being here to share in this experience. It is our hope that you walk away from this conference renewed and reinvigorated to inspire change in your own corner of the world.

Shawn A. Henry OCALI Executive Director

OCALI

Lifespan Transitions Center

Universal Design for Learning Center

Shawn Henry Sheila Smith Jen Bavry Kim Finnerty Jody Fisher Casey O’Mara Laura Sfikas Nathan Ticknor

Chris Filler Starr Boli Sue Beck Madeline Rosenshein

Ron Rogers

Office for Policy, Strategic Initiatives & Stakeholder Engagement

Family Center Teresa Kobelt Melody Painter Donna Owens Autism Certification Center

Melissa Bacon Jill Hudson

Carly McVey Kelli Yeagley

Autism Center

Center for the Young Child

Amy Bixler Coffin Patt Krug Denise Sawan Caruso Julie Short Wendy Szakacs

Laura Maddox-Bechard Maggie Gons Courtney Yantes

Teaching Diverse Learners Center

Mark Garrett Larry Sexton Mike Seemueler Simon Buehrer Kyle Knapp Hal Hixson Nicole LaGrasso

Shawna Benson Tamara Clinkscales

Integrated Systems Team

The Outreach Center for Deafness and Blindness Christine Croyle Jennifer Catlin Jennifer Govender Kelli Henery Heather Herbster Michelle Motil Julie Stewart Mackenzie Workman AT & AEM Center Jan Rogers Julie Pashovich Heather Bridgman Kelly Houston Vicki Knisely Shelley Mack Lisa Modena Katie Robinson Rachel Schultz Judy Siens Mary Jo Wendling Greg Wilson Jerry Whittaker


CONFERENCE SESSION REVIEWERS GENERAL INFORMATION Barbara Boone

The Ohio State University

Myra Beth Bundy

Eastern Kentucky University

Brooke Carson

Colorado Department of Education

Joan Cooksey

Robert Pennington University of Louisville

3

WELCOME

6

CONFERENCE INFO

Josie Santomauro

7

CONFERENCE SESSIONS

Carol Schall

8

EXHIBIT HALL FEATURES

9

EXHIBIT HALL FEATURES – OCALI CENTRAL

Chris Robinson

Butler County Board of Developmental Disabilities

Books By Josie

Texas Health and Human Services

Virginia Commonwealth University

Christina Even

Rebecca Silva

Warren County ESC

Barb Gentille Green

State Support Team Region 7

Charles Kemp

Portsmouth City Schools

Paul LaCava

Rhode Island College

Hyo Jung Lee

Dongguk University

Denise Malkovits

State Support Team Region 5

Natalie Marsh

St. Rita School for the Deaf

Riverside County Office of Education

FEATURES AND HIGHLIGHTS

State Support Team Region 6

11

CEUS/GRAD CREDIT

Katie Sochor

12

MAPS

15

EVENTS AT-A-GLANCE

16

2017 OCALI AWARDS

Cherie Smith

Dublin City Schools

Maci Spica

Minnesota Department of Education

Doug Sturgeon

University of Rio Grande

Jim Taylor

Knows Autism

Kai-Chien Tien

PATINS Project

National Chunghua University of Education

Kristen Metz

Aaron Weisbrod

Pete Moore

State Support Team Region 1

Patricia Wright

Ohio Association of County Boards

Rethink

Raschelle Neild

Joy Zabala

Gallaudet University

Ginger O’Connor

Washington County Board of Developmental Disabilities

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Breakdown of session types

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Daniel McNulty

Elyria City Schools

Admissions, hotel info, evals, and more

National AEM Center and CAST

Columbus and convention center


Table of contents

OCALI ADVISORY BOARD WEDNESDAY 18

WEDNESDAY AT-A-GLANCE

24

WEDNESDAY SESSIONS

CHAIR

Reginald Fields

Ohio State Medical Association

Descriptions and locations

Richard Cowan

Kent State University

THURSDAY 33

THURSDAY AT-A-GLANCE

40

THURSDAY SESSIONS Descriptions and locations

Michelle DePolo

KidsLink Neurobehavioral Center

Jocelyn Geib

KidsLink Neurobehavioral Center

Aimee Gilman

Agins & Gilman, LLC

FRIDAY 52

FRIDAY AT-A-GLANCE

56

FRIDAY SESSIONS

Descriptions and locations

62

EXHIBIT HALL MAP

63

EXHIBITORS LIST

64

EXHIBITOR DESCRIPTIONS

74

PRESENTER BIOS

96

PRESENTER INDEX

Willow Wind Self Advocate Parent

Jacqueline Wynn

Nationwide Children’s Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders

Barb Yavorcik

Autism Society of Ohio Parent

Mary Murray

EMERITUS

Geauga County Educational Service Center

Bowling Green State University

Washington County Board of Developmental Disabilities

Jan Osborn

Putnam County Educational Service Center

Chloe Rothschild Self Advocate

Scott Short

PRESENTERS

Sondra Williams

Sharon Knotek

Ginger O’Connor EXHIBITORS

Sarah Walker

Amherst Exempted Village Schools

HOPE Intervention West Virginia Autism Training Center Parent

Jon Peterson

Former State Representative Treasurer of Delaware County EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS

Tom Goodney

Educational Service Center of Central Ohio

Melissa Bacon

OCALI – Interagency Work Group on Autism (IWGA)

Wendy Stoica

Ohio Department of Education

Jerod Smalley NBC 4 Columbus Parent

Contact OCALI 470 Glenmont Ave. Columbus, OH 43214 614.410.0321 phone | 614.262.1070 fax www.ocalicon.org | #ocalicon2017

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C O N F E R E N C E IN FO ADMISSIONS & CONFERENCE BADGES Admission to conference sessions and features is limited to registered conference attendees. Registered conference attendees receive an official conference badge, which serves as the “admission ticket” for gaining access to session rooms and featured areas. All participants are required to wear a conference badge at all times while attending OCALICON 2017. Lost or misplaced badges may be replaced at the Registration Area. There is a $25 charge to reprint a lost or misplaced badge.

CONFERENCE HOTELS Hampton Inn and Suites 501 N. High Street | 614.559.2000 Hilton Columbus Downtown 401 N. High Street | 614.384.8600 Drury Inn & Suites Columbus Convention Center 88 E. Nationwide Blvd. | 614.221.7008 Crowne Plaza Columbus – Downtown 33 E. Nationwide Blvd. | 614.461.4100

LUNCH ON YOUR OWN

Red Roof Inn+ Columbus Downtown – Convention Center 111 E. Nationwide Blvd. | 614.224.6539 Courtyard Marriott Columbus Downtown 35 W. Spring Street | 614.228.3200

Lunch is on your own and available from food stations located inside Exhibit Hall C, Discovery Café across from Exhibit Hall B, or the South Café & Marketplace at the south end of the convention center. There are also a variety of restaurants, as well as the North Market food court, across the street and in the immediate area surrounding the convention center. A map of options is on p.12

The Westin Columbus 310 S. High St. | 614.228.3800

LOST AND FOUND

RECYCLING

The Lost and Found is located at the Registration Area. Items not retrieved by the close of the conference will be turned over to convention center security (614.827.2547).

OCALI is committed to creating environmentallyfriendly events. Please join us in these ongoing efforts to reuse materials and reduce consumption and waste. Recycling receptacles for office paper, glass, plastic, and aluminum cans are available throughout the convention center. Name badges may be recycled at the Registration Area before leaving the convention center. In an effort to reduce paper waste, OCALI seeks to minimize the distribution of paper copies and presenter handouts. Presenters are encouraged to upload electronic copies of handouts and session documents which attendees can access through the online Session Sorter. Online session and conference evaluations are also available. This program is printed on FSC-certified paper.

INTERNET All OCALICON participants are welcome to connect to the conference network. Network: OCALICON2017 Password: Columbus2017 Note: The OCALICON network range is limited to session rooms, presenter lounge, and the main concourse.

SESSION SORTER

Hyatt Place Columbus/OSU 795 Yard St. | 614.280.1234

KEEP THE CONVERSATION GOING!

SESSION SORTER

Join us on social media:

Access the mobile-friendly OCALICON 2017 program through your smart phone or tablet computer.

Twitter: @ohioautism

You can build your own schedule, download handouts, and complete session evaluations! www.conference.ocali.org/session-sorter

Use the hashtag #ocalicon2017

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Facebook: OCALI


C ONFERENC E SE SSI ONS Over 215 sessions are offered during the three days of OCALICON 2017, providing numerous opportunities to discover new ideas while furthering your knowledge and understanding. OCALICON offers a variety of session types designed to be engaging, innovative, scholarly, interactive, visual, and applicable to all kinds of learners in all kinds of settings. KEYNOTE SESSIONS Inspirational opening general sessions presented by nationally recognized leaders and speakers. Designed to start your day with thought-provoking, intriguing, and stimulating content based on years of research and real-life experiences. LECTURE SESSIONS Classroom-style instructional sessions conducted by organization, school, state, and national leaders. PANEL SESSIONS An interactive group of presenters who share ideas, viewpoints, and experiences on key topics and issues. Panel sessions are designed to cultivate increased understanding and advance knowledge on a particular subject through the sharing of different perspectives. Questions and comments from the audience are welcome and encouraged. FACILITATED DISCUSSION SESSIONS A dynamic forum to engage the audience in sharing their thoughts, ideas, strategies, and perspectives. A facilitated discussion differs from a panel session in that the presenters briefly introduce a topic then actively engage the audience in a lively and emerging exchange of viewpoints and ideas. Rooms for facilitated discussions feature a limited number of chairs set in a circle in order to better support continued conversation and promote collective interaction. RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM POSTER SESSIONS Visual displays of innovative content, data, and/or findings presented by representatives from a variety of universities, programs, and agencies. The Research Symposium allows attendees to see and review topics at their leisure, and provides an opportunity to engage presenters in one-on-one discussions from 11:30 am 12:30 pm, on Wednesday and Thursday. HANDS-ON INTERACTIVE SESSIONS An exploration and manipulation of technology, materials, and/or resources. These sessions encourage audience participation and engagement with concepts, ideas, role plays, and implementation strategies to better understand and make practical application of session content. SESSION UPDATES AND CHANGES Last-minute changes and cancellations are sent out via Twitter (@ohioautism), posted in the Registration Area and on the cancelled session’s room sign.

CONTINUE THE DISCUSSION – #OCALICON2017

LEARNING LAB SESSIONS A hands-on technology-based environment for discovering and practicing new skills and techniques with a variety of software and technology products. The Learning Lab consists of an online computer lab facilitated by content experts. An overview of tools and resources will be accompanied by active demonstrations where participants get to explore and practice what they learn as they go. EXHIBITOR SESSIONS Presenters from leading companies and organizations showcase products and services, and engage in a question-and-answer exchange with participants. SESSION ATTENDANCE All sessions are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Please plan accordingly and arrive 10-15 minutes prior to the session start time to reserve a seat. When room capacity has been reached, sessions will be closed due to fire code regulations. Thank you for your cooperation and understanding. SESSION HANDOUTS Session handouts are only available through the Session Sorter. You must first log in to your OCALI Pass to see the session handouts option in the Session Sorter. Sessions that have handouts available for download will include a white rectangle that says “Download.” Session handouts will continue to be available online after the conclusion of the conference, allowing access to information for sessions which you are unable to attend. Remember: You must be logged in to your OCALI Pass in order to view and download session handouts from the Session Sorter. Note: Presenters have been asked to submit their handouts for inclusion on the website and provide their audience with printed copies; however, OCALI cannot guarantee handouts will be available for every session. EVALUATIONS Paper evaluations are back! Please take a few minutes at the end of each session to complete an evaluation and provide feedback and suggestions to the presenter(s). Online session evaluations are also available through the Session Sorter. The overall conference evaluation is also available in paper or online format. Please complete one before or after you leave. Your ideas and suggestions are important – and help us in the ongoing pursuit of developing and offering the best event possible! 7


EXH IB IT H A L L F E ATUR E S CONFERENCE EXHIBITORS

ACCESSIBILITY DESK

Conference exhibitors include leading companies and organizations who demonstrate, showcase, and sell the latest products, services and assistive technology in support of ASD, sensory disabilities, low-incidence disabilities and related areas. Be sure to schedule several hours in the exhibit hall to discover and learn more about their resources and solutions. Thirty-minute breaks between sessions and an extended lunch break provide multiple opportunities for meeting with exhibitors. Energy Breaks are held each afternoon from 2:00 – 2:45 pm in the exhibit hall. Live music, snacks, and more will help give everyone a mid-day boost.

The Accessibility Desk helps promote full participation by all OCALICON participants. Centrally located inside the exhibit hall near Main Registration, the Accessibility Desk provides information and resources to help you get the most out of your OCALICON experience. While many requests were received through the registration process, we may be able to provide additional on-site accommodations. Stop by any time during the conference if you have a question or need some assistance. We’re here to help!

Exhibit Hall Hours: Weds | 9:00 am - 5:00 pm Thurs | 9:00 am - 3:00 pm BEST AT Vendor Tables – Thurs | 4:30 - 6:30 pm Fri | 7:30 am - 1:00 pm

RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM The Research Symposium allows you to see and review topics at your leisure and also provides an opportunity for one-on-one discussion with researchers. Research is presented by representatives from a variety of universities, programs, and agencies. Check out the Research Symposium as early as 7:00 am on Wednesday and Thursday. Presenters will be with their posters from 11:30 am – 12:30 pm on Wednesday and Thursday. FAMILY CORNER The Family Corner is an informal meeting and collaboration area designed by families for families. Family Corner allows families of individuals with disabilities a chance to connect with one another and share ideas, tips, and suggestions on the latest resources and information. GALLERY BY OCALI A showcase of original artwork by individuals with disabilities. OCALI is pleased to welcome artwork from VSA Ohio’s Accessible Expressions Ohio 2017 Exhibit and Tour and Open Door Art Studio. CHILL ZONE Do you need to get away from the excitement and bustle of OCALICON? Need some space to sit quietly for a few minutes? Enjoy a time out from the conference commotion and conversation for a short time by visiting the Chill Zone in the back of the exhibit hall near the Family Corner. 8

Electronic, Large Print, and Braille Documents Electronic, large print, and braille versions of the conference program, session handouts received to date, and other documents are available. Tactile Stickers for Scavenger Hunt Pick up a sheet of tactile stickers and use to participate in the Exhibit Hall Scavenger Hunt! ASL Interpreters Attendees who requested ASL interpreters in advance can meet up with their assigned interpreters at the Accessibility Desk. Mobility A limited number of wheelchairs and motorized scooters are available. Bring your driver’s license to reserve one for the day. Service Animals Does your service animal need a bathroom break? There is a grassy area on the south end of the building by the Goodale St. garage. Stop by the accessibility desk if you need directions – or dog waste bags. THINK TANK The Think Tank is a space set aside to encourage your continued conversation, debriefing, brainstorming, and discussion of ideas, application, and implementation strategies. Equipped with flip charts, markers, Post-it® notes, and other supplies, take advantage of the Think Tank to engage with other participants in stimulating and thoughtgenerating discussion before you leave. NETWORKING NODES We’ve added extra tables and chairs and carved out some meeting space on the exhibit hall floor. Take advantage of these areas to mingle with fellow attendees and continue your conversations and networking.


EXHIBIT HA LL FEAT URES – O C A L I C entra l

Inspiring Change for People

Connectwith withDisabilities OCALI on-site in OCALI Central – located in the back of the Exhibit Hall. We’ve created a hospitality area where you can catch up on our latest doings and offerings, meet with OCALI staff, and learn how our programs and opportunities can align with and support your efforts and work. While you’re visiting OCALI Central, check out the multitude of resources available in the OCALI Lending Library. Don’t miss the meet and greet with keynotes Patrick Henry Hughes and Peter Vermeulen on Wednesday and Thursday, respectively. And don’t forget the Door Prize drawings on Wednesday and Friday and Scavenger Hunt drawing on Thursday for your chance to win some great prizes!

THE OUTREACH CENTER for Deafness and Blindness The Outreach Center for Deafness and Blindness at OCALI, seeks to increase access and equity for students, families, and communities. We do this by developing and connecting resources, training, supports and relationships so that communities can empower and equip students with what they need, when they need it – to grow, learn, and live their best lives. Stop by to explore our newly developed resources: •

The Communication Planning Guide for Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

The 2017 Ohio Guidelines for Working With Students Who are Blind or Visually Impaired

Guidelines for the Assessment and Educational Evaluation of Students Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

autism certification center

Stop by to experience the innovative online video training program for everyone who interacts with people with ASD. ASD Strategies in Action gives families and service providers tools to ensure they are equipped to effectively care for, support, educate, employ, or work with individuals on the autism spectrum from early childhood to young adulthood. Start learning today with the free 90-minute course “Many Faces of Autism.”

hio

Department of Developmental Disabilities

hio

Department of Education

Governor’s Office of Health Transformation

Finally, don’t forget to: Grab a cup of coffee (on us). CONTINUE THE DISCUSSION – #OCALICON2017

The AT & AEM Center provides accessible educational materials (AEM), access to assistive technologies (AT), and highly specialized technical assistance, and professional development support. Stop by the booth to learn about the free Ohio AT Lending Library, the Clearinghouse of audio, braille, digital, and large print textbooks and educational aids, Federal Quota Funding, AT Internet Modules, and much more. We are here to serve your accessibility needs.

OCALI LENDING LIBRARY The OCALI Lending Library is a free service for any person over the age of 18 residing or working in the state of Ohio. Items in the lending library include books, DVDs, assistive technology devices, assessment tools, and other media. Free materials shipping and pickup anywhere in Ohio.

KEYNOTE MEET AND GREET Meet keynote Patrick Henry Hughes and Peter Vermeulen Stop by the keynote meet and greet area immediately after the keynote sessions on Wednesday and Thursday.

Document your experience in the conference photo booth.

Purchase an OCALICON 9 t-shirt for $20.


F E ATU R E S A N D H IGH LIG H TS ENERGY BREAK

SCAVENGER HUNT

Recharge your afternoons during the mid-day break in the exhibit hall. Grab a snack and beverage, visit with exhibitors, and much more! The Energy Break is 2:00 – 2:45 pm on both Wednesday and Thursday.

You received a game card in your conference tote bag. Visit exhibitors on the card to learn about their great products and services, then have them mark your card. Once you collect the minimum number of special marks, turn it in at OCALI Central for your chance to win prizes including an Amazon Echo Show or Apple Watch. Note: Tactile stickers are available for attendees who are blind or visually impaired so they can participate in the Exhibit Hall Scavenger Hunt. Stop by the Accessibility Desk!

Oakapella returns to OCALICON! Don’t miss their toe-tappin’, finger snappin’ performances during the afternoon Energy Breaks as they sing and stroll through the exhibit hall. Oakapella is an a capella singing group from Oakstone Academy here in Columbus, OH. The group performs modern music from artists including Bastille, Imagine Dragons, and Bruno Mars. Energy Break Sponsored by:

DOOR PRIZES Stop by OCALI Central on Wednesday and Friday to register for your chance to win great door prizes – including books, gift cards, software, and more!

Completed game cards must be submitted by 2:15 pm, Thursday, November 16. The Scavenger Hunt drawing will be held at 2:30 pm. Sponsored by:

BEST AT FORUM The BEST AT Forum is a special event within OCALICON that focuses on braille literacy, assistive technology for students who are blind or visually impaired, the AT assessment process, and more. Don’t miss the Thursday evening kick-off – featuring BEST AT Forum vendors, live music from InnerVision, and more! Spin the prize wheel, and win great OCALI swag! Thursday 4:30 - 6:30 pm | Exhibit Hall

Door prize drawings occurs on Wednesday at 2:20 pm and Friday at 11:15 am in OCALI Central. A final drawing will be held Friday at 12:50 pm near Main Registration at the front of the exhibit hall.

Please note: Events on the Main Stage may feature loud music, amplified voices, and bright lights.

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OCALI is pleased to welcome back InnerVision, the dynamic duo of Genene Blackwell (keyboards and vocals) and Sam Shepherd (vocals, harmonica, guitar, and trombone). The internationally awardwinning group performs during the Thursday BEST AT Forum kick-off.


C EUs /GRA DU AT E C R E DI T CEU CREDIT ACVREP – Academy for Certification of Vision Rehabilitation and Education Professionals 1 hour per approved session American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA) 1.85 CEUs BCBA – Board Certified Behavior Analyst 1.5 hour per approved session Ohio Counselor, Social Worker, and Marriage and Family Therapist Board (CSWMFT) 16.75 hours Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities 1 hour per approved session Ohio Psychology Association MCE 1 hour per approved session Ohio Occupational Therapist, Physical Therapist, and Athletic Trainer Board (OTPTAT) 18.75 hours Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (RID) Professional Development Contact Hours (PDCH) 18.75 hours

HOW TO OBTAIN GRADUATE CREDIT 1. OCALICON participants can earn 1 credit hour from Ashland University for attending the full conference. 2. Obtain a CEU Participation Form from the Graduate Credit counter. Record session information on the CEU Participation Form for each session attended. Please note: Sessions must be attended in their entirety. Partial credit will not be given. 3. Register for graduate course (6145 S4) and submit payment to the Ashland University representative. The representative will be available: Weds | 7:30 am – 10:00 am Thurs | 11:00 am – 1:30 pm 4. Submit completed CEU Participation Form and completed assignment to course instructor by Friday, December 1, 2017. Assignment details and instructor information are available at the Graduate Credit counter.

HOW TO OBTAIN CEU CREDIT 1. Visit the CEU counter on Wednesday, November 15, to pick up the CEU information packet. The packet includes a CEU Participation Form and listing of sessions eligible for credit. The CEU counter is located in Hall C near the Registration Area. 2. Record session information on the CEU Participation Form for each session attended. Note: Sessions must be attended in their entirety. Partial credit will not be given.

Need help at OCALICON 2017? Ask a Volunteer!

VOLUNTEER

3. Submit your CEU Participation Form to the CEU counter on Friday, November 17, at the conclusion of the conference. 4. Please note: It is your responsibility to document session information for the sessions you attend and submit your completed form(s) on Friday, November 17. CEU forms will not be accepted after this date.

Look for the bright shirts!


A RE A M A P

Short North

More restaurants Marcella’s Stack City Burger Bar Eleven Black Point

Hyde Park

GOOD

Discovery Café Crimson Cup

Greater Columbus Convention Center

SPRUCE STRE ET Fuzzy’s Taco Shop

Granero Lounge

T

TREET HIGH S

PARK STREET

TREET S WA N S

Bar Louie

North Market

REE ALE ST

Barley’s Denmark on High Bareburger

REET VINE ST Martini Modern Kooma Sushi Italian Hilton Hotel

Starbucks South Café

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DR

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Coffee and Pastries

Arena District

Nationwide Arena, restaurants

Lunch and Dinner

South to Downtown

Dinner Only

More restaurants

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CONVENTION CENTER MAP D280

D281 D282 D283 D284

Second Floor

SHORT NORTH BALLROOMS B

A

D180

D181 D182 D183

Exhibit Hall C CEUs/Grad Credit

Main Stage

Presenter Lounge C172 C171 C170

Registration Bag Pick Up

OCALI CENTRAL

Accessibility Desk C162 C161 C160 A&B

Note: A detailed map of the Exhibit Hall can be found on p.62. C151

C150

B144- B142- B140B145 B143 B141

B132

B131

B130

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Drive Autism Awareness... Put More on Your Plate! Ohio residents can support individuals with autism, their families, and service providers with the Autism Awareness license plate.

Details are available at www.autismohio.org Ask at your local BMV or visit www.oplates.com

ASO is a coalition of Autism Society of America affiliates including Autism Society Central Ohio, Autism Society of Greater Akron, Autism Society of Greater Cincinnati, Autism Society of Greater Cleveland, Autism Society of Mahoning Valley and Autism Society of Northwest Ohio. $25 of the annual $35 fee for the Ohio Autism Awareness License Plate supports local and statewide autism awareness and programming.


EVENTS AT-A-GLANCE

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MEETING TIME 7:30 – 8:00 AM

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Friday, November 17

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Thursday, November 16

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Wednesday, November 15

SESSION 3 11:30 – 12:45 PM

SESSION 2 12:45 – 2:00 PM

ENERGY BREAK 2:00 – 2:45 PM

ENERGY BREAK 2:00 – 2:45 PM

SESSION 3 2:45 – 4:00 PM

SESSION 3 2:45 – 4:00 PM

SESSION 4 4:30 – 5:45 PM

SESSION 4 4:30 – 5:45 PM

4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30

BEST AT FORUM VENDOR TABLES

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AWARDS Congratulations to the 2017 OCALI Award recipients! OCALI is honored to recognize and celebrate the achievements and impact of these leaders and champions whose continued work, contributions, and stewardship help support and improve outcomes for people with autism, sensory disabilities, and low-incidence disabilities. Candidates were evaluated for their personal achievements and accomplishments, leadership skills and abilities, innovative ideas, practices, and solutions, collaboration and mentoring efforts, and overall impact on communities. Excerpts from their nominations are included below. Please join us in recognizing and congratulating the 2017 OCALI Award winners at the Main Stage on Thursday, at 9:45 am.

Governor of Ohio, John R. Kasich Columbus, OH

Throughout his career in public service, as state legislator, Congressional leader and Ohio’s governor, John Kasich has demonstrated strong support for people with disabilities and their families, including individuals with autism. With Governor Kasich’s ongoing support and commitment, Ohio has become a national leader in improving the outcomes, and the lives, of people with disabilities. Early in his administration, Governor Kasich signed an executive order launching Ohio’s Employment First initiative, which established community employment as the preferred outcome for working-age adults in Ohio. Through a directive in 2013 and House Bill 463 in 2016, Governor Kasich championed significant strides to ensure people with autism would get the services they need when they need them, and that those services would be covered by insurance, greatly reducing the financial burden experienced by families. In 2015, Governor Kasich further recognized the importance of work and earned income in the lives of people with disabilities, signing the ABLE act into law. Governor Kasich backed these commitments and initiatives with funding support. Over the course of the last two operating budgets, his administration was able to secure more than $350 million in new funds, putting Ohio’s efforts well ahead of other states with investments in the lives of people with disabilities, including autism. With these funds, the state made historic investments in Home- and Community-Based Waivers, initiatives to stabilize families and children in crisis, innovative projects to promote supported employment and community life, and initiatives to support families across the lifespan. In addition, the Governor’s Office of Health Transformation, along with the Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities and the Ohio Department of Education, committed funds to the creation of ASD Strategies in Action. Since its inception, more than 20,000 people have accessed this online training, including families and service providers supporting individuals on the autism spectrum. Thanks to Governor John Kasich’s leadership, individuals with disabilities have a greater chance for a meaningful and fulfilling life. 16


OC A LI AWA R DS Dr. Sue Zake Columbus, OH Dr. Sue Zake has spent a lifetime creating a better reality for individuals with disabilities. Her vision, leadership, and continued efforts have been vital in coalescing state partners, higher education institutions, regional systems of support, and local school districts to better serve individuals with disabilities. While serving as the director of the Office for Exceptional Children at the Ohio Department of Education, Dr. Zake fortified and leveraged regional structures across the state to strengthen a multi-tiered system of support for Ohio children and youth, connecting early childhood, higher education, and agencies focused on transitioning youth. She helped oversee district administration and leadership teams in the area of school improvement and the implementation of successful instructional practices for improving student learning outcomes and closing achievement gaps. Through her guidance and unwavering focus, her vision for achieving the best outcomes for all students, including those with disabilities, has been realized.

Emily Rubin Atlanta, GA Emily Rubin has devoted her time and energy to addressing the needs of individuals with ASD and those who support them. Her work on the integration of social emotional learning within a universal design for learning is truly innovative. Collaborating with the educational systems to support learning and understanding through a different lens has greatly impacted the outcomes for both general and special education. Emily is constantly learning, evaluating, creating, and changing practice. Anyone who listens to her – a researcher, an educator, a parent, a related service provider – whether in the field for years or just getting started, will walk away with something new to implement that day. Innovation is really necessary so that people understand the simplicity of what is needed. Although her talents are many, she has an exceptional gift of translating research into practical classroom and daily life applications.

William “Bill” Bauer Marietta, OH Bill Bauer has a relentless curiosity and passion, combined with steadfast perseverance to serve and advocate on behalf of those impacted by disabilities. Bill was born with a severe bilateral sensory-neural hearing loss, though through much struggle, he has defied the odds and has become a champion for those with disabilities. His early career included time as an elementary school teacher, school principal, and superintendent. He serves on many boards, is an author, professor, creator of many programs for individuals with disabilities, and has a private counseling practice. His leadership skills combined with his passion for adding value to the lives of all individuals, and his compassion for those with disabilities, is nothing short of remarkable. Bill truly leads and lives a life with purpose.

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WEDNESDAY Patrick Henry Hughes I Am Potential: Overcoming Obstacles, Breaking Barriers, and Being and Doing More Than You Think You Can Patrick Henry Hughes and his dad share a remarkable story of people overcoming amazing odds to get the most out of life – despite Patrick being born with an extremely rare genetic disorder which gave him arms that couldn’t straighten, legs that would never be able to walk, and total blindness. Patrick’s parents never gave up on their hopes for their son, and determined that he would grow up to be the best Patrick Henry Hughes he could be. Watch this incredible journey of defying disability against all odds and enjoy the lessons that optimism and hard work will pay great dividends. Learn how faith, perseverance, and unconditional love can beat any odds, and be amazed at Patrick’s talents as he shares his story and his remarkable musical ability. Discover his infectious attitude and see what it will do for you! Patrick Henry Hughes is a 29-year-old multi-instrumental musician, speaker, and author from Louisville, KY. He first came to national prominence in 2006 while a student at the University of Louisville, where he played trumpet as a member of the Louisville Marching Band, with the elder Hughes pushing Patrick in his wheelchair through the marching routines. Hughes is the author of I Am Potential: Eight Lessons on Living, Loving, and Reaching Your Dreams. His life is dramatized in the 2015 film I am Potential.

OSSB MARCHING BAND The Ohio State School for the Blind Marching Band helps kick off OCALICON on Wednesday morning.

Please note: Events on the Main Stage may feature loud music, amplified voices, and bright lights.


W EDNESDAY AT- A- GL A NC E 8:00 – 9:15 am | Concurrent Sessions Ballroom A

Emotional Regulation for Teens and Adults: Using Interoception to Maximize Success Kelly Mahler, Chloe Rothschild

Ballroom B

NYC's ASD Nest Model: If We Can Do Inclusion Here, You Can Do It Anywhere! Lauren Hough Williams

C150

Outcomes Matter! Supporting Your Child's Educational Transitions Julie Short, Dee Marks, Scott Short, Jen Bavry

C151

Reading for Meaning With Read Naturally Live Elaine Balum

C160

Peer Collaboration: Supports Students Through Authentic Peer Relationships Karen Brothers, Erin Canaday

C161

A User-Friendly Toolbox of Executive-Functioning Supports for the Classroom Amy Gaffney, Erin Klonne

C162

The STAR Program: Why it Works Kristi Porter

C170

Social Teaching Strategies for Individuals With ASD from the Animé Community: An Overview James Williams

C171

Increasing Educational Quality for Children With ASD Through Classroom Indicators Carol Schall, Taryn Traylor, Susan Palko

D180

Early Intervention for Families of Infants and Toddlers With D-HH via Telepractrice Sandra Brotman Domoracki, Maggie Collins-Harris

D181

EI-VI-OH! Jenni Remeis

D182

Increasing Transition independence Through Mobile Technology Thomas Simmons, Debra Bauder

D280

Finding Meaningful Employment: Solutions Across a Spectrum of Abilities Cariann Harsh, Madeline Wenzel, Jennifer McDonough

D281

Core Word Instruction for Young Adults With ASD and Complex Communication Needs Christi Carnahan, Kathryn Doyle, Carla Schmidt

9:00 am – 5:00 pm | Exhibit Hall Hall C

Exhibit Hall Day 1

9:45 – 11:15 am | Keynote Session Main Stage Hall C

I Am Potential: Overcoming Obstacles, Breaking Barriers, and Being and Doing More Than You Think You Can Patrick Henry Hughes

11:30 am – 12:30 pm | Research Symposium Presentations Hall C 502

Autism Toolkit: Providing Teachers With Interventions for Children With Autism Heather Frank

CONTINUE THE DISCUSSION – #OCALICON2017

Exhibitor Session

19


WED N E S D AY AT-A-G LANCE

20

Hall C 505

Bug-in-Ear as an Evidence-Based Tool for On-the-Job Training John Schaefer, Scott Dueker

Hall C 507

Building Perseverance During Early Childhood Through a Growth Mindset Sarah Good, Taylor Alexander

Hall C 509

Changing Attitudes and Knowledge Through Family Employment Awareness Training Paul LaCava

Hall C 511

Enjoyment of a Therapy Dog by Child Social Group Participants Myra Beth Bundy, Shirley O'Brien, Corey Sheldon

Hall C 513

Increasing the Number and Diversity of Choices Offered by Staff in a Community Day Program Rachel Schwartz

Hall C 515

Leadership in Autism Training: Interprofessional Leadership Maggie Freeman, Natalie Fielders

Hall C 517

Positive Behavioral Interventions in a School-Based Setting for Deaf Students With Autism Nicole Carrasquillo, Karen Wilson

Hall C 519

Sensory Processing Toolkit: A Guide for Teachers and Parents in Early Childhood Education Elizabeth Koss, Grace Reifenberg

Hall C 521

Single-Subject Study: Research-Based Instructional Strategies for Sensorimotor Learners Tristan Pierce

Hall C 524

Tech Connect: Assistive Technology Across Generations Connie Hartman, Nancy Likens

Hall C 526

The Magic Wand for Motivating Learners: Incorporating Special Interests in Instruction Allison Officer, Carol Dittoe

Hall C 528

Unique Mentoring Programs on College Campuses: The EKU Experience Macaulay Schifferdecker, Mackenzie King

Hall C 530

Using Behavioral Skills Training to Increase the Fidelity of Discrete Trial Teaching Charla Hutchinson, Kathryn Frank

Hall C 532

Staying on Track: Creating Meaningful Individual Education Plans for Students With Autism Jennifer Krumins

Hall C 534

When Appropriate Behavior Is Inappropriate Kate Gladstone, James Williams

Hall C 536

A Dress Rehearsal for Life-Building a Transition Program in a Small Rural School District Kim Luedde, Kyle Fenton

Hall C 538

Behavioral Approaches to Supervision and Staff Training in Effective Treatment Kristopher Brown

Hall C 540

Next Steps in Functional Communication Training as a Means of Decreasing Prompt Dependency Sara Boettcher, Jocelynn Hughes

Hall C 542

How to Gain Victory Through the Transition into Adulthood? Daniel Durany


W EDNESDAY AT- A- GL A NC E Hall C 544

Peer Mentoring Training Program Pilot Kari Sassu, Ruth Eren, Doreen Tilt, Jim Loomis

Hall C 546

Developing a Global Framework for Improving the Lives of Individuals With ASD Tara Lavelle

Hall C 548

Mindfulness For Children With ASD: Ratings of Paws b and Changes in Self-Concept, Social, and Cognitive Skills Adrienne Sande, Sheneik Wedderburn, Desiree Gagnon

12:45 – 2:00 pm | Concurrent Sessions Ballroom A

Everything Is STILL Awesome With LEGO! Matt Mobilio, Michael Kennedy

Ballroom B

Do-Watch-Listen-Say Framework for Teaching Social and Communication Skills Generalization L. Lynn Stansberry-Brusnahan

C150

Multi-Agency Planning to Employment: From the Ideal to the Real Ashley Logan, Rae Lynn Daviso, Lilian Beck, Kylee Ransbottom

C151

Special Needs Life Planning: Making a Good Life Possible Blaine Brockman

C160

Sensory Solutions: Enhancing Antecedent-Based Interventions Through Sensory Theory Lisa Combs, Susan Aebker

C162

Finding the Right Assistive Technology for Everybody Amanda Gray

C170

The Road to Success Using Culturally Responsive Practices With UDL Ron Rogers, Heidi Orvosh-Kamenski

C172

Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation: Helping Children Succeed in Childcare Grace Schoessow

D180

Improving Language Outcomes for Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing Rose Sheldon, Sandra Grether

D181

Work Smarter, Not Harder: Child Change Through Developing Local Capacity Technical Assistance Mark Campano, Laurie Kettle-Rivera

D182

Free Tools to Facilitate the AT Assessment Process Heather Bridgman

D280

Re-Analyzing ASD Prevalence Data to Target Often Overlooked Gaps in Identification Peter Doehring

D281

Writing Matters! Building Written Expression Skills for Learners With ASD and ID Robert Pennington

CONTINUE THE DISCUSSION – #OCALICON2017

Exhibitor Session

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WED N E S D AY AT-A-G LANCE 2:00 – 2:45 pm | Energy Break Snacks and Beverages in Booths 420 and 136. Door Prizes in OCALI Central. Live music from Oakapella. Hall C

Special Thanks to Our Energy Break Sponsors:

2:45 – 4:00 pm | Concurrent Sessions Ballroom A

Social Emotional Engagement: The Fuel for Learning in the Classroom Emily Rubin, Jennifer Townsend

Ballroom B

Strategies to Improve Executive Function: A Foundation for Success Carol Burmeister

C150

What Is a Job Coach's Role in Postsecondary Transition? Jennifer Earley, Michele Louk, Diane Page, Chad Boone

C160

You Can't Be Everywhere at Once: Creating Protocols to Maintain Classroom Expectations Erica Hackett

C161

Assessing and Supporting the Communication Skills of Emergent Communicators Maggie Gons

C162

A Practical and Comprehensive Approach for Generating Positive Outcomes Through Evidence-Based Practices Kristi Porter

C170

The Power of Questions in a UDL Environment That Spark Breakthrough Ideas Ron Rogers

C171

Supporting Families in Early Intervention: Is It Time to Turn Over a New Leaf? Susan Jones, Marilyn Espe-Sherwindt, Ronni Bowyer

C172

Using Social Scripts With Adolescents and Adults Significantly Impacted by Autism Kathryn Doyle, Carla Schmidt, Kelly Garland

D181

Advocacy for Students Who Are Deaf and Hard of Hearing Tabitha Belhorn

D182

Rock Teaching With 5 Free or Low-Cost Tools for Student Expression Daniel McNulty, Kelli Suding

D280

Understanding the Ohio STABLE Account Doug Jackson

D281

Reading Comprehension and Autism: Connecting Strategies to the Core Features of Autism Nicole Birri, Pamela Williamson

4:30 – 5:45 pm | Concurrent Sessions

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C150

Improving Outcomes for High School Students With ASD Through Community Collaboration Brittany Joseph, Catina Harding, Kelly Elton, Beth Ann Hatkevich

C160

The Marriage of UDL and PBIS: A Framework to Support the Whole Child Denise Malkovits, Gregory Boerio


W EDNESDAY AT- A- GL A NC E C161

The Emotional Classroom: The Importance of Teaching Kids to Manage Their Emotions Lori Jackson, Steve Peck

C170

Deaf-Blind Rights: A Road Least Traveled Ryan Odland, Judy Knisely, Christopher Woodfill

C171

Preparing Students for the Future of Adult Services Justin Blumhorst

C172

Self-Care With Flair: Teach Self-Care Skills to Children With ASD and Other Disabilities Ginger McDonald, Bhanu Raghavan

D180

Autism and the Grandparent Connection: The Role of a Lifetime Jennifer Krumins

D181

Beyond the Modality Debates: How to Define Student Language Needs Pat Skidmore, Heather Cooper

D182

Free Google Tools to Increase Access to the General Curriculum Michael Roush

D280

Understanding Alcohol and Substance Use in Individuals With ASD Ann Palmer, Elizabeth Kunreuther

D281

Social Communication Program for Students With Autism and Above-Average Cognitive Skills Trisha Gallagher, Sarah West, Nicole Bishop

OCALI THANKS THE FOLLOWING FOR THEIR GENEROUS SUPPORT OF OCALICON 2017.

Office for Exceptional Children 23


WED N E S D AY SE SS ION S 8:00 – 9:15 am Emotional Regulation for Teens and Adults: Using Interoception to Maximize Success Ballroom A

Kelly Mahler, Chloe Rothschild One of the most overlooked foundations of emotional regulation is interoception, our eighth sensory system. Many teens and adults with ASD have differences in interoception, and often these differences go unnoticed. This session will describe the connection between interoception and emotional regulation with a focus on how to use this information to better understand the needs of teens and adults with ASD. Several practical strategies, created and used by people with ASD, will be shared. Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

NYC's ASD Nest Model: If We Can Do Inclusion Here, You Can Do It Anywhere! Ballroom B

Lauren Hough Williams This presentation will introduce the New York City ASD Nest Model, an inclusion program in the Department of Education for students with ASD. We will highlight the foundational beliefs of our model, key structures that have made it possible, and the core classroom strategies that bring the model to life. Our goal is to encourage other schools and districts to explore similar models of inclusion to support students with ASD. If we can do it here, you can do it anywhere! Type: Lecture Level: Advanced

Outcomes Matter! Supporting Your Child's Educational Transitions C150

Julie Short, Dee Marks, Scott Short, Jen Bavry Everyone goes through transitions in life, whether they have a disability or not. It is a natural part of all educational programs; however, for families of children with disabilities, it can be a challenging experience. This panel session includes parents who will share their perspective, discuss strategies, and offer ideas that can promote a successful transitional experience for all involved at various grade levels. Type: Panel Level: Introductory

Reading for Meaning With Read Naturally Live

C151

Kristi Porter

Read Naturally combines three researchbased strategies (teacher modeling, repeated reading, and progress monitoring) into one powerful strategy that has accelerated the reading development of Title I, special education, ELL, and mainstream students nationwide for over 20 years. In this presentation, learn how Read Naturally supports vocabulary development and promotes comprehension as students work through each step of the strategy using nonfiction stories to improve reading fluency. Educators can easily differentiate instruction to meet a wide range of instructional needs by individually placing each student at an appropriate level and goal.

The STAR Program (Strategies for Teaching based on Autism Research, Arick, Loos, Falco, Krug, 2004) teaches children with autism the critical skills identified by the 2001 National Research Council and uses many of the evidence-based practices identified in the 2009 National Standards Report and 2014 National Professional Development Report. The ABA (Applied Behavior Analysis) instructional methods of discrete trial training, pivotal response training and teaching functional routines form the instructional base of this comprehensive program for children with autism. The STAR Program is the only curriculum that has been validated by multiple independent randomized control trials (including IES and NIH Grants) on the market today.

Elaine Balum

Type: Exhibitor Level: Introductory

Peer Collaboration: Supports Students Through Authentic Peer Relationships C160

Type: Exhibitor Level: Introductory

Social Teaching Strategies for Individuals With ASD from the Animé Community: An Overview

Karen Brothers, Erin Canaday

C170

Featured on WCMH/NBC4, the Peer Collaboration Program is a high-impact, student-driven program providing Peer Support and authentic friendships, and fostering a school and community climate that battles bullying. Peer collaboration provides an excellent method for speech pathologists, occupational therapists, and intervention specialists to support generalization of goals. The peer collaborators support these goals daily and help with practice in an authentic environment. Friendships are established as social, communication, and self-regulation goals are achieved.

Many individuals with autism (and individuals with social deficits) enjoy Japanese animé and belong to the animé fan community. To accommodate these individuals, people in the animé fan community have created a series of teaching strategies, activities, games, and apps used to teach appropriate social behavior among its members. In this session, listen to a self-advocate with autism who works for multiple animé conventions describe and demonstrate how these strategies can be implemented by educators during social skills instruction for students with autism.

James Williams

Type: Hands-On Interactive Level: Intermediate

Type: Hands-On Interactive Level: Intermediate

A User-Friendly Toolbox of Executive-Functioning Supports for the Classroom

Increasing Educational Quality for Children With ASD Through Classroom Indicators

C161

C171

Amy Gaffney, Erin Klonne

Carol Schall, Taryn Traylor, Susan Palko

This session will share some specific executivefunctioning abilities and how they affect students in a variety of areas throughout their day, such as reading, math, writing, and emotional regulation. For each ability, a userfriendly strategy will be given that teachers can use to help their students develop executivefunctioning abilities. Students with various disabilities, including autism, ADHD, and learning disabilities, along with some students who do not have an identified disability, can all benefit from executive functioning supports.

As ASD has changed from a rare disability to becoming the fourth most common disability in Virginia, school districts have struggled to keep pace with the needs of this heterogeneous population. In this session, we will present a regional professional development model that included online and live training. We will also present the Classroom Indicators Checklist, a tool used to monitor the success of systems change within the region. This checklist became the standard for measuring program quality and informing further professional development.

Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

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The STAR Program: Why it Works

C162

Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

Exhibitor Session


W EDNESDAY S E SSI ONS Early Intervention for Families of Infants and Toddlers With D-HH via Telepractrice

Finding Meaningful Employment: Solutions Across a Spectrum of Abilities

Sandra Brotman Domoracki, Maggie Collins-Harris

Cariann Harsh, Madeline Wenzel, Jennifer McDonough

D180

Ninety-six percent of families who have a newborn with hearing loss have no history of hearing loss and need information and support to help promote their young child's communication development and well-being. Families in 55 Ohio counties have access to these services through virtual visits with speech-language therapists and audiologists who have specialized knowledge and experience in early intervention and hearing loss. This session will present information on setting up tele-intervention, incorporating family-centered practices, data from the first year, and lessons we have learned. Type: Lecture Level: Introductory

EI-VI-OH! D181

Jenni Remeis This presentation is for those who are interested in learning about the statewide early intervention vision program. It will provide information about common diagnoses frequently associated with visual impairments, as well signs that vision may be contributing to delays in development. Participants will learn the role of the TVI/COMS as a member of core early intervention teams and leave with the knowledge of when and how to make referrals. Type: Lecture Level: Introductory

Increasing Transition independence Through Mobile Technology D182

Thomas Simmons, Debra Bauder This session will discuss the use of everyday technologies such as the iPhone, iPad, and iPod and how they can be used to increase transition, independence, and inclusion of people with intellectual and other developmental disabilities. A variety of applications (apps), software, and hardware will be introduced that can be utilized in a functional approach for daily living/work environments. Type: Learning Lab Level: Intermediate

D280

As a nation, we need to do more to create meaningful employment opportunities for people with autism and other disabilities. Everybody needs to have the option to work to lead a fully integrated, meaningful life. As states across the U.S. tackle this issue, programs and practices are emerging, many demonstrating positive outcomes. This session will focus on results-oriented employment models serving individuals with a wide array of interests and abilities. The highlight will be new ventures in public and private partnerships aimed at creating more employment opportunities. Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

Core Word Instruction for Young Adults With ASD and Complex Communication Needs D281

Christi Carnahan, Kathryn Doyle, Carla Schmidt In this session, we will share a systematic process for teaching adolescents and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD) who have very limited communication to make comments in highly structured literacy settings, and then begin to generalize these comments to increasingly social situations. Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

9:45 – 11:15 am I Am Potential: Overcoming Obstacles, Breaking Barriers, and Being and Doing More Than You Think You Can Main Stage Hall C

Patrick Henry Hughes Patrick Henry Hughes and his dad share a remarkable story of people overcoming amazing odds to get the most out of life. Patrick was born with an extremely rare genetic disorder that gave him arms that could not straighten, legs that would never be able to walk, and total blindness. But his parents never gave up on their hopes for their son, determined that he grow up to be the best Patrick Henry Hughes he could be. Watch this incredible journey of defying disability against all odds and enjoy the lesson that optimism and hard work will pay great dividends. Learn how faith, perseverance, and unconditional love can beat any odds and be amazed at Patrick's talents as he shares his story and his remarkable musical ability. Discover his infectious attitude and see what it will do for you!

11:30 am – 12:30 pm Autism Toolkit: Providing Teachers With Interventions for Children With Autism Hall C 502

Heather Frank This session reports on a study in which a needs assessment was given to teachers who work with students identified with autism, intellectual disabilities, and severe other health impairments. Between 67% and 83% of teachers reported they had limited to moderate understanding or training in evidence-based practices in behavior management, communication skills, sensory behavior, and social skills. The project provides teachers with interventions to use in their classroom for students, including a binder of interventions, activities, and samples. Type: Poster Level: Intermediate

Bug-in-Ear as an Evidence-Based Tool for On-the-Job Training Hall C 505

John Schaefer, Scott Dueker Bug-in-ear is an evidence-based training tool that has been used successfully as an on-the-job training tool for preservice and inservice practitioners working with students with disabilities. It has also been used to teach job skills to individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities in a variety of employment settings. This session will share the research base for using bug-in-ear, teaching participants how to use bug-in-ear technology to give and receive performance feedback, and provide an opportunity for participants to interact directly with the technology. Type: Poster Level: Introductory

Building Perseverance During Early Childhood Through a Growth Mindset Hall C 507

Sarah Good, Taylor Alexander This presentation focuses on the importance of teaching children to adopt a growth mindset and to persevere through challenges as a way to expand their knowledge and a foundational life skill. Learning is a priority for growthminded people. Growth goals or personal best goals fall under the growth mindset category, and are defined as specific and challenging self-focused targets. A fixed mindset places ability as central to self-worth. How we praise and encourage our children makes a difference in determining their mindset. Type: Poster Level: Introductory

Type: Keynote Level: Introductory

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WED N E S D AY SE SS ION S Changing Attitudes and Knowledge Through Family Employment Awareness Training

Leadership in Autism Training: Interprofessional Leadership

Paul LaCava

Preservice interdisciplinary educational opportunities are viewed as best practice in preparing future professionals. The mechanisms often are challenging with accredited programs in health-related services. Collaboration begins in the classroom. This session will describe the process of structuring an interprofessional community-based social group for individuals with ASD. The leadership skills of psychology and OT student mentors were analyzed and the results will be shared. The data demonstrate the value of interprofessional opportunities for enhancing service delivery for individuals with ASD.

Hall C 509

Individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities have historically low rates of community employment. The Family Employment Awareness Training (FEAT) program was created at the University of Kansas to increase family employment expectations as well as knowledge of available federal and state employment supports. The purpose of this presentation is to share the results of FEAT's implementation in Rhode Island, including the FEAT process, components, findings from our participant survey, and lessons learned from this experience. Type: Poster Level: Introductory

Enjoyment of a Therapy Dog by Child Social Group Participants Hall C 511

Myra Beth Bundy, Shirley O'Brien, Corey Sheldon Interest in therapeutic use of animals as an intervention and form of support for individuals with ASD is increasing. Questions still remain, however, about the use of animals to support mental health and quality of life. This session will share a study exploring a therapy dog's effect on social group enjoyment by children with ASD. Type: Poster Level: Intermediate

Increasing the Number and Diversity of Choices Offered by Staff in a Community Day Program Hall C 513

Rachel Schwartz Researchers trained staff in a community day program serving adults with disabilities to create and facilitate diverse choice-making opportunities. A multiple-probe acrossparticipants single-subject design was used to address the following questions: (a) Will a staff training package in choice-making increase provision of choices by staff?, and (b) Will this training increase the diversity of choices offered by staff? This session will present the findings, describe a procedure for training staff in choice, and promote discussion of the impact of choice on staff and consumer behavior. Type: Poster Level: Introductory

Hall C 515

Maggie Freeman, Natalie Fielders

Type: Poster Level: Intermediate

Positive Behavioral Interventions in a School-Based Setting for Deaf Students With Autism Hall C 517

Nicole Carrasquillo, Karen Wilson The American School for the Deaf adopted a positive behavioral interventions and supports framework in 2012-13 in an effort to transform the PACES Residential Treatment Program into a strengths-based program. Using data collection software, the program demonstrated a significant reduction in the number of restraints and seclusions, resulting in the elimination of time-out rooms and the development of quiet, comfort, and sensorysupported areas. This session will describe the classroom, clinical, and residential approach to non-punitive interventions. Type: Poster Level: Introductory

Sensory Processing Toolkit: A Guide for Teachers and Parents in Early Childhood Education Hall C 519

Elizabeth Koss, Grace Reifenberg Sensory processing differences may interfere with a child's participation in school. In order to determine evidence-based strategies for improved sensory regulation, a review of the literature was completed. Abstracts of 2,176 peer-reviewed articles were screened, of which 130 abstracts were reviewed, and 26 met inclusion criteria and were appraised. Results included 1 “do it” or green light intervention, 3 “maybe do it” or yellow light interventions, and 1 “don't do” or red light intervention. This session provides an outline of these strategies to promote sensory regulation.

Single-Subject Study: ResearchBased Instructional Strategies for Sensorimotor Learners Hall C 521

Tristan Pierce This presentation reports on a single-subject study procedure showing the effectiveness of research-based instructional strategies for sensorimotor-stage learners with sensory and multiple impairments. Baseline levels of sensory functioning were established using the assessment tools in the Sensory Learning Kit. The instruction was designed and implemented using the “routines” model for a period of six months. Achievement of targeted skills was measured using video observation of instructional activities. Type: Poster Level: Introductory

Tech Connect: Assistive Technology Across Generations Hall C 524

Connie Hartman, Nancy Likens Tech Connect links senior citizens and individuals with disabilities using technology to cultivate the art of conversation. Individuals who are nonverbal “teach” the seniors how to use devices. Senior citizens mentor the individuals in how to engage in communication and activities. This unique program has stimulated the interests of university researchers and program developers. This session describes how the program has evolved and the various elements that have been discovered as technology is used within diverse community settings. Type: Poster Level: Intermediate

The Magic Wand for Motivating Learners: Incorporating Special Interests in Instruction Hall C 526

Allison Officer, Carol Dittoe This session will report on a case study incorporating special interests and multisensory learning strategies during instruction to increase engagement and academic performance and decrease anxiety for a student with multiple disabilities. An intervention specialist and a speech therapist will be available to answer questions and brainstorm ideas for incorporating special interests. Participants will learn where they can download templates and get directions for using these tools. Type: Poster Level: Introductory

Type: Poster Level: Introductory

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Exhibitor Session


W EDNESDAY S E SSI ONS Unique Mentoring Programs on College Campuses: The EKU Experience

When Appropriate Behavior Is Inappropriate

Macaulay Schifferdecker, Mackenzie King

Can social skills backfire? For people with disabilities, what potential “landmines” lurk within many routinely imposed interventions and routinely taught strategies ? How can needed skills be taught more productively to avoid unforeseen consequences of “appropriate behavior” that has been taught rigidly and unrealistically? This session will include “mini case studies” of problematic situations that have arisen through ill-designed, rigidly imposed interventions, with exploration of how the interventions could and should have been more appropriately, realistically, and humanely designed.

Sara Boettcher, Jocelynn Hughes

Type: Poster Level: Introductory

Type: Poster Level: Intermediate

A Dress Rehearsal for Life-Building a Transition Program in a Small Rural School District

How to Gain Victory Through the Transition into Adulthood?

Hall C 528

This presentation describes the implementation of a peer mentoring program on a college campus, with the impact of an individualized goal-setting program to help students develop the self-determination skills needed to succeed in the higher education and housing environment. Recruitment of participants occurred through referral. Weekly mentoring sessions were scheduled during the semester, and data were gathered from qualitative and quantitative measures. Outcomes addressing the effectiveness of incorporating occupational performance skills into the development and execution of the program will be shared. Type: Poster Level: Intermediate

Using Behavioral Skills Training to Increase the Fidelity of Discrete Trial Teaching Hall C 530

Charla Hutchinson, Kathryn Frank Behavioral skills training (BST) is an evidencebased practice used to assist in building skill repertoire with caregivers (e.g., parents, behavior techs, teachers). Supervisors can use BST as a tool to increase team-wide treatment fidelity or increase the validity of in-house training procedures. The case study presented in this session highlights the results of using BST during discrete trial training with a behavior technician. Type: Poster Level: Intermediate

Staying on Track: Creating Meaningful Individual Education Plans for Students With Autism Hall C 532

Jennifer Krumins Does the mere thought of creating IEPs send shivers down your spine? Parents and educators alike tend to dread the development of these documents - often for good reason. But it doesn't have to be this way. IEPs can be created to be authentic, useful and practical. Learn how to transcend the drudgery! Type: Poster Level: Introductory

Hall C 534

Kate Gladstone, James Williams

Hall C 536

Kim Luedde, Kyle Fenton Even in a small community, it is possible to create a transition program to prepare students with disabilities for adulthood. We will share how we got our program started, from design to implementation. Topics include five areas of transition, selecting a location for the program, how to work with community partners, creating individualized schedules based on students' desires, the key to making learning “real,” teaching a simple problem-solving process, and a shift in teachers' thinking that will make a major difference in the learning of transition students. Type: Poster Level: Intermediate

Behavioral Approaches to Supervision and Staff Training in Effective Treatment Hall C 538

Kristopher Brown As the prevalence of neurodevelopmental disorders such as ASD continue to rise, so does the need for well-trained and clinically effective direct service staff to provide appropriate treatment. Several approaches to training and supervision stemming from behavior analysis may be utilized to increase staff performance and the reliability with which interventions are applied. This presentation will cover examples of these procedures and their feasibility, along with research and case examples. Type: Poster Level: Intermediate

Next Steps in Functional Communication Training as a Means of Decreasing Prompt Dependency Hall C 540

Prompt dependency leads to missed learning opportunities in the classroom. Functional communication training teaches students ways to communicate their wants and needs. FCT is frequently considered as a strategy for nonverbal individuals. However, this session looks at taking FCT strategies to the next level. Students often engage in problematic or taskavoidant behavior, including asking for help when otherwise capable of completing work independently. In this latter example, FCT can be used to help students stay on task and use appropriate communication.

Hall C 542

Daniel Durany What comes to mind when you hear the word “transition?” Transition into adulthood is a pivotal moment in a person's life when there are often many questions and concerns. Typical questions arise including, “What will my child be like when they become an adult? Will they be able sustain employment?” Durany will share about when transition starts, breakdown the various transition stages into adulthood, and discuss how to make the transition smoother during each stage. Type: Poster Level: Intermediate

Peer Mentoring Training Program Pilot Hall C 544

Kari Sassu, Ruth Eren, Doreen Tilt, Jim Loomis The Peer Mentoring Training Program was developed by a transdisciplinary team from the Center of Excellence on Autism Spectrum Disorders at Southern Connecticut State University and Dr. Jim Loomis, of the Center for Children with Special Needs. The project aimed to support and enhance the development of social skills in high school students with ASD and to fortify relationships between these students and their nondisabled peers. Several assessment tools were developed and used to evaluate the effectiveness of the training sessions. This presentation documents the implementation of this pilot program within a school district in Connecticut in the fall of 2016. Type: Poster Level: Introductory

HOW WAS YOUR SESSION? USE THE ONLINE SESSION SORTER TO SUBMIT AN EVALUATION.

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WED N E S D AY SE SS ION S Developing a Global Framework for Improving the Lives of Individuals With ASD Hall C 546 Tara Lavelle

This session presents findings from a study identifying the challenges facing communities worldwide and offers resulting policy recommendations. Participants from 12 countries were asked about the current level of services provided in their country, barriers faced in expanding these services, and established practices for overcoming barriers. Five main themes emerged resulting in the development of three overarching recommendations for policymakers worldwide to coordinate the response to ASD and affect substantive change. The guidance developed from this work will help enact policies that improve the lives of individuals with ASD, their families, and their communities. Type: Poster Level: Intermediate

Mindfulness For Children With ASD: Ratings of Paws b and Changes in Self-Concept, Social, and Cognitive Skills Hall C 548

Adrienne Sande, Sheneik Wedderburn, Desiree Gagnon Paws b is a Mindfulness-based Therapy (MBT) for school-aged children, which was adapted for children with ASD. Results indicate that Paws b training improved some social skills, and executive functioning improvements approached significance. Further, children reported improvements in self-concept and gave feedback about the program itself. This presentation highlights adaptations, child feedback, and intervention outcomes for children with ASD. Results suggest that MBT is effective and acceptable for improving social skills in children with ASD. Type: Poster Level: Intermediate

12:45 – 2:00 pm Everything Is STILL Awesome With LEGO! Ballroom A

Matt Mobilio, Michael Kennedy In this hands-on session using LEGO Education products, educators and parents alike will discover the many uses of LEGO products in the classroom and at home, including how to integrate them into core subjects (language, writing, and STEM with Common Core Standards) and social skills using the provided teacher support and lessons plans by LEGO Education. The presenters will also share websites and LEGO apps that will enhance students' learning experience with 21stcentury skills.

Do-Watch-Listen-Say Framework for Teaching Social and Communication Skills Generalization

Sensory Solutions: Enhancing Antecedent-Based Interventions Through Sensory Theory

L. Lynn Stansberry-Brusnahan

This session will provide participants an opportunity to engage in activities to explore and apply research-based sensory theory to inform the process of using antecedentbased interventions for instruction, behavior, and socialization, including incorporation of preferred activities; creating schedule/routine; implementing pre-activity priming; providing student choice; choosing different media and materials for instruction; and designing the environment with sensory stimuli that support optimum participation.

Ballroom B

The purpose of this session is to learn how to (a) assess skills and needs; (b) target goals and write specific objectives based on prioritized needs and a task analysis; (c) plan intervention to meet goals and objectives utilizing the DO-WATCH-LISTEN-SAY framework; (d) teach targeted skills working towards acquisition, mastery, and generalization of functional skills, utilizing evidence-based practices, instructional strategies, and supports; and (e) monitor progress on the acquisition, mastery, and generalization of functional skills utilizing data collection methods. Type: Lecture Level: Advanced

Multi-Agency Planning to Employment: From the Ideal to the Real C150

Ashley Logan, Rae Lynn Daviso, Lilian Beck, Kylee Ransbottom Multi-Agency Planning (MAP) to Employment is a cross-training effort for professionals working with transition-age youth. MAP participants include educators, county board of DD personnel, and OOD counselors working together to learn about tools and processes of the Employment First (EF) Transition Framework. The framework emphasizes the need to collaboratively plan for transition assessment and transition services in place of practices that “hand off” youth from one agency to another. Panel members from across the state of Ohio will share effective strategies and success stories. Type: Panel Level: Intermediate

Special Needs Life Planning: Making a Good Life Possible

C151

Blaine Brockman This session provides an overview of special needs planning options including major sources of public benefits such as Medicaid, SSI, and SSDI. It will explore the question of whether guardianship is necessary and the various considerations that should be taken into account when making this important decision. Trusts will be discussed at length including a breakdown of how different types of trusts work, the roles of parties involved, and how they fit into a family estate plan. The session will also include a summary of the ABLE Act and Stable Accounts.

C160

Lisa Combs, Susan Aebker

Type: Hands-On Interactive Level: Intermediate

Finding the Right Assistive Technology for Everybody C162

Amanda Gray Choosing the right assistive technology can be overwhelming. This session reviews a variety of assistive technology devices currently being used across the country. It will also defuse many myths that influence decisions on technology. A hands-on approach with specific activities and anecdotal evidence will be presented. Attendees will also be encouraged to brainstorm activities particular to the needs of their client base. Time will be set aside for questions on these and other assistive technology devices. Type: Exhibitor Level: Intermediate

The Road to Success Using Culturally Responsive Practices With UDL C170

Ron Rogers, Heidi Orvosh-Kamenski This interactive, hands-on discussion will make you reflect on your beliefs and how you teach your students. You will walk away not only with more knowledge but with more digital tools for your toolbox. Type: Hands-On Interactive Level: Intermediate

Type: Exhibitor Level: Introduction

Type: Hands-On Interactive Level: Introductory

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Exhibitor Session


W EDNESDAY S E SSI ONS Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation: Helping Children Succeed in Childcare

Free Tools to Facilitate the AT Assessment Process

Grace Schoessow

This hands-on session will explore free tools that can be used to guide the AT assessment process. Specifically, the Assistive Technology Internet Modules (ATIM), Student Inventory for Technology Support (SIFTS), and an array of forms to guide the AT assessment process will be discussed.

C172

This session explores early childhood mental health consultation as an evidence-based approach that helps children succeed in early learning and childcare environments by developing adult capacities and capabilities. Many families rely on community childcare programs. The sooner children's socialemotional, behavioral, and mental health needs are understood, identified, and addressed, the better the outcomes. This takes a team effort, as many challenges can derail early intervention efforts. Successful implementation of ECMHC requires strong childcare-school-family-community partnerships. Type: Lecture Level: Introductory

Improving Language Outcomes for Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing D180

Rose Sheldon, Sandra Grether Children who are deaf or hard of hearing (D/HH) continue to fall short in language and social skill development, and few evidencebased interventions have been developed to date. Our goal is to directly teach language structures via augmentative and alternative communication strategies in order to facilitate language development and social functioning of children who are D/HH who continue to display clinically significant gaps in language. This presentation introduces a pilot study focused on the feasibility of this intervention and its effectiveness on language development. Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

Work Smarter, Not Harder: Child Change Through Developing Local Capacity Technical Assistance D181

D182

Heather Bridgman

Type: Learning Lab Level: Intermediate

Re-Analyzing ASD Prevalence Data to Target Often Overlooked Gaps in Identification D280

Peter Doehring Despite concerns over the prevalence of ASD, many children continue to be diagnosed late. By re-analyzing publicly available prevalence data from the CDC, the presenter discovered patterns suggestive of four distinctive but overlooked identification gaps varying across states, income, and race/ethnicity. Each gap has a different impact, reflects a distinct breakdown in services, and requires a different solution. Understanding state-to-state variations in these gaps in services and in the response to date helps to clarify the reported rise in prevalence and to tailor state-specific plans to close these gaps. Type: Lecture Level: Advanced

Writing Matters! Building Written Expression Skills for Learners With ASD and ID D281

Robert Pennington This session presents the most current research on teaching writing to students with ASD/ID and provides step-by-step descriptions of teaching methods for this unique population of learners. Type: Lecture Level: Introductory

2:45 – 4:00 pm Social Emotional Engagement: The Fuel for Learning in the Classroom Ballroom A

Emily Rubin, Jennifer Townsend Research in social neuroscience fosters our understanding of how social and emotional engagement fuels learning in the classroom. This translates into essential instructional elements for students with autism while creating a universal design for learning for all students. The outcomes of the Social Emotional Engagement - Knowledge and Skills (SEEKS) program, which is focused on ensuring that learning strategies are implemented to ensure that all students, regardless of their developmental level, are initiating, invested, and independently engaged in classroom lessons. Type: Hands-On Interactive Level: Intermediate

Strategies to Improve Executive Function: A Foundation for Success Ballroom B

Carol Burmeister For many learners in today's classrooms, a lack of appropriate executive function (EF) skills - which include the ability to switch between topics and activities, initiate action, cope with change, make choices, plan and organize, manage time, inhibit impulses, regulate emotions, and solve problems makes reaching high expectations difficult. In this session, participants will learn how to incorporate numerous evidence-based strategies into academic and social settings that build competent EF skills and provide a foundation for learning and thriving in all environments. Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

What Is a Job Coach's Role in Postsecondary Transition? C150

Mark Campano, Laurie Kettle-Rivera

Jennifer Earley, Michele Louk, Diane Page, Chad Boone

As more students with special needs are being served in their home districts, the need for content knowledge and the skill to implement that knowledge also increases. Most teacher training programs do not provide much training/support for educating students with low-incidence high needs. This absence is intensified for those serving students who also has a sensory loss (vision, hearing, both). The same holds true in the content focus for professional development. This session will look at how using technical assistance through outreach will maximize the teams around students with severe and complex needs.

Job coaches from Dublin City Schools transition programs will share how they support transition and outcomes for employment, education, and independent living across various levels of student need. Learn how they support students, families, school personnel, and business partners to establish strong foundations, achieve IEP goals and outcomes leading to post-school success. Panel topics include soft-skill building, social skills, peer relationships, employment strategies, resources, recognizing independence, behavior management, emotional health, communication, and community involvement.

Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

Type: Panel Level: Introductory

DON’T LOSE THAT THOUGHT – VISIT THE THINK TANK IN THE EXHIBIT HALL

29


WED N E S D AY SE SS ION S You Can't Be Everywhere at Once: Creating Protocols to Maintain Classroom Expectations

The Power of Questions in an UDL Environment That Spark Breakthrough Ideas

Advocacy for Students Who Are Deaf and Hard of Hearing Tabitha Belhorn

Erica Hackett

C170

Ron Rogers Ignite change in a world moving at warp speed. Together, we will explore a tool that will find imaginative, powerful answers. Join this session for a hands-on universal design for learning session using the power of inquiry to spark breakthrough ideas that can be used in everyday life, including district leadership teams, building leadership teams and teacherbased teams not to mention engaging your students throughout their learning.

This session will focus on educational advocacy surrounding the needs of students who are deaf and hard of hearing. Participants will also learn how to apply IDEA to the needs of students who are D/HH, including IDEA special considerations, special education laws and their application to deaf students, placement options, assessments, and evaluations for deaf students. An emphasis is placed on collaboration between families and professionals to foster a unified approach towards successful educational planning for students.

C160

When used appropriately, paraprofessionals play a key role in student success. Session attendees will gain valuable insight into current research on the use of paraprofessionals across school settings. Through discussion and reflection, attendees will have an opportunity to identify areas of need for staff protocols. Through facilitated collaboration, attendees will work together to share ideas and create a protocol they can take back to their classroom to implement immediately. Type: Hands-On Interactive Level: Introductory

Assessing and Supporting the Communication Skills of Emergent Communicators C161

Maggie Gons This session defines the characteristics of the functional developmental levels (FDLs) developed by Dr. Stanley Greenspan needed to achieve two-way communication. A variety of tools supporting the assessment of children with complex needs will be reviewed. Methods and techniques of a developmental, relationship-based model (PLAY Project) that support gains in children with complex needs will be demonstrated. Finally, resources that aid the selection of appropriate communication vocabulary within the context of family priorities and daily routines will be provided. Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

Type: Hands-On Interactive Level: Intermediate

Supporting Families in Early Intervention: Is It Time to Turn Over a New Leaf? C171

Susan Jones, Marilyn Espe-Sherwindt Ronni Bowyer Ohio has made progress in moving toward evidence-based EI practices, yet providing effective family support remains a concern. A new statewide initiative, Project TREES: Tools and Resources for Engaging, Empowering and Supporting Families, will explore the difference between child-focused vs. familyfocused services. What services and strategies are supported by the research as having strong short- and long-term impact on optimizing child development and building family capacity for success beyond EI? What are the implications for delivering EI services? Come join us as we untangle and discover the answers together. Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

A Practical and Comprehensive Approach for Generating Positive Outcomes Through Evidence-Based Practices

Using Social Scripts With Adolescents and Adults Significantly Impacted by Autism

C162

C172

Kristi Porter

Kathryn Doyle, Carla Schmidt, Kelly Garland

Learn practical solutions for teaching secondary students the critical skills necessary for success in school and beyond. See how districts are building capacity to provide appropriate education to all students while transitioning them into postsecondary life. The needs of students in both inclusive/selfcontained environments will be discussed. Our Links Curriculum web-based application allows educators and others to conduct global and targeted autism assessments. Educators can immediately review the results through a variety of easy-to-understand reports that detail the findings. Among other things, baseline and ongoing data will be collected to assess a student's level of independence, while considering individualized prompting needs for daily routines.

While it is recognized that ASD is a lifelong social communication disability, many of the interventions used to increase social competency are targeted on the early intervention years. There is a lack of social skills interventions for adolescents and adults impacted by ASD, particularly those with significant needs. This session explores strategies using social scripts with adolescents and adults with significant ASD across settings and people. Scripts often include phrases or visuals to increase conversation and engagement.

Type: Exhibitor Level: Introductory

30

Type: Lecture Level: Introductory

D181

Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

Rock Teaching With 5 Free or LowCost Tools for Student Expression D182

Daniel McNulty, Kelli Suding In this hands-on session, presenters demonstrate tools, resources, and processes that students can use to access, interact with, and respond to content that might otherwise be less accessible to them. Participants have an opportunity to observe and participate in at least five ways by which students who might struggle with various aspects of reading and writing can show what they know through the creation of accessible digital products utilizing free/low-cost apps, software, and websites. Participants will leave feeling confident about replicating this process immediately in their own learning environments. Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

Understanding the Ohio STABLE Account D280

Doug Jackson Find out how the Ohio STABLE Account can increase the financial independence of people with disabilities by providing a tool to save, invest, and spend personal funds without affecting eligibility for federal or Ohio meanstested benefits programs like SSI or Medicaid. Type: Lecture Level: Introductory


W EDNESDAY S E SSI ONS Reading Comprehension and Autism: Connecting Strategies to the Core Features of Autism

The Emotional Classroom: The Importance of Teaching Kids to Manage Their Emotions

Self-Care With Flair: Teach SelfCare Skills to Children With ASD and Other Disabilities

Nicole Birri, Pamela Williamson

Lori Jackson, Steve Peck

Ginger McDonald, Bhanu Raghavan

D281

C161

C172

Individuals with autism have challenges in social cognition and executive function. Teaching students to read is a comprehensive way to address these challenges. This session describes these challenges and provides two strategies that systematically address the development of social cognition and executive function to support reading comprehension. The following strategies will be described along with concrete examples teachers can easily implement when they return to their classrooms: (a) text structures and (b) character event maps.

Emotional regulation (ER) is not a criterion in DSM-V for a diagnosis of autism, ADHD, or other behavioral disorders. Yet behavioral issues are reported most for these populations. Research shows that ER is a critical component of these disabilities with fMRI evidence confirming deficit areas of the brain. To change behavior, we need to teach strategies to develop emotional regulation in and out of the classroom and enable students to develop new neural pathways to create lasting behavior change. This session will offer a proven method to teach emotional regulation in the classroom.

Teaching basic self-care skills to children with disabilities can be difficult, and is often not a priority. Yet, these skills are critical for acceptance at school and successful transition into the community. Effective learning occurs faster when methods are consistent between home and school. Brain-based research has shown that children remember better when novelty is intertwined with learning new skills. This session presents strategies, including catchy rhymes and pictures designed to help children master self-care skills within a short time and generalize to multiple environments.

Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

Type: Lecture Level: Advanced

Type: Lecture Level: Introductory

4:30 – 5:45 pm

Deaf-Blind Rights: A Road Least Traveled

Autism and the Grandparent Connection: The Role of a Lifetime

Ryan Odland, Judy Knisely, Christopher Woodfill

Jennifer Krumins

Improving Outcomes for High School Students With ASD Through Community Collaboration C150

Brittany Joseph, Catina Harding, Kelly Elton, Beth Ann Hatkevich This panel session will address the need to improve outcomes for high school students with ASD. An overview of how this was addressed by community partners in Northwest Ohio, including Great Lakes Collaborative for Autism, Perrysburg High School, Bittersweet Farms, Bowling Green State University, and The University of Toledo, will first be presented. Then examples of the program, outcomes, and curriculum will be provided. Participants will have an opportunity to ask questions and engage in dialogue about this increasingly emergent topic. Type: Panel Level: Intermediate

The Marriage of UDL and PBIS: A Framework to Support the Whole Child C160

Denise Malkovits, Gregory Boerio In this presentation, participants will learn to identify how positive behavior interventions and supports (PBIS) and universal design for learning (UDL) complement one another and provide a systematic framework that supports the whole child. Participants will be able to identify how the UDL guidelines and the components of PBIS are more similar than different and support educators in their efforts to be intentional when striving to meet the needs of each and every learner.

C170

Exercising one’s right to live and function in society is a measure of being granted the freedom to shape one’s future. But witnessing a person with combined hearing and vision loss exercise his or her right to seek employment, obtain a college degree, and have a family remains rare. Historically, the deaf-blind community has been excluded from opportunities to benefit from information and resources allowing them to live and choose. Type: Hands-On Interactive Level: Intermediate

Preparing Students for the Future of Adult Services C171

Justin Blumhorst Adult services for people with intellectual disabilities are changing throughout the country. People are moving into communitybased settings instead of the traditional facility-based settings. Hear from a provider of direct services who moved to the new model about some of the skills that can help people flourish in this new model. Find out how you can prepare students for new community employment as well as day service options. Type: Lecture Level: Introductory

D180

Raising a child with autism or other special needs is challenging. At times it is exhausting and lonely. We cannot do it alone. It takes a “village.” Grandparents have the power to make life more manageable for their children and grandchildren. Filled with practical information, this presentation gives tools needed to provide stability, support, and strength to grandchildren and their families. Type: Lecture Level: Introductory

Beyond the Modality Debates: How to Define Student Language Needs D181

Pat Skidmore, Heather Cooper In the best case scenario, school-age children have access to a complete language, whether American Sign Language (ASL), spoken English, or some manually coded form of English. Unfortunately, all too often, IEP teams are faced with students with a hearing loss AND language delay. The Common Core demands full language command, and even the extended standards fail to address language learning needs. Ways of quantifying student language, speech, sign, auditory, and academic needs and writing meaningful goals will be discussed in this interactive facilitated discussion. Type: Facilitated Discussion Level: Intermediate

Type: Hands-On Interactive Level: Intermediate

CONTINUE THE DISCUSSION – #OCALICON2017

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WED N E S D AY SE SS ION S Free Google Tools to Increase Access to the General Curriculum D182

Michael Roush

Social Communication Program for Students With Autism and AboveAverage Cognitive Skills

Ann Palmer, Elizabeth Kunreuther

Trisha Gallagher, Sarah West, Nicole Bishop

D280

This session demonstrates and gives participants time to practice with tools and techniques that increase access to the general curriculum for all learners. By using extensions as well as built-in features of the Google Apps for Education suite of tools, teachers will learn how to implement a variety of supports for diverse learners without reducing academic expectations. This session is designed for individuals with a Google (Gmail) account, and schools that have a Google Apps for Education account and provide (or are planning to provide) individual accounts for their students. Type: Learning Lab Level: Intermediate

Understanding Alcohol and Substance Use in Individuals With ASD

D281

Social, vocational, educational, and emotional demands are a part of life for adults and adolescents with ASD. Along with the rewards of mainstreaming, there are also opportunities to use and abuse drugs and alcohol. Current studies report higher rates of substance use disorder (SUD) in individuals with ASD than the general population. This discussion will include repetitive behaviors in ASD and SUD, the possible genetic and neurocognitive similarities, substance use as a form of selfmedication or coping, and what families and professionals need to know to address autism and substance use.

Some students with autism master academic content easily, yet fail in school due to their social communication needs. This session introduces the Social Communication Program (SCP), developed to meet the needs of these students. SCP supports students earning a regular diploma with the skills needed to succeed in school by offering instruction in social skills, appropriate behaviors, and executive functioning while providing a home base when they need a break. Students receive academic instruction in general education classrooms and get individualized instruction in the SCP room at least once a day.

Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

Comprehensive pediatric therapy services in Northeast Ohio OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY SPEECH-LANGUAGE THERAPY PHYSICAL THERAPY ABA THERAPY COUNSELING MEALTIME MANAGEMENT EAR START AUTISM PROGRAM EARLY

GALVINTHERAPYCENTER.COM 216-514-1600

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THURSDAY Peter Vermeulen Autism and Happiness: Mission (Im)Possible? Happiness is a personal and subjective construct. The things that make a person with autism happy do not necessarily have to be a copy of what makes a neurotypical person happy. Support, in terms of quantity, content, as well as style, should be adapted to the needs of the person with ASD: “goodness of fit” is more important than how much support is offered. This keynote provides different strategies that aim to increase happiness and emotional well-being in people with ASD. Peter Vermeulen is the co-director of Autisme Centraal – a training and education center for autism spectrum disorders in Gent, Belgium. He has worked with people with ASD and their families for more than 25 years and is an internationally respected lecturer/trainer. Vermeulen is author of more than 15 books and several articles on autism, including Autistic Thinking – This is the Title (2001), I am Special: A Workbook to Help Children, Teens and Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders to Understand Their Diagnosis, Gain Confidence and Thrive (2000, revised edition 2013), and Autism as Context Blindness (2012).

ZAYNE HARSHAW Guitarist Zayne Harshaw from Blue Spectrum performs Thursday morning.

Please note: Events on the Main Stage may feature loud music, amplified voices, and bright lights.


T H U R S D AY AT-A-G LANCE 8:00 – 9:15 am | Concurrent Sessions B130

Managing Me: A Developmental Continuum of Self-Regulation Supports Susan Aebker, Lisa Combs, Lynn DeMange

B131

Ohio Regional Literacy Institute – Southeast Jessica Dawso, Kim Monachino, Melissa Weber-Mayrer, Wendy Stoica, Sarah Buoni, Nancy Osko, Shawna Benson, Sheila Smith, Jennifer Govender, Julie Stewart

B140

Recipe for a Successful Transition: From Part C to Part B Diane Fox, Sophie Hubbell, Angela Boblitt, Erin Simmons

B142

Hospitality Listens: Improving Quality of Life for Families of Children With ASD Milos Bujisic, Anne Turpin, Vanja Bogicevic

Ballroom B

34

Talk With Me: A Framework for Teaching Conversation Balance and Fluency Kerry Mataya, Hollis Shaffer

C150

Implementing Community Internships for Youth With ASD: Why, How, Who, What, Where, When Carol Schall, Jennifer McDonough, Alissa Molinelli Brooke, Lauren Avellone

C151

Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Special Needs Trusts Amanda Buzo

C160

Don't Tell Me What to Like!: The Ethics of Age-Appropriate Interests Chloe Rothschild, Lydia Wayman, Sondra Williams

C161

Extending Literacy Experiences Through Multi-Modal Strategies Elisabeth Wharton, Regina Jankowski, Margaret Roth, Evelyn Mylander

C162

Changing Lives: How Social, Emotional, and Behavioral Skill Development Transforms Learning for ASD Learners Greg Firn

C170

Optimistic Voices: Engaging Hearts and Minds Through Musical Theater Heather Meeker, Jodi Kirk, Bridie Carroll

C171

Teach Some Skills and Get Others for Free: Strategies to Obtain Generalized Outcomes Bobby Huffman

C172

Why Didn't They Just Say That? Helping Students With Autism Decode the Social World Jennifer Schmidt

D180

ESSA, LEAD K, Language and Communication ... More Than Just Mandates Mark Campano, Laurie Kettle-Rivera

D181

Literacy, Language, and Family Involvement Sheri Cook

D280

Supporting Individuals With I/DD Transition to Postsecondary Education Diane Clouse, Jan Goings

D281

Behavioral Crisis Management for Families Erin Mayberry

D283

Integrating Related Services Into Natural Settings: Pushing in for Maximum Success! Lezlie Fahl Kinder, Carol Conway

Exhibitor Session


T HURSDAY AT- A- GL A NC E 9:00 am – 3:00 pm | Exhibit Hall Hall C

Exhibit Hall Day 2

9:45 – 11:15 am | Keynote Session Main Stage Hall C

Autism and Happiness: Mission (Im)Possible? Peter Vermeulen

11:30 am – 12:30 pm | Research Symposium Hall C 500

Teaching Students With Severe Disabilities to Write Opinions Related to Text Robert Pennington

Hall C 501

A Virtual Tutor With Automatic Speech Recognition to Teach Reading to People With Autism Mohammad Nasser Saadatzi, Robert Pennington

Hall C 503

Effects of a Reading Racetrack on the Sight-Word Reading of Elementary Students Who Are Deaf Carrie Davenport, Sheila Alber-Morgan

Hall C 504

An Examination of Literacy Interventions for Students Who Are Deaf and Hard of Hearing Carrie Davenport, Moira Konrad

Hall C 506

At the Crossroads of Evidence-Based Practice and Universal Design: A Roadmap Lisa Combs, Allison Officer

Hall C 508

Calm Your Classroom: Visual Supports for Promoting Internal Regulation and Self-Management Lynn DeMange, Carol Dittoe

Hall C 510

Children With and Without Sight: Learning Literacy Through Play Tristan Pierce

Hall C 512

Transdisciplinary Team Approach: A Process for Educational Identification and Support Andrea Schneider, Melissa Good, Julie Hammer

Hall C 514

Perspectives of Early Childhood Educators on Autism Amy Grattan, Paul LaCava

Hall C 516

Practical Application of Applied Behavior Analysis in the School Setting L. Lynn Stansberry-Brusnahan, Erin Farrell

Hall C 518

Preparing for an Endoscopy Using Preferred Interests and Visual Supports Becky Payton, Cindy Andree Bowen

Hall C 520

Staff Incentives: Reinforcement-Based Strategies to Increase Accurate Data Collection Stephanie Holladay, Kristin Toruno

Hall C 522

Ten Lessons Amelia Needs You to Learn Michael Roush, Angie Roush

Hall C 523

Free Tools to Support the Five-Step Writing Process for All Students Michael Roush

Hall C 525

Living in the Field: Inclusion Perspectives From Parents as Professionals Jodi Collins, Leigh Porch, Jason Hague, Jerry Turning

DON’T LOSE THAT THOUGHT – VISIT THE THINK TANK IN THE EXHIBIT HALL

35


T H U R S D AY AT-A-G LANCE Hall C 527

What's Next? Transition to the Adult World of Work, Independent Living, and Recreation Anne Russell

Hall C 529

A Novel Approach to Enhance Upper-Limb Coordination in Children With ASD Alejandra Gamez, Jason Boyle

Hall C 531

But First Do No Harm – The Nitty-Gritty of Real Inclusion Joanie Calem

Hall C 533

Teaching Students With Autism: Cognitive Differences Impact How and What We Teach Jennifer Krumins

Hall C 535

Developing an Inclusive Center in an Area Where Few Resources Exist Brittany Joseph, Kari Sherwood, Stacy Borgio

Hall C 537

App It Up! Using Apps to Increase Student Engagement and Achievement Laura Clarke, Dusty Columbia Embury

Hall C 539

Considerations of Standards-Referenced Curricula for Students With High-Intensity Needs Danielle Nowosiadlo, Phyllis Jones

Hall C 541

Safety Town Plus Lance Apple, Sharon Horn, Tracy Lezark, Beth Whitman

Hall C 543

What Works for Hyperlexia in Children and Adults With ASD Katie Terry

Hall C 545

The Importance of Systematic Phonics Instruction Beyond Kindergarten for Successful Reading and Writing Development Heather Villela

Hall C 547

Early Care Professionals’ Knowledge and Perceptions of Early Screening for Developmental Disabilities and ASD Jessica Page

12:45 – 2:00 pm | Concurrent Sessions B130

Meaningful Implementation of Augmentative and Alternative Communication Devices Caroline Pusey

B131

Ohio Regional Literacy Institute – Northeast Jessica Dawso, Kim Monachino, Melissa Weber-Mayrer, Wendy Stoica, Sarah Buoni, Nancy Osko, Shawna Benson, Sheila Smith, Jennifer Govender, Julie Stewart

B140

PBIS Family Engagement Rubrics: Tools for Deepening Partnerships With Families Barbara Boone, Anthony Pizzuti, Marla Peachock

B142

Universal Design for Learning in the Classroom With Students on the Autism Spectrum Angela Allen, Amber Wolf, Paige West

Ballroom B

36

Righting Writing Instructional Practices to Increase Independence and Learning David Koppenhaver

C150

Accessible Educational Materials, Accessible Technology, and Intensive Technical Assistance Cynthia Curry, Diana Foster Carl, Jan Rogers, Rachel Schultz

C151

Autism2Work – Creating Connections and Employment Opportunities in IT that Change Lives Beth Schulz

C160

How to Cut Down on Coffee and Chocolate: Identifying and Teaching Missing Skills Wendy Szakacs, Julie Short

Exhibitor Session


T HURSDAY AT- A- GL A NC E C161

An Inclusive Program for Students With ASD and Challenging Behavior Leslie Paterson, Paul LaCava, Judi Lamarre, Amanda Michaud

C170

Peer Supports for Middle and High School Students With Severe Disabilities Matthew Brock, John Schaefer

C171

Social Networks: Supporting College and University Students With High-Functioning ASD Barbara Cook, Deborah Weiss

C172

School and Community-Based Models to Support Mental Health in the Schools for Persons With ASD Melissa Bacon, Cathy Pratt, Lee Stickle

D180

Down Syndrome and ASD Patricia Nash, Christopher Hanks, Belinda Davis, Regina Parker

D181

Practical Strategies for Families and Educators of Deaf Learners With Autism Raschelle Neild

D182

Understanding Deafblindness and Intervener Services, Part 1: Deafblindness 101 Leanne Parnell, Kim Moritz

D281

Jack and Jill Went Up the Hill To Increase Their Play and Social Skills Greta Powell, Kathryn Woodburn, Kim Garner

D283

Yes, You CAN Work Together! Intervention Specialists and Paraprofessionals Lisa Orem, Karin Humble

2:00 – 2:45 pm | Energy Break Snacks and Beverages in Booths 420 and 136. Scavenger Hunt Prizes in OCALI Central. Live music from Oakapella. Hall C

Special Thanks to Our Energy Break Sponsors:

2:45 – 4:00 pm | Concurrent Sessions B130

Integrating Social Emotional Learning Instruction Into Core Academic Instruction Amy Tseng, Melissa Spence, Amy Nhi Nguyen

B131

Ohio Regional Literacy Institute – Northwest Jessica Dawso, Kim Monachino, Melissa Weber-Mayrer, Wendy Stoica, Sarah Buoni, Nancy Osko, Shawna Benson, Sheila Smith, Jennifer Govender, Julie Stewart

B140

How ASD and Other Special Needs Impact Children of Color and Their Families Teirra Everette, April Stephens, Timothy Roberts

B142

Promoting Positive Interactions Among Law Enforcement and Individuals With Disabilities Abigail Love, Kirsten Scheil, Jorgina Arballo

Ballroom B C150

Transitioning from Emergent to Beginning Literacy in Students with Complex Needs David Koppenhaver Postsecondary Education: Building a Model Program for Success Katie Sochor, Karen Monfort, Becky Haselberger, Joshua Graham

CONTINUE THE DISCUSSION – #OCALICON2017

37


T H U R S D AY AT-A-G LANCE C151

Ensuring Quality of Life for Loved Ones With Special Needs Lynn Tramontano

C160

Do We Really Know What We Mean When We Talk About Quality of Life? Jim Taylor

C161

Using Self-Advocacy to Promote Inclusion Marie Wilbanks, Michelle Gifford, Lisa Wilkins, Bryston Lee

C170

Modeling Strategies for Improving the Reading Skills of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students Pamela Luft

C171

Including Accessible Materials and Tech in the IEP: Where They Go. Why They Matter Cynthia Curry, Diana Foster Carl

C172

Voices On: Authentic Engagement of AAC Device Users in Group and Independent Work Danielle Levesque

D180

The Role of Home Visiting in Improving Children's Developmental and Health Outcomes Sandra Oxley, Jye Breckenridge

D181

Leveraging Dual Licensure to Support Inclusive Practices for Students With Disabilities Charles Kemp

D182

Understanding Deafblindness and Intervener Services, Part 2: Intervener Techniques Kim Moritz, Leanne Parnell

D280

Suicidality in Schools: Identifying Risk, Reactions, and Response Strategies Marquetta Pittman, Andrea May, Elizabeth Greene

D281

Transition Starts in Kindergarten Melissa Haskins-Berger, Tabatha Devine

D283

Using Communication and Sensory Regulation to Promote Independence Chloe Rothschild, Patty Cunningham, Katie Nelson

4:30 – 5:45 pm | Concurrent Sessions B130

FUNctional Communication: Activities, Goal Writing, Data Collection, and Generalization Amber Huber, LaQuita Schwartz, Amy Savage

B131

Ohio Regional Literacy Institute – Southwest Jessica Dawso, Kim Monachino, Melissa Weber-Mayrer, Wendy Stoica, Sarah Buoni, Nancy Osko, Shawna Benson, Sheila Smith, Jennifer Govender, Julie Stewart

B142

Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo! How Video Modeling Can Work Like Magic Jennifer Schmidt, Marina Mendel

Ballroom B

38

Inclusive Practices in Conventional Literacy Instruction for Students With Significant Intellectual Disabilities David Koppenhaver

C150

Collaborative Transition-Focused Education Deborah Stroud, Tara Willig, Renee Klusman, Ellen Perica

C151

Making the Most of Related Services: From Related to Integrated Amanda Sheldon, Christine McElfresh

C160

Promoting Successful Transition Across All Grade levels Alfred Daviso, Rae Lynn Daviso Exhibitor Session


T HURSDAY AT- A- GL A NC E C161

Classroom Peer Assistance – For a Grade and OCALI Autism Certification! Emily Schmetzer, Cynthia Morris, Sydney Wright, Jessica Shelton

C162

Increasing Motivation for Social Interaction in Children With Autism Selene Johnson, Lizzy Donovan

C170

Building Student Capacity for Independence With Multi-Step Skills and Routines Matthew Brock, Mary Barczak

C171

Neurodiverse College Students' Experiences: Challenges and Support Strategies Darlene Unger, Alyx Weaver, Timothy Mikes

C172

Writers’ Workshop: Learning With Students David Schleper

D180

Explicitly Teaching English Through the Air To Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing Shannon Clancy, Ross Leighner, Jessica Bennett

D181

Making Science Education Accessible for Students With Visual Impairments Tiffany Wild, Deborah Grzybowski, Karen Koehler

D182

Student Engagement: Technology Scaffolds to Increase Student Learning Debra Bauder, Thomas Simmons

D280

Removing Thresholds for Service Options for Students With Autism Andrew Kuzmickas, Susan Baraga, Carrie Yasenosky

D281

Creative-Movement Programs to Promote Creativity and Skill Development Brigid Rankowski

D283

Happiness and Well-Being: Why Promoting Positive Feelings Fosters Self-Regulation Kelly Mahler

Save the Date! November 14 – 16 Featured Keynote: Dr. Christopher Gillberg

39


T H U R S D AY S E SS ION S 8:00 – 9:15 am Managing Me: A Developmental Continuum of Self-Regulation Supports B130

Susan Aebker, Lisa Combs, Lynn DeMange Self-regulation is a critical skill for any individual to learn to achieve personal dreams and reach desired goals. Unfortunately, selfregulation can be a challenging skill to learn if it does not develop naturally. This session will explore the developmental continuum of self-regulation instruction for improved success in teaching this complex skill. Attendees will have an opportunity to create a self-regulation support plan for an individual based upon age and developmental level. Attendees will also learn strategies for improved transfer and generalization of self-regulation skills. Type: Hands-On Interactive Level: Intermediate

Ohio Regional Literacy Institute – Southeast B131

Jessica Dawso, Kim Monachino, Melissa Weber-Mayrer, Wendy Stoica, Sarah Buoni, Nancy Osko, Shawna Benson, Sheila Smith, Jennifer Govender, Julie Stewart The purpose of the Literacy Institute is to provide updates and information on literacy efforts across Ohio. This session offers the same content four times during the day in order to host a unique meeting and networking opportunity for each of four regions in Ohio (northwest region, northeast, southeast and southwest). Type: Panel Level: Advanced

Recipe for a Successful Transition: From Part C to Part B B140

Diane Fox, Sophie Hubbell Angela Boblitt, Erin Simmons This session promotes a family-centered approach to transition, and addresses priorities, concerns, and needs related to transitioning a child from Part C to Part B services. An overview of key timelines and activities from current federal law that requires IFSP teams to begin preparing the child and family to transition from Part C into Part B services will be shared. Family members will share how the team supported them and what specific strategies were the most successful. Participants will learn to identify new strategies that they can implement with their local transition process. Type: Facilitated Discussion Level: Intermediate

40

Hospitality Listens: Improving Quality of Life for Families of Children With ASD

Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Special Needs Trusts

Milos Bujisic, Anne Turpin, Vanja Bogicevic

This session will explore special needs trusts, including a specific type known as a pooled trust, and why those trusts allow people to retain benefit eligibility. Trusts funded by a person with a disability compared to trusts funded by a third-party for a person with a disability will be discussed, as well as Ohio’s STABLE account, the Qualified Income trust, and special needs trusts. This session will also focus on trust administration and how special needs trusts supplement, not supplant, government benefit eligibility.

B142

Hospitality Listens is an interdisciplinary event that is based on collaboration from The Ohio State University Hospitality Program, local restaurants, and OCALI to sponsor a dining-out experience for families of children and adults with ASD. Presenters will discuss the developmental trajectory of this event, which aims to serve the needs of families of individuals with ASD when dining out in the community and to equip university hospitality students with knowledge and skills that they can apply to their profession in the future. Type: Facilitated Discussion Level: Introductory

Talk With Me: A Framework for Teaching Conversation Balance and Fluency Ballroom B

Kerry Mataya, Hollis Shaffer Learn how Talk With Me: A Framework for Teaching Conversation Balance and Fluency breaks down the elements of a conversation we must master in order to be proficient at carrying out a conversation. The framework was developed and refined across many years using relevant research along with close observation of how people talk to each other – what conversations really sound like. Many find it difficult to teach conversation skills, but this framework provides a simple and easyto-implement process for teaching effective conversational habits for students with HF-ASD. Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

Implementing Community Internships for Youth With ASD: Why, How, Who, What, Where, When C150

Carol Schall, Jennifer McDonough, Alissa Molinelli Brooke, Lauren Avellone Achieving competitive, employment continues to be a challenge facing transition-aged youth with ASD. Thus, the promise of full participation in the workforce has yet to be realized by the majority of young adults with ASD. Nevertheless, some studies demonstrate successful supports for individuals with ASD in employment. In this session, research on the impact of internships and employment while in high school will be presented. Additionally, specific information regarding implementation of internships in community-based settings will be shared.

C151

Amanda Buzo

Type: Exhibitor Level: Introductory

Don't Tell Me What to Like!: The Ethics of Age-Appropriate Interests C160

Chloe Rothschild, Lydia Wayman, Sondra Williams Individuals with developmental disabilities are often pressured to adopt “age-appropriate” interests based on the belief that interests aimed at younger ages limit social inclusion, emotional growth, and overall development. As adults with autism who have some interests that are not considered “age appropriate,” the presenters will explain their impact on them – how they do not limit but in many ways help. Using personal experiences as well as mentoring and advocacy experiences, the presenters will use real-world examples to equip attendees with the tools to support their own family members, students, and clients. Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

Extending Literacy Experiences Through Multi-Modal Strategies C161

Elisabeth Wharton, Regina Jankowski, Margaret Roth, Evelyn Mylander Early childhood literacy has gained increased attention in recent years. Research focuses on the importance of developing foundational skills as they relate to the components of literacy. Literacy is not only the ability to read the printed word but also the ability to decipher its meaning or interpretation and to express one's thoughts or ideas through words, print, or picture form. The prominent literacy focus has been on print. This session will address an area that is often overlooked the brain's ability to interpret what it sees and the ability to reproduce that information. Type: Panel Level: Intermediate

Type: Panel Level: Introductory

Exhibitor Session


T HU RSDAY S E SSI ONS Changing Lives: How Social, Emotional, and Behavioral Skill Development Transforms Learning for ASD Learners

Why Didn't They Just Say That? Helping Students With Autism Decode the Social World

Supporting Individuals With I/DD Transition to Postsecondary Education

Jennifer Schmidt

Diane Clouse, Jan Goings

Greg Firn

In fall of 2007, Beavercreek High School piloted a new approach to teaching social skills to students with high-functioning autism. This highly intelligent population can be intentionally taught these “soft skills,” which will enhance their transition into college, the workforce and life. The PeerSpectrum class uses high-level curriculum, peer models, intentional and immersive lessons, and authentic social practice to help students gain social competence and confidence.

C162

In this session, participants will learn the transformational impact of evidencebased practices and strategies integrated into a research-informed curriculum and facilitated through a facially expressive, social, humanoid robot to engage, enhance, and empower social, emotional, behavioral, and communicative skill development for learners with ASD. The session features both quantitative and qualitative results as well as several opportunities to experience and interact with this innovative program. Type: Exhibitor Level: Introductory

Optimistic Voices: Engaging Hearts and Minds Through Musical Theater C170

Heather Meeker, Jodi Kirk, Bridie Carroll There is transformative power in musical theater - that distinctive combination of acting, music, and movement. When we believe and invest in creative play, story, character, and song, we open a gate to learning and understanding for every student. Members of the Musical Theater Project will share the teaching methodologies used in its evidencebased artist residency program, “Kids Love Musicals!,” for special education classrooms, and help participants incorporate musical theater activities into lesson plans and structured play to support academic, social, and emotional learning. Type: Hands-On Interactive Level: Introductory

Teach Some Skills and Get Others for Free: Strategies to Obtain Generalized Outcomes C171

Bobby Huffman Generalization occurs when an individual demonstrates learning in the absence of specific instructional situations. Generalization is typically difficult for individuals with autism to achieve and, therefore, needs to be systematically programmed into daily instruction. This session will demonstrate how generative instruction, a systematic set of teaching strategies to facilitate generalization, has emerged as an evidence-based practice to facilitate generalized learning outcomes. Type: Lecture Level: Advanced

C172

Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

D280

This presentation previews a four-year certificate program providing students with I/DD access to an inclusive college experience, which includes university classes, residential campus living, vocational internships, and campus social life. The program aims to enhance competencies related to vocational, social, and independent living outcomes. A transition checklist designed to assist educators and parents when supporting students with I/DD in transitioning from high school to college will be reviewed as well as an overview of disability services provided in college. Type: Lecture Level: Introductory

ESSA, LEAD K, Language and Communication ... More Than Just Mandates

Behavioral Crisis Management for Families

D180

D281

Mark Campano, Laurie Kettle-Rivera

Erin Mayberry

We are constantly provided mandates from federal and state levels that do not come with a manual on how to make those initiatives happen in the context of the classroom. This session will look at the federal initiative Every Student Shall Succeed Act (ESSA) and the state-level trend, Language Equality and Acquisition for Deaf Kids (LEAD-K), and what they mean for those providing services to students with deafness, hard of hearing, blind, low vision, deaf-blindness, with additional disabilities (sensory impairments and low incidence high needs).

Behavioral crises present safety concerns, limit accessibility to the community, and create stress on family members. Often family members do not receive adequate support in preventing and managing crisis behaviors. This session will teach family members strategies for preventing and minimizing crisis behavior and review important components of family safety plans at home and the community.

Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

Literacy, Language, and Family Involvement D181

Sheri Cook Families and professionals working with young children who are deaf and hard of hearing (age 0-5) are recommended to attend this presentation. The participants will discover that before children can read independently, they need emergent literacy skills. Research and the impact of family involvement in a deaf/hard of hearing child’s language acquisition skills will be discussed. The presenter will describe how her parents and grandparents contributed to the language and academic development of her deaf sister and herself, as well as helpful tips and activities.

Type: Hands-On Interactive Level: Introductory

Integrating Related Services Into Natural Settings: Pushing in for Maximum Success! D283

Lezlie Fahl Kinder, Carol Conway Legislation and research support integrating related-service provision in the least restrictive environment, yet many still use a pull-out service delivery model. This session will review the law and describe how two school districts integrated OT service delivery into natural settings to provide promotion, prevention, and intensive services to meet the participation needs of all students. Specific strategies (applicable to all related-services providers) for implementing change as well as for collaborating effectively with diverse school personnel will be discussed. Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

Type: Lecture Level: Introductory

DON’T LOSE THAT THOUGHT – VISIT THE THINK TANK IN THE EXHIBIT HALL

41


T H U R S D AY S E SS ION S 9:45 – 11:15 am Autism and Happiness: Mission (Im)Possible? Main Stage Hall C Peter Vermeulen

Happiness is a personal and subjective construct. The things that make a person with autism happy do not have to be a copy of what makes a neurotypical person happy. Support, in terms of quantity, content, as well as style, should be adapted to the needs of the person with ASD: “goodness of fit” is more important than how much support is offered. This presentation provides different strategies that aim to increase the happiness and emotional well-being of people with ASD. Type: Keynote Level: Intermediate

11:30 am – 12:30 pm Teaching Students With Severe Disabilities to Write Opinions Related to Text Hall C 500

Robert Pennington This session will describe the results of a recent study involving teaching three students with severe disabilities to construct text in response to literature. The researchers incorporated response prompting techniques and technology to improve students' writing skills. The findings will be discussed in the context of application by practitioners. Type: Poster Level: Intermediate

A Virtual Tutor With Automatic Speech Recognition to Teach Reading to People With Autism Hall C 501

Effects of a Reading Racetrack on the Sight-Word Reading of Elementary Students Who Are Deaf

Calm Your Classroom: Visual Supports for Promoting Internal Regulation and Self-Management

Carrie Davenport, Sheila Alber-Morgan

Lynn DeMange, Carol Dittoe

Hall C 503

Hall C 508

This presentation reports on a study that examined the effects of a reading racetrack game on the acquisition, maintenance, and generalization of sight words of four kindergarten students who are deaf. The game consisted of placing sight words around a racetrack board and prompting the participant to read the word. A multiple-probe design across picture sets was used. Study outcomes will be shared, as well as limitations, future directions for research, and implications for practice.

This session will share the most current data supporting the use of visual support tools and calming strategies for individuals who have deficits in internal regulation and self-management. Team members from Montgomery County ESC's Autism and LowIncidence Coaching Team (ACT) will share some of the visual tools they have used to support educational teams serving students in the Miami Valley area. ACT members will be available to demonstrate the use of the visual tools and answer questions.

Type: Poster Level: Intermediate

Type: Poster Level: Introductory

An Examination of Literacy Interventions for Students Who Are Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Children With and Without Sight: Learning Literacy Through Play

Carrie Davenport, Moira Konrad

This session presents fieldtest results on an oversized manipulative designed to help develop literacy (braille and print) as well as essential childhood skills such as cognitive, motor, social, and communication at centers serving young children with visual impairment (with and without additional disabilities) and/ or young children with autism, some of whom have visual impairments. Sighted siblings attend and participated at some locations. Attributes tested included color, texture, patterns, visual tracking, tactile tracking, and sound.

Hall C 504

This presentation reports on a review to explore the effectiveness of literacy interventions for students who are deaf or hard of hearing in preK through high school. Singlesubject studies published in peer-reviewed journals between 2004 and 2016 were reviewed based on specific inclusion criteria. Ten studies met criteria. Results indicate that various interventions were implemented with students who are deaf or hard of hearing to determine effectiveness in teaching literacy skills. Limitations, directions for future research, and implications for practice are described. Type: Poster Level: Intermediate

At the Crossroads of EvidenceBased Practice and Universal Design: A Roadmap

Hall C 510

Tristan Pierce

Type: Poster Level: Introductory

Transdisciplinary Team Approach: A Process for Educational Identification and Support Hall C 512

Mohammad Nasser Saadatzi, Robert Pennington

Hall C 506

Andrea Schneider, Melissa Good, Julie Hammer

This session reports on a computer-based tutoring system that uses an interactive computer character as a pedagogical agent. The agent instructs sight-word reading aloud based on constant time delay, delivers instructions through synthesized speech, and receives students' responses via microphone and automatic speech recognition. A multiplebaseline across-participants design was used to assess the efficacy of the intervention with two students with autism. The results show that both participants acquired and maintained new sight words and demonstrated generalized responding.

This session will provide a graphic organizer showing how the evidence-based practices for autism overlap with the guidelines for implementation of universal design for learning. Understanding this relationship can help educators, especially when supporting students with autism in the general education environment, where evidence-based practices can benefit many and, sometimes, all the students in the classroom.

Have you ever felt alone in supporting a student with many needs? Join us for this session where you can explore how a transdisciplinary approach can be used to design the best possible educational programming for students with ASD. Collaboration allows the team to view a student through many lenses and fosters opportunities for greater success with interventions. Learn how service providers work together through the transdisciplinary process – from observations to educational identification – in order to develop a comprehensive educational program for student success.

Type: Poster Level: Advanced

42

Lisa Combs, Allison Officer

Type: Poster Level: Intermediate

Type: Poster Level: Intermediate

Exhibitor Session


T HU RSDAY S E SSI ONS Perspectives of Early Childhood Educators on Autism Hall C 514

Amy Grattan, Paul LaCava This presentation introduces the Perspectives of Early Childhood Educators on Autism survey designed to gather information about early childhood educators' (ECE) knowledge and beliefs about autism. In addition, the survey was used to collect information on early childhood educators' use of evidence-based practices to support a child with autism in an early childhood classroom. Type: Poster Level: Introductory

Practical Application of Applied Behavior Analysis in the School Setting Hall C 516

L. Lynn Stansberry-Brusnahan, Erin Farrell Not specific to core autism characteristics but simultaneous with impairments in social interaction, communication, and restricted behaviors, some individuals with autism exhibit challenging behaviors. This session highlights a single-subject case study that examined the application of functional communication training to address behaviors with the assistance of a school district behavior specialist trained in applied behavior analysis. Results demonstrated increases in a young African American female's use of communication and a decrease in the duration and frequency of her behaviors. Type: Poster Level: Introductory

Preparing for an Endoscopy Using Preferred Interests and Visual Supports Hall C 518

Becky Payton, Cindy Andree Bowen This presentation explores how caregivers can use a child's preferred interests, along with visual supports and desensitization procedures, to prepare for medical procedures in a hospital setting. A case study focuses on supporting a child with autism prepare for an endoscopy. Type: Poster Level: Introductory

Staff Incentives: ReinforcementBased Strategies to Increase Accurate Data Collection

Living in the Field: Inclusion Perspectives From Parents as Professionals

Stephanie Holladay, Kristin Toruno

Jodi Collins, Leigh Porch, Jason Hague, Jerry Turning

Hall C 520

This presentation reports on a case study to illustrate evidence-based practices that can be used to increase staff motivation to complete less preferred tasks. Specifically, the study focused on reinforcement-based strategies rather than punitive strategies to correct staff behavior. In order to increase accurate data collection across all participating direct-care staff members, a lottery system was put into place. An independent group contingency was used to increase staff motivation to complete daily data collection. Data were collected on the number of eligible staff members each week. Type: Poster Level: Introductory

Ten Lessons Amelia Needs You to Learn Hall C 522

Michael Roush, Angie Roush Amelia, our 8-year-old daughter, was diagnosed with autism five years ago. Come learn ten important lessons she has taught us (her parents) since then. Type: Poster Level: Introductory

Free Tools to Support the Five-Step Writing Process for All Students Hall C 523

Michael Roush This presentation will introduce the Five-Step Writing Process (Pre-write, Write, Edit, Revise, Publish) and explain how it can positively impact achievement and engagement for all students, across all content areas. High-quality, free tech tools will be demonstrated that allow teachers to implement the Five Step Writing Process for all students, including students with diverse needs. Time will be devoted to planning for implementing the Five Step Writing Process in the curriculum and supporting students in becoming accomplished, confident writers. Type: Poster Level: Introductory

Hall C 525

What do a pastor, a police officer, a teacher, and a social worker have in common? Their collective role is vital to society, but they also may be the voice for a family member with autism. In this session, you will meet autism parent bloggers from Bacon and Juice Boxes, Flappiness Is, Jason Hague, Writer, and Running Through Water as they represent the mosaic of services that help form the foundation of any community. As both parents and professionals, they will share unique insider tips for inclusion and also what it is like to access those services as families living with autism. Type: Poster Level: Introductory

What's Next? Transition to the Adult World of Work, Independent Living, and Recreation Hall C 527

Anne Russell This session will present information about and understanding of the transition from high school to being an adult in the world of college, work, independent living, benefits, and recreation for a child with disabilities who will be graduating from high school. The presentation includes information for family members and supports along with information for the individual consumer to prepare for the upcoming changes in their post-high school lives. Type: Poster Level: Introductory

A Novel Approach to Enhance Upper-Limb Coordination in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder Hall C 529

Alejandra Gamez, Jason Boyle This session will report on a study to further the understanding on the kinematic components of goal-directed upper-limb movement in children with ASD and to investigate the adaptability of their limb movements after undergoing exposure to a sine wave tracking task. The kids were tested with a speed-accuracy tradeoff (Fitts) task that involved moving a cursor between two targets of varying sizes and distances. The tentative findings conclude that children with ASD execute post-training movements of higher velocity with smoother displacement profiles after tracking the sine template. Type: Poster Level: Advanced

43


T H U R S D AY S E SS ION S But First Do No Harm – The Nitty-Gritty of Real Inclusion Hall C 531

Joanie Calem This session provides support for parents, educators and administrators who are struggling to help their children/clients with sensory processing disorder (SPD), autism etc., negotiate the world. Using songs, stories, exercises, and conversation, the presenter explores the details of SPD and how it affects one's daily life. Though dealing with serious material, this session is presented with a combination of humor and empathy, and includes tools for inclusion and building a compassionate culture. Type: Poster Level: Intermediate

Teaching Students With Autism: Cognitive Differences Impact How and What We Teach Hall C 533

Jennifer Krumins Have you ever wondered why a student with autism might focus on everything except what he is expected to? Provide seemingly random responses? Fail to notice social cues? Or follow directions properly? Learn the critical impact that reduced context sensitivity and increased cognitive load have on students with autism, and how to reduce the impact of brain differences and support deep learning. Experience the effect of context yourself. Don't miss this opportunity to reflect, learn, and grow! Type: Poster Level: Intermediate

Developing an Inclusive Center in an Area Where Few Resources Exist Hall C 535

Brittany Joseph, Kari Sherwood, Stacy Borgio This session will explain how the Pathway Inclusion Center was conceptualized and developed based upon a significant need in Ottawa County and Port Clinton, OH. Through their mission to provide individualized, developmentally appropriate child care, after-school programs, summer camps, and therapy services to individuals ages 6 months to 21 years with or without developmental disabilities, the presenters will encourage attendees to develop similar inclusive centers that benefit everyone in communities where existing resources are limited.

App It Up! Using Apps to Increase Student Engagement and Achievement

What Works for Hyperlexia in Children and Adults With ASD

Hall C 537

Katie Terry

Laura Clarke, Dusty Columbia Embury Students with disabilities require additional supports to access content, and for many students, technology is their primary means of access. Apps like Nearpod, Google Classroom, Padlet, Edmodo, and more can help increase student participation and engagement. This session will present teacher-chosen resources and demonstrate apps that can help teachers increase student engagement and achievement in content instruction.

Hyperlexia is a common problem for individuals with ASD. Like other splinter skills often found in autism, hyperlexia is characterized by strong decoding skills in reading, but little or no comprehension of the material. This presentation will highlight the relevant research on reading comprehension difficulties in autism. It will also describe how auditory, visual, and language cues can increase the sensory-cognitive function of readers, increasing both symbol imagery and concept imagery.

Type: Poster Level: Intermediate

Considerations of StandardsReferenced Curricula for Students With High-Intensity Needs Hall C 539

Danielle Nowosiadlo, Phyllis Jones This presentation engages participants in the challenge of developing appropriate and meaningful pedagogy for students with highintensity needs - learners who have incredibly complex learning pathways due to multiple learning issues. Participants will engage with important pedagogical considerations before learning about teachers' curricular-referenced best lesson narratives through case studies from six teachers. Type: Poster Level: Intermediate

Safety Town Plus Hall C 541

Lance Apple, Sharon Horn, Tracy Lezark, Beth Whitman Dr. Kaye Stanley-Bryson designed Safety TownPlus as a one week program to teach safety instruction for up to 24 children in grades kindergarten to grade three and diagnosed with autism or another developmental disability. The materials and physical activities are provided to generalize curriculum material. The program covers street & bike safety, poison safety, 911 calling, fire safety, bus safety, pet safety with active community support provided by Akron Children's Hospital, Medina County Sheriff's Dept, Fire and Rescue, McDonald's, and many volunteers. The program is free.

Hall C 543

Type: Poster Level: Introductory

The Importance of Systematic Phonics Instruction Beyond Kindergarten for Successful Reading and Writing Development Hall C 545

Heather Villela It is generally accepted that all children benefit from an explicit, systematic and multi-sensory approach to learning letters and sounds in kindergarten. However, what happens after students have mastered the alphabetic principle? Too often instruction jumps from letters and sounds to meaning-focused reading of whole words. Research indicates that young readers in grades 1-2 still need a systematic approach to word work instruction – especially true struggling readers. Highly effective approaches include advanced phonemic awareness development, systematic decoding and encoding instruction, and extensive practice in connected text. (Kilpatrick, 2015.) Learn why this approach is effective for struggling readers and how to effectively implement key strategies in collaboration with all instructors. Type: Exhibitor Poster Level: Introductory

Type: Poster Level: Introductory

Type: Poster Level: Introductory

44

Exhibitor Session


T HU RSDAY S E SSI ONS Early Care Professionals’ Knowledge and Perceptions of Early Screening for Developmental Disabilities and ASD

PBIS Family Engagement Rubrics: Tools for Deepening Partnerships With Families

Accessible Educational Materials, Accessible Technology and Intensive Technical Assistance

Hall C 547

Barbara Boone, Anthony Pizzuti, Marla Peachock

Cynthia Curry, Diana Foster Carl, Jan Rogers, Rachel Schultz

Early developmental and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) screening has many benefits, including earlier diagnosis, access to early intervention (EI), and improved developmental outcomes (Dawson et al., 2012). To benefit from EI, children must be identified, typically through screening by a healthcare provider, and referred for an evaluation. Alternatively, child care settings may be another avenue for early screening. While recent studies show that early care professionals can be adept at screening for ASD (Dereu, 2011), research has yet to provide insight as to whether early care professionals feel comfortable and knowledgeable with early screening, talking with parents about concerns, or referring families to EI.

In a welcoming, supportive school climate, family engagement is central. The PBIS Family Engagement Rubrics for Tier I, II, and III help school teams see the possibilities for family partnerships and begin their plan of action. In this session, participants will receive the rubrics and learn how to use these tools to strengthen their PBIS practices through a multi-tiered approach to partnering with families. Feedback from participants will inform improvement of PBIS family engagement resources.

Jessica Page

Type: Poster Level: Introductory

B140

Type: Facilitated Discussion Level: Intermediate

Universal Design for Learning in the Classroom With Students on the Autism Spectrum B142

Angela Allen, Amber Wolf, Paige West

12:45 – 2:00 pm Meaningful Implementation of Augmentative and Alternative Communication Devices B130

Caroline Pusey This session will address the challenges of implementing AAC devices. AAC device options will be discussed along with the importance of using core and fringe vocabulary. Participants will compare referential and descriptive teaching practices, and specific examples of experiential teaching will be shared. Strategies to support language development for students using AAC devices will be reviewed, and participants will use them to plan for instructional, functional, and social activities. Type: Hands-On Interactive Level: Intermediate

Ohio Regional Literacy Institute – Northeast B131

Jessica Dawso, Kim Monachino, Melissa Weber-Mayrer, Wendy Stoica, Sarah Buoni, Nancy Osko, Shawna Benson, Sheila Smith, Jennifer Govender, Julie Stewart The purpose of the Literacy Institute is to provide updates and information on literacy efforts across Ohio. This session offers the same content four times during the day in order to host a unique meeting and networking opportunity for each of four regions in Ohio (northwest region, northeast, southeast and southwest). Type: Panel Level: Advanced

This session will provide information about the universal design for learning (UDL) and its educational framework. We will discuss students who have an ASD and how to integrate these students into the general education setting using UDL. This will include identifying barriers in the classroom setting and strategies to help remove these barriers and promote independence and success in the classroom. Type: Facilitated Discussion Level: Introductory

Righting Writing Instructional Practices to Increase Independence and Learning Ballroom B

David Koppenhaver Students with ASD or significant intellectual disabilities often struggle in learning to write. Numerous well-intended interventions (e.g., copying, tracing, use of writing prompts) have proven ineffective in improving the written language capabilities of these students. This presentation will explore theoreticallyreferenced and research-based approaches to get students writing immediately who are not already doing so, and improve the writing of students through stages of emergent understanding into increasingly elaborated and conventional written communication. Resources for continued exploration of the topic will be shared. Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

C150

All students need useful learning materials in order to access, participate, and achieve in the general curriculum. The standard print and digital learning materials that are purchased by school districts and used in the classroom are not always accessible or usable by all students. Ohio accepted an invitation as one of eight states to participate with the National Center on Accessible Educational Materials (AEM) in the AEM Best Practices Cohort project. This panel featuring national, state, and district representatives discusses issues at both the policy and practical level. Type: Panel Level: Intermediate

Autism2Work - Creating Connections and Employment Opportunities in IT that Change Lives

C151

Beth Schulz With an ASD diagnosis rate in the US of 1 in every 68 Americans and continuing to grow, it is imperative for companies to begin initiatives to incorporate this diversity into their workplaces. Each individual on the autism spectrum can be a huge asset to a company that provides opportunities that aligns to their particular strengths and interests. In this session, we will review CAI’s Autism2Work initiative which provides businesses with the opportunity to partner in establishing a program resulting in a highly productive and inclusive work environment for those on the autism spectrum. Type: Exhibitor Level: Introductory

How to Cut Down on Coffee and Chocolate: Identifying and Teaching Missing Skills C160

Wendy Szakacs, Julie Short This session will discuss the challenges of teaching students with complex needs and offer strategies to target those challenges through identification of missing skills. Participants will learn how to match up evidence-based practices to help support student challenges, how to categorize missing skills into seven common areas (communication, social/ emotional, transitions/being prepared, behavior, self-regulation/coping, following directions/ functioning within a routine, academics), and how to match evidence-based practices to the specific missing skills. Type: Lecture Level: Introductory

HOW WAS YOUR SESSION? USE THE ONLINE SESSION SORTER TO SUBMIT AN EVALUATION.

45


T H U R S D AY S E SS ION S An Inclusive Program for Students With ASD and Challenging Behavior C161

Leslie Paterson, Paul LaCava, Judi Lamarre, Amanda Michaud This panel will discuss the challenges, successes, and accommodations required for students with autism and related behavioral, social, and emotional difficulties to succeed in a general education curriculum. Several evidence-based strategies will be discussed in terms of how they are integrated into the curriculum. The perspective of the teacher, behaviorist, school administrator, and consultant will be shared, with suggestions for program development. Finally, strategies for social and emotional skill development will be demonstrated in an elementary setting. Type: Panel Level: Intermediate

Peer Supports for Middle and High School Students With Severe Disabilities C170

Matthew Brock, John Schaefer Peer support arrangements involve one or more peers without disabilities providing academic and/or social support to students with disabilities in general education classrooms under the direction of a teacher or paraprofessional. Based on their experience both implementing and training others to implement this practice, the presenters will prepare participants to implement peer support arrangements with their own students. After a brief review of the evidence-base for peer support, step-by-step directions will be provided, and audience members will be guided to draft individualized peer support plans. Type: Hands-On Interactive Level: Introductory

Social Networks: Supporting College and University Students With High-Functioning ASD C171

Barbara Cook, Deborah Weiss College-bound individuals with highfunctioning autism (HFA) are at risk of failing to complete their degrees. This presentation discusses a specially designed program comprised of a college-level course in social cognition for students with HFA and typically developing peers, paired with orientation experiences for those with HFA. These serve as a venue for the development of peer mentors and social networks, which have been linked to student success. Participants will be invited to share perspectives, ideas, and strategies for implementation in their settings as well as opportunities for program enhancement.

School and Community-Based Models to Support Mental Health in the Schools for Persons With ASD

Understanding Deafblindness and Intervener Services, Part 1: Deafblindness 101

C172

Leanne Parnell, Kim Moritz

Melissa Bacon, Cathy Pratt, Lee Stickle This session will briefly identify the need for mental health supports in the school for learners on the autism spectrum. Evidencebased programs and elements within those programs will also be described. In addition, presenters will describe their professional experiences in this under-served and underrecognized area, providing helpful tips on how to integrate mental health supports in general and special education settings.

This session introduces participants to dual sensory loss, or deafblindness. Participants will learn the definition of deafblind, how to identify a child who has hearing and vision loss, and the impact a dual sensory loss can have on learning and communication. Participants will engage in a deafblind simulation and learn a few basic techniques to use with children who are deafblind or have sensory and/or multiple disabilities. The session will also introduce participants to the concept of interveners and intervener services, with examples from the Open Hands Open Access Intervener Modules.

Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

Down Syndrome and ASD D180

Patricia Nash, Christopher Hanks, Belinda Davis, Regina Parker This session will provide a place for families and educators to explore the unique challenges presented by this dual diagnosis. Panelists include the parent of a child with Down Syndrome (DS) and a diagnosis of ASD, a developmental pediatrician who has diagnosed children with these co-occurring conditions, and a special educator with experience serving them. The panelists will explore the challenges faced by physicians in diagnosing DS/ASD, by teachers in addressing the academic and social needs of these students, and by families who can often feel like they do not belong in either world. Type: Lecture Level: Introductory

Practical Strategies for Families and Educators of Deaf Learners With Autism D181

Raschelle Neild Deaf learners with autism have unique learning characteristics that present challenges in a variety of settings for teachers, family members, and caregivers. This session offers strategies for a variety of situations in different environments. A collaborative approach to increase effectiveness of the home-school continuum will be provided, since generalization is both an important and a difficult skill. Type: Lecture Level: Introductory

D182

Type: Hands-On Interactive Level: Introductory

Jack and Jill Went Up the Hill To Increase Their Play and Social Skills D281

Greta Powell, Kathryn Woodburn, Kim Garner Teaching play and social skills to young children with ASD is often a challenge for educators and parents. This “make it-take it� session will discuss ways to incorporate nursery rhymes/fairy tales into the classroom as a means of facilitating play and social skills in preschoolers with autism. A case study will be provided, including video demonstration. Participants will create props and visual supports that they can take home to use in their classrooms. Type: Hands-On Interactive Level: Introductory

Yes, You CAN Work Together! Intervention Specialists and Paraprofessionals D283

Lisa Orem, Karin Humble Participants in this session will have an opportunity to see a variety of purposeful, functional, and fun models and strategies used to organize the classroom, create seamless staff transitions, build capacity, grow leaders and specialists who ultimately support and promote the unique interests of all the kids. Participants will then learn how to collect data and create systems that are efficient, quick, and collaborative with your team through the practices and models that the presenters have implemented in their classroom. Type: Lecture Level: Introductory

Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

46

Exhibitor Session


T HU RSDAY S E SSI ONS 2:45 – 4:00 pm Integrating Social Emotional Learning Instruction Into Core Academic Instruction B130

Amy Tseng, Melissa Spence, Amy Nhi Nguyen Students with ASD experience social communication challenges that can greatly impact both social communication and academic learning. This session will address communication barriers to Common Core instruction through the integration of socialemotional learning within the daily core instruction to promote student success in general education settings. Participants will learn strategies using universal design of learning, evidence-based practices for teaching students with ASD, and small-group instruction to address social communication needs. Type: Hands-On Interactive Level: Introductory

Ohio Regional Literacy Institute – Northwest B131

Jessica Dawso, Kim Monachino, Melissa Weber-Mayrer, Wendy Stoica, Sarah Buoni, Nancy Osko, Shawna Benson, Sheila Smith, Jennifer Govender, Julie Stewart The purpose of the Literacy Institute is to provide updates and information on literacy efforts across Ohio. This session offers the same content four times during the day in order to host a unique meeting and networking opportunity for each of four regions in Ohio (northwest region, northeast, southeast and southwest). Type: Panel Level: Advanced

How ASD and Other Special Needs Impact Children of Color and Their Families B140

Teirra Everette, April Stephens, Timothy Roberts Our goal in this session is to bring awareness, education, tools, and resources to help children and adults of color with special needs. This demographic is most affected by bias in terms of diagnosis, education, therapies, treatments, and employment. Type: Facilitated Discussion Level: Intermediate

Promoting Positive Interactions Among Law Enforcement and Individuals With Disabilities B142

Abigail Love, Kirsten Scheil, Jorgina Arballo Individuals with disabilities are seven times more likely to interact with law enforcement officials than the general population (Kelley, 2007). This session will address the importance of promoting positive interactions between law-enforcement officials and individuals with disabilities before and during a crisis. Individuals may have difficulty communicating, while officers may possess minimal knowledge on best practices. We will address strategies for building community partnerships and consider critical components for improving reciprocal communication among lawenforcement and community members with disabilities. Type: Facilitated Discussion Level: Introductory

Ensuring Quality of Life for Loved Ones With Special Needs

C151

Lynn Tramontano This session addresses issues faced by families of loved ones with special needs when making future plans. Families face a complicated maze when dealing with government benefits, understanding legal issues, and wondering how to handle it all financially. Participants will learn when and how to refer to a financial advisor who will assist clients/families through the process to ensure quality of life for their loved one with special needs. Type: Exhibitor Level: Introductory

Do We Really Know What We Mean When We Talk About Quality of Life? C160

Jim Taylor

Transitioning from Emergent to Beginning Literacy in Students with Complex Needs Ballroom B

David Koppenhaver Students with ASD or significant intellectual difficulties can experience challenges when learning to read. In this session, participants will learn an informal process for identifying whether students would benefit most from emergent or conventional instruction. Comprehensive approaches to both sets of interventions will be presented, and each of the core strategies and instructional approaches will be reviewed. Resources for continued exploration of the topic will be shared. Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

Postsecondary Education: Building a Model Program for Success C150

Katie Sochor, Karen Monfort, Becky Haselberger, Joshua Graham If you build it, they will come! What happens after high school? What are the secrets to success for individuals with disabilities? How prepared are our students for life after graduation? This presentation reports on the innovative LIFE, PREP, and POWER Plus Programs which achieve postsecondary success through partnerships between students, families, program staff, agencies and the Dublin community. This district-based postsecondary program provides targeted transitional experiences and curriculum that assists students with varying ability levels in planning for future employment, education, and independent living goals.

The skills required to improve quality of life need to be systematically taught. Many first-person accounts identify anxiety as a fundamental barrier to quality of life for people with ASD. This presentation will explore the contemporary literature by autistic authors and the findings from extensive interviews with other autistic individuals in an effort to use these findings to inform the development of programs and methodology to improve the health and wellbeing and, subsequently, quality of life of people with autism. Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

Using Self-Advocacy to Promote Inclusion C161

Marie Wilbanks, Michelle Gifford, Lisa Wilkins, Bryston Lee Facing a critical shortage of transportation options for people with disabilities, Pickaway County partnered with self-advocates to create an awareness video. Come view a short film that tells the story of three people who are limited in their interactions with others because they can not go places they want to go. Pickaway County used this video to start a community conversation around transportation needs, and through this compelled the local public transportation provider to begin offering around-the-clock services. Type: Panel Level: Intermediate

Type: Panel Level: Intermediate

CONTINUE THE DISCUSSION – #OCALICON2017

47


T H U R S D AY S E SS ION S Modeling Strategies for Improving the Reading Skills of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students C170

Pamela Luft Deaf and hard-of-hearing (D/HH) students struggle significantly with reading. This session demonstrates and teaches six critical skills based on research: decoding, chunking, comprehension, fluency, self-monitoring, and integrated strategies. Participants will practice individual strategies in small groups and then combine them for multi-strategic reading. Two videotapes will show skillful D/HH readers strategy use. Instruction will demonstrate a continuum of read aloud, shared reading, guided reading, and moving to skillful independent reading used in classrooms that supports D/HH student learning. Type: Hands-On Interactive Level: Intermediate

Including Accessible Materials and Tech in the IEP: Where They Go. Why They Matter C171

Cynthia Curry, Diana Foster Carl Does your student need accessible educational materials (AEM) and technologies to increase participation, productivity, and independence in ways that improve outcomes? If so, this session is for you! The presenters will lead educators and families through seven points in the IEP development process at which AEM might reasonably be considered and documented. Participants will be provided with AEM-related questions aligned to each point and examples of language for documenting AEM and accessible technologies in IEPs in ways that support students' effective use of them for learning. Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

Voices On: Authentic Engagement of AAC Device Users in Group and Independent Work C172

Danielle Levesque Strategies for authentically engaging nonverbal students using AAC devices across school settings are few and far between. Working with students during a concentrated and specialized session is beneficial, but how can we help them meaningfully access the curriculum, friends, and general education throughout the rest of the day? This session provides participants with actionable strategies for facilitating this type of learning and participation, as well as criticalthinking skills that will help educators identify outside-the-box, in-the-moment opportunities for engagement. Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

48

The Role of Home Visiting in Improving Children's Developmental and Health Outcomes

Suicidality in Schools: Identifying Risk, Reactions, and Response Strategies D280

D180

Marquetta Pittman, Andrea May, Elizabeth Greene

Home visiting is a free, voluntary program giving pregnant women and families, particularly those considered at risk, the necessary resources and skills to raise children who are physically, socially, and emotionally healthy, and ready to learn. Quality home visiting programs improve maternal and child health, prevent child abuse and neglect, encourage positive parenting, and promote child development and school readiness. The Department of Health continues to innovate and redesign the home visiting program and data system. This session outlines current innovations to Ohio's home visiting program and provides details about program goals and outcomes.

This session will discuss how Summit Academy Schools are using suicide prevention programming to identify the risk factors and warning signs for students with disabilities. Components of a comprehensive suicide prevention program used by Summit Academy will be introduced. Furthermore, the use of screening and risk-assessment tools across educational disability categories will be discussed as well as postvention approaches applied during a recent suicide death of a student in our district.

Type: Lecture Level: Introductory

Transition Starts in Kindergarten

Sandra Oxley, Jye Breckenridge

Leveraging Dual Licensure to Support Inclusive Practices for Students With Disabilities D181

Charles Kemp Leveraging dual-licensure teacher education programs is one way schools could include more students with complex needs in the general education classroom. A quick look into any school classroom reveals the diversity of today's students - English language learners, students with high-incidence disabilities, children who use augmentative communication devices, and others who need additional adult support are just some of the notable differences. This session reports on the efforts of universities in Ohio to develop duallicensure programs so preservice teachers are general and special education content experts. Type: Lecture Level: Introductory

Understanding Deafblindness and Intervener Services, Part 2: Intervener Techniques D182

Kim Moritz, Leanne Parnell This session continues discussing dual sensory loss, or deafblindness, and digs deeper into the essential role and function of the intervener with examples from the Open Hands Open Access Intervener Modules. Key strategies used by interveners, school staff, and families while working with a deafblind child will be identified, and examples of real-life experiences will be shared. Type: Hands-On Interactive Level: Intermediate

Type: Lecture Level: Introductory

D281

Melissa Haskins-Berger, Tabatha Devine This presentation introduces the Employment First Initiative via hands-on activities and discussion related to how this initiative impacts students with disabilities. The focus of the presentation is to provide information on the use of backward planning and types of prompting to promote student independence starting at an early age. The team will discuss how to assist students in the transition process as they move across all grade levels. Participants will have a greater understanding of how to prepare students with disabilities for integrated competitive employment. Type: Hands-On Interactive Level: Introductory

Using Communication and Sensory Regulation to Promote Independence D283

Chloe Rothschild, Patty Cunningham, Katie Nelson Recent research supports the collaboration of occupational and speech therapy services in serving individuals with ASD. This session explores how the use of augmentative alternative communication systems to support the expression of feelings, emotions, states of being, likes and dislikes often requires sensory supports and strategies for regulation. Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate


T HU RSDAY S E SSI ONS 4:30 – 5:45 pm FUNctional Communication: Activities, Goal Writing, Data Collection, and Generalization B130

Amber Huber, LaQuita Schwartz, Amy Savage The benefits of helping children develop FUNctional language includes increased independence, increased verbalizations, and increased ability to follow directions. Once supports are in place, students can learn to generalize skills across settings. Participants in this session will learn how to use a total communication approach in the classroom and how to implement a FUNctional triad to generalize those skills across settings, how to write goals to encompass those strategies and skills, and how to easily keep data on the goals. Type: Hands-On Interactive Level: Intermediate

Inclusive Practices in Conventional Literacy Instruction for Students with Significant Intellectual Disabilities B131 Ballroom B

David Koppenhaver This session explores inclusive literacy practices that can be employed to support the growth of students with significant intellectual disabilities in conventional literacy. These practices are inclusive in the sense that they can be incorporated successfully in mainstream instructional settings, but they also support student learning regardless of educational placement. For example, the use of reading ability groups effectively segregates learners while failing to accelerate learning of low-skilled readers. However, the use of mixed ability groups, K-W-L strategies with text sets, book buddy strategies, or purpose-setting referenced to state reading standards all can support reading growth in settings where students may have widely varying abilities.

Ohio Regional Literacy Institute – Southwest

Type: Lecture Level: Advanced

Jessica Dawso, Kim Monachino, Melissa Weber-Mayrer, Wendy Stoica, Sarah Buoni, Nancy Osko, Shawna Benson, Sheila Smith, Jennifer Govender, Julie Stewart

Collaborative Transition-Focused Education

B131

The purpose of the Literacy Institute is to provide updates and information on literacy efforts across Ohio. This session offers the same content four times during the day in order to host a unique meeting and networking opportunity for each of four regions in Ohio (northwest region, northeast, southeast and southwest). Type: Panel Level: Advanced

Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo! How Video Modeling Can Work Like Magic B142

Jennifer Schmidt, Marina Mendel Video modeling is a best practice used when working with students on the autism spectrum. This evidence-based practice is effective with all ages, cognitive levels, and severities. When coupled with students' special interest, teachers can use video modeling for a multitude of purposes. This session will primarily focus on creating film studies using popular Disney, Pixar, and other movies and/or movie clips to teach a range of different topics including social skills, nonverbal communication, social thinking, decision making, conversations, and behavior management. Type: Facilitated Discussion Level: Introductory

C150

Deborah Stroud, Tara Willig, Renee Klusman, Ellen Perica Using a multi-disciplinary approach targeting individuals with a variety of disabilities results in successful outcomes for students to become employed in integrated settings upon leaving school services. In this panel discussion, a school administrator, as well as related-services and interagency providers will share techniques and successful outcomes in creating a transition-focused education from this collaborative approach using evidencebased practices to assist students in accessing competitive employment. Type: Panel Level: Intermediate

Making the Most of Related Services: From Related to Integrated C151

Amanda Sheldon, Christine McElfresh Join related-services providers as they share case studies that utilize dynamic tiers of support to facilitate successful integration of students with complex needs into the general education classroom. Content will focus on how to creatively and collaboratively integrate services and interventions so that meaningful progress is made. Successful, creative intervention approaches will be explored, and data from interventions will be shared. This session seeks to change perspectives on how to effectively use related-services providers in the school setting.

Promoting Successful Transition Across All Grade levels C160

Alfred Daviso, Rae Lynn Daviso This presentation will examine high-leverage and promising practices in transition services in the elementary, middle, and high school grade levels. These practices will assist educators to better prepare students with disabilities to make informed choices, given that transition services are mandated and critical to student post-school success. Type: Lecture Level: Introductory

Classroom Peer Assistance, For a Grade and OCALI Autism Certification! C161

Emily Schmetzer, Cynthia Morris, Sydney Wright, Jessica Shelton This discussion presents information about the course Peer Helping Peer, including recruiting students, developing coursework, pairing peers with students with disabilities, and teacher collaboration. Attendees will also hear from a student who has completed one year of the course, as well as a general education teacher, a related-services therapist, and a special education teacher, who collaborated with peer helpers inside and outside of the classroom. Attendees will have an opportunity to ask questions. Type: Panel Level: Intermediate

Increasing Motivation for Social Interaction in Children With Autism C162

Selene Johnson, Lizzy Donovan Many children with autism do not find social interaction very rewarding. They may prefer to play alone; may not respond to social rewards; may not have diverse play interests; and may not be motivated to converse. Some research has hypothesized that autism involves a fundamental deficiency in social motivation related to a lack of sensitivity to social reward. This presentation will focus on byproducts of social motivation deficits, address the fundamental challenges in traditional treatment approaches, and suggest alternative treatment strategies that address social motivation. Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

Type: Lecture Level: Introductory

49


T H U R S D AY S E SS ION S Building Student Capacity for Independence With Multi-Step Skills and Routines

Explicitly Teaching English Through the Air To Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

Matthew Brock, Mary Barczak

Shannon Clancy, Ross Leighner, Jessica Bennett

C170

This presentation will focus on how to break down complex skills and routines, initially teach a skill while ensuring early student success, and then fade back support to promote independence. The session begins with an introduction to each strategy, followed by opportunities for audience members to practice the skills with each other while receiving direct feedback from the presenters. Audience members will then apply the skills learned in the presentation to create an individualized intervention plan with support from the presenters. Type: Hands-On Interactive Level: Introductory

Neurodiverse College Students' Experiences: Challenges and Support Strategies C171

Darlene Unger, Alyx Weaver, Timothy Mikes In this presentation, neurodiverse college students will share their transition and college experiences, including challenges and utilization of support systems to address academic, career, psychosocial, and daily living needs. The panel moderator and discussants will also summarize research-informed strategies aimed at supporting college students through graduation and provide resources and tools to address challenges with executive functioning and interpersonal communication competence experienced across the college environment, including classes, student life, daily living, internships, and employment experiences. Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

Writers’ Workshop: Learning With Students C172

David Schleper Writers’ Workshop has been around for a long time, and yet many teachers in classrooms with deaf and hard of hearing students do not give it the focus needed to really improve the students’ writing. Using examples from deaf and hard of hearing children and young adults, this session will show how the writers’ workshop can have an impact on the lives of students in the classroom. Type: Lecture Level: Introductory

50

D180

Students who are D/HH are often charged with the dual task of learning to read and write English at the same time as they are learning English through the air. This presentation will explore the intersection of language learning with literacy skill acquisition in students who are D/HH. Specifically the presenters will discuss the results of their research of the effects a direct instruction (DI) curriculum on the signed and/or spoken English skills of students who are D/HH, the finding that DI may be an efficacious way to teach morphology and syntax to D/HH students with language delays. Type: Lecture Level: Advanced

Making Science Education Accessible for Students With Visual Impairments

Removing Thresholds for Service Options for Students With Autism D280

Andrew Kuzmickas, Susan Baraga, Carrie Yasenosky Service delivery for students with ASD requires a complex alignment of strategies and interventions. This is increasingly complicated, as students with ASD often receive support from multiple service providers. To improve student outcomes, Strongsville City Schools has embarked on a multi-year journey of increasing the district's capacity to serve students with ASD across the continuum of needs. Intervention specialists, SLPs, general education teachers, BCBAs, administrators, and parents have contributed to the plan, and the presenters are eager to share their experiences and learn from others. Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

Creative-Movement Programs to Promote Creativity and Skill Development D281

D181

Brigid Rankowski

With the recent changes to public policy, students with visual impairment are spending more time in general education classrooms, which includes the science classroom. This session will present ways to make science education accessible for students with visual impairments. Strategies and helpful lesson plan resources will be shared. Attendees will also have a chance to examine materials created specifically for teaching science to students with visual impairments.

There have been a rise in the number of creative-movement programs specifically designed for those with disabilities or who are part of at-risk communities. These programs address a need for creative expression, a physical outlet, promoting skill development and at its basic core, a way to let participants have fun. Many options exist to create programs targeting a variety of skill levels, ages, and abilities. This presentation will examine current creative-movement programs, the literature supporting the benefits of these activities, and also allow participants to try activities first-hand.

Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

Type: Hands-On Interactive Level: Introductory

Student Engagement: Technology Scaffolds to Increase Student Learning

Happiness and Well-Being: Why Promoting Positive Feelings Fosters Self-Regulation

Tiffany Wild, Deborah Grzybowski, Karen Koehler

D182

D283

Debra Bauder, Thomas Simmons

Kelly Mahler

Without a doubt, one of the keystones to academic achievement is active learning. According to research, personalized, collaborative, and connected learning experiences enhance student engagement, which in turn drives student success. By integrating technology into the classroom, educators can take learning experiences to the next level and significantly improve student performance (Brenner, 2015). This session shows you how to effectively use technology to enhance lessons and increase students' retention, comprehension, and engagement.

When it comes to building self-regulation skills, emerging evidence indicates that maximizing positive feelings like happiness, safety, comfort, well-being, and pleasure is more effective than the traditional deficit-focused approach of reducing negative feelings like anxiety and frustration. This session will provide an overview of this research as well as how to apply this evidence when designing effective programming for individuals with ASD. The important connection between interoception and positive feelings will also be discussed.

Type: Learning Lab Level: Intermediate

Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate


T HU RSDAY S E SSI ONS

Research-Based Reading Interventions Our research-based programs develop the essential components of reading—phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension.

Visit Booth #204 and Enter a Drawing for a Read Naturally Gift Card!

Learn to engage & empower at-risk readers at Elaine Balum’s presentation: “Reading for Meaning with Read Naturally Live” Wednesday, Nov. 15, 8:00 a.m.

800-788-4085 n www.readnaturally.com

OCALICON is expanding. Major announcements coming soon. Check ocalicon.org in Spring 2018. November 14 – 16, 2018 | Greater Columbus Convention Center


FRIDAY

STRENGTHS & ASS SONAL ETS PER Y & NAVIG R COVE DIS

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community living

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Summit on Sensory Disabilities

BEST AT Forum

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daily life & employment

COM MU NIT Y

Charting the LifeCourse is a workshop that introduces a framework developed by families to help individuals and families of all abilities and all ages:

The BEST AT Forum focuses on braille literacy, assistive technology for students who are blind or visually impaired, the AT assessment process, and more.

Develop a vision for a good life

Think about what you need to know and do

Identify how to find or develop supports

Discover what it takes to live the lives you want to live

Vendor table displays showcase the latest products, services, and solutions to support those who are blind or visually impaired. Six educational sessions feature the expertise and insights of parents, professionals, and students.

Sessions begin at 8:00 am on the Main Stage in Hall C.

The Summit on Sensory Disabilities is designed for education professionals serving individuals who are deaf/hard of hearing or blind/ visually impaired. Summit participants will: •

Explore best practices with a specific focus on literacy

Learn from experts in the field in a moderated panel discussion

Vendor tables open at 7:30 am. They are located in Hall C.

Participate in roundtable discussions facilitated by experts in the field

Sessions are held in B140 and B142.

Network with state and regional partners

The Summit is held in B130

Please note: Events on the Main Stage may feature loud music, amplified voices, and bright lights.

B


FRIDAY AT- A- GL A NC E 7:30 – 1:00 pm | Exhibit Hall Hall C

Exhibit Hall Day 3 | BEST AT Forum Vendor Table Displays

8:00 – 9:15 am | Concurrent Sessions B140

AT at Work: How the Bureau of Services for the Visually Impaired Can Support Workplace Accommodations Sarah Kelly

B142

Blending Mainstream and Assistive Technology for Successful Classroom Outcomes Jim Sullivan

C150

It's Working! Ohio's Transition Vision for Students With Disabilities Chris Filler, Amy Szymanski, Stacy Collins, Kristen Helling

C151

How We All Learn: The Brain, Body, and Communication Mark Campano

C160

UDL and Students With More Intensive Support Needs Cynthia Curry, Diana Foster Carl

C161

Enhancing Classroom Success Through Behavioral Momentum, Choice, and Prompting Richard Cowan, Sara Boyle, Rachel Haupt

C162

Implementing Principles of Positive Psychology to Enhance Thriving Meagan Bellan, Stacy Blecher

C170

Using Technology to Make Data-Driven Decisions Courtney Monastra, Karen Monfort, Mary Jo Wendling

C171

Access to Dance and Expression for Individuals With Disabilities Jennifer Suppo, TaMara Swank

D180

Self-Advocacy Skills for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students Tabitha Belhorn, Abby White

D280

The Autism Advantage: A Business Case for Hiring Autistic Talent John Marble

D281

Autism: As Easy as ABC and 1, 2, 3 Mo Buti

D283

Implementing a Social Group for Adolescent Girls With ASD Susan DeLuke, Alexandra Zimmer

Main Stage Hall C

LifeCourse Framework Overview Celia Schloemer, Melane Barlow, Lisa Meyer

9:45 – 11:00 am | Concurrent Sessions B140

Hands-On Fun With Assistive Technology Tools for Visual Impairments Heather Rushmore Koren

B142

The American Printing House for the Blind: Products and Resources Monica Turner

C150

Innovative Strategies to Improve College and Career Readiness Amy Szymanski

CONTINUE THE DISCUSSION – #OCALICON2017

53


F R I DAY AT- A - GLANCE C151

Employment First: Overview of Employment Navigation and Multi-Agency Planning Britta Hough, Keith Banner

C160

There's No Crying in IEP Meetings: Turning Your Emotions into Productive Goals for Your Child Beth Thompson, Haley Dunn

C161

Culturally Responsive Design for English Learners: How UDL Supports Second Language Acquisition Patti Ralabate

C162

PEERS for Students With ID and DD in Transition and Postsecondary Settings Carla Schmidt, Kathryn Doyle, Diane Clouse

C171

The ABCs of Movement: Using Multi-Sensory Strategies to Teach the Alphabet Laurie Gombash

C172

From Complaint to Compliance Kevin Gorman, Joe Keith, Andrea Rowson, Brett Tingley

D180

All Aboard! Angela Sheets, Nicole Wingate

D182

Do Children With Autism Respond Differently to Praise? How to Encourage Performance More Effectively Lorna Timmerman

D280

The Americans With Disabilities Act and Community-Based Recreation Kristen Clatos Riggins, Alayne Kazin

D281

I Am Not Your Puppet, So Let Go of My Strings! Sondra Williams

D283

Effects of Delayed Reinforcement Without Extinction on Escape-Maintained Problem Behavior Elle Smith, Corinne Gist

Main Stage Hall C

Using the LifeCourse Framework Within Person-Centered Supports Celia Schloemer, Lisa Meyer, Barbara Brent

9:45 am – 12:45 pm | Summit on Sensory Disabilities B130

2017 Summit on Sensory Disabilities: Literacy Begins With Access Christine Croyle, Jan Rogers, Cynthia Curry, Frances Mary D’Andrea, Kelly Lusk, David Schleper, Brenda Schick, Diana Foster Carl, Sheri Cook

11:30 am – 12:45 pm | Concurrent Sessions

54

B140

Perspectives of Young Adults With Sensory Disabilities Michelle Motil, Chris Harrington, Katie Robinson, Jacob Kaplan, Noah Beckman

B142

BrailleSense Polaris Andy Leach

C150

Beyond the Blog: Raising Awareness, Connecting Community, Creating Balance Jodi Collins, Jason Hague, Jerry Turning, Leigh Porch

C151

Promoting Positive Outcomes for Students With Moderate to Intensive Disabilities Alfred Daviso, Carol Sparber, Robert Baer


FRIDAY AT- A- GL A NC E C160

Using the ASD Program Quality Indicator to Develop Successful Educational Programs Amy Tseng, Melissa Spence, Amy Nhi Nguyen

C161

Stress, the Final Frontier: Emotional Regulation and ASD Ruth Prystash, Jekereen Barrozo, Amyleen Tuiza

C162

Building Sustainable Leadership in Assistive Technology Services Joan Breslin Larson

C170

How to Promote Social Connections at Recess With Peer Networks Matthew Brock, Scott Dueker, Lynde Webster

C171

A Touchy Subject: Using Sensory and Communication Strategies to Incorporate All Students Katy Ganz, Farrah Raines

C172

Keep Calm, Carry On: Implementing Individual PBIS With Parent-Professional Collaboration Bonnie Marquis, Heather Shafer

D180

The Roles and Support of Siblings Across the Lifespan Sarah Hall, Zach Rossetti

D181

We Aut-To-Be-Partners: How E-Commerce, Autism, and Employment Fit Together Joel Vidovic, Alison Thomas, Alison Miller, Amy Trautwein

Main Stage Hall C

Identify Possible Innovations for Supporting Families in Ohio Lisa Meyer, Barbara Brent

Hickman & Lowder Co., L.P.A.

Your Advocate. Your Trusted Partner.

Hickman & Lowder offers comprehensive services to meet the lifetime legal needs of children and adults with disabilities and their families. Since 1981, our nationallyrecognized attorneys have been dedicated to helping individuals throughout Ohio. From guiding parents through a difficult school year to obtaining public benefits and establishing an estate plan—we are here to help families work through the issues of today and plan for tomorrow.

Special Needs Estate Planning  Guardianship Special Education  Transition Planning CONTINUE THE DISCUSSION – #OCALICON2017

55

Hickman-Lowder.com । (614) 879-4143


F R I DAY S E S S IONS 8:00 – 9:15 am AT at Work: How the Bureau of Services for the Visually Impaired Can Support Workplace Accommodations B140

Sarah Kelly The Bureau of Services for the Visually Impaired (BSVI) provides individuals with low vision and blindness services and supports necessary to help them attain and maintain employment. Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) services are customized for each individual through assessments and one-on-one meetings with professional VR counselors. VR services are available in all 88 counties. The focus of this discussion includes how assistive technology can be used as an accommodation in the workplace, and strategies job seekers can use to dialogue with employers to explain their disability and request accommodations during the hiring process. Type: BEST AT Forum Lecture Level: Intermediate

Blending Mainstream and Assistive Technology for Successful Classroom Outcomes B142

Jim Sullivan Braille and large-print readers must be able to successfully access a wide array of course content and electronic media to compete with their sighted peers. Tools that blend the functionality of assistive technology with the features of mainstream technology provide needed access to resources such as Google Classroom. In this session, participants explore how braille and large-print-reading students can use this technology to access classroom content and much more. Type: BEST AT Forum Lecture Level: Intermediate

It's Working! Ohio's Transition Vision for Students With Disabilities C150

Chris Filler, Amy Szymanski, Stacy Collins, Kristen Helling The Ohio Employment First Task Force recognized the need to focus their energies towards developing a collaborative vision for Ohio's transition-age youth. In this session, several Employment First Task Force members will describe the core principles of the Transition Vision and work plan strategies currently being implemented to assist youth in achieving meaningful community employment and community membership. Reflective discussions will allow participants to identify personal action steps in their individual roles that will support Ohio's Transition Vision for youth.

How We All Learn: The Brain, Body, and Communication

Implementing Principles of Positive Psychology to Enhance Thriving

Mark Campano

Meagan Bellan, Stacy Blecher

C151

This session looks at typical aspects of learning and the individualized sensory and conceptual aspects of students with multiple disabilities and deafblindness including inventories and tools to identify how students access the world. Data from these tools will be used to demonstrate how to create a meaningful and functional learning experience, thus creating value for the student to learn and communicate beyond his/her current means. Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

UDL and Students With More Intensive Support Needs C160

Cynthia Curry, Diana Foster Carl When goals, assessment, materials, and methods are proactively designed and delivered according to the principles and practices of UDL, barriers to learning are lowered for most learners, but what about learners with more intensive support needs? This session will build upon UDL to concentrate on identifying and lowering barriers that some learners with more intensive support needs will face. Content will focus on strategies, services, and supports (e.g., accessible technologies and materials) that can be used to level the learning field and extend UDL benefits to every student. Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

Enhancing Classroom Success Through Behavioral Momentum, Choice, and Prompting C161

Richard Cowan, Sara Boyle, Rachel Haupt This presentation will further develop participants' knowledge and skills related to three antecedent-based interventions that have proven effective for enhancing compliance and on-task performance in students with autism and other disabilities: behavioral momentum, choice, and prompting/promptfading. Participants will gain a researchinformed understanding of how to develop target behavior definitions, implement these interventions with integrity, and use data to inform practice. Active participation is strongly encouraged. Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

C162

In this session, the presenters will describe the carefully selected interventions that are implemented at Prentiss Autism Center, serving more than 90 students ranging in age from 5-22 from more than 30 school districts, with various skill sets, diverse backgrounds, and varying trauma-related experiences. Using principles from positive psychology, we are able to love and educate the most challenging children. Real-life examples of the daily work at the center and why the methods employed make a meaningful difference to the families served will be shared. Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

Using Technology to Make DataDriven Decisions C170

Courtney Monastra, Karen Monfort, Mary Jo Wendling In today’s education world, we need efficient ways to prepare and effective ways to present content, as well as the ability to collect meaningful data to prove our hard work! Thankfully, advances in technologies make this possible. We will explore how using technology can cut down on planning time, engage, make it easier to track meaningful data, and make modifying the curriculum a more successful process. Come learn how Dublin City Schools implemented the program VizZle to make all of this easy and seamless. No matter the age or population you work with, there is something for you! Type: Hands-On Interactive Level: Introductory

Access to Dance and Expression for Individuals With Disabilities C171

Jennifer Suppo, TaMara Swank This session focuses on the importance of life, leisure, and extracurricular opportunities for children with disabilities through the lens of dance. An overview of disability-specific instructional strategies, adaptations, and modifications is provided. The presenters will bring both real-life experiences and case-study simulations into the interactive presentation, giving attendees the opportunity to take part in demonstrations of how to assist children with disabilities in meeting their full potential. Type: Hands-On Interactive Level: Introductory

Type: Panel Level: Intermediate

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HOW WAS YOUR SESSION? USE THE ONLINE SESSION SORTER TO SUBMIT AN EVALUATION.


FRIDAY S E SSI ONS Self-Advocacy Skills for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students

Implementing a Social Group for Adolescent Girls With ASD

The American Printing House for the Blind: Products and Resources

Tabitha Belhorn, Abby White

Susan DeLuke, Alexandra Zimmer

Monica Turner

D180

D283

Self-advocacy (SA) skills are needed by all students regardless of setting or age. SA involves having a clear understanding of one’s needs and rights and knowing how to access services to meet those needs. Often adults, including teachers, interpreters, and parents tend to intervene to meet those needs and, as a result, students may miss out on opportunities to learn critical skills. Lack of independence and self-advocacy skills often leads to the unwanted traits of learned helplessness, including a lack of selfconfidence and poor problem-solving skills. This presentation emphasizes that SA skills are particularly crucial for D/HH students.

The presenters share practices used in a social intervention program for adolescent girls with high-functioning ASD, including elements of the PEERS program and Social Thinking. Outcome data include information on group dynamics, social skills observed, responsiveness to role models, and gains made in this eight-week program.

Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

The LifeCourse framework is based on the premise that all people and their families have the right to live, love, work, play, and pursue their life aspirations in their community. If you are new to the LifeCourse framework, don't miss this initial session, which provides an introduction to the principles and the key features of the framework. (This is the first of three related consecutive sessions.)

The Autism Advantage: A Business Case for Hiring Autistic Talent D280

John Marble Many autistic employees possess unique abilities and perspectives that are highly valued by successful companies. Yet, unemployment for autistic adults remains remarkably high. This session shares how to make the business case for hiring and supporting autistic talent. Recent models from Silicon Valley show how successful companies are beginning to view autistic employees as a crucial business need. This session uncovers their best practices as they recruit and support autistic talent. It also explores resources for autistic adults to navigate the hiring and employment process. Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

LifeCourse Framework Overview Main Stage Hall C

Celia Schloemer, Melane Barlow, Lisa Meyer

Type: Hands-On Interactive Level: Introductory

9:45 – 11:00 am Hands-On Fun With Assistive Technology Tools for Visual Impairments B140

Heather Rushmore Koren

From the moment someone with autism wakes up to the moment they go to bed, there are numerous opportunities to use strategies to improve their lives. This session will share such strategies and how to use them, including many resources from the Web. A tip, strategy, or resource for every letter of the alphabet will be presented for families, educators, or therapists. This session draws from 26 years in the field to share what the presenter has found to work.

Discover the many benefits and uses of three assistive technology tools for visual impairments. LightAide provides many benefits ranging from simple cause and effect to visual tracking, learning letters and numbers to reading site words and working on basic math skills. The Braille Labeler is a great tool to create custom Braille labels for identifying and organizing your home, school, or work materials. Finally, the Braille Trainer is a great tool to learn how to read Braille with the ability to customize and add new words and/ or phrases. Join us for a fun session to learn more about each of these three great tools and get time to experience them all with hands-on activities.

Type: Lecture Level: Introductory

Type: BEST AT Forum Lecture Level: Introductory

Autism: As Easy as ABC and 1, 2, 3 D281

Mo Buti

CONTINUE THE DISCUSSION – #OCALICON2017

B142

This session will make participants aware of some of products and resources available from the American Printing House for the Blind. The products being discussed will be related to assistive technology, multiple disabilities, and recreation for children who are blind or visually impaired. Participants will also be introduced to several online resources available through the American Printing House for the Blind. Type: BEST AT Forum Lecture Level: Introductory

Innovative Strategies to Improve College and Career Readiness C150

Amy Szymanski This session will describe strategies that were implemented during the Innovative Strategies to Improve College and Career Readiness for Students with Disabilities grant project funded by the Ohio Department of Education, Office for Exceptional Children. Strategies were based upon and included evidencebased predictors and practices for post-school success in the areas of education, employment and independent living. A review of these evidence-based predictors and practices will be provided as well. Type: Panel Level: Introductory

Employment First: Overview of Employment Navigation and MultiAgency Planning C151

Britta Hough, Keith Banner The Ohio Employment First Initiative has established a statewide Employment Taskforce and Advisory Committee, which has helped create and implement projects across the state to better support individuals of all ability levels in gaining greater access to employment success. This session will provide an overview of the launch of Employment Navigation within county boards across the state. The session will also share personal experiences utilizing the Employment First transition framework to facilitate multi-agency planning with youth. Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

57


F R I DAY S E S S IONS There's No Crying in IEP Meetings: Turning Your Emotions into Productive Goals for Your Child

The ABCs of Movement: Using Multi-Sensory Strategies to Teach the Alphabet

Beth Thompson, Haley Dunn

Laurie Gombash

C160

This session will review evidence-based strategies for managing emotional reactions that often occur in IEP meetings and working more collaboratively to achieve the educational goals for the child. Participants will learn key strategies to use in managing feelings of anxiety, anger, or frustration when working with schools and how to harness their emotional energy into effective advocacy efforts for their child. Taking real-life examples of common conflicts, the speakers will review what supports are available for parents and when to bring those supports onto the IEP team. Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

Culturally Responsive Design for English Learners: How UDL Supports Second Language Acquisition D161

Patti Ralabate Traditional planning and instructional strategies are challenged by increasing diversity within our classrooms. How can UDL help you to reduce barriers to learning for culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students and second language learners? Using a problem-based approach (e.g., the use of scenarios, protocols, and/or posed questions), this session focuses on how the UDL framework applies to learner variability among CLD and second language (L2) learners. You will explore effective lesson planning strategies and identify steps you can take immediately to enhance your learning environment and plan culturally responsive lessons for all your learners. Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

PEERS for Students With ID and DD in Transition and Postsecondary Settings C162

Carla Schmidt, Kathryn Doyle, Diane Clouse One of the primary goals of any program for students with ID and DD is to prepare students for a life of independence. Central to this goal is the acquisition of social competence. Students who have social competence have better success with employment, relationships, and adult outcomes. This presentation will review the curricular concepts covered in the Program for the Education and Enrichment of Relational Skills (PEERS; Laugeson & Frankel, 2010), introduce the setting modifications, and share student outcome data. Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

58

C171

Young children of all abilities learn best when they engage their world with their whole body. This session highlights using a multi-sensory, movement-based approach to teaching young children, including children with autism, sensory disabilities, and low-incidence disabilities, how to learn the alphabet. The approach combines using movements, visual supports, and auditory cues to make sense of the alphabet. Supporting research is discussed and active audience participation is incorporated. Type: Hands-On Interactive Level: Introductory

From Complaint to Compliance C172

Kevin Gorman, Joe Keith, Andrea Rowson, Brett Tingley In the late 90’s, Upper Arlington Schools was sued by a family over child find, and not assisting their dyslexic child with the correct intervention. Years later a group of parents, UA-KID, filed similar complaints with ODE to ensure their children were identified and received the proper intervention for dyslexia. Today, parents and administration work together to ensure all kindergarten children are screened for dyslexia, and that children in K-3 receive the appropriate intervention for the treatment of dyslexia.

Do Children With Autism Respond Differently to Praise? How to Encourage Performance More Effectively D182

Lorna Timmerman Praise is inherently a social stimulus meant to reinforce behaviors or encourage performance. Although widely used by parents and teachers, praise often does not function as a reinforcer for the behavior of children with autism. If children with autism do not respond positively to social reinforcers (like praise, high fives, fist bumps, smiles, eye contact, tone of voice, and social gestures), what is the most effective way to encourage these children to expand their interests and engage in more social connectedness? This session addresses this issue as well as the question whether praise robs children of intrinsic motivation? Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

The Americans With Disabilities Act and Community-Based Recreation D280

Kristen Clatos Riggins, Alayne Kazin

Type: Lecture Level: Introductory

Recreation is an essential part of the quality of life for all persons, including those with disabilities. In this presentation, key points of Title II of the ADA, including reasonable accommodation and essential eligibility under the law as well the responsibilities recreation providers, will be addressed. Participants will learn how to best request an accommodation from community recreation providers, public and non-public, thereby getting a win-win for families and community recreation providers.

All Aboard!

Type: Lecture Level: Introductory

D180

Angela Sheets, Nicole Wingate Educators from Bluffton Harrison Elementary School will present their AAC journey including experimentation, education, assessment, and growth. Presenters will demonstrate creative methods to increase AAC use across multiple settings with a variety of ages, levels of cognitive performance, and physical needs. Along the journey, participants will examine data collection procedures to help guide instruction. Additionally, presenters will demonstrate methods to educate and encourage non-AAC instructors to become vested participants. Type: Lecture Level: Introductory

I Am Not Your Puppet, So Let Go of My Strings! D281

Sondra Williams The presenter will discuss the various human and ethical rights of persons living with ASD from personal perspectives balanced with examples of many individuals she has worked with and for over the years. When persons live with disabilities, they are told they have rights, but often these rights are ignored. They are told what to do, when to do it, where to do it, and how to do it with no respect for their lives and preferences. But people with disabilities are not puppets on a string. The goal of this session is to teach individuals and their families how to empower voice as a means of obtaining our rights to be the individuals we are. Type: Lecture Level: Introductory


FRIDAY S E SSI ONS Effects of Delayed Reinforcement Without Extinction on EscapeMaintained Problem Behavior D283

Elle Smith, Corinne Gist This session will review the limitations of using extinction and discuss the research on treating problem behaviors without the negative side-effects of extinction. In addition, the session will extend the research by sharing the results a new study that uses delayed terminal reinforcement without extinction to treat escape-maintained problem behaviors. The data indicate that the treatment was successful by eliminating problem behavior and increasing compliance for all participants. Type: Lecture Level: Advanced

Using the LifeCourse Framework Within Person-Centered Supports Main Stage Hall C

Celia Schloemer, Lisa Meyer, Barbara Brent This session builds on the initial LifeCourse Framework foundation and philosophy, offering hands-on opportunities to use LifeCourse tools to identify and magnify existing personcentered supports. (This is the second of three related consecutive sessions.) Type: Hands-On Interactive Level: Intermediate

9:45 am – 12:45 pm 2017 Summit on Sensory Disabilities: Literacy Begins With Access B130

Christine Croyle, Jan Rogers, Cynthia Curry, Frances Mary D’Andrea, Kelly Lusk, David Schleper, Brenda Schick, Diana Foster Carl, Sheri Cook The Summit is designed for education professionals serving individuals who are deaf/ hard of hearing or blind/visually impaired. The Outreach Center for Deafness and Blindness and Assistive Technology and Accessible Educational Materials (AT & AEM) Center will provide an update of their activities over the past year and share newly developed resources. Various professionals in the area of sensory disability and accessibility from across the nation will lead a panel and participate in a facilitated discussion around the topic of literacy and sensory disabilities. Join us for an informative and highly interactive morning! Type: Hands-On Interactive Level: Advanced

11:30 am – 12:45 pm Perspectives of Young Adults With Sensory Disabilities B140

Michelle Motil, Chris Harrington, Katie Robinson, Jacob Kaplan, Noah Beckman Join young adults with visual impairments and deafblindness at one of the concluding sessions of the BEST AT Forum for an open panel discussion on transitioning to the workforce and independent living. Panelists represent a variety of experiences and professions, such as post-secondary students, bankers, transcribers, and parents. Areas of focus include employment, apartment hunting, daily living skills, useful assistive technologies, and opportunities for recreational and social activities. There will be opportunities for attendees to ask follow up questions. Type: BEST AT Forum Panel Level: Introductory

BrailleSense Polaris B142

Andy Leach This session explores native applications familiar to BrailleSense users such as the word processor, address manager, scheduler, and greatly simplified methods of Nemeth and UEB math entry, while also unleashing the power of Android (Google Play Store, Google Docs, etc.). Type: BEST AT Forum Lecture Level: Intermediate

Beyond the Blog: Raising Awareness, Connecting Community, Creating Balance

Promoting Positive Outcomes for Students With Moderate to Intensive Disabilities C151

Alfred Daviso, Carol Sparber, Robert Baer This presentation will discuss the findings from the Ohio Longitudinal Transition Study related to students with moderate/ intensive disabilities. Predictors of post-school outcomes such as employment, postsecondary education, and independent living will be identified and discussed for program improvements. This information is vital to families and educators who are assisting students with disabilities make the transition from secondary education to adult life. Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

Using the ASD Program Quality Indicator to Develop Successful Educational Programs C160

Amy Tseng, Melissa Spence, Amy Nhi Nguyen Students with ASD present unique learning needs that require a specific focus in their educational programs. This session presents an ASD Program Quality Indicator (ASDPQI) used in the Los Angeles Unified School District featuring research-based components found in high-quality programs that address individual learning needs. These components guide the development, implementation, and review of classroom programs for students with ASD in K-12 settings. We will discuss the improvements and progress made in our educational programs for students with ASD and key features of successful programs. Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

C150

Jodi Collins, Jason Hague, Jerry Turning, Leigh Porch With the popularity of social media, individuals with disabilities are no longer bound to their local supports, but can find solace with bloggers whose words resonate with them or find likeminded readers from around the world. In this session, attendees will experience live readings, perspectives and interactions with parent bloggers from across the country, including Bacon and Juiceboxes: Our Life with Autism, Flappiness Is..., Jason Hague: Faith, Fatherhood, Autism and Running Through Water. These writers share their stories and the ups and downs of having a presence in social media. Type: Panel Level: Introductory

Stress, the Final Frontier: Emotional Regulation and ASD C161

Ruth Prystash, Jekereen Barrozo, Amyleen Tuiza Join the Reach Autism Team for a fascinating look at revolutionary new strategies to teach emotional regulation skills to individuals with severe behaviors and high rates of anxiety and stress. Sensory overload, meltdowns, and upsetting social situations often result in extreme behaviors that approximate PTSD. This presentation will discuss a variety of ways to teach self-regulation through executive functioning skills, including the use of personal fitness tracking devices, binaural beats, sensory strategies, and visual supports to help both identify and deal with stress. Type: Lecture Level: Introductory

CONTINUE THE DISCUSSION – #OCALICON2017

59


F R I DAY S E S S IONS Building Sustainable Leadership in Assistive Technology Services C162

Joan Breslin Larson Assistive technology services in educational systems continues to evolve. A contributor to this evolution is defining what quality assistive technology services are and how they are delivered. It has become clear that existing models require supports for sustainability and boots-on-the-ground implementation. This presentation will focus on defining quality services through use of the Quality Indicators for Assistive Technology, practitioner self-evaluation through innovation configuration matrices based on those indicators, and development of a sustainable plan for systems change. Type: Lecture Level: Introductory

How to Promote Social Connections at Recess With Peer Networks C170

Matthew Brock, Scott Dueker, Lynde Webster At recess, many students with autism struggle to interact and play with their peers. Peer networks address this problem by recruiting and working with peers who encourage cooperative play and promote interaction and communication. This presentation will provide a step-by-step guide for how to implement peer networks at your school including opportunities to practice using five key strategies. We will conclude by helping you to plan next steps for how to implement a peer network. Type: Hands-On Interactive Level: Introductory

A Touchy Subject: Using Sensory and Communication Strategies to Incorporate All Students C171

Katy Ganz, Farrah Raines The least restrictive environment is more than just recess. Students travel throughout their schools to the electives or “the specials” of art, music, PE, and computer. How can we empower these “specials” teachers from outside the world of special education to feel confident providing services to all students? In this session, we will show through hands-on demonstrations and videos how we paired with public school districts to help provide activities that include sensory input, visuals, and physical adaptation to allow all students to participate in all “the specials.” Type: Hands-On Interactive Level: Intermediate

Keep Calm, Carry On : Implementing Individual PBIS With Parent-Professional Collaboration

Identify Possible Innovations for Supporting Families in Ohio

Bonnie Marquis, Heather Shafer

This session further builds on the LifeCourse Framework providing an opportunity to begin identifying the innovations that Ohio will focus on while building its Community of Practices on Supporting Families. This is the third of three related consecutive sessions.

C172

In this session, a longitudinal case study will be co-presented by a parent and a PBIS specialist. They examine how individual PBIS guided them in addressing the challenges of a male diagnosed with Asperger Disorder (prior to DSM-V) from daily meltdowns in elementary school, academic challenges in middle school, through a successful and satisfying high school experience. Together they review both successes and setbacks while demonstrating the use of diagnostic tools to drive strategy development, facilitate team buy-in, and increase student independence across home, school, and community environments. Type: Lecture Level: Intermediate

The Roles and Support of Siblings Across the Lifespan D180

Sarah Hall, Zach Rossetti Siblings have the longest life relationship with their brothers and sisters with developmental disabilities and are able to provide a continuum of support throughout their lives. For people with more significant support needs, siblings may undertake additional roles and responsibilities. This session presents research examining the roles of siblings in the lives of their brothers and sisters with developmental disabilities, their challenges in these roles, and ways to support siblings. Participants will identify ways to collaborate with and include siblings in future planning. Type: Lecture Level: Introductory

We Aut-To-Be-Partners: How E-Commerce, Autism, and Employment Fit Together D181

Joel Vidovic, Alison Thomas, Alison Miller, Amy Trautwein The e-commerce industry is experiencing rapid growth, with platforms such as Amazon and eBay offering attractive options for U.S. shoppers. Current reports indicate that e-commerce sales account for 8% of all retail sales in the United States, up from 4% in 2009. As adults with autism find themselves under-represented in the labor market, might this industry provide some encouraging employment opportunities? We think so. This presentation will describe a model for creating jobs for individuals with autism that is currently in practice at a Charter School in Toledo, OH. Type: Lecture Level: Advanced

60

Main Stage Hall C

Lisa Meyer, Barbara Brent

Type: Hands-On Interactive Level: Intermediate


FRIDAY S E SSI ONS

www.robots4autism.com 800-494-1206

Breakthroughs in social emotional skill development for learners with ASD SPEAKER

Dr. Gregory Firn retired superintendent with 35 years in public education BREAKOUT SESSION Thursday, November 16th 8:00a - 9:15a LOCATION: C162

When you join Dr. Firn for the breakout session you will learn: • How social robotic technology engages and enhances curriculum, instruction, and formative assessment to activate learning for ASD learners. • How early and effective integration of social, emotional, behavioral and communications skill development for learners with ASD results in life changing experiences. • How to assess evidenced-based practices and techniques.

If you are unable to attend this session please stop by booth #136/237 and you can meet Milo face-to-face! © 2017 by RoboKind LLC All Rights Reserved www.robokind.com


E XH IB IT H A L L MAP to Keynote Stage

ASD Strategies in Action

Exhibitor Lounge

Family Corner

Chill Zone

W 136

Lending Library

336

437

436

134

235

334

435

434

132

233

332

433

432 430

M THE OUTREACH CENTER for Deafness and Blindness

128

229

228

329

328

429

428

126

227

226

327

326

427

426 424

Concessions

Keynote Meet and Greet

122

223

222

323

120

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220

321

116 114

423 320

421

217

316

417

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415

113 110

211

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411

109

108

209

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309

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409

107

Presenter Storage

406 104 102

OCALI Gallery

Think Tank 412

111

105

420

CEU/ Grad Credit

203

204

305

202

303

Registration

302

Bag Pick Up Accessibility Desk

Presenter Lounge

Interpreter Lounge Entrance

Research Symposium

BEST AT Forum Vendors Thurs 4:30 – 6:30 Fri 7:30 – 1:00


EX H I B I TOR S AAPC Publishing American Printing House for the Blind

302

Praises, Prizes, and Presents

314

320

Prentke Romich Company

321

ASD Strategies in Action

OCALI Central

QBS, Inc.

226

AT & AEM Center

OCALI Central

Read Naturally

204

Autism Aspirations

108

Recreation Unlimited

305

Autism Society of Ohio

336

RedTreehouse.org

437

Autism Speaks

433

Relate and Grow

303

Behavioral Perspective, Inc.

208

Relias Learning

210

Bridgeway Academy

316

REM Ohio, Inc.

228

RoboKind

136

Saltillo Corporation

415

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

110

College Internship Program (CIP)

122

Columbus Speech and Hearing Center

323

Community Fund Management Foundation

429

Computer Aid, Inc.

211

Designs by Siri

233

Disability Rights Ohio

334

Drawings By Trent

109

DSC – Where Communication Happens

423

Dublin City Schools Postsecondary Education

435

EduLync

432

Edward Jones Investments – Lynn Tramontano

328

Els for Autism Foundation

132

ESC of Central Ohio

134

FH&L Autism Services

227

Florida Institute of Technology

411

School Choice Ohio

107

Sheryl's Autistic Impressions

105

SpedTrack

128

STAR Autism Support, Inc.

308

StealthWear Protective Clothing, Inc.

310

Sunshine Communities

309

TAI – Talent Assessment, Inc.

120

The Alpha Group of Delaware, Inc.

229

The Center for Autism and Dyslexia

111

The Childhood League Center

209

The I Feel ... Children's Book Series

332

The Ohio Center for Deafblind Education

223

The Outreach Center for Deafness and Blindness

OCALI Central

TippyTalk

116 203

Fluttering Families

327

Toledo Regional Autism Network

Gallaudet University Regional Center for the Midwest

126

Trumpet Behavioral Health

217

Galvin Therapy Center

326

University of Cincinnati

427

Got-Special KIDS

420

Viggi Corp

102

Healthy Relationships Curriculum

220

Hickman & Lowder Co., L.P.A.

202

Lakeshore Learning Materials

409

Westminster Technologies, Inc.

406

BEST AT Forum – Thursday / Friday American Council of the Blind of Ohio

9AT

American Printing House for the Blind

2AT

Cincinnati Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired

11AT

Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center, Gallaudet University

235

LearnTools, Inc.

215

Cleveland Sight Center

Letterland

430

HIMS, Inc.

5AT 14AT

Lindamood-Bell Learning Processes

424

HumanWare

1AT

Merrill Lynch

104

Marmon Valley Ministries

15AT

Milestones Autism Resources

329

National Federation for the Blind of Ohio

8AT

Monarch Center for Autism – A Division of Bellefaire JCB

221

Ohio Federal Quota AT & AEM Center

6AT

Monarch Teaching Technologies, Inc.

434

Ohio State School for the Blind

16AT

Neurogeekery by Dragon Adventures

428

Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities

12AT

Nova Southeastern University

113

OCALI

OCALI Central

Sighted Guide Ohio

13AT

The Visual-Tech Connection

10AT

ODE – Project AWARE

412

Universal Low Vision Aids, Inc.

3AT

Options for College Success

426

Otterbein University

114

VFO (Ai Squared – Freedom Scientific – Optelec – The Paciello Group)

4AT

OYO Camp – Ohio's Camp for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Kids!

436

Westminster Technologies, Inc.

7AT

P.A.C.E. at National Louis University

311

Pamer Family Chiropractic

421

Pearson Clinical Assessment

222

Positive Education Program

417

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E XH IB IT O R S AAPC Publishing

AT & AEM Center

Autism Speaks

P.O. Box 23173 Shawnee Mission, KS 66283 877.277.8254 http://www.aapcpublishing.net

470 Glenmont Ave. Columbus, OH 43214 614.410.0321 https://ataem.org

470 Glenmont Ave. Columbus, OH 43214 614.716.8570 http://www.autismspeaks.org

AAPC Publishing is your first source for practical solutions for autism spectrum and related disorders. We specialize in books and multimedia on ASD and related exceptionalities for individuals on the spectrum, their parents, families, peers, educators, and other professionals. We take pride in offering practical solutions that translate research into practice at affordable prices. Our books and other materials are designed to promote awareness and acceptance of children, adolescents, and adults with ASD as well as provide ready-to-use information related to: • sensory issues • self-regulation • behavior • vocational skills • academics

The AT & AEM Center is a centralized, responsive resource center that empowers individuals with disabilities by providing accessible educational materials (AEM), access to assistive technologies (AT), and highly specialized technical assistance and professional development. Through ongoing work with several projects, such as the Federal Quota Program, the Center creates, collects, and disseminates materials and resources for individuals with print disabilities. Additionally, the Center selects, acquires, and manages a short-term AT device loan program that supports a variety of needs. As a key step to ensuring access for all, the Center serves the entire state of Ohio and also provides multi-modal professional development in order to build regional and local supports.

Autism Speaks is dedicated to promoting solutions, across the spectrum and throughout the lifespan, for the needs of individuals with autism and their families through advocacy and support; increasing understanding and acceptance of people with autism spectrum disorder; and advancing research into causes and better interventions for autism spectrum disorder and related conditions. Autism Speaks enhances lives today and is accelerating a spectrum of solutions for tomorrow.

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OCALI Central

Autism Aspirations American Printing House for the Blind 314

1839 Frankfort Ave. Louisville, KY 40206 800.223.1839 http://www.aph.org APH is the world’s largest company devoted to making products for people who are blind and visually impaired, and is the official supplier of educational materials for blind students in the U.S. working at less than college level.

ASD Strategies in Action OCALI Central

470 Glenmont Ave. Columbus, OH 43214 614.410.0321 https://autismcertificationcenter.org Stop by to experience the innovative online video training program for everyone who interacts with people with ASD. ASD Strategies in Action gives families and service providers tools to ensure they are equipped to effectively care for, support, educate, employ, or work with individuals on the autism spectrum from early childhood to young adulthood. Start learning today with the free 90-minute course “Many Faces of Autism.”

autism certification center

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61 Ridgewood Ct. Peterborough, Ontario K9J 8A1 Canada 705.742.5759 http://www.autismaspirations.com Four books to inspire and empower educators, parents, and families of individuals with autism. Written by a mother and teacher of children with autism. Honest, down-to-earth guidance you need.

Autism Society of Ohio 336

P.O. Box 545 Worthington, OH 43085 614.619.5508 http://www.autismohio.org Autism Society of Ohio is an affiliate of the Autism Society of America, the nation’s leading grass roots autism organization. The Autism Society exists to improve the lives of all affected by autism. We do this by increasing public awareness about the day-to-day issues faced by people with ASD, advocating for appropriate services across the lifespan, and providing the latest information regarding treatment, education, and advocacy. ASO is a coalition of local Autism Society affiliates focusing on statewide advocacy and awareness and serving areas not covered by a local affiliate.

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Behavioral Perspective, Inc. 208

452 N. Eola Rd. Aurora, IL 60502 888.308.3728 http://bpiaba.com Behavioral Perspective Inc.’s (BPI) mission is to be a leader in the field of ABA by providing top quality service, supporting families, and empowering individuals to reach their full potential. Through intensive and client-centered programming, advanced staff development, and continued staff and parent support, children can reach their goals of maximized independence and an improved quality of life. BPI provides services in Illinois and Ohio, intending to reach children and families with the highest need for ABA.

Bridgeway Academy 316

2500 Medary Ave. Columbus, OH 43202 614.262.7520 http://www.bridgewayohio.org Bridgeway Academy is a non-profit organization located in Columbus, OH with a mission to meet the educational and therapeutic needs of children with autism and other developmental disabilities. Bridgeway Academy’s highly trained staff provides students with a supportive, compassionate environment ensuring each child is working towards his or her full potential. The Education Center is a full-day private school program featuring small classroom sizes and low student-to-teacher ratios for students, early-intervention through high school. The Therapy Center offers music, speech, physical and occupational therapies and psychological services for students enrolled in the Education Center as well as those who come strictly for therapeutic services. Camp Bridgeway provides families a safe and healthy option for students during the summer months.


EX H I B I TOR S Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry 110

3333 Burnet Ave. MLC 4002 Cincinnati, OH 45229 513.803.7226 http://www.cincinnatichildrens.org The Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at Cincinnati Children’s, provides a continuum of services including inpatient, outpatient, partial, and residential hospitalization. All of our programs support family-centered care, in which treatment plans focus on the needs of both the patient and family.

College Internship Program (CIP) 122

National Office 199 South St. Pittsfield, MA 01201 877.566.9247 http://cipworldwide.org CIP Bloomington 425 N. College Ave. Bloomington, IN 47404 812.323.0600 www.cipbloomington.org CIP operates five full-year postsecondary programs across the U.S. Each program provides individualized academic, social, career, and life skills support for young adults ages 18-26 with ASD, ADHD, and other learning differences. CIP also offers 10 summer programs for teens and young adults ages 16-26.

Columbus Speech & Hearing Center 323

510 E. North Broadway St. Columbus, OH 43214-4114 614.263.5151 http://www.columbusspeech.org For over 93 years, Columbus Speech & Hearing Center has provided specialized services to Central Ohio (CSHC) through our core program areas of speech, audiology, and our Careers for People with Disabilities (CPD) Jobs Program. Speech services include: autism diagnostic evaluations, speech-language evaluations, individual and group therapy, and community outreach. Audiology services include hearing aids and audiological care. The CPD Jobs Program focuses on employment support for people with disabilities. CSHC strives to be the recognized leader for information, support, and care resulting in enhanced communication skills for all people.

Community Fund Management Foundation 429

14955 W. Sprague Road – Suite 290 Strongsville, OH 44136 216.736.4540 http://www.cfmf.org Community Fund Management Foundation is an Ohio nonprofit that administers special needs trusts for Ohio residents with disabilities. Originally started by County DD Boards in 1993, CFMF now administers over 2,000 trusts established by individuals with disabilities or their loved ones for the purpose of supplementing government benefits received by the beneficiary. CFMF also offers grants to nonprofits who serve people with disabilities and individuals with disabilities. Visit our website for a grant application and to learn more about our trust options.

Computer Aid, Inc. 211

1390 Ridgeview Dr. Allentown, PA 18104 954.452.6331 http://www.compaid.com Computer Aid, Inc.’s Autism2Work initiative is a partnership between CAI, community autism support organizations, and a collection of forward-minded businesses who are interested in supporting meaningful diversity in their workplace. Autism2Work provides workforce training and employment opportunities for adults who have been diagnosed on the autism spectrum. The program primarily supports semiskilled to high-functioning individuals who are eager to enter a work environment that values their contributions and supports their needs.

Designs by Siri 233

1842 Loyola Dr. Burlingame, CA 94010 650.219.6069 http://www.designsbysiri.com Handmade with sandalwood and howlite beads.

Disability Rights Ohio 334

200 Civic Center Dr. – Suite 300 Columbus, OH 43215 614.466.7264 http://www.disabilityrightsohio.org Disability Rights Ohio is a non-profit corporation with a mission to advocate for the human, civil and legal rights of people with disabilities in Ohio. We envision a society in which people with disabilities are full and equal members, enjoy the rights and opportunities of all people, are self-directed, make decisions about where, how and with whom they will live, learn, work and play, have access to needed services and supports, and are free from abuse, neglect, exploitation and discrimination.

CONTINUE THE DISCUSSION – #OCALICON2017

Drawings By Trent 109

804 S. Denver St. El Dorado, KS 67042 316.258.5003 http://drawingsbytrent.com Through all the struggles of living in a world he doesn't understand, Trent has always had his art. From the time he could hold a pen (his preferred utensil) he has been drawing the most amazing things in the most amazing ways – upside down, starting with a tail or a hoof and drawing an whole animal in perfect perspective. In July 2016, a video of Trent sitting cross legged on a trampoline drawing pictures on the mat with chalk went viral and has now been seen by over 51 million people worldwide. 

DSC – Where Communication Happens 423

5830 N. High St. Worthington, OH 43085 614.841.1991 http://dsc.org DSC is the largest non-profit organization serving the deaf and hard of hearing in Ohio. DSC provides community centers in the northwest, central, and southeast regions along with offering interpreting and speech-to-text services throughout Ohio and neighboring states – including Michigan and Kentucky. Offerings include: community advocacy, case management, education, information and referral, ASL classes, deaf youth programming and camps, kids of deaf adults (KODA) programming, early intervention, deaf equipment modification program, and more. DSC is a CARF-accredited facility in Ohio.

Dublin City Schools Postsecondary Education 435

62 W. Bridge St. Dublin, OH 43017 614.760.4556 http://www.dublinschools.net/postsecondary. aspx Dublin City Schools’ innovative postsecondary program opportunities are for students with disabilities that have met all secondary academic requirements, completed four years of high school, and whose IEP team has determined there is a need for ongoing skill development in the areas of employment, education, and independent living. Program participation is customized through a process of deferring the student’s diploma. Levels of support and content instruction are varied across the tiered continuum to meet the needs of each student. Learn how a collaborative process can help lead students to greater independence in education, employment, and independent living.

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E XH IB IT O R S EduLync

ESC of Central Ohio

Fluttering Families

P.O. Box 16431 CH 27154 Durham, NC 27707 336.213.0551 http://www.edulync.com

2080 Citygate Dr. Columbus, OH 43219 614.445.3750 http://www.escco.org

P.O. Box 133 Powell, OH 43065 614.859.0191 http://www.flutteringfamilies.org

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EduLync is changing special education service delivery by saving teachers time in designing more effective individualized instruction for their students. Our platform addresses the most acute challenges teachers face, providing them with tools to assess student needs, collaborate with colleagues, implement the right interventions for students with challenging behaviors, and evaluate student progress – all in one powerful, integrated online solution. We save teachers time and make them more effective, so they can excel at what they truly love: teaching.

Edward Jones Investments Lynn Tramontano, Financial Advisor 328

1500 W. Third Ave. – Suite 100 Columbus, OH 43212 614.488.4717 http://www.edwardjones.com As an Edward Jones financial advisor, I bring my full career experience and my passion into my practice. I believe that it’s important to invest my time to understand your family’s goals, and we both know the importance of a strategy to help protect your loved ones with special needs. Every day I assist families with difficult issues. For example, “I worry about what will happen to my son/daughter when I pass away. What is the best way for me to leave my estate to my loved one?” I have the unique experience and heartfelt passion to work with families of loved ones with special needs and provide solutions for families through trust funding, retirement, and meeting other financial goals such as college savings.

Els for Autism Foundation 132

18370 Limestone Creek Rd. Jupiter, FL 33458 561.598.6200 http://www.elsforautism.org Els for Autism is a game-changing resource, delivering and facilitating programs that are leading examples of what can be available to people with ASD. Designed as a global hub to connect the international autism communities, the facility creates shared best practices and the latest research for improved collaboration. The 26-acre facility in Jupiter, FL, provides on-site programs and services for individuals of all ages, addressing needs in education, research, global outreach, recreation, therapies, and adult services.

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The ESC of Central Ohio responds to the needs of its partners and provides services to support quality educational opportunities for all students. Services provided include campus-based transition opportunities, early learning peer model programs, instructional coaching for staff, specialized on-site supports, structured teaching programs for students with autism, and much more.

FH&L Autism Services 227

701 Hill Rd. N. Pickerington, OH 43701 855.467.3273 http://www.fhlautism.com FH&L is focused on helping developmentally delayed children grow – specializing in autism – and serving children ages 18 months to 21 years old. We are dedicated to providing the highest quality of services to the children we work with and their families. Our staff are highly qualified, trained, and supervised regularly. A thorough skills-based assessment is completed for child to determine specific strengths and weaknesses. Programs are designed to meet the child's individual needs. FH&L is ready to provide you with a team of workers to help you and your child narrow the deficit gap.

Florida Institute of Technology 411

150 W. University Blvd. Melbourne, FL 32901 321.674.8382 http://aba.fit.edu Why should you pursue a certification in applied behavior analysis (ABA)? The answer is marketability. There is a high demand for welltrained behavior analysts. Florida Tech is one of the few universities to offer an online professional development program in ABA, thereby preparing those with a previous degree for an advanced career role as a certified behavior analyst and offering continuing education to meet an array of educational needs.

327

Fluttering Families is a non-profit organization born from a mother’s love for her daughter with special needs. Our mission is to improve the lives of families of children with special needs by offering support, advocacy, innovative activities, and outreach. At Fluttering Families, we focus our efforts on adapting typical childhood events and activities for families of children with special needs. This includes an annual Easter egg hunt, Sweetheart Dance, private visit with Santa Claus, concerts, movies, and other entertainment. We want special families to feel valued, respected, and included in the community. Fluttering Families also offers unique opportunities for learning with educational and informational sessions.

Gallaudet University Regional Center for the Midwest 126

John A. Logan College 700 Logan College Rd. Carterville, IL 62918 618.534.7255 http://www.jalc.edu/gurc Gallaudet University Regional Center for the Midwest shares Gallaudet's and the Clerc Center's resources for the Midwest part of the United States.

Galvin Therapy Center 326

25221 Miles Rd. – Suite F Warrensville Heights, OH 44128 216.514.1600 http://www.galvintherapycenter.com Galvin Therapy Center is a multidisciplinary pediatric clinic proudly serving Northeast Ohio with locations in Warrensville Heights and Avon. We offer occupational, speech-language, and physical therapies, along with a mealtime management program, an early start autism program, counseling, and educational services. We strive to provide effective, evidence-based, and individualized treatment, focusing on the family’s priorities and what is most functional for the child. We work closely with all members of the child’s team to ensure success across environments.


EX H I B I TOR S Got-Special KIDS

Hickman & Lowder Co., L.P.A.

LearnTools, Inc.

10052 Commerce Park Dr. Cincinnati, OH 45246 888.237.4988 http://www.got-specialkids.com

6000 Venture Dr. – Suite B Dublin, OH 43017 614.879.4143 http://www.Hickman-Lowder.com

1131 Fernwood Dr. Westlake, OH 44145 440.333.5976 http://www.learntools.org

Our mission is to improve the lives of kids with special needs. We provide affordable, engaging, and functional therapeutic toys and tools for children and teens with developmental and behavioral challenges. Our products are designed for parents, educators, and therapists, and include special needs toys and games, therapy aids, learning tools, and calming sensory solutions. Got-Special KIDS is your all-in-one stop for products designed for kids with autism, developmental delays, sensory challenges, or other special needs.

Hickman & Lowder Co., L.P.A. offers comprehensive services to meet the lifetime legal needs of children and adults with disabilities, the elderly, and their families. Since 1981, our nationally-recognized attorneys have been dedicated to helping individuals throughout Ohio in the areas of special education, special needs estate planning, transition planning, and guardianship. From guiding parents through a difficult school year to obtaining public benefits and establishing an estate plan – we are here to help families work through the issues of today and plan for tomorrow. Visit our booth or contact one of our offices, conveniently located in Dublin, Cleveland, Sheffield Village, and Mentor, OH, to learn more about our services.

Learning Math is FUN with our Mac’s Abacus Basic early math curriculum. This hands-on curriculum includes the highest quality Abacus and a full-color workbook filled with 60 examples and 300 very attractive picture lessons. Our wordless curriculum seamlessly guides children from the first notion of “counting” into comparing counts of groups, finger counting, concept of zero, numerals, addition, subtraction, lengths, time, our decimal system, and money. Our workbook includes a lesson planner and a teaching guide, complete with detailed answers to all lessons. Great for all kids!

Lakeshore Learning Materials

P.O. Box 605 Herndon, VA 20172 877.538.8375 http://www.letterland.com

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Healthy Relationships Curriculum 220

3230 William Pitt Way Building A-3 Pittsburgh, PA 15238 412.342.2302 http://www.HealthyRelationshipsCurriculum.org The Healthy Relationships Curriculum was developed for schools and organizations that serve students with autism and other developmental disabilities. The curriculum is designed from beginning to end to educate, inform, and promote healthy relationships so that students can successfully transition into adulthood. The curriculum is a complete kit that helps students with topics like self care, understanding their bodies, and developing healthy relationships. Evidence-based principles, like video modeling, are incorporated into the curriculum and ensure that students are set up for success.

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2695 E. Dominguez St. Carson, CA 90895 800.421.5354 http://www.lakeshorelearning.com Since, 1954, Lakeshore Learning Materials has been providing schools and educational programs with innovative products, training, and customized materials that span the curriculum. Designed to meet state and national standards in early childhood and elementary education, our top-quality products reflect the latest research in teaching and child development.

Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center, Gallaudet University 235

800 Florida Ave. NE – KDES 3400 Washington, DC 20002 202.651.5933 http://clerccenter.gallaudet.edu The work of the Clerc Center is guided by the Education of the Deaf Act, which sets forth our mission: To raise the achievement of deaf and hard of hearing students ages birth-21 nationwide by supporting the families and professionals who work with these students. This support is in turn guided by public input gathered from educators, professionals, and families working with deaf and hard of hearing children.

CONTINUE THE DISCUSSION – #OCALICON2017

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Letterland 430

Letterland is a unique, phonics-based approach to teaching reading, writing and spelling in PK-2 grade. Letterland transforms plain black letters into child-friendly characters and uses stories, songs, and a wide range of multi-sensory activities to explain how the English language works. Research shows that this engaging and motivating curriculum allows students to quickly progress to word building, reading, and writing. The systematic and explicit nature of Letterland results in far less students struggling to learn to read and is appropriate for EC and Special Education students. Letterland is a research- and Orton-Gillingham-based program.

Lindamood-Bell Learning Processes 424

760 3rd Ave SW – Suite 110 Carmel, IN 46032 317.815.1319 http://www.lindamoodbell.com Traditional reading and tutoring programs focus on content instruction. Lindamood-Bell programs focus on the sensory-cognitive processing necessary for reading and comprehension. Our experience, our quality of instruction, our commitment to ongoing research and development, and our passion to constantly expand the implementation and success of our instructional programs are at the root of our success.

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E XH IB IT O R S Merrill Lynch

Monarch Teaching Technologies, Inc.

ODE – Project AWARE

206 S. Prospect St. Marion, OH 43302 740.223.1776 http://fa.ml.com/lars_olson

7100 Euclid Ave. – Suite 155 Cleveland, OH 44103 800.593.1934 http://www.monarchtt.com

Whether your child was recently diagnosed or has been living with a disability for many years, it is critical that every member of your family be involved in a strategy designed to provide for his or her lifetime financial security. This task can seem daunting — but you don’t have to do it alone. Lars Olson, CFP®, a Merrill Lynch Wealth Management Advisor, working with a team of Merrill Lynch professionals can help provide you the support and guidance you’ll need to make the complex decisions involved in providing financially for your child’s future.

Research shows that students with special needs learn better through visual learning and interactive tools. Using Vizzle, educators and administrators give students an easyto- use, engaging tool to help them learn the curriculum, develop skills and demonstrate understanding. We have a moderated library with more than 15,000 interactive lessons, games, and activities aligned and searchable by state learning standards. Developed with The Monarch Center for Autism and Children’s Hospital Boston/Harvard Medical School.

25 S. Front St. Columbus, OH 43215 614.387.2204 http://education.ohio.gov/Topics/OtherResources/School-Safety/Building-BetterLearning-Environments/PBIS-Resources/ Project-AWARE-Ohio

Milestones Autism Resources

Neurogeekery by Dragon Adventures

104

329

434

4853 Galaxy Parkway – Suite A Warrensville Heights, OH 44128 216.464.7600 http://www.milestones.org/

428

Founded in 2003, Milestones Autism Resources improves the lives of individuals on the autism spectrum throughout Northeast Ohio by educating, coaching, and connecting the autism community with evidence-based information. Milestones is the first call for help at each transition of an individual’s life. Milestones envisions a community in which individuals on the autism spectrum reach their full potential as contributing members of society, recognized for their strengths and supported in their challenges. Each year, Milestones serves more than 3,100 parents, professionals, and individuals of all ages and abilities, through an annual conference, trainings, and coaching services.

Do you stim or fidget? Then come check out our booth. We have a wide variety of items from weighted plush to chewables to more discrete stim toys. We are run by an all Autistic team.

Monarch Center for Autism – A Division of Bellefaire JCB 221

22001 Fairmount Blvd. Shaker Heights, OH 44118 216.932.2800 http://www.monarchcenterforautism.org Monarch School and Boarding Academy operate under the auspices of Bellefaire JCB. The goal of Monarch is to provide the ultimate in individualized programming for children on the autism spectrum. Our approach is dynamic and multidimensional. Through our partnership with Harvard Medical School, Children's Hospital Boston, and Massachusetts General Hospital, we have a state-of-the-art teaching model that is philosophy neutral. All of our programs are located on one campus, allowing for a wider breadth of treatment possibilities. We are able to address co-occurring illness in clients, including those with substance abuse, learning disabilities and emotional problems.

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1187 E. 175th St. Cleveland, OH 44119 http://dragonadventure.etsy.com

Nova Southeastern University 113

3301 College Ave. Fort Lauderdale, FL 33314 954.262.7168 http://www.nova.edu Nova Southeastern University provides programs in autism and applied behavior analysis at the undergraduate, master's, and doctoral levels. These programs are offered on-site, online, or through blended delivery systems. Also, on the main campus in Fort Lauderdale, FL, there are a range of direct service programs and clinics serving individuals with autism and their families.

OCALI

OCALI Central 470 Glenmont Ave. Columbus, OH 43214 614.410.0321 http://www.ocali.org OCALI is a recognized global leader in creating and connecting resources and relationships to ensure that people with disabilities have the opportunity to live their best lives for their whole lives. As a trusted source, OCALI enhances, develops, and promotes highquality programs and services to effectively equip anyone who cares for, supports, educates, employs, or works with individuals with disabilities across the lifespan.

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Project AWARE Ohio is a partnership between schools and community agencies in order to raise awareness of the mental health needs of youth and increase access to services.

Options for College Success 426

1515 Maple Ave. – Suite 190 Evanston, IL 60201 847.425.4797 http://www.optionsforcollegesuccess.org Options for College Success is a postsecondary residential program in Evanston, IL, providing individualized support to students with learning challenges as they move toward independence. Support is provided in key areas: academic, career, independent living skills, social skills and activities, and finance management. Our young adults can attend local colleges or work toward a career opportunity. For those attending out-ofthe-area schools, we provide support via Skype.

Otterbein University 114

1 South Grove St. Westerville, OH 43081 614.823.3210 http://www.otterbein.edu/graduate Otterbein University is excited to offer highquality teacher education intervention specialist programs in two concentrations. Teachers can add the intervention specialist license or start a master of arts in education. Students interested in initial licensure in intervention can complete our master of arts in teaching program. Otterbein offers the best of all teacher learning experiences – practical, hands-on clinics, blended learning, and expert instruction.

OYO Camp – Ohio's Camp for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Kids! 436

1500 W 3rd Ave. – Suite 223 Columbus, Ohio 43212 Phone 614.224.3667 Video Phone 614.569.0202 http://www.oyocamp.org OYO Camp was created and designed specifically for kids with hearing loss in mind; so all communication at camp is geared towards each camper's level of communication. OYO Camp provides a communication barrier-free overnight camp experience that empowers each camper. ASL is used throughout camp, as well as other forms of visual and oral communication. Each camper's communication style is valued – which results in a safe, nurturing, and fun atmosphere of friendship.


EX H I B I TOR S P.A.C.E. at National Louis University 311

122 South Michigan Ave. – Suite 3013 Chicago, IL 60603 312.261.3770 http://www.nl.edu/paceatniu Path to Academics, Community and Employment (P.A.C.E) at National Louis University is a three-year, post-secondary certificate program designed to meet the transitional needs for young adults with multiple intellectual, learning and developmental disabilities. P.A.C.E. is one of the leading residential-based programs in the country that integrates employment preparation, independent living skills coaching, functional academic courses and social development into a curriculum that prepares students for independent living through experiential learning.

Pamer Family Chiropractic 421

246 W. Olentangy St. Powell, OH 43065 614.798.1419 http://www.pamerfamilychiropractic.com Pamer Family Chiropractic is a principled, corrective-care chiropractic clinic, focusing on spinal correction for disease prevention. Your neurology controls all function and healing of the body. We check to see if misalignment of the spine is causing problems. Stop by the booth to have your neck checked today!

Pearson Clinical Assessment 222

5601 Green Valley Dr. – 4th Floor Bloomington, MN 55437 800.627.7271 http://www.pearsonclinical.com Pearson has a long history in developing assessments used in clinical and educational settings to understand a person's cognitive, behavioral, emotional, language, and occupational strengths and weaknesses. We have been a trusted partner since 1921, and today we are a global market leader in clinical assessment. We provide efficacy-based solutions to assess and positively impact educational, occupational, and quality-of-life outcomes. Our wide range of assessment and intervention products are used by over 300,000 psychologists, speech-language pathologists, occupational therapists, and related practitioners. Our portfolio includes WISC-V, KTEA-3, CELF-5, GFTA-3, Review360, and Q-interactive Pearson new digital system.

Positive Education Program

QBS, Inc.

3100 Euclid Ave. Cleveland, OH 44115 216.361.7761 http://www.pepcleve.org

49 Plain St. – Suite 200 North Attleboro, MA 02760 855.727.6246 http://www.qbscompanies.com

PEP helps troubled and troubling children (0-22) successfully learn and grow, blending quality education and mental health services in partnership with families, schools, and communities.

QBS, Inc., provides quality behavioral solutions to complex behavioral problems. Using evidence-based procedures supported by decades of scientific research in the field of applied behavior analysis, QBS offers behavioral training and consultation for residential and day treatment programs, psychiatric hospitals, schools, nursing facilities, families, and agencies who provide services to children, adolescents, or adults. Safety-Care Behavioral Safety Training™ – trained in hundreds of provider settings – is the only crisis prevention course providing staff with a combination of behavioral competencies and crisis prevention and management skills. With applied behavior analytic content throughout, staff acquire the best of prevention skills.

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Praises, Prizes, and Presents 320

1228 Colony Dr. Saline, MI 48176 616.791.7003 http://praisesprizespresents.com Praises, Prizes, and Presents specializes in products that motivate and reward children with special needs.

Prentke Romich Company 321

1022 Heyl Rd. Wooster, OH 44691 800.262.1984 http://www.prentrom.com For over 50 years, PRC has let the industry in providing AAC solutions with advanced communication technology via speechgenerating devices. The company is also a pioneer in language vocabulary development, giving children and adults with communication challenges the ability to participate in life. Families, clinicians, and special educators select PRC augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices as part of a communication strategy to assist a wide range of individuals with communication disabilities. An employee-owned company since 2004, we are fully committed to our motto, “Everyone deserves a voice.”

CONTINUE THE DISCUSSION – #OCALICON2017

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Read Naturally 204

1284 Corporate Center Dr. – Suite 600 Saint Paul, MN 55121 800.788.4085 http://www.readnaturally.com Read Naturally provides research-proven reading interventions for struggling readers. The flagship program has been improving reading fluency and comprehension skills for over 20 years. The newest version, Read Live, is completely web-based and compatible with iPads and Chromebooks. Read Naturally also offers programs targeting specific skills like phonics and vocabulary.

Recreation Unlimited 305

7700 Piper Rd. Ashley, OH 43003-9741 740.548.7006 http://www.recreationunlimited.org The mission of Recreation Unlimited is to provide year-round programs in sports, recreation and education for individuals with disabilities and health concerns, while building self-confidence, self-esteem and promoting positive human relations, attitudes, and behaviors.

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E XH IB IT O R S RedTreehouse.org

REM Ohio, Inc.

School Choice Ohio

10415 Euclid Ave. Cleveland, OH 44106 216.229.5758 x1126 http://www.redtreehouse.org

470 Portage Lakes Dr. – Suite 206 Akron, OH 44319 800.685.0071 http://www.rem-oh.com

88 E. Broad St. - Suite 640 Columbus, OH 43215 614.223.1555 http://www.scohio.org

RedTreehouse.org is Ohio’s online resource promoting and supporting the physical, emotional, intellectual, and social development of children and young adults, prenatal to age 25. The site helps families meet challenges and special needs, linking them to organizations, training, support, and events in their local communities. Professionals can build referral sources to support those they serve and find opportunities for their own professional development. A program of the Ronald McDonald House® of Cleveland, Inc. in collaboration with Ohio Family and Children First.

Founded in 1987, REM Ohio offers an array of services and support for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, job seekers facing employment challenges, and individuals with other complex needs. Our flexible programs and services are structured around the needs of each individual we serve, and are designed to promote independence, skill development and growth in the communities that they call home.

School Choice Ohio educates families on the education options available for their children and advocates for the expansion of quality education options for every child.

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Relate and Grow 303

5132 Schulykill St. Columbus, OH 43220 614.989.9461 http://www.relateandgrow.com Relate & Grow is the most experienced provider of DIR Floortime and P.L.A.Y. Project services for families and training for professionals and organizations in central Ohio. Relate & Grow provides developmental, relationship-based intervention services, educational consultation, and professional development training that aids families and other caregivers – such as schools, daycares, and therapy providers – in helping children reach their potential. Our services are based on the DIR model of Dr. Stanley Greenspan and the P.L.A.Y. Project Intervention model developed by Dr. Richard Solomon. These evidence-based intensive intervention services have been shown to be effective for children with autism and other developmental differences.

Relias Learning 210

111 Corning Rd. – Suite 250 Raleigh, NC 27518 919.655.1800 http://www.reliaslearning.com Relias Learning offers online training to postacute care, acute care, health and human services, autism and applied behavior analysis, public safety, payers, and intellectual and developmental disabilities organizations. Our mission is to measurably improve the lives of the most vulnerable members of society and those who care for them. Online learning solutions from Relias Learning give you unrivaled content and an intuitive experience making it easy to generate meaningful savings, increase compliance, and improve service quality.

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RoboKind 136

211 N. Ervay St. – Suite 1100 Dallas, TX 75201 800.494.1206 http://www.robots4autism.com Robots4Autism combines the power and engagement of advanced social robotics with a comprehensive curriculum to effectively teach social and emotional behavior and communication skills to students with autism. The Robots4Autism curriculum utilizes the principles of ABA and evidence-based practices with automated progress reporting to support the understanding and development of appropriate social skills. The curriculum is delivered via Milo, a facially expressive humanoid robot who engages students with ASD at rates as high as 87% versus only 3% with a human therapist or teacher. The combination creates powerful learning outcomes and structured generalization of skills.

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Sheryl's Autistic Impressions 105

25 East Crafton Ave. – Apt. 301 Pittsburgh, PA 15205 412.919.5995 Original and award-winning artwork and prints, greeting cards, the children's book Emma the Giraffe, and more from artist Sheryl Yeager.

SpedTrack 128

3653 South Ave. Springfield, MO 65807 417.823.8449 http://www.spedtrack.com SpedTrack™ is web-based software that revolutionizes the management of special education programs (IEP's, evaluations and Section 504s) by allowing school districts to centralize information and processes into one comprehensive application. SpedTrack™ was designed from the ground up to maximize ease of use for school district end users, while providing the flexibility to easily respond to the constantly changing requirements of special education. Our product was developed hand in hand with special education professionals and represents more than 13 years of continued product design and development.

STAR Autism Support, Inc. 308

Saltillo Corporation 415

2143 Township Rd. – 112 Millersburg, OH 44654 800.382.8622 http://www.saltillo.com Saltillo Corporation is dedicated to making personal communication possible to individuals who are unable to use their natural voice. Saltillo offers full-featured communication devices that can be configured for different communication needs for a wide variety of individuals. We offer many portable communication devices that include the Nova Chat 5, 8, 10, 12, Chat Fusion, TouchChat Express, and the TouchChat app.

6663 SW Beaverton Hillsdale – Hwy Box 119 Portland, OR 97225 503.297.2864 http://www.starautismsupport.com STAR® Autism Support is a leading provider of evidence-based curricula and staff development opportunities specifically designed for students with ASD, intellectual disabilities, and developmental disabilities ages 3 through adult. Curricula offered by STAR Autism Support are based on the principles of applied behavior analysis and can be successfully implemented in school and agency settings. Our commitment to comprehensive, sustainable solutions for school districts brings educators the tools they need for effective instruction right into their classroom.


EX H I B I TOR S StealthWear Protective Clothing, Inc. 310

68 Broadview Ave. – Suite B1 Toronto, ON M4M 2E6 Canada 888.880.3235 http://www.stealthwearclothing.com Stealthwear Protective Clothing provides streamlined impact and compression resistant clothing for special educators working in a high needs environment. Designed with an athletic apparel appearance, our Active Aide line of products provide protection from behaviors such as bites, scratches, pinches and hits, so that your focus can remain on what’s most important – helping your student reach their full potential. With Active Aide, special educators encounter fewer injuries, and become more confident in their ability to effectively work with their student.

Sunshine Communities 309

7223 Maumee Western Rd. Maumee, OH 43537 419.865.0251 http://www.sunshine.org Sunshine Communities has been creating community alongside people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in Northwest Ohio since 1950. Today, it supports more than 400 men, women and children in Northwest Ohio with its residential living options, family support services, vocational services and community supported employment. Sunshine operates Maumee-based Georgette’s Fair Trade Grounds & Gifts and Sunshine Studios, two retail outlets that employ artists and staff with developmental disabilities. Sunshine opened its first group home in 1978, and by the end of 2018 there will be a total of 21 homes in the community. At its core is a mission of “mutuality” – an understanding that all can learn and find joy in each other.

TAI – Talent Assessment, Inc. 120

6838 Phillips Parkway Dr. S Jacksonville, FL 32256 800.634.1472 http://www.talentassessment.com TAI – Talent Assessment, Inc. has been publishing and selling programs for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities for over 40 years. Nationally and internationally, TAI's programs have helped students in middle school, high school, and young adults with hands-on assessment, teaching, training, and planning for their life and career skills. TAI's programs have also helped adults in need of vocational rehabilitation. The programs produced are fundamental work development: hands-on skill training; career assessment, planning, and placement; work literacy development; functional and community living skills. TAI products are PAES, TAP, PIC, VIP, WayPoint SCP, Money Manager, Job Talk, and Let's TALK.

The Alpha Group of Delaware, Inc.

The I Feel ... Children's Book Series

1000 Alpha Dr. Delaware, OH 43015 740.368.5810 http://www.alphagroup.net

3023 N. Clark St. – Suite 364 Chicago, IL 60657 847.971.3709 http://www.ifeelbook.com

Since 1970, The Alpha Group of Delaware, Inc. is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit agency which provides gainful employment, quality rehabilitation, and adult day support services to individuals with disabilities in Delaware and surrounding counties. Alpha is committed to the belief that people with disabilities have the same rights and responsibilities as all people; notably, the right to participate in their community. Services and supports that enhance and provide additional life choices to individuals should be accessible.

The international award-winning and Mom’s Choice Awards® Gold Recipient I Feel... Children’s Series has been celebrated by therapists, speech-language pathologists, special education professionals, teachers, and more! Listed on the Autism Speaks Resource Library, the series focuses on emotional recognition, behaviors, and solutions in a simple, witty, and fun way!

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The Center for Autism and Dyslexia 111

7430 Timberstone Dr. Findlay, OH 45840 567.525.4487 https://centerforautismanddyslexia.com

The Ohio Center for Deafblind Education

At the Center for Autism & Dyslexia, we believe that education isn’t about memorizing facts or taking tests – it’s about teaching children skills they can use to maximize their potential and live more meaningful lives. We are dedicated to providing a quality, well-rounded educational experience that gives your child the opportunity to achieve beyond expectations. Our goal is to help shape all students into independent, productive young adults who can effectively interact in real-world settings. Our child-centered approach focuses on fostering emotional growth; increasing academic, language, and behavioral competencies; and enhancing each child’s natural strengths.

3246 Henderson Rd. Columbus, OH 43220 614.897.0020 http://www.ohiodeafblind.org

The Childhood League Center 209

674 Cleveland Ave. Columbus, OH 43215 614.253.6933 http://www.childhoodleague.org Founded in 1945, The Childhood League Center is a nonprofit serving children birth to age 6 with developmental delays or who are at risk. The Childhood League Center partners intentionally with families to offer a holistic approach that combines evidencebased and innovative practices in early childhood education, interventions, and specialized preschool services. Every child is supported by an interdisciplinary team of dedicated experts for a true 360° perspective that provides individualized care. Recently, The Childhood League Center launched their Intervening Early Initiative to help build awareness of the importance of intervening early and the benefits, as well as the important role of parents/caregivers in intervention, and evidence-based therapy models that best support the development of young children. In 2016, The Center became the nation’s first PLAY Project Center with the ability to train professionals to provide PLAY Project.

CONTINUE THE DISCUSSION – #OCALICON2017

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The Ohio Center for Deafblind Education (OCDBE) is a federally-funded technical assistance (TA) and dissemination project designed to improve academic achievement and adult-transition results for Ohio children with combined hearing-vision loss (aka deafblindness). As one of several projects operated through the University of Cincinnati Systems Development & Improvement Center, OCDBE provides child-specific consultation, TA, professional development, and other targeted support to educators, parents, and others (e.g., regional providers) to build their capacity to meet the needs of children with sensory impairments. OCDBE conducts an annual census of children with deafblindness as part of the national DB child count.

The Outreach Center for Deafness and Blindness OCALI Central

470 Glenmont Ave. Columbus, OH 43214 614.410.0321 https://deafandblindoutreach.org We work to increase access and equity for students, families, and communities through connections, resources, and supports. Building relationships, sharing resources, and reaching the community is instrumental as we strive to support students where they are, with what they need, when they need it - to learn, grow, and experience the good life.

THE OUTREACH CENTER for Deafness and Blindness

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E XH IB IT O R S TippyTalk

Viggi Corp

Charlotte's House Charlottes Quay Limerick Ireland 353 85 7479721 http://www.tippy-talk.com

2144 Brighton Henrietta Townline Rd. Suite 800 Rochester, NY 14623 800.213.3172 http://www.viggikids.com

9AT

TippyTalk is the first communication solution that allows a person living with a nonverbal learning disorder instant access to whomever they chose anytime, anywhere. TippyTalk combines picturebased communication with personalized text messages, removing the frustration isolation and limitation of same room communication for the user, and their entire support network.

At Viggi, we believe everyone has a natural, childlike spirit. We aspire to ignite the excitement of learning and well-being through the use of our innovative and thoughtfully designed products. Learning through play is at the very heart of Viggi. Our products are designed for universal learning to benefit different needs. On display at the conference are two new products: (1) The patented Vidget 3-in-1 Flexible Seating System™ which is an active seat, stool, and desk – all in one! Allowing students to move has proven to increase attention, focus, and concentration. (2) The Digit Widgit® STEM math manipulative provides an exploratory, visual, and tactile experience of learning basic math concepts.

The American Council of the Blind of Ohio is a statewide non-profit organization dedicated to improving the quality and equality of life for persons who are blind or visually impaired. We achieve our mission through programs and services provided throughout the state, including our scholarship program, our annual conference and convention, and seasonal sports retreats. Providing these programs and services, along with information and referral assistance, helps ensure blind and visually impaired Ohioans live full, independent lives.

Westminster Technologies, Inc.

2AT

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American Council of the Blind of Ohio

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 Toledo Regional Autism Network 203

2040 W. Central Ave. Toledo, OH 43606 419.291.7031 http://www.tranresources.org TRAN serves as a platform for providers to come together in dialogue and action to better serve individuals with autism and their families and caregivers. In addition to the missions of their respective organizations, members leverage resources and talents to advance agreed upon initiatives which benefit the community.

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1702 St. Clair Ave. NE Cleveland, OH 44114 844.881.2088 http://www.westminstertech.com Westminster Technologies, Inc., offers a wide range of specialized assistive technology solutions. Our product lines include the TAPit, ProxTalker, Skoog, NAO robot, Headpod, and others. We also offer customized consulting services and professional development. Our mission is to enable those with differing abilities to reach their full potential.

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2430 Van Buren Ave. Springfield, OH 45505 937.878.8444 http://www.tbh.com

University of Cincinnati 427

P.O. Box 210002 Cincinnati, OH 45221-0002 888.325.2669 http://www.cech.uc.edu The University of Cincinnati offers endorsement programs and licensure programs for current teachers. Our professional development office is here to meet your needs.

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American Printing House for the Blind 1839 Frankfort Ave. Louisville, KY 40206 800.223.1839 http://www.aph.org APH is the world’s largest company devoted to making products for people who are blind and visually impaired, and is the official supplier of educational materials for blind students in the U.S. working at less than college level.

Cincinnati Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired 11AT

2045 Gilbert Ave. Cincinnati, OH 45202 513.221.8558 http://www.cincyblind.org

Trumpet Behavioral Health

Trumpet Behavioral Health provides exceptional behavior health services to children with ASD and other developmental disabilities. Our treatment is based on the principles of ABA – an outcomebased scientific approach used to measure behavior, teach socially significant skills, and evaluate the progress of those skills. By tailoring each program to meet specific client needs, we strive to bring lifelong positive change to the clients we serve.

3805 N. High St. – Suite 305 Columbus, OH 43214 614.221.6688 http://acbohio.org

BEST AT Forum for Families and Professionals The BEST AT Forum is a special event within OCALICON that focuses on braille literacy, assistive technology for students who are blind or visually impaired, the AT assessment process, and more. Exhibitor table displays on Thursday and Friday showcase the latest products, services, and solutions to support those who are blind or visually impaired.

BEST AT Forum Exhibit Hours: Thursday, Nov. 16 Friday, Nov. 17

4:30 – 6:30 pm 7:30 am – 1:00 pm

Cincinnati Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired is a vision rehabilitation agency serving individuals of all ages. Services for students include low vision evaluations, access technology evaluations and instruction, and vision rehabilitation therapy evaluations and instruction. Specialists work with families, students, TVIs, and other school professionals to recommend appropriate equipment and provide needed instruction. We also work with families to advocate for appropriate services and accommodations on the IEP throughout a student’s educational career – including transition from high school.

Cleveland Sight Center 5AT

1909 E. 101 St. Cleveland, OH 44106 216.791.8118 http://www.clevelandsightcenter.org Demonstrating various low vision equipment including head worn devices and low tech products.


EX H I B I TOR S HIMS, Inc. 14AT

4616 W. Howard Ln. – Suite 960 Austin, TX 78728 888.520.4467 https://hims-inc.com HIMS has been a global leader in the development and manufacturing of assistive technology for the blind and visually impaired since 1999. Our U.S. headquarters is centrally located in Austin, TX, and is responsible for all of our North American operations including sales, support, and repair of all HIMS products. We are proud to employ individuals with low vision and blindness at all levels, both domestically and overseas. We offer a vast range of products for all needs and preferences, and we look forward to continuing to do so in the future!

HumanWare 1AT

1 UPS Way Champlain, NY 12919 800.772.3393 http://www.humanware.com For over 25 years, HumanWare’s inspirational vision has resulted in a range of highly intuitive and intelligent solutions that empower people who are blind or with low vision by giving them the independence to participate effectively within a sighted world.

Marmon Valley Ministries 15AT

7754 State Route 2 Zanesfield, OH 43360 937.593.8000 http://www.marmonvalleyministries.org The Insight Summer Horse Camp is for boys and girls ages 7-17 who are blind or visually impaired. Similar to other camps, children will learn basic horsemanship skills and safety, such as tacking up a horse and controlling a horse at a walk and trot. Other camp activities include archery, kayaking, the climbing wall, and hayride. This is a partial week resident camp. Scholarship assistance available.

National Federation for the Blind of Ohio 8AT

P.O. Box 20544 Kettering, OH 45420 937.396.5573 http://nfbohio.org The National Federation of the Blind of Ohio (NFBO) is a founding affiliate of the National Federation of the Blind (NFB). We are proud to be an integral part of the oldest and largest blindness organization in the United States. We are a diverse group of people dedicated to changing what it means to be blind. Our members work tirelessly to break down the legal, social, and personal barriers to living the lives we want.

Ohio Federal Quota AT & AEM Center 6AT

470 Glenmont Ave. Columbus, OH 43214 614.410.0955 https://ataem.org/special-projects-and-grants/ federal-quota The AT & AEM Center conducts the annual Federal Quota Registration for students who are blind. Visitors will learn about student eligibility, how to register students, and how to submit material requests. Engaging materials will be on display to learn about the process to RegisterRequest-Receive. Opportunities will also be available to explore some of the materials that can be purchased through the Federal Quota program.

Ohio State School for the Blind 16AT

5220 N. High St. Columbus, OH 43214 614.752.1359 http://www.ossb.oh.gov The Ohio State School for the Blind, a publicly funded educational facility, is dedicated to the intellectual, social, physical, and emotional growth of all students with visual impairments. Our mission is to work cooperatively with students, families, and the community to provide an effective, enjoyable educational experience through specialized, curriculum, equipment, materials, and individualized, disability-specific instruction to develop our students’ unique potential.

Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities 12AT

150 E. Campus View Blvd. – Suite 300 Columbus, OH 43235 614.438.1474 http://www.ood.ohio.gov Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities is the State of Ohio agency that partners with Ohioans with disabilities to achieve employment and independence. OOD works with partners in business, education, and non-profit organizations to facilitate individualized employment plans for Ohioans with disabilities. OOD’s mission is to ensure individuals with disabilities achieve quality employment, independence, and disability determination outcomes through integrated services, partnerships, and innovation.

Sighted Guide Ohio 13AT

P.O. Box 33 Rossford, OH 43460 419.870.2797 https://www.sightedguideohio.org Sighted Guide Ohio’s mission is to provide a magazine dedicated to the visually impaired and blind friends and family. We reach out to the State of Ohio for the people that need a voice for visually impaired and blind communities.

CONTINUE THE DISCUSSION – #OCALICON2017

The Visual-Tech Connection 10AT

P.O. Box 1996 Westerville, OH 43086 800.589.8835 http://www.thevisualtechconnection.com The Visual-Tech Connection has a 31-year history serving as a comprehensive resource for assistive technology products for persons with low vision. We offer a complete array of video magnification products – as well as the latest text-to-speech products. We serve private individuals, businesses, local and statewide agencies, organizations, and government entities. We are dedicated to helping individuals maintain their independence by specifically offering free, no-obligation in-home/ office/school demonstrations, product set-up, user training, and after sales support to our customers in our home state of Ohio.

Universal Low Vision Aids, Inc. 3AT

1350 W. Fifth Ave. – Suite 112 Columbus, OH 43212 614.224.6465 http://www.ulva.com Universal Low Vision Aids, Inc., is a factoryauthorized dealer of assistive technology for blind, visually impaired, and individuals with special needs. We specialize in electronic magnification, both portable and desktop, text to speech devices, computer compatible devices and software, and Braille devices. ULVA has been serving agencies, schools, and individuals across the entire state of Ohio for 30 years.

VFO (Ai Squared - Freedom Scientific - Optelec - The Paciello Group) 4AT

11800 31st Court N. St. Petersburg, FL 33716 727.803.8000 http://www.vfo-group.com VFO™ is the world’s leading assistive technology provider for the visually impaired. On their own, our brands Ai Squared, Freedom Scientific, Optelec, and The Paciello Group have a long history of developing and providing innovative solutions for blind and low vision individuals – helping them to reach their full potential.

Westminster Technologies, Inc. 7AT

1702 St. Clair Ave. NE Cleveland, OH 44114 844.881.2088 http://www.westminstertech.com Westminster Technologies, Inc., offers a wide range of specialized assistive technology solutions. Our product lines include the TAPit, ProxTalker, Skoog, NAO robot, Headpod, and others. We also offer customized consulting services and professional development. Our mission is to enable those with differing abilities to reach their full potential.

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P RE S E N T E R S Susan Aebker

Susan Aebker, DHS, OTR/L, CAS, graduated from The Ohio State University and worked for 10 years as an OT in clinical care before becoming a school-based therapist with the Miami Valley Regional Center 15 years ago. She received her master's and doctoral degrees from the University of Indianapolis, where her studies focused on sensory modulation. She is currently an associate professor in Kettering College's OT doctoral program and works as a consultant on the Autism/Low-Incidence Coaching Team.

Sheila Alber-Morgan

Sheila R. Alber-Morgan, Ph.D., BCBA, is an associate professor of special education at The Ohio State University. Prior to that, she was a general and special education teacher for seven years in South Carolina. She has authored more than 70 publications, including peer-reviewed research and practitioner articles, book chapters, and books. Alber-Morgan's research focuses on literacy interventions for students with disabilities.

Melissa Bacon

Melissa Bacon, program director of the Office of Policy, Strategic Initiative, and Stakeholder Engagement at OCALI, oversees the Interagency Workgroup on Autism, collaborating with state agencies to promote issues impacting and involving persons with ASD. Previously, she served as policy director for the Ohio Department of Health, coordinated policy for Health and Human Services, and was director of government affairs for the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services. She also worked as director of public policy and advocacy for the Ohio Children's Hospital Association and as a policy aide for the Ohio Senate Republican Caucus.

Robert Baer

Taylor Alexander is an education major studying at Ohio University in Chillicothe. She is working toward a bachelor’s degree in early childhood education with the intention to become a PK-3 grade teacher.

Robert Baer, Ph.D, is the director of the Ohio Center for Innovation in Transition and Employment, where he has developed and received ongoing funding to conduct research for the Office for Exceptional Children at the Ohio Department of Education. He directs the Ohio Longitudinal Transition Study (OLTS) and has been responsible for documenting and analyzing the postschool outcomes of students with disabilities across Ohio (see www.olts.org). Baer has co-authored a book, Transition Planning for Secondary Students With Disabilities (Flexer, Baer, Luft, & Simmons, 2013), now in its fourth edition.

Angela Allen

Elaine Balum

Taylor Alexander

Angela Allen, M.S., Ed.S., is a nationally certified counselor and a licensed mental health counselor. She obtained ABA certification through Ball State University and is a board-certified behavior analyst. She has worked at Indiana University providing behavioral therapy to families and participated in the Research Units of Behavioral Interventions study. She is currently an autism coordinator with Bartholomew County Schools. She presented at the 2015 Indiana Council for Exceptional Children Conference on ABA and ASD in the classroom.

Lance Apple

Lance Apple is a positive supports specialist with over 30 years' experience working with children and adults with autism, developmental disabilities, and behavior challenges in home, work, and school settings. Apple is currently employed at the Medina County Board of Developmental Disabilities.

Jorgina Arballo

Jorgina Arballo is a specialist student in the school psychology program at the University of Kentucky. She graduated from Loyola Marymount University with a B.A. in psychology in 2014. During her undergraduate studies, she worked as a student teacher at the children's center on campus, and volunteered at an entirely inclusive elementary school. Over the last few years she has worked as the school administrator for KinderCare Learning Center. She is currently researching services provided to adolescents with autism and factors affecting quality of life among individuals with multiple sclerosis.

Lauren Avellone

Lauren Avellone, Ph.D., BABC, is a research associate at the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center at Virginia Commonwealth University. She has been instrumental in research and implementation of employment and postsecondary supports to transition-aged youth with ASD. She has served the Project SEARCH research coordinator.

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Elaine Balum is a 35-year teaching veteran of language arts/reading in public education and has trained teachers at Susquehanna University. She has had outstanding success with the Read Naturally strategy, and has used the program in her classroom since 1996. Balum is a past recipient of the Coca Cola/Health South Always Teaching Award, as well as the Susquehanna Valley Reading Teacher of the Year.

Keith Banner

Keith Banner is Employment First and Community Life Engagement project manager with Employment First/ DODD. He has worked in the DD field in Ohio for over 24 years, including positions as a work incentives practitioner, employment services coordinator for Butler County Board of DD, and project lead for the Employment Navigation Technical Liaison Project. Banner sometimes teaches disabilities studies and other courses at Miami University in Oxford, OH. He helped co-found Visionaries + Voices and ThunderSky, Inc., two community-based arts organizations in Cincinnati.

Susan Baraga

Susan Baraga, M.Ed., is an intervention specialist in Strongsville City Schools, where she has taught in a variety of K-12 settings over the past 18 years. Currently, she teaches in a K-3 special education classroom that is structured to meet the needs of students with ASD using evidence-based practices, such as ABA and TEACCH, with the support of the district BCBA, classroom staff members, and related service providers trained in the principles of ABA. She enjoys working collaboratively with team members to help students develop new skills and generalize these skills to multiple settings.

Mary Barczak

Mary Barczak is a board-certified behavior analyst with experience teaching students with autism and other low-incidence disabilities. She is currently pursuing a doctorate in special education and ABA at The Ohio State University. Prior to her studies at OSU, Barczak worked as a special education teacher and as a behavior analyst at a vocational program for young adults with significant disabilities.

Melane Barlow

Melane Barlow received a secondary education degree from The Ohio State University. She is a Family Resource Network LifeCourse trainer. Barlow is the parent of 2 children – Ben 22 and Hannah 19.

Jekereen Barrozo

Jekereen Barrozo, M.A., OTR/L, ATP, is a schoolbased OT and AT specialist for Riverside County Office of Education. For the last 19 years, Barrozo has held clinical, teaching, and management positions, including lead OT, special education teacher, EI OT, and college instructor. Active in teacher and parent trainings, Barrozo has made national and local presentations on topics related to autism, AT-AAC, and sensory processing disorder. He has certification in SI/SIPT from USC-WPS, a certificate of Assistive Technology Applications from CSU-Northridge, and an AT Professional Certificate from RESNA.

Debra Bauder

Debra Bauder, Ph.D., is an associate professor of special education at the University of Louisville. For over 30 years, she has provided training on educational technology/assistive technology and its uses with persons with disabilities. She has worked with hundreds of professionals in general and special education in providing technical consultation and training on effective methods of integrating technology into the classroom. Bauder is a nationally known speaker and has presented at conferences such as ATIA, CEC, ISTE, and SITE.

Jen Bavry

Jen Bavry serves as special projects coordinator for OCALI supporting initiatives led by the executive director. She also assists with fiscal management and center-specific projects, which included the launch of ASD Strategies in Action. While senior associate with Ohio Afterschool Network, she prepared tools to improve the quality of Ohio's after-school programs. She served as parent consultant, Columbus City Schools, providing families with resources to enhance their district experience. As a parent of a son with autism, Bavry is passionate about increasing engagement and participation for individuals with ASD.

Lilian Beck

Lilian Beck has been working with the Franklin County Board of Developmental Disabilities since 2005. She worked as a service coordinator for youth and adults for eight years, then moved to her current role as the transition resources coordinator. Her primary responsibilities involve transition planning for students enrolled with FCBDD School-Age Services at West Central School and in Reynoldsburg and SouthWestern City School districts. Beck also coordinates the FCBDD Transition to Work Summer Program to allow more transition-age youth the opportunity to explore their communities and develop career goals.

Noah Beckman

Noah Beckman earned his degree in finance from Ohio State in 2015. He works as a bank examiner for the federal government. He enjoys music, sports, and books.

Tabitha Belhorn

Tabitha Belhorn, B.A., studied psychology and vocal performance at Heidelberg University. She has three children, the oldest of whom is deaf. Belhorn is currently the executive director of Ohio Hands & Voices and has worked with families of children who are deaf, hard of hearing, deaf plus, or deaf-blind for over 10 years. She has been a member of the State Advisory Panel for Exceptional Children and is currently serving as the co-chair for the Universal Newborn Hearing Screening Subcommittee.


P RESE NTE R S Meagan Bellan

Meagan Bellan, M.Ed., Ed.S., is a clinical supervisor at Positive Education Program's Prentiss Autism Center. She received a bachelor's from Miami University and her graduate degrees from Kent State University. Bellan has her independent school psychologist license through the Ohio Board of Psychology. She was employed by the Solon City Schools as a school psychologist for nearly 10 years. Bellan recently cofacilitated a workshop at Kent State University on the topic of PBIS.

Jessica Bennett

Jessica Bennett, Ph.D., taught children who were deaf/hard of hearing before earning her doctorate in Special Education from The Ohio State University in 2014. She was a powerful practices specialist at Battelle for Kids, and presented around the state of Ohio on the Third-Grade Reading Guarantee. She is currently an intervention specialist at Bexley City Schools for elementary-aged students who have mild to moderate reading disabilities, including dyslexia. She teaches at Ohio State, has six publications in referred journals, and over 20 presentations at the local, state, and national levels.

Shawna Benson

Shawna Benson is the program director for the Teaching Diverse Learners Center at OCALI. Benson has worked as an associate professor and director of disability services at Urbana University and with the Knox County ESC/SST 7 as the assistive technology, autism, and low-incidence consultant for the region. Benson previously taught students with and without disabilities and has experience co-teaching in inclusive settings, providing academic instruction and intervention to students with a wide range of exceptionalities, ages, and needs.

Nicole Birri

Nicole L. Birri is a special education doctoral student. She holds a graduate assistantship with the Transition Access Program as an academic instructor. Her research interests include increasing literacy skills in individuals with high-functioning autism through addressing deficits in social cognition, executive functioning, and theory of mind. Additionally, she is interested in identifying and putting into practice academic and social supports needed by individuals with autism in higher education. Birri has published in journals such as Journal of Special Education and Focus on Autism and Developmental Disabilities.

Nicole Bishop

Nicole Bishop, MAT, earned a B.A. from the University of Louisville in psychology, an MAT in special education P-12, and an MAT in regular education P-5 from Bellarmine University. She has worked for Jefferson County Public Schools for 13 years as a special education teacher, regular education teacher, special education consultant, and now as an autism program resource teacher. In her current position, Bishop provides programming for children with autism in all types of classrooms and trains school personnel in evidence-based practices for students with autism.

Stacy Blecher

Stacy Blecher, M.A., is a registered art therapist at Positive Education Programs Prentiss Autism Center, where she runs art and mindfulness meditation groups. She is on the Assaulted Staff Emotional Response and the Appreciative Inquiry Team. She runs a monthly art therapy group for adults with ASD through Autism Personal Coach. Belcher received her master's in art therapy from Ursuline College. She is a member of the American Art Therapy Association and of Tri-Sigma. She has worked with ASD for 13 years and has spoken at parent night, inservices, in-hospital trainings, school trainings, to graduate students, and at autism conferences.

Justin Blumhorst

Chad Boone

Angela Boblitt

Stacy Borgio

Justin Blumhorst has over 15 years' experience in services for people with disabilities. After graduating with a degree in business from Bowling Green State University, Blumhorst started as a direct service professional and is now the operations leader at Capabilities. Capabilities assists over 2,300 people a year in working towards their goal of integrated community employment. He advocates for policy changes that improve the lives of people with disabilities and presents to people on topics such as inclusion, the future of disability services, transition services, accommodations, and assistive technology.

Angela Boblitt graduated with a B.A. in music from Winona State University. She worked as the director of children and youth ministries in Springfield, OH, for nearly a decade. Boblitt and her husband, Brett, have 4 children - Noah, GeorgiAnne, Xander, and Lucy. The two oldest children are biological, whereas the younger two joined their family through adoption. Their experience in adopting and parenting Lucy, who has Down syndrome, has given them a heart for kids with special needs and special needs adoption. This led Boblitt to open Choosing Hope Adoptions – an adoption agency in Ohio where she has served as executive director since it was founded in 2014.

Gregory Boerio

Gregory Boerio, Ed.S., NCSP, is the associate director of academics and outreach at The Rich Center for Autism in Youngstown, OH. With a background as a school psychologist and special education administrator, Boerio was previously employed as a consultant for State Support Team Region 5 and focused on topic areas such as positive behavior interventions and supports, universal design for learning, integrated comprehensive systems, and the Ohio Improvement Process. He strives to better the educational experience for each individual student while working to transform the system responsible for meeting the needs of all learners.

Sara Boettcher

Sara Boettcher, Ms.Ed., received a master's degree in special education with an emphasis in ASD from Bowling Green State University. Previously, she served as a teacher in a preschool classroom for both typically developing children and children with developmental disabilities. Currently, she is working toward becoming a BCBA through University of North Texas. She is an intervention specialist at Step by Step Academy, a behavior treatment center for children with autism, teaching in the educational transition program's K-3 classroom.

Chad Boone is a job coach/instructional paraprofessional for the postsecondary program in Dublin City Schools. Boone has worked with individuals with autism and developmental disabilities for four years, and in the L.I.F.E. program within the postsecondary program for two years. He is currently enrolled in a master's program in behavior analysis at Western Michigan University and plans to become a board certified behavior analysis upon graduation. Boone has an extensive behavioral background and hopes to work in Central Ohio with individuals with challenging behaviors.

Stacy Borgio, OTR/L, is a mother of three, one on the autism spectrum. She graduated from Cleveland State University and has been working in the field of OT for 14 years. Borgio is the vice president and co-founder of Pathway Inclusion Center, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. Pathway Inclusion Center was developed to provide inclusive child care, therapies, after-school programs and summer camps to children and families in her community. Borgio is passionate about bringing these much-needed services to children with special needs who live in her community.

Cindy Andree Bowen

Cindy Andree Bowen, M.A., BCBA, received her degree in elementary education with a minor in psychology at Wake Forest University. She earned a master’s in special education with a focus on ABA from Ball State University. She has a North Carolina teaching license for grades K-6, as well as a board certification as a behavior analyst. Bowen has presented at state and national conferences on evidence-based practices in autism. She is a program supervisor at ABC of NC Child Development Center, an accredited nonpublic school for children with ASD.

Ronni Bowyer

Ronni Bowyer, M.S.A., is a parent, trainer, master coach, and consultant. She is the parent mentor of Ohio for Newark City Schools and was the family support specialist for Licking County. Bowyer holds a B.A. in psychology and English and master's in administration with a concentration in human resources. She serves on a variety of councils and boards focused on early intervention, and is creator of several curricula and training series. She is co-creator of Pathways to Inclusion training series.

Jason Boyle

Vanja Bogicevic is a graduate teaching associate at The Ohio State University, Department of Human Sciences. Her expertise includes design of hospitality environments and customer behavior in the service industry. She has six years of work experience in hospitality industry and architecture. Bogicevic has presented in major national and international conferences and designed a number of disabilityfriendly service environments.

Jason Boyle, Ph.D., is a third-year assistant professor in the College of Health Sciences at The University of Texas at El Paso, with a dual appointment in the Department of Kinesiology as well as the Doctor of Physical Therapy Program. Boyle is the director of the Virtual Reality and Motor Control lab, which houses sophisticated equipment involved with motion capture, balance, vision, and issues of upperextremity coordination. Current projects at the lab are investigating the role of perception-to-action in full-body ballistic movements as well as the kinematic structure of upper-extremity movement in children diagnosed with autism.

Barbara Boone

Sara Boyle

Vanja Bogicevic

Barbara Boone, Ph.D., is a strong advocate for family, school, and community partnerships as a mother and professional. She has 25 years of experience in education, family engagement, learning supports, and delivering training for professionals and parents. Boone is working with the Ohio Department of Education on several statewide initiatives building the capacity of professionals and families to be partners in supporting each child's learning and healthy development. She received a Bachelor of Science degree from Michigan State University, a Master of Science from the University of Kentucky, and a Ph.D. from The Ohio State University.

Sara Boyle, Ms.Ed., is a doctoral student in the school psychology program at Kent State University. She holds a master's degree in school psychology from Kent State University and a bachelor's degree in child behavioral psychology from Rowan University. Boyle has presented at state and regional conferences on teacher training in universal classroom management practices and positive behavioral interventions and supports in preschools, with a specific interest in providing behavioral systems and supports in early childhood settings.

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P RE S E N T E R S Jye Breckenridge

Jye Breckenridge is a licensed independent social work supervisor with nearly 16 years of clinical and supervisory experience in the treatment of children, adolescents, and adults. Having served as either a clinician or administrator at all levels on the spectrum of care, Breckenridge possesses extensive training and experience in psychoanalytic social work practice, as well as early childhood trauma.

Barbara Brent

Barbara Brent is director of state policy, National Association of State Directors of Developmental Disabilities Services (NASDDDS), co-director of National Community of Practice on Supports to Families, and former state director of developmental disabilities for Arizona and Tennessee. She has more than 34 years of experience in publicly funded systems for children and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Heather Bridgman

Heather Bridgman is a regional consultant for OCALI. She has been working in the field of assistive technology for more than 20 years. Her specialties include computer access, augmentative communication, and universal design for learning. Bridgman has a master's degree in systems engineering as well as a teaching license in high school mathematics. She has presented at numerous state and regional conferences on a wide variety of AT tools and systems to build capacity at a local level. She is an adjunct instructor in AT at Ashland University.

Matthew Brock

Matt Brock, Ph.D., is an assistant professor in the Department of Education Studies at The Ohio State University and a faculty associate at the Crane Center for Early Childhood Research and Policy. His research interests include instructional and support strategies for students with severe disabilities and effective dissemination of these strategies to educators. Brock has been a special education teacher, general education teacher, U.S. Peace Corps special education volunteer, and a technical assistance specialist with the National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorders.

Blaine Brockman

Blaine P. Brockman, J.D., is an attorney with Hickman & Lowder and manages the office in Dublin, OH. He focuses his practice on special needs estate planning, special education, elder law, public benefits, probate, and guardianship. Brockman is a member of the Academy of Special Needs Planners and the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys. He served for 12 years on the Madison County Board of Developmental Disabilities and is on the boards of the ARC, Community Housing Network, Advocacy and Protective Services Inc., and Creative Housing. He received his J.D. from Capital University Law School with honors.

Alissa Molinelli Brooke

Alissa Molinelli Brooke, M.S., has been with VCURRTC since 2008. She earned an ACRE certification for community rehabilitation and began working as an employment specialist. She is also a positive behavior support facilitator. Brooke has experience working with individuals across disabilities and in the last four years has provided leadership for Project SEARCH at St. Mary's Hospital, working exclusively with youth with autism. She is focused on supporting choice, customized employment, job retention, assistive technology, and positive behavioral supports.

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Karen Brothers

Karen Brothers, M.A., M.S., is a guidance counselor for Dublin City Schools. A teacher and counselor for over 33 years, she is also the parent of a 22-year-old son with autism. Brothers started a peer collaboration program in 1999, which began with 10 children and now serves more than 200 students at Dublin Coffman High School alone. She has dedicated years to research and application of programs that promote peer modeling and now has programs in many schools throughout her district as well as schools in Ohio, Wisconsin, and Indiana.

Kristopher Brown

Kristopher Brown, M.S., is a board-certified behavior analyst and certified Ohio behavior analyst and the coordinator of the Steps Towards Educational and Psychological Development (STEPS) Program at The Knapp Center for Childhood Development. Brown received his B.A. in psychology and M.S. in ABA from Youngstown State University. He has conducted both basic and applied research that has been presented at state and national conferences on topics such as language training for children, preference for variability, and stimulus equivalence.

Milos Bujisic

Milos Bujisic is an assistant professor at The Ohio State University, Department of Human Sciences. His expertise includes customer experience management in the hospitality industry and transformative services. He has 10 years of industry experience in various managerial positions. Additionally, he has 27 journal publications and more than 30 conference presentations. Currently, Bujisic is working on developing a new course, “Customer Service for Individuals With Disabilities,” which will be the first course of its kind offered at Ohio State.

Myra Beth Bundy

Myra Bundy, Ph.D., is a professor of psychology at Eastern Kentucky University and a licensed psychologist with graduate and postgraduate specialization in autism and developmental disabilities. She interned at the University of North Carolina's TEACCH program. In the EKU psychology clinic, she works alongside graduate students with individuals on the autism spectrum across the lifespan. She writes on and researches autism topics, and coordinates the EKU ASD certificate program. She is a clinician with the Kentucky CCSHCN Autism Diagnostic Clinics. Bundy enjoys spending time with individuals with autism and their families.

Carol Burmeister

Carol Burmeister, M.A., is an educational professional whose experience spans over 40 years, working as a paraprofessional, general education teacher, special education teacher, program specialist, university instructor, and consultant in a wide variety of educational settings. Burmeister participated as a reviewer in the National Professional Development Center on ASD's update on evidence-based practices. She collaborates with educators and parents to help them understand the unique strengths of students with autism and related disorders and to determine how to best meet their academic, behavioral, and social-emotional needs.

Mo Buti

Mo Buti, M.Ed.-BD, M.Ed-ADMIN, has been working in the field of special education for over 26 years with children/adults with severe and profound, moderate, and mild autism. She has served as a teacher, consultant, and coordinator of autism and intellectual disabilities in Chicago Public Schools. Buti was also director of program development at Neumann Family Services. Currently, she is the owner of AiepA (Advocate and Instructional Expert for People with Autism). She has a passion for learning, making visual modifications, and teaching, and is a dynamic international speaker.

Amanda Buzo

Amanda M. Buzo, Esq., received her B.S. from The Ohio State University and her Juris Doctor from the University of Akron School of Law. She practiced in the areas of estate planning, trust administration, elder law, special needs estate planning, and probate before joining Community Fund Management Foundation as the executive director. Buzo's responsibilities include reviewing distribution requests, managing daily operations, and community education and outreach. She is a frequent speaker and author, and was recognized as a 2010 and 2016 Rising Star by Ohio Super Lawyers and was included in the 2015 edition of The Best Lawyers in America.

Joanie Calem

Joanie Calem, B.A., is a songwriter, teacher, and disability awareness advocate. She is the parent of a son with autism and a teacher of diverse learners. Calem leads workshops for parent groups, teacher training, community building, disability awareness, strategies to support individuals with sensory processing disorder, autism, and other neurological differences. Articles include “Creating Safe Musical Spaces,” “SPD: The Invisible Mystery Monster,” and “The ABCs of SPD.” Calem has presented for Aspirations, SIBS, Head Start, AAUW, the JCC, Friendship Circle, churches, synagogues, preschools, and parent groups.

Mark Campano

Mark Campano, M.Ed., is the statewide coordinator of the Delaware Program for Children with DeafBlindness. He has served children with deafblindness in five states in a variety of roles, such as technical assistance specialist and project director. Prior to working in the field of deafblindness, he worked with emotionally challenged deaf adolescents in a 24/7, therapeutic milieu in a variety of roles. Campano's education includes a B.A. in psychology/sociology and an M.Ed. in severe intensive special needs. He has a certification for K-12 in deafblindness.

Erin Canaday

Erin Canaday has been in the teaching profession for 25 years. For the past 16 years, she has served as a work study/transition coordinator focusing on transitioning students (ages 14-22) to work, community, and independence. Canaday has worked for Dublin City Schools for 14 years as a transition coordinator and the past 8 years as the department chair for Dublin Coffman High School. The Peer Collaboration Program in which she is involved has been a benefit to the special education department in many ways. Canaday has three children, who have been involved in Dublin Coffman's Peer Collaboration Program.

Diana Foster Carl

Diana Foster Carl, M.A., has over 35 years’ experience as a licensed specialist in school psychology. A former director of special education services at Texas Region 4 Education Service Center, Carl also led the Texas Assistive Technology Network for 12 years, and has served in national, statewide, and regional AT leadership roles. Currently, she contracts with CAST as special projects coordinator for the National Center on Accessible Educational Materials. She is a founding member of the Quality Indicators in Assistive Technology (QIAT) Consortium and co-author of Quality Indicators for Assistive Technology: A Comprehensive Guide to Assistive Technology Services.


P RESE NTE R S Christi Carnahan

Christina Carnahan, Ed.D., is an associate professor of special education at the University of Cincinnati, where she is also the director of advancement and transition services. She conducts research in special education with individuals with autism and other complex learning needs. Carnahan's work with students with significant developmental disabilities focuses on improving post-high school outcomes through strategies that increase active engagement in learning activities, promote teacher efficiency, and improve literacy experiences at home and school.

Nicole Carrasquillo

Nicole Carrasquillo has been a certified special educator for 13 years and works with students who are deaf, on the autism spectrum, and have additional significant behavioral challenges. She creatively develops and implements a multi-sensory approach to build the academic and vocational skills of students with autism and complex needs by infusing PBIS strategies into her classroom. Prior to her current position, Carrasquillo taught for nine years in the Wolcott Public School system in Connecticut.

Bridie Carroll

Bridie Carroll recently returned to Cleveland after spending the last ten years in NYC and the last four years traveling the country with the Broadway tour of Wicked. She played Tracy Turnblad in the first regional production of Hairspray, and went on to do High School Musical, Pure Country, Fat Camp, The Little Mermaid and toured the country, once again, with Grease. She earned a BFA from The Boston Conservatory of Music, and can be heard on the original cast recording of Thirteen Stories Down.

Shannon Clancy

Shannon Clancy, Ph.D., has been involved the field of deaf education for nearly 20 years. Her research focuses on the intersection of language and learning in students who are DHH, particularly with respect to content-area sign language and classroom discourse in the learning of science. She has been an elementary school teacher of DHH students, has presented at conferences on both education and educational interpreting, and currently serves on the advisory counsel for The Outreach Center for Deafness and Blindness at OCALI. She recently completed her doctoral studies at The Ohio State University.

Laura Clarke

Laura Clarke is a faculty member at Eastern Kentucky University, where she supports preservice and current teachers who want to teach students with mild-tomoderate and moderate-to-severe disabilities in both early childhood and P-12 settings. Clarke has published in journals such as TEACHING Exceptional Children, Teacher Educator/Special Educator, and Learning Disabilities America.

Diane Clouse

Diane Clouse, Ed.D., is the director of the Transition and Access Program at the University of Cincinnati. She has had experience as an interventionist in a variety of K-12 settings, and held faculty positions at Sinclair Community College and Wilmington College. Clouse is a member of many professional organizations and her research interests include utilizing single-subject, qualitative, and action research methodologies to support individuals with I/DD in their transition to independent adult living.

Jodi Kempner Collins

Jodi Kempner Collins, MSW, LISW-S, is a clinical social worker in private practice meeting the behavioral and mental health needs of children and families living with developmental disabilities. In addition to her clinical work, Collins is also the parent to a child with autism, developmental, and educational special needs, and shares her passion for advocacy through her writing and speaking engagements. She has presented at a TEDx Talk and Listen To Your Mother and has been featured online under her pen name at The Mighty, Huffington Post, TODAY Community, Scary Mommy, and her own blog Running Through Water.

Stacy Collins

Stacy Collins, MSW, joined the Employment First Team in May 2014 as project manager within the Division of Policy and Strategic Direction at Ohio DODD. She coordinates the implementation of Ohio’s Employment First Initiative, including activities and projects for DODD and the Ohio Employment First Taskforce and Advisory Committee. She works to identify training and resource needs to help improve employment outcomes in all areas of the state, as well as coordinating efforts to raise awareness of community employment as a preferred outcome. Collins has a master of social work degree in social administration from The Ohio State University.

Maggie Collins-Harris

Maggie Collins-Harris has been supporting families and their young children with autism for 17 years. She has two children, one of whom has a moderateto-severe bilateral progressive hearing loss. Collins continues to stay motivated in the field of early intervention, both on a professional and personal level in an effort to incorporate parent-driven and relationship-based supports to families. The main emphasis of her work is always to empower families to be their child's best coach and teacher. Collins' most current pathway to do this work has been working with families through virtual home visiting.

Lisa Combs

Lisa Combs, M.A., CAS, earned her degrees in special education from Ball State University. Over the course of her 30-year career, she has taught students with a wide range of disabilities and directed special education programs, was a regional coach for OCALI, and coordinates the Miami Valley Autism Coaching Team. Combs is on the faculty at Wright State University and owns Combs Educational Consulting, Ltd. She is an author with AAPC Publishing. She is also co-owner of Best Friend Books.

Carol Conway

Carol Siefert Conway, MS, OTR/L, is a pediatric occupational therapist with 36 years' experience, specializing in school-based practice. In her current position at Hudson City Schools, she provides services for students in grade 3-5. Conway serves on the school leadership team and has been instrumental in successfully shifting OT service provision to an integrated model, thus maximizing the impact of OT at a whole-school level.

Barbara Cook

Sheri Cook

Sheri Cook has a bachelor's degree in deaf education and a master's degree in applied linguistics. She taught at the Wisconsin School for the Deaf and in southern Illinois. Cook was a consultant and trainer for the Illinois School for the Deaf Outreach Program and taught American Sign Language and deaf studies courses at John A. Logan College and at Southern Illinois University. Cook is the director of Gallaudet University Regional Center for the Midwest, serving 14 Midwest states and collaborating with schools and programs to promote their connection with Gallaudet and the Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center.

Heather Cooper

Heather Cooper is a speech-language pathologist with the Hearing Intervention Team at the Miami Valley Regional Center in Dayton. She provides consultative and direct services to school teams within State Support Regions 6 and 10 for students with hearing loss. Cooper has presented at numerous conferences, including ASHA National Conference, OSHLA, and OSPEAC. She has worked alongside and under forerunners in the field of auditory skill development and rehabilitation.

Richard Cowan

Richard Cowan, Ph.D., associate professor at Kent State University, completed his graduate training at University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Cowan has been involved in multiple research projects, publications, presentations, and grants focusing on the implementation and evaluation of positive behavioral supports across settings for a variety of learners, including students with disabilities and students who are at risk for academic failure. Cowan's most recent work focuses on the prevention of disruptive behavior in the classroom within the context of building positive, inclusive environments for all students.

Christine Croyle

Christine Croyle, Ed.D., CCC-SLP, program director for The Outreach Center for Deafness and Blindness, provides leadership to support communities in providing community-based supports for learners with sensory needs related to hearing and vision. Previously, she served as a school administrator for Pickaway County Board of Developmental Disabilities and as a speech-language pathologist at The Ohio State School for the Blind. Croyle has presented at state, national, and international conferences on leading inclusive models of education, instructional strategies, and designing spaces with accessibility in mind.

Patty Cunningham

Patty Cunningham, M.Ed., OTR/L, is an OT who has been providing intervention services to individuals with ASD for 33 years. She holds a graduate degree in special education and an autism certificate from Bowling Green State University. Her undergraduate degree is from The Ohio State University. Cunningham is employed in intensive autism programming for preschool-aged children and provides outpatient intervention for children and young adults. She has worked in clinical, home, and school-based practices. Cunningham is a specialist in sensory processing disorders and has spoken nationally on this subject.

Barbara Cook, Ed.D., CCC-SLP, is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication Disorders at Southern Connecticut State University and a speech-language pathologist consultant to the SCSU Center of Excellence on ASD. Her research interests include the development of social communication in youth, adolescents, and adults with autism and other developmental disabilities.

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P RE S E N T E R S Cynthia Curry

Cynthia Curry, M.S. Ed., is co-director of the National Center on Accessible Educational Materials for Learning Center (AEM Center). She provides technical assistance and leadership on the provision and use of AEM for learning to multiple stakeholders. She has worked across K-12 schools, universities, nonprofit organizations, and state agencies to improve outcomes for learners with disabilities. Curry has extensive leadership experience in federally-funded projects having led three U.S. DOE-funded projects to prepare teachers to use technology to improve curriculum access by learners with disabilities, and having participated in two NSF projects to increase the number of students with disabilities pursuing STEM.

Frances Mary D’Andrea

Frances Mary D’Andrea, Ph.D., is an instructor at the University of Pittsburgh and other universities, and an educational consultant specializing in literacy issues related to students with visual impairments. She has completed the reading specialist program at University of Pittsburgh. D’Andrea began as a teacher of students with visual impairments, and eventually worked at the American Foundation for the Blind, helping to establish their National Literacy Center. She has co-authored a number of textbooks. D’Andrea is currently Immediate Past Chair of the Braille Authority of North America, and has served as AFB’s representative to BANA since 1998.

Carrie Davenport

Carrie Davenport is a doctoral candidate in the special education program at The Ohio State University. Previously, she was the early childhood consultant for the Center for Outreach Services at the Ohio School for the Deaf in Columbus. Davenport is a founding board member of Ohio Hands & Voices. She has served on several boards and committees, including the Universal Newborn Hearing Screening subcommittee and the American Society for Deaf Children.

Susan DeLuke

Susan DeLuke, Ph.D., is an associate professor of special education at the College of Saint Rose in Albany, NY, where she teaches courses on ASD, emotional and behavior disorders, and positive behavior supports. She is the director of Social Intervention Programs at the college, which provides recreational opportunities and social teaching groups for children and adolescents with ASD. She has prepared graduate students to facilitate social groups for youngsters with ASD since 2004. DeLuke has presented at the TED division of CEC conferences and other national conferences, including ASA, Geneva Centre, and OCALI over the past 10 years.

Lynn DeMange

Lynn DeMange, OTR/L, graduated from Shawnee State University in 2002 and worked for four years as an OT in clinical care at OSU Harding Hospital. In 2006, she transitioned to school-based therapy and worked for 10 years through the Miami Valley Regional Center. DeMange currently works for the Montgomery County Educational Service Center as a consultant on the Autism/Low Incidence Coaching Team.

Tabatha Devine

Tabatha Devine, M.Ed., has been a transition coordinator for the Westlake City School System for the past 15 years. She received her master’s in rehabilitation services from Kent State University and was among the first candidates to receive the Transition-To-Work endorsement. She has 10 years’ experience as an intervention specialist, has worked for multiple group homes, activity centers, and has attended court hearings to advocate for her students’ rights. Devine has served on the Milestones “Strike it Big” committee and was asked to serve on the Milestones Conference Committee. She was awarded Educator of the Year from Milestones in 2017.

Carol Dittoe

Belinda Davis has been a special education teacher with Columbus City Schools for 18 years. She spent the majority of her career teaching in a multiple disabilities classroom, and taught a few years in a high-incidence classroom. Davis attended a five-day training at the University of North Carolina for the TEACCH program and implemented those strategies into her classroom.

Carol Dittoe, M.A., CCC-SLP, has over 30 years of experience in autism, augmentative communication, and assistive technology. She has worked as a speech pathologist in both hospital and educational settings providing evaluation and treatment for children with a variety of disabilities. In her current role, Dittoe provides educational teams across west central Ohio with ongoing assistance in implementing evidencebased practices to support students with autism and low-incidence disabilities.

Alfred Daviso

Peter Doehring

Belinda Davis

Alfred Daviso, Ph.D., is an associate professor at the University of Akron. Since 2010, he has published 10 articles in special education focusing on transition services. Daviso previously worked as an intervention specialist and a transition coordinator in Akron Public School. In addition, he has presented at over 40 national conferences. He currently helps coordinate data collection and analysis for the Ohio Longitudinal Transition Study.

Rae Lynn Daviso

Rae Lynn Daviso was an intervention specialist for students with moderate to intensive educational needs for 13 years in the Stow Munroe Falls City School District. She was employed at Akron Children's Hospital as a child life specialist prior to her educational career. Daviso currently serves as a job training coordinator in the Akron Public School District, helping students with disabilities to develop skills for employment at a job training site at Akron Children's Hospital as well as working with students in high school on job seeking skills, job retention, and linkage to adult agencies.

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Peter Doehring, trained as a clinical psychologist, has worked with people with ASD for 25 years. He has led the development and expansion of school-, hospital-, and university-based programs integrating services, research, training, and policy. He has presented internationally, and published books evaluating evidence-based treatments for ASD and the development of innovative ASD programs at the state and national level. Doehring is the father of an adolescent with multiple and complex developmental disabilities.

Sandra Brotman Domoracki

Sandra Brotman Domoracki, Au.D., is employed by the Family Child Learning Center (FCLC) at Akron Children’s Hospital. She is project director for FCLC Tele EI Hearing Services. Domoracki was one of the first educational audiologist in Ohio and is now embarking on another new service model, providing early intervention to families with young children who have hearing loss through tele-practice. Local/ national presentations include coaching families in EI, family support, meeting the needs of students with hearing loss, and collaboration. Domoracki received graduate degrees at The Ohio State University and A.T. Still University.

Lizzy Donovan

Lizzy Donovan is a senior program supervisor at ABC of North Carolina, an accredited nonpublic school for children with autism. She has over 14 years' experience working with children who have autism and their families. Donovan is working toward becoming a board-certified behavior analyst. She was the Autism Society of North Carolina's Professional of the Year in 2008. Last summer, she traveled to the Maldives as a member of the Knowledge for People: Autism Education Around the World Team.

Kathryn Doyle

Kate Doyle, Ph.D., is an assistant professor and director of the Special Education program at the College of Mount St. Joseph in Cincinnati. She serves as an educational consultant to many Greater Cincinnati schools. Doyle's research interests include social skills interventions, language and literacy instructional strategies, and behavioral interventions for individuals with low-incidence disabilities.

Scott Dueker

Scott Dueker is a board-certified behavior analyst with almost 10 years' experience working with individuals with developmental and intellectual disabilities. His focus is primarily on adolescents with profound disabilities; he has worked in homes, schools, residential placement settings, and the community. He is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in special education and ABA at The Ohio State University. Dueker's research interests include using technology such as video prompting, video games, and virtual reality to teach moderate to severely impacted students both academics and life skills.

Haley Dunn

Haley Dunn, M.A., teen and adult coordinator at Milestones Autism Resources, works with individuals with ASD to help them transition to adulthood. She is a licensed professional counselor who has worked with children birth to 5, school age, and young adults, providing diagnosis and treatment of mental health. She has a deep passion for connecting people to their community, whether through employment, volunteering or life-enrichment activities. Dunn earned a B.A. in communications from John Carroll University and an M.A. in clinical mental health counseling from Xavier University.

Daniel Durany

Daniel Durany is a national speaker, advocate, and mentor in the autism field. Durany pioneered a local adult Asperger's Support Group knows as FEAT (Families for Effective Autism Treatment). In 2013, he was appointed by the Governor to serve the State of Texas on The Council on Autism and Pervasive Developmental Disorders. He also served as the keynote speaker for the Texas State Autism Conference. Since 2014, he has stretched his horizons outside of Texas by speaking at the Oklahoma Statewide Autism Conference, OCALICON, Arkansas, and Chattanooga autism conferences.

Jennifer Earley

Jennifer Earley, B.A., is a job coach with Dublin City Schools. As a job coach, she supports transition-aged youth as they navigate employment, community, and independent living opportunities. She creates visual, auditory, and kinesthetic job aids and learning tools to reinforce job skills and tasks to meet the individual learning style of each student. Her role as a job coach has been highlighted in ASD: Strategies in Action. Prior to coming to Dublin, Earley worked at OSUWMC Nisonger Center in the office of Special Education and Transition Services. Earley holds a B.A. in social work and is a certified Orton-Gillingham teacher.


P RESE NTE R S Dusty Columbia Embury

Dusty Columbia Embury is an associate professor of special education at Eastern Kentucky University. She has published articles on inclusion and access for students with disabilities in Teaching Exceptional Children, Teacher Education and Special Education, Educational Action Research, and the International Journal of Special Education. She also serves as an associate editor for the journal Action Research. Columbia Embury has presented her research at the annual conferences for the Council for Exceptional Children, American Middle-Level Educators, and Teacher Education Division.

Kelly Elton

Kelly Elton, Ms.Ed., holds a graduate certificate in autism and a master's degree in special education from BGSU. She has worked with adults and adolescents with autism for nearly a decade at Bittersweet, Inc. She has recently overseen the development and implementation of successful Social Living Clubs in Pemberville and Lima, OH, and the Venture Bound Program. Currently, Kelly is the co-director and teacher of the Venture Bound program. She participates in the Toledo Regional Autism Network.

Ruth Eren

Ruth Eren, Ed.D., is the director of the Center of Excellence on Autism Spectrum Disorders and associate professor at Southern Connecticut State University in New Haven, where she led the development of the master's degree program in special education with a concentration in ASD and other developmental disabilities. Eren has presented at state and national audiences on topics related to professional development for teaching students with ASD. Her publications include both journal articles and book chapters related to reaching children with ASD.

Marilyn Espe-Sherwindt

Kyle Fenton

Kyle Fenton has been working with students with special needs for the past six years. He has a degree in program planning and implementation from BYUIdaho specializing in designing programs for students with special needs. Fenton's passion is evident in his desire to help students become successful and independent through learning everyday life skills and vocational training. He designed and implemented a new off-campus transition program and has presented this program across the state of Wyoming. He works closely with community members and employers to place students in work experiences.

Natalie Fielders

Natalie Fielders, B.S., is currently pursuing a master's degree in OT at Eastern Kentucky University. She received her undergraduate degree in occupational science at Eastern Kentucky University. Her clinical interests include working with children with developmental disorders, more specifically those with autism. She has participated in the EKU Autism Social Skills Groups for one year and has assumed a leadership role within the group.

Chris Filler

Chris Filler is the program director of the Lifespan Transitions Center at OCALI. She has worked with individuals/families with ASD and developmental disabilities for over 30 years as an early intervention service coordinator, family resource specialist, autism/ behavior consultant, and private consultant. Currently, her focus is transition to adulthood and creating supports that promote a meaningful adult life. To this end, Filler is working extensively with the Ohio Employment First Initiative targeting community employment and community membership.

Gregory Firn

Marilyn Espe-Sherwindt, Ph.D., is director of the Family Child Learning Center (FCLC), the early intervention demonstration, teaching, and research center at Akron Children's Hospital. Her teaching, presentations, and research have focused on family-centered practices, parents with cognitive disabilities, program evaluation, systems change in early identification/intervention for toddlers with ASD, and using innovative technology to increase access to evidence-based early intervention services. Espe-Sherwindt also serves as a consultant to early intervention programs in Portugal.

Greg Firn, Ph.D., is the chief operating officer at RoboKind. He has over 34 years in public education including superintendent of schools and other educational leadership roles in TX, NC, CT, WA, NV, and overseas. Grounded in school effects research, Firn has been a pioneer in digital conversion where he twice led systemwide digital transformation initiatives including the implementation of human capital development programs. Firn is the product of the public school system, holds an undergraduate degree from Washington State University and earned a doctorate from Seattle Pacific University where his research focused on learner-centered education.

Teirra Everette

Diane Fox

Teirra Everette is the mother and primary advocate to her son, who has ASD and other special needs. She is a graduate of Ohio University and Cleveland-Marshall College of Law, and currently serves as counsel at Dominion. Most recently, Everette presented at the 15th Annual Milestones Conference as a panelist on how ASD impacts children of color and their families. Her motivation is fueled by her son's experiences with the public education system/therapeutic community, which highlighted the impact that race and gender has on a child's timely diagnosis, plan of treatment, and determination of the least restrictive environment.

Erin Farrell

Erin Farrell M.A., BCaBA, is a district behavior specialist and an adjunct professor with the University of Saint Thomas teacher education program. Farrell has a background in ABA and early intervention programs in clinical settings. She works to promote and support the use of positive behavior supports through her work across settings.

Diane Fox, early intervention program manager at DODD, has a master's degree in special education from West Virginia University with a focus on early intervention. Fox is a licensed social worker through the State of Ohio Counselor, Social Work and Marriage and Family Therapist Board and holds a professional credential from DODD as an EI specialist. She has developed workshops and training for EI service providers on understanding the role of a service provider and service coordinator, applicable federal regulations and state rules, understanding Ohio's EI system, the development of IFSP outcomes, compliance, and evidence-based practices.

Heather Frank

Heather Frank, M. Ed., received a master of education in intervention services degree in 2015, and recently completed her educational specialist in school psychology degree. She has an interest in working with students with disabilities, with a focus with students who live in low socio-economic homes and students with autism. Frank is a member of the Ohio School Psychologists Association and the National Association of School Psychologists. Publications include “Looking at the Social Activity for Adolescents with Orthopedic Impairments” in the International Journal of Evaluation and Research.

Kathryn Frank

Katie Frank is a graduate student pursuing a BCBA. She has been providing evidence-based practices for children with autism at an independent site in North Carolina for the past 11 years. She obtained an undergraduate degree in sociology from North Carolina State University.

Maggie Freeman

Maggie Freeman, B.A., is currently pursuing a master's and doctorate in clinical psychology at Eastern Kentucky University. She received an undergraduate degree in psychology at Bellarmine University. Her clinical interests include working with children with developmental disorders, autism, and families of children with developmental disorders. She has volunteered with the EKU Autism Social Groups for two years, and has assumed a leadership role within the groups.

Amy Gaffney

Amy Moore Gaffney, M.A., CCC-SLP, is an autism consultant, a TEACCH-certified practitioner, and a speech-language pathologist. She received a master's degree from the University of Kansas through the Communication and Autism Project. Over the last 15 years, Gaffney has worked in public schools, private clinics, and in-home settings. She has presented to local parent support groups, professional organizations, the Autism Society National Conference, National Chromosome 18 Conference and OCALICON. Gaffney works for Southside Special Services of Marion County in Indianapolis.

Desiree Gagnon

Desiree Gagnon completed her bachelor’s in psychology at the University of Manitoba under the supervision of Dr. Janine Montgomery. Her honors thesis examined emotional intelligence in maltreated teen girls in comparison to teen girls with and without ASD. Over the course of the summer, she worked as a French autism tutor, as a camp counselor, and as a one-to-one coach with OHEYS (summer camp for children and teens on the autism spectrum). She is currently taking a gap year before pursuing a master’s in clinical psychology. Gagnon continues to be actively involved in the Social Cognition Labratory, helping with numerous undergraduate and graduate research projects.

Trisha Gallagher

Trisha Gallagher, Ph.D., is the autism program specialist for Jefferson County Public Schools in Kentucky. Her dissertation focused on social networks of parents of students with autism as a proxy measure of social capital. Gallagher supervises programming for students with autism and trains personnel on EBPs. As a member of the state Autism Team, she assisted in the development of the KY Family Guide, coordinated the first model classrooms in partnership with the NPDC, and contributed to the development of the KY DOE Guidance Document for Autism. Gallagher participated as a reviewer of the most recent EBPs with the NDPC.

Alejandra Gamez

Alejandra Gamez is currently obtaining an M.S. in kinesiology. She has been a research assistant for over two years studying different areas within the field of biomechanics and motor control. Her research includes examining the effect of total-body vibration training and fall prevention, whole-body ballistic movements, as well as issues of upper extremity coordination. Gamez is working at the Virtual Reality and Motor Control lab at the University of Texas at El Paso, and was recently awarded a national research grant to investigate coordination issues in children diagnosed with autism.

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P RE S E N T E R S Katy Ganz

Katy Ganz, M.A., CCC-SLP, is a speech-language pathologist for the Tuscarawas County Board of DD. She has experience providing communication, feeding, and behavioral supports to PK-12 grade students. She earned a master's degree in speechlanguage pathology from the University of Akron. Using assistive technology, she has staged puppet shows, science fairs, and concerts with nonverbal students. Through the Tusc County School Collaboration Team, Ganz has spent two years helping teachers, aides, and administrators in the county's 10 school districts adapt “mainstream” classes for students with speech, sensory, and motor impairments.

Kelly Garland

Kelly Garland is a second year M.A., SLP student at the University of Cincinnati. She is a graduate assistant at IMPACT Innovations, an adult day program for adults with autism with significant behavioral, sensory, intellectual, and communication needs. Garland's research interest encompass the intersection of behavioral and communication needs in adults with ASD. After graduation, she plans to work with adults with autism in an integrated community setting.

Kim Garner

Kim Garner, M.S., CCC-SLP, received both her bachelor's and master's degrees from Kent State University. Over the past 20 years, she has practiced as a pediatric therapist at St. Elizabeth Medical Center in Youngstown, OH, at the Family Child Learning Center (FCLC) in Tallmadge, OH, and at the Summit County Board of DD. Garner has also been an instructor at Kent State University in the school of Speech Pathology and Audiology. Currently, she is serving as the speech-language pathologist at FCLC for the integrated preschool program serving children on the autism spectrum.

Michelle Gifford

Michelle Gifford is president of Pickaway County People First and a graduate of Project STIR. She also serves on Pickaway County DD's Human Rights Committee. She is a proud homeowner, along with her husband, and is employed at the Pickaway County YMCA. Gifford is a powerful advocate for the rights of people with disabilities, and starred in a short film about transportation struggles in her rural community.

Corinne Gist

Corinne Gist, Ed.S, LSPSY, BCBA, is a full-time doctoral student in the Department of Special Education/Applied Behavior Analysis at The Ohio State University. A board-certified behavior analyst, Gist previously worked as a school psychologist in both public school and therapeutic day settings for 10 years. Her research interests include decreasing problem behaviors in with students with emotional and behavioral disorders and increasing social skills in students with high-functioning autism.

Kate Gladstone

Kate Gladstone, M.L.S., is a self-advocate and internationally respected specialist in handwriting instruction and remediation. Her advocacy work includes publication in the Autism Advocate. Her handwriting intervention materials include published courseware as well as a peer-reviewed journal publication. She serves on the Panel of Spectrum Advisors for the Autism Society.

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Jan Goings

Jan Goings, M.P.A., is the co-director of the University of Cincinnati Transition and Access Program and director of TAP Transition Services. She has launched innovative services in education, women's health, disability services and diversity initiatives. She has a B.S. in special education, an M.P.A. (Public Administration) and academic work in doctoral studies from Syracuse University in policy and disability. Prior to her current position, Goings held faculty positions at Xavier University and Bellarmine University and served as the COO for a community-based residential provider agency with an operating budget of 8.6 million.

Laurie Gombash

Laurie Gombash is a physical therapist with a master's degree in education. She has worked in the public school setting for over 20 years. Gombash enjoys creating challenging, yet engaging learning opportunities through the use of a multi-sensory approach to skill acquisition. She is committed to educating others in movement-enhanced learning and has a knack for turning ordinary items into fun, therapeutic tools. She is the creator of several movement products, including The ABC's of Movement®.

Maggie Gons

Maggie Gons, M.A., CCC-SLP, obtained her M.A. in speech-language pathology from the University of Cincinnati. She works as an early intervention speechlanguage pathologist and certified PLAY Project/ Teaching PLAY consultant for the Southern Ohio Council of Governments (SOCOG) and as an Early Intervention Facilitator for OCALI. Gons is the former Director of PLAY Project and Specialized Interventions at The Childhood League Center and has experience as a PLAY Project supervisor, facilitator, and trainer. She has presented at PLAY Project trainings, OCALICON, and Milestones Conference.

Melissa Good

Melissa Good has completed nine years of teaching, all within the Kenton City school district. Due to the high demand to serve preschool children, she took on the role as an itinerant intervention specialist within a preschool classroom. Along with a general education co-teacher and an education assistant, they serve a total of 36 kids ranging in age from 3-5. In 2012, Good was a member of a group that presented at the Ohio Educators Connect for Success Conference, sharing their successes and challenges of implementing the Teacher Based Teacher Teams within their grade level.

Sarah Good

Sarah Good is a preschool intervention specialist in southern Ohio. She holds degrees in early childhood education, early childhood intervention specialist, educational leadership, and is currently working towards a Ph.D. in curriculum and instruction. She is an adjunct professor at Ohio University, where she teaches introduction to early childhood education and introduction to child development. She presented at OCALICON 2016.

Kevin Gorman

Kevin Gorman, Ed. D., is the director of student services for Upper Arlington Schools. Gorman has been in education for over thirty-six years. He is the author of Breaking Down the Barriers: A Guide to Student Services Supervision.

Jennifer Govender

Jennifer Govender is an outreach specialist for The Outreach Center for Deafness and Blindness. She has 13 years of experience in the special education field including: early intervention specialist, assistive technology specialist and a teacher for visually impaired. This has provided her with the opportunity to work in-depth with diverse groups of students. She is constantly driven to research modern technology and techniques in her field to maximize educational opportunities for all students.

Joshua Graham

Josh Graham has 10 years’ experience working with people with disabilities. During those years, he has worked as an independent provider through the Franklin County Board of Developmental Disabilities, as an instructional paraprofessional in the Dublin City Schools district, and as an intervention specialist in the Dublin City Schools district. Graham excels with populations with intensive needs, especially non-verbal students who exhibit aggressive/selfinjurious behaviors. He is now the instructor of the L.I.F.E. Postsecondary Program within the Dublin City Schools district.

Amy Grattan

Amy Grattan works for the Sherlock Center on Disabilities, Rhode Island's University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, at RI College. Grattan works in collaboration with the RI Department of Education to support teachers with school-wide inclusion and educational programming for students with ASD and assists in the professional development of the state-wide early intervention autism mentor group. Prior to her work with the Sherlock Center, Grattan was an autism fellow at the RI Department of Education and a teacher of students with autism.

Amanda Gray

Amanda Gray started her career as an inner-city teacher. She has a bachelor's degree in early childhood education and a master's degree in curriculum and instruction. After five years of teaching, she decided to focus her energy on helping schools with their technology needs. She is very passionate about working with students and staff, and realizes that every child is different and unique - there is no one-size-fitsall – which makes what she does so rewarding.

Elizabeth Greene

Elizabeth L. Greene, MSW, is a 2007 graduate of the University of Cincinnati School of Social Work. A licensed social worker, she works for Summit Academy Community School in the role of behavior specialist. Greene is also an adjunct instructor at Chatfield College, a catholic college that serves nontraditional students, teaching sociology and social work.

Sandra Grether

Sandra M. Grether, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is a speechlanguage pathologist III at Cincinnati Children's Hospital in the Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics and associate professor at the University of Cincinnati in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders. Her research is in prelinguistic communication with individuals with significant cognitive disabilities, the impact of cognition on language in pediatric hearing loss and cognitive disabilities, childhood apraxia of speech, and augmentative communication. She has been with DDBP for 18 years and a practicing clinician for 43 years.


P RESE NTE R S Deborah Grzybowski

Deborah Grzybowski, Ph.D., is a professor of practice in the Department of Engineering Education at The Ohio State University. She received her Ph.D. in biomedical engineering and her M.S. in chemical engineering from OSU. Prior to becoming focused on broadening participation in engineering, her research was on regulation of intracranial pressure and transport across the blood-brain barrier in addition to various ocular-cellular responses to fluid forces and their implications in ocular pathologies. Grzybowski's research is on increasing participation of students with disabilities using modeling, and under-represented minority students through artsintegrated approaches like STEAM.

Erica Hackett

Erica Thompson-Hackett, M.Ed., is an educator who is passionate about student growth and independence. She believes students are best served using a multidisciplinary approach. Hackett graduated from the University of Cincinnati with a B.S. in special education and an M.Ed. in educational leadership, as well as a postgraduate certificate in ABA. She has taught in both rural and urban districts with students in grades K-12. She currently works for the Warren County Educational Services Center as a behavior coach and curriculum consultant.

Jason Hague

Jason Hague is associate pastor at Christ's Center Church in Junction City, OR, where he was a member of the pastoral team that developed Open Heaven's Room, a classroom helping families with autism be able to attend services. Hague blogs at Jason Hague, Writer: Faith, Fatherhood, Autism, and has had his work featured in Prodigal Magazine and The Mighty. He also wrote and directed the viral short film A Reflection of Aching Joy, an ode to his son with autism. Through writing and preaching, Hague has worked to educate his own congregation about autism and the need for a loving community to support families.

Sarah Hall

Sarah Hall, Ph.D., is an associate professor in the Inclusive Services and Exceptional Learners Program at Ashland University. She teaches special education courses in transition, collaboration, behavior management, assessment, and educational intervention. Her research includes social inclusion of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and the concerns of their siblings. Hall is the chair of Ohio SIBS and has an older brother with multiple disabilities.

Julie Hammer

Julie Hammer, MOT, OTR/L is an OT at Kenton City Schools. She studied OT at the University of Findlay, where she received a master's degree. She has worked in pediatrics for 12 years. Prior to working in the school system, Hammer worked at Lima Memorial Health System providing inpatient and outpatient services to newborn through adult patients. She is Sensory Integration and Praxis (SIPT) certified. She enjoys collaborating with students, families, and staff to provide successful opportunities for students in the school environment.

Christopher Hanks

Christopher Hanks, M.D., is board-certified in internal medicine and pediatrics. His clinical career focuses on improving access and quality of care for individuals with ASD, and his research centers on improving education and training of medical providers in the care of individuals with ASD and other developmental disabilities as they transition to adult medical care settings. Hanks is the Medical Director with The Center for Autism Services and Transition (CAST) at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. The CAST program has been under his leadership since opening in 2014 and provides care to over 500 individuals with autism.

Catina Harding

Beth Ann Hatkevich

Chris Harrington

Rachel Haupt

Catina Harding, MSW, is the executive director of The Great Lakes Collaborative for Autism. She also serves as facilitator for the Toledo Regional Autism Network. Harding began her career as an operations manager for a global marketing research firm. In that leadership role, she helped countless employees deal with unique issues and needs. Combining a business background, social work skills, and a passion for serving families in the community, she has developed a broad understanding of the unique needs of a nonprofit organization.

Chris Harrington is a full-time college student studying business and risk management at Ohio Dominican University. He also works part-time for Apple and offers accessibility training for various assistive technologies. Harrington’s hobbies include music, cars, and woodworking.

Cariann Harsh

Cariann Harsh, M.P.A., MBA, Ed.M., is a PCG human services senior advisor with expertise in disability. She focuses on autism, developmental/ intellectual disabilities, brain injury, and co-morbid behavior. Harsh spent over a decade as director of the Massachusetts' Autism Division, developing and administering programs for children/young adults. Harsh is committed to scaling employment models with demonstrated outcomes for transitional-age youth with autism by creating linkages between the public and private sector.

Connie Hartman

Connie Hartman received a bachelor of science in nursing degree from The Ohio State University and a master's degree in speech from the University of Akron. She has worked in the field of developmental disabilities and public health throughout her career. Hartman's professional emphasis is on enhancing communication skills of individuals and supporting their ability to interact within their community and other environments. In her current role as an assistive technology specialist, she helps individuals reach their educational and employment goals.

Becky Haselberger

Becky Haselberger has 10 years of experience working with students with differing abilities. She has specialized training in autism and was an intervention specialist in a resource room for students with autism. She has been working with students and families in postsecondary transition for seven years, and excels in the areas of differentiation, program development, program leadership, creativity-based and visualthinking strategies, program staff collaboration and team work, community-based instruction, and community partnerships. She participated in the autism certification series ASD Strategies in Action.

Melissa Haskins-Berger

Melissa Haskins-Berger is the transition coordinator for Berea City Schools. Her education background includes a bachelor's degree in K-12 special education, a master's degree in administration, and a transition to work endorsement. She participates in interagency collaboration with community members, school staff, career center staff, and adult service providers including Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities and the Cuyahoga County Board of Developmental Disabilities. Haskins-Berger is a member of the Berea City School District Autism Team, Berea City Schools Business Advisory Council, and the Berea Schools Parent Advisory Council.

Beth Ann Hatkevich, Ph.D., is an associate professor in the occupational therapy doctoral program at the University of Toledo. As an OT, Hatkevich has developed and participated in programming that focuses on the transitional needs of adolescents with I/DD. Her clinical background includes experience working with individuals in both rehabilitation and mental health settings. She is a recognized leader in community-based practice models for OT. Hatkevich's research interests include aging individuals with I/DD, as well as at-risk adolescents and adults.

Rachel Haupt is a second-year doctoral student in the school psychology program at Kent State University, where she also completed a master's degree in school psychology. She has received grant money to present at regional and national conferences on the issues of stress, perception, and social support. Haupt currently holds a graduate assistantship in the Grants Administration Office within the College of Education, Health, and Human Services. Within this role, she assists faculty in identifying funding opportunities and develops budgetary documents for grant proposals.

Kristen Helling

Kristen Helling joined Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities as an assistant deputy director for the Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation. She oversees interagency agreements, including the Employment First Task Force. Previously, she worked for the Ohio DODD as community advisor for the Division of Policy and Strategic Direction, where she led implementation of the governor's Employment First Executive Order. Helling was named a 2015 Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program ambassador for the U.S. Department of Labor's Office of Disability Employment Policy.

Stephanie Holladay

Stephanie Holladay received her undergraduate degree in psychology at Kennesaw State University. She is currently an assistant behavior analyst at ABC of North Carolina Child Development Center, a specialized program for students with ASD in Winston Salem. The center provides a variety of educational services, including 1:1 and small-group instruction, parent education services, social skills groups, and professional workshops. Holladay has been working with children who have autism for nearly nine years in home- and center-based programs.

Sharon Horn

Sharon W. Horn has taught children with disabilities for over 30 years, including at the Medina County Board of Disabilities.

Britta Hough

Britta Hough has a master's degree in special education with a specialization in transitioning youth from school to work. She started her career as a teacher, and became an employment-focused SSA for the Cuyahoga County Board. Hough completed the Ohio Employment First MAP training. She worked on the Employment Navigation Project for NE Ohio, and is currently an employment and community engagement project manager for DODD. Hough has much experience providing technical assistance and trainings throughout the state to implement Employment First and support individuals with disabilities to move along the path to community employment.

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P RE S E N T E R S Sophie Hubbell

Sophie Hubbell serves as an assistant director and 619 coordinator in the Office of Early Learning and School Readiness at the Ohio Department of Education, where she oversees services for preschool children with disabilities. She began working for the state as the Race to the Top Early Learning Challenge Grant Assessment coordinator, responsible for coordinating the development and implementation of Ohio’s Early Childhood Comprehensive Assessment System in collaboration with Maryland. She is licensed to teach children with and without disabilities from grade P-3 in Ohio. Hubbell holds an educational specialist degree in special education and a master’s degree in child development.

Charla Hutchinson

Charla Hutchinson, M.Ed., BCBA, is a program supervisor at ABC of North Carolina. She is a boardcertified behavior analyst and has worked with children, adolescents, and adults with autism and intellectual disabilities in both the public and private sectors for 18 years. She has a bachelors' degree in psychology from Meredith College and a master's degree in special education from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Hutchinson also holds a postgraduate certification in behavioral intervention in autism from the University of Massachusetts, Lowell.

Doug Jackson

Amber Huber is an early childhood intervention specialist at Little Miami, where she teaches an integrated Pre-K model. Half of her students receive special services (OT, PT, and/or speech), where the therapists push-in the classroom; the other half of the students pay tuition to attend. Huber is in her sixth year of teaching. Prior to teaching, she attended Miami University in Oxford, OH, where she received a licensure as an early childhood intervention specialist and a mild-moderate intervention specialist.

Doug Jackson serves as the deputy director of STABLE Accounts for the Office of the Ohio Treasurer of State. He has been dedicated to the field of developmental disabilities for over 18 years, and works with a passion to serve people with disabilities and their families through improving the support system and support staff. Jackson's experiences include managing the services of a direct support agency, executive administration in Ohio's County Board of DD system, teaching human services classes at Wright State University, and serving as superintendent of a state-operated developmental center.

Bobby Huffman

Lori Jackson

Amber Huber

Bobby Huffman is an intervention and behavioral specialist at Tremont Elementary in the Upper Arlington School District with 10 years' teaching experience. He holds a master's degree in ABA from The Ohio State University. During his studies at Ohio State, Huffman's research interests targeted special interests and published one of these studies in the journal Behavior Analysis in Practice. He has presented at various conferences in Ohio and the midwest, including OCALICON, OHABA Conference, and the ABAI Conference.

Jocelynn Hughes

Jocelynn Hughes is a licensed professional counselor at Step By Step Academy, a non-profit mental health center delivering exceptional results to individuals with autism, developmental disabilities, and mental illness. She received a master's in education from the University of Dayton. Hughes is currently pursuing board-certified behavior analyst certification from the University of North Texas. Prior to becoming an LPC, she was a registered behavior technician, providing ABA to individuals ages 3-22 with autism and other behavioral disorders.

Patrick Henry Hughes

Patrick Henry Hughes is a 29-year-old multiinstrumental musician, speaker, and author from Louisville, KY. He first came to national prominence in 2006 while a student at the University of Louisville, where he played trumpet as a member of the Louisville Marching Band. Born without eyes and unable to fully straighten his arms or legs, Hughes and his father made a great team, with the elder Hughes pushing Patrick in his wheelchair through the marching routines. Hughes is the author of I Am Potential: Eight Lessons on Living, Loving, and Reaching Your Dreams. His life is dramatized in the 2015 film I Am Potential.

Karin Humble

Karin Humble is a paraprofessional with Dublin City Schools. She has been working with children with special needs in both school and home environments for the past 20 years. In 2015, Humble participated in the filming of the ASD Strategies in Action training series for OCALI. She has presented to other paras within Dublin City Schools, sharing ways to modify the curriculum to give all students access to learning.

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Lori Jackson is an educational psychologist who has extensive experience working with students and families with ASD and other global disabilities. She is the co-director of the Connections Program, which serves public school students with autism spectrum disorders, emotional behavioral disorders, and other low-incidence disabilities. Jackson has presented nationally on new methods and approaches for working with students with ASD and other significant disabilities.

Regina Jankowski

Regina J Jankowski received a B.S. Ed., with concentration in art education from the University of Toledo. She is the Family Center manager for Toledo Museum of Art, a hands-on family learning center that services over 30,000 visitors per year. Jankowski has over 25 years of experience in early childhood education and has a strong interest in visual literacy and language development.

Selene Johnson

Selene Johnson, M.Ed., BCBA, is the executive director of ABC of North Carolina Child Development Center, a specialized program for students with autism that provides a variety of services, including 1:1 and group instruction, parent education, social skills groups, professional workshops, and diagnostic services. Johnson has worked with students with autism for more than 20 years and has presented at state and national conferences. She is a boardcertified behavior analyst and a previously licensed special education teacher.

Phyllis Jones

Phyllis Jones, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Teaching and Learning at the University of South Florida. She is author/co-author/editor of eight books including Curricula for Students With Severe Disabilities: Narratives of Standards-Referenced Good Practice. Jones is also published widely in international journals related to inclusive practices, teacher learning for teachers of students with severe intellectual disabilities and/or ASD, and teaching students with significant disabilities. She has worked in England, Ireland, New Zealand, Thailand, and Mexico.

Susan Jones

Susan Jones, M.S., is a consultant for Ohio Association of County Boards focusing on children and families. She has a B.S. from Bowling Green State University and a master's in education administration from the University of Dayton. She is a licensed speech-language pathologist and supervisor of special education, and has been instrumental in providing technical assistance and training to advance Ohio in EBEI service provision through the Bridging the Gaps in Ohio Part C Service Delivery Project. Jones has expertise in the use of technology to expand and enhance EBEI as well as in Parent Responsiveness: Play to Talk curriculum.

Brittany Joseph

Brittany Joseph, M.Ed,. is an instructor in the College of Education and Human Development at Bowling Green State University, where she teaches undergraduate courses in special education within the School of Intervention Services. She is also a board member of iTaalk Autism Foundation in Toledo and Pathway Inclusion Center in Port Clinton. Joseph is actively involved in Venture Bound at Perrysburg High School, Toledo Regional Autism Network, Great Lakes Collaborative for Autism, and Northwest Ohio Apraxia Support.

Jacob Kaplan

Jacob Kaplan graduated from the Ohio State School for the Blind and later attended Columbus State Community College for three years. Kaplan uses his computer in a unique way due to vision loss and physical challenges. He also attends Learning Never Ends part-time, where he enjoys bowling and ceramics.

Alayne Kazin

Alayne Kazin, CTRS, is the service area coordinator for the Cincinnati Recreation Commission’s Division of Therapeutic Recreation. Kazin has a B.S. in recreation and park administration from Indiana University and an M.A. in physical education/recreation education from The Ohio State University. Since 2001, she has worked in the community setting for CRC as an inclusion specialist, inclusion coordinator and in her current position as a service area coordinator.

Joe Keith

Joe Keith, Ph.D., is a school psychologist for Upper Arlington schools.

Sarah Kelly

Sarah Kelly is the program services manager for the Bureau of Services for the Visually Impaired at Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities, as well as a certified orientation and mobility specialist. Kelly has worked in vocational rehabilitation for over five years, specializing in providing services and supports to individuals with visual impairments.

Charles Kemp

Charles W. Kemp, Ed.D., is the supervisor of special education for Portsmouth City Schools, where he serves as a trainer of building- and district-level autism teams. His case study research investigated state-level leaders' perceptions of district readiness to include students with low-incidence disabilities. Kemp has presented at state and national conferences on the topics of preparing the paraprofessional for the work of today's classrooms, designing comprehensive programming for students with autism, building social-emotional competence in young children with autism, and co-teaching for cooperating teachers and teacher candidates.


P RESE NTE R S Michael Kennedy

Michael Kennedy has been a member of the Linden Grove School staff for three years. He holds a master's degree in education from Marygrove College and a bachelor of science in elementary education from Wright State University. He has taught elementary and middle school grades for 25 years in rural, suburban, and urban settings. Kennedy has instructed the LEGO Robobtics and Build to Express (BTE) programs at Linden Grove School since 2015, and is responsible for presenting the benefits of these programs during the LGS Parent Sampler Nights.

Laurie Kettle-Rivera

Laurie Kettle-Rivera began her career in deaf education as a secondary English language arts teacher and then English language arts specialist K-12. She became coordinator of statewide services for deaf and hard of hearing students served by Delaware Statewide Programs, and currently serves at interim director of Delaware School for the Deaf and Delaware Statewide Programs for the Deaf, Hard of Hearing, and Deaf-Blind. Kettle-Rivera has presented at the local, state, and national levels on topics ranging from curriculum mapping, to early intervention services, to literacy development of deaf/ HH students.

Lezlie Fahl Kinder

Lezlie Fahl Kinder, OTR/L, is an OT in Lake County, OH, where she provides services, primarily to students on the autism spectrum. She has worked with children with special needs for over 30 years. She has also presented to parents, educators and others on subjects such as technology, supporting sensory/ behavioral needs, fine-motor skills, integrated service provision, and supporting mental health. Kinder has great interest in collaboration and helping to empower all members of educational teams to use effective, user-friendly strategies with students.

Renee Klusman

Renee Klusman, MOT, earned a master's degree in OT from the University of Indianapolis. She has 20 years of experience in Ohio, with 11 years in the medical field and nine years in school-based pediatrics. She is a registered member of the NBCOT. For the past nine years, Klusman's career focus has been on high school education, including vocational training and transition. She presented at the Ohio ACTE/SND & OASCES Transition Conference in 2016 on the topic of in-school vocational programs.

Judy Knisely

Judy Knisely is regional representative of the Helen Keller National Center North Central Region 5, serving OH, MI, IN, IL, MN, and WI. Prior to joining HKNC, she worked with HKNC's affiliate program, Ohio Deaf-Blind Outreach Program, as a deaf-blind specialist. Knisely has also provided consultant services for the Center for DeafBlind Education. In 2011, she completed the NIU-certificate program in deaf-blind rehabilitation.

Karen Koehler

Elizabeth Kunreuther

Andrew Kuzmickas

David Koppenhaver

Erin Klonne, M.S. Ed., an autism consultant for Perry Township, OH, has over 18 years of experience teaching all areas of disabilities. She currently supports transition services for secondary students at seven schools, serves on the district's assistive technology team, and provides educational and behavioral support and training to the staff, students, and parents of students with ASD. She has been instrumental in implementing the district's structured teaching classrooms, a flexible resource model classroom for students on the autism spectrum. Klonne is also the mother of a teenager on the autism spectrum.

Jennifer Krumins is the owner of Autism Aspirations and Autism Aspirations Academy. A passionate international speaker, educator, certified leadership coach, and author, Krumins is a firm believer that individuals with autism are here to teach, lead, and challenge us to become the best version of ourselves as individuals, families, and a society. Having taught in Ontario, Canada, for 25 years, she holds a master of education in applied psychology and has studied special education and autism extensively. Krumins has three young-adult children (one of whom has autism).

Moira Konrad

Jodi Kirk

Erin Klonne

Jennifer Krumins

Elizabeth Kunreuther, MSW, has both personal and professional connections to autism and substance use disorder. Before receiving a master's in social work, she worked for ten years as the family intake coordinator for the Raleigh office of the University of North Carolina's TEACCH Autism Program. Kunreuther served as the family recruitment coordinator for the Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities' Autism Research Registry, and is currently a clinical instructor with UNC Department of Psychiatry working as a counselor for the Addictions and Detoxification Unit at the UNC WakeBrook campus in Raleigh.

Mackenzie King is in her first year of OT graduate school at Eastern Kentucky University. In addition, she is a graduate assistant for the housing department and works with retention initiatives, particularly those directed toward students with disabilities, including autism. King is also a part of the prestigious autism certificate program at Eastern Kentucky.

Jodi Kirk, M.A., is an arts educator, director, and actor, who has worked extensively in Northeast Ohio theater for more than 25 years. She formerly served as director of theater at Laurel School, associate artistic director at Near West Theater, and director of the school residency program at Great Lakes Theater. She is a graduate of the University of Mount Union and earned an M.A. in theater from Bowling Green State University. As a theater educator, Kirk has taught and worked with Cleveland School of the Arts, Lorain County Community College, Cleveland Signstage, and BGSU.

Elizabeth Koss is a doctoral candidate in the Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Ph.D. program at The Ohio State University. She is an OT with an emphasis in pediatrics and works in the school system through Columbus Therapy Associates. Koss received a master's in OT from The Ohio State University and a bachelor's of science in psychology from Lindenwood University.

Karen Koehler is completing a Ph.D. at The Ohio State University. She has an M.A. in special education, a B.S. in science education, and is a certified TVI at The Ohio State School for the Blind. She serves on the boards of the Division on Visual Impairments and Deafblindness of CEC and the Ohio Chapter of AERO. She has published in special education journals and is a co-author of book chapters on science education for students with special needs. She has presented at state, regional, and national conferences on STEM education for students with disabilities, 3D printing, and standardized testing accessibility.

Moira Konrad, Ph.D., is an associate professor of special education at The Ohio State University. Her primary research interests include self-determination, literacy, and integrating life skills instruction into academic instruction. Konrad has nine years of public school experience teaching students with a range of disabilities and has been involved in teacher preparation for over 15 years. She currently serves as managing editor for Career Development for Exceptional Individuals and as associate editor for Intervention in School and Clinic.

Mackenzie King

Elizabeth Koss

David Koppenhaver, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Reading Education and Special Education at Appalachian State University. He earned a Ph.D. in curriculum and instruction from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research focuses on literacy in children with significant disabilities including ASD, intellectual disabilities, complex communication needs, and multiple disabilities. His current research includes a study of visual attention to print in young children with Rett syndrome, development of an emergent literacy program for students with significant disabilities, and a study of reading comprehension in students with Down syndrome.

Heather Rushmore Koren

Heather Rushmore Koren began her career as an SLP assistant for people with severe and profound disabilities. She received a master’s in rehabilitation science and technology from the University of Pittsburgh. Rushmore Koren worked for United Cerebral Palsy as an AT specialist, developing communication and vocational training programs. At the University of Washington’s Center for Technology and Disability Studies, she worked in the outpatient computer access evaluation lab and provided training to rehabilitation therapists and school professionals. She taught AT classes at East Carolina University, directed the AT lab, and developed an online graduate certificate program.

Andrew “Drew” Kuzmickas has been a special education coordinator for Strongsville Schools for nearly five years. He has presented to staff and parents on multiple topics, including executive functioning, UDL, and supporting students with behavioral challenges; he also coordinates the nonviolent crisis intervention training. Before working in Strongsville, Kuzmickas was a school psychologist for eight years. He follows OCALI closely and reviews autism internet modules in monthly staff meetings.

Paul LaCava

Paul G. LaCava, Ph.D., is an associate professor of special education at Rhode Island College. He directs two graduate programs and teaches courses in special education, assessment, research, and autism. He also conducts research at RIC's Paul V. Sherlock Center on Disabilities. LaCava has published and presented on topics such as PBIS, ASD historical perspectives, legal and policy matters, socialemotional methods, evidence-based practices, and technology.

Judi Lamarre

Judi Lamarre started her career 37 year ago teaching elementary students with special needs. Motivated by her parents' struggle with her sister, who was born with microcephaly, Lamarre's passion was to create a school environment where all students were respected, valued, and understood. Understanding that fair is not always equal, she has worked tirelessly to ensure that all students and staff understand this concept as it applies to social and academic success. Lamarre is currently the principal of South Elementary School, which is one of 47 schools statewide to receive a level one accountability rating from the state of Massachusetts.

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P RE S E N T E R S Joan Breslin Larson

Joan Breslin Larson, M.Ed., provides consulting services in assistive technology, systems change, and practice. She is the former supervisor for lowincidence disabilities at the Minnesota Department of Education. She has worked in AT for over 25 years as an independent consultant, in a school setting, and at the state education agency. Larson is the parent of three adult children, one of whom had an IEP. She is a member of the QIAT Leadership Team and a coauthor of Quality Indicators for Assistive Technology: A Comprehensive Guide to AT Services.

Tara Lavelle

Tara Lavelle, Ph.D., is an assistant professor at the Tufts Medical Center Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies and an investigator at the Center for the Evaluation of Value and Risk in Health. Her research and interests focus on the cost and value of health care services, and in advancing the use of comparative and cost-effectiveness research in vulnerable populations, including children. Lavelle earned her Ph.D. in health policy with a concentration in decision science from Harvard University and was a postdoctoral research fellow in the Child Health Evaluation and Research Unit in the Division of General Pediatrics at the University of Michigan.

Andy Leach

Andy Leach has worked for HIMS since June of 2012 as a regional sales manager based in the suburbs of Dayton. Before HIMS, he worked for Freedom Scientific and Dolphin Computer Access in various capacities largely focused on business development. Previously, Leach was a computer programmer for EDS and worked on the GMAC account. Blind since birth, he has relied on access technology and has watched it evolve over time. He holds an M.B.A. from Clemson University and a B.S.C. in telecommunication systems management from Ohio University.

Bryston Lee

Bryston Lee has worked in the field of developmental disabilities since 2002, working as an ABA therapist in a home-based program while still in college. She graduated from The Ohio State University with a specialized bachelor's degree in behavior and communication disorders. Bryston has since worked as an educational program specialist, and a service and support administrator. In her current role she also serves as a Good Life facilitator, trauma informed care trainer, People First advisor, and behavior support liaison.

Ross Leighner

Ross Leighner, M.A., is a child behavior support specialist at The Ohio State University Nisonger Center. He is a former intervention specialist, who worked at the Ohio School for the Deaf and with Hilliard City School District as a behavior specialist. Leighner has a master's in ABA and a bachelor's in moderate-intensive special education with a minor in disability studies. His research interests focus on working with and training others to work with lowincidence populations (i.e., multiple disabilities, deaf, HOH, and deafblind).

Danielle Levesque

Danielle Levesque, M.A.Ed., is an intervention specialist at New Albany High School in New Albany. Levesque has served students with low-incidence disabilities since 2011 in a variety of roles, as an adult day program volunteer, camp counselor, educational assistant, service provider, substitute teacher, Special Olympics volunteer, and in her latest role as a teacher in a cross-categorical classroom. Levesque is passionate about creating authentic inclusion opportunities for all students, regardless of ability.

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Tracy Lezark

Tracy Lezark has been a teacher's assistant and has worked with children with a wide range of disabilities for over 20 years. She is very passionate about increasing the quality of life for children with special needs. She implements routines, procedures, and IEP goals set by the teacher, and enjoys volunteering with Special Olympics.

Nancy Likens

Nancy Likens, B.A. Family/Child Development, University of Akron, has served as director of the Soprema Senior Center for 15 years. She is vice chair of the Cleveland Area Long Term Care Ombudsman Board of Trustees, chair of the Medina County Public Transit Consortium, and a member of the University of Akron National Alumni Board. Throughout her 30-year career, Likens has worked to expand opportunities for older persons and remains a strong advocate for them. Most recently, she received the Western Reserve Area Agency on Aging Excellence in Leadership Award and the 2015 Promising Practices Award from Mather LifeWays Institute on Aging.

Ashley Logan

Ashley Logan is the designated employment navigator at the Logan County Board of DD. She began using backwards planning while earning her degrees in psychology and social work at Wilmington College, and has continued to use those practices as a group home supervisor and now with transition youth at the county board. She uses multi-agency planning to streamline the process of getting individuals from high school graduation to their future goals. Logan recently presented on MAP at the Employment Navigation Now Conference in Lucas County and is also assisting Darke and Hardin Counties in facilitating their MAP framework.

Jim Loomis

Jim Loomis, Ph.D., is a child and family psychologist and the director of adult services at the Center for Children with Special Needs, specializing in ASD and developmental disabilities. Loomis received a doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Michigan, completed a fellowship at the Deveroux Foundation, and postdoctoral training at the Kantor Family Institute. He is a licensed psychologist in Connecticut and clinical faculty at the Yale Child Study Center. He is the author of Staying in the Game: Providing Social Opportunities for Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Other Developmental Disabilities.

Michele Louk

Michele Louk, M.A., CCC-SLP, works with young adults with disabilities across high school and postsecondary settings. She specializes in group based intervention that focuses on social, vocational, and life skills development.

Abigail Love

Abigail Love, M.S., received a B.S. in deaf education and elementary education from Eastern Kentucky University and her master's in educational psychology from the University of Kentucky. She has worked in Australia as a special education teacher, focusing on supporting students with autism. She founded an alternative learning environment for homeschooled students, and currently works as an advocate for individuals with autism. Love also has experience teaching preservice teachers. Her research interests include teacher motivation and beliefs, improving educational experiences for disability populations, and building community partnerships.

Kim Luedde

Kim Luedde has taught for over 30 years. Life skills is her passion as a result of having a sister with Down syndrome. She became a national board-certified teacher in 2010. In January 2015, she became part of a team that redesigned the life skills program in her district. That fall, Luedde became a Teacher on Special Assignment, heading up implementation of these changes across the district. In addition, she designed and implemented an off-campus transition program, speaks on this subject to local groups, and has presented this innovative program via webcast across the state of Wyoming.

Pamela Luft

Pamela Luft, Ph.D., is an associate professor of special education at Kent State University and the director of the deaf education program. She received an M.Ed. in deaf education from McDaniel College, an M.S. in technology for persons with disabilities from Johns Hopkins University, and a Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her research and grant projects have focused on transition services and rehabilitation services for the deaf. She has published on issues related to transition, technology employment of persons with disabilities, literacy, special education policy, and instructional practices.

Kelly Lusk

Kelly Lusk is the chair of the low vision rehabilitation division of the Association for Education and Rehabilitation of the Blind and Visually Impaired. She studied at Vanderbilt University, receiving a doctorate in special education, with an emphasis in teaching children with visual impairments. Lusk is adjunct faculty at several universities, serves on professional committees and advisory boards, and has testified as an expert witness in helping to provide appropriate special education services for a child with a visual impairment. She has co-authored multiple textbook chapters, had her research published in various journals, and has presented extensively.

Kelly Mahler

Kelly Mahler, M.S., OTR/L, is an OT and autism consultant. She has presented numerous workshops at the international and national level. Mahler is the author of four books: Interoception: The Eighth Sensory System; Sensory Issues and High-Functioning Autism (with Myles and Robbins) – winner of 2015 National Parenting Publications Bronze Medal; Destination Friendship (with Benton, Hollis, and Womer); and Hygiene and Related Behaviors – winner of Mom's Choice Awards Gold Medal 2011.

Denise Malkovits

Denise Malkovits works as a consultant with State Support Team Region 5 in Ohio, specializing in inclusive best practices, including co-teaching strategies and structures and universal design for learning. She has taught both general and special education at the elementary, middle, and high school levels. She was a special education supervisor for four years for a small rural district in Ohio. Malkovits earned two master's of education degrees from Youngstown State University, one in reading and the other in administration.

John Marble

John Marble is an autistic self-advocate. A former journalist, he was appointed by President Obama in 2009 to serve as a presidential appointee at the U.S. Office of Personnel Management. There, he helped implement White House policy on workforce planning, which included recruitment, retention, and diversity efforts. He currently works as a writer on numerous subjects, including issues related to neurodiversity and autistic culture. In 2017, he began working with Silicon Valley on efforts to recruit and retain autistic talent.


P RESE NTE R S Dee Marks

Jennifer McDonough

Bonnie Marquis

Christine McElfresh

Dee Marks, mother of two children with significant disabilities, has advocated for her children to be fully included in their school and community. Marks has a strong background in special education law and the ability to foster positive, collaborative communication. She is an Ohio Parent Mentor for Dublin City Schools, helping families navigate the special education process. Marks also teaches a course on transition at Ohio Dominican University to students studying to be special education teachers.

Bonnie Marquis, M.A., is a special educator with more than 25 years of experience teaching with a focus on behavioral issues both at home and in the classroom. She currently works with the West Virginia Autism Training Center at Marshall University as a clinical instructor and positive behavior support trainer, serving families and school communities throughout southwestern West Virginia.

Kerry Mataya

Kerry Mataya, M.S.Ed., is the executive director of Bridgeway Services, providing individualized and group intervention-based services in social development, problem solving, perspective taking, academics, self-awareness, behavior regulation, and executive functioning. Mataya holds many contracts with school systems and hosts summer camps. She co-authored Successful Problem-Solving for High-Functioning Students With Autism Spectrum Disorders and Talk With Me: A Framework to Teach Conversational Balance and Fluency, and is working on additional projects that systemize learning for students with ASD.

Andrea May

Andrea K. May, MSW, LSW is the behavior specialist/ performance coach for the Summit Academy Transition High School in Cincinnati. Prior to joining Summit Academy's team, she worked with Ena, Inc. (dba Necco Therapeutic Foster Care) as a home resource assessor and helped start an independent living scatteredsite program. May started her career at Child Focus, Inc., in the Head Start program before transferring to the therapeutic foster care program as the licensing specialist and case manager. She received both her BSW and LSW from The University of Cincinnati.

Erin Mayberry

Erin Mayberry, M.S., has a bachelor's degree in early childhood education, a master's of science in ABA from Simmons College in Boston, and is a board-certified behavior analyst. She has worked in the field for over 10 years, providing services to individuals with developmental disabilities in home, school, clinic, and community settings, as well as providing parent training on behavior reduction and reinforcement-based strategies. Mayberry presented “Promoting Weight Management in Individuals With Developmental Disabilities: A Behavioral Approach” at the NAQ conference in New Orleans.

Ginger McDonald

Ginger McDonald, OTR/L, a graduate of the University of Wisconsin, has practiced OT for over 40 years, mostly in the Dayton area, working in hospital, school, and geriatric settings. With Bhanu Raghavan, a colleague in the Centerville City Schools, they conceived the idea for Self-Care with Flair! (Published by Therapro, Inc. 2012). They presented their idea at the AOTA national conference in 2012 and 2013, the annual conference of the British Association of Occupational Therapists in 2014, as well as numerous state and local OT conferences throughout the Midwest.

Jennifer Todd McDonough, M.S., has been a faculty member at Virginia Commonwealth University and worked in the field of employment for people with disabilities for over 15 years. She earned her M.S. from the Medical College of Virginia at Virginia Commonwealth University in rehabilitation counseling. McDonough is the associate director of training at VCU-RRTC and the project coordinator for the Vocational Rehabilitation Service Models for Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorders DRRP.

Christine McElfresh, Ph.D., earned a doctorate in physical therapy from Duquesne University. McElfresh has worked in public and specialized school settings, providing direct physical therapy services to children with disabilities, supervising physical therapy assistants, and providing consultation to parents, teachers, and administrators. A guest lecturer for introduction to special education and sensory-motor classes at North Central State College and Ashland University, she has also presented for MOESC's Diverse Learners Series in areas of reflex integration, incorporating movement with academics and motor planning.

Daniel McNulty

Daniel McNulty, M.S., is the state director for the PATINS Project, a non-profit state-wide technical assistance network for the provision of assistive/ accessible technology and acquisition/creation of accessible educational materials. He presents nationally on assistive technology, UDL, accessible educational materials, and including all students in the general education programming with increased achievement. McNulty holds a master's in education from Purdue University with licensing in K-12 Moderate-Severe Disabilities. His experiences include UDL pilot program lead, ISTE SETSIG/PLN board member at large, and NIMAS/AIM coordinator for the state of Indiana.

Heather Meeker

Heather Meeker, MFA, serves as executive director for The Musical Theater Project (TMTP), an arts education non-profit based in Cleveland, OH. She has directed programming, public relations, and fundraising efforts for arts, education, and cultural nonprofits for more than 25 years, including the National Inventors Hall of Fame, Hiram College, and Young Audiences of Northeast Ohio. Meeker is a graduate of Hiram College, earned her MFA in theater at Virginia Tech, and serves on the adjunct faculty of Hiram's Professional and Graduate Studies Program.

Marina Mendel

Marina Mendel recently graduated from University of Dayton with a degree in intervention specialty and a minor in psychology. She student taught at Beavercreek High School, where she worked with students with high-functioning autism on communication and social skills. The class consists of typical students who act as peer mentors to support students with HFA and social deficits. She also worked with a young boy with autism in ABA, as part of a team to create a sensory room and a system to help him use the toilet effectively.

Lisa Meyer

Lisa Meyer has worked in the human services field for more than 35 years. She got her grassroots start in the disabilities system by providing direct in-home support to people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and people in need of emotional health/behavioral health support. Meyer supports states with the implementation of person centered systems, person centered thinking (PCT) training, coaching, plan facilitation training, and PCT Trainer credentialing.

Amanda Michaud

Amanda Michaud has a bachelor's degree in elementary education and over 10 years of experience teaching in inclusion classrooms. She has taught multiple grade levels in both urban and suburban settings. She is currently working with multiple students in a full inclusion behavioral support program serving students with autism and other behavioral needs. In January 2017, she co-presented for the Community of Practice in Autism Education at Rhode Island College. She shared classroom strategies that can be used to promote full inclusion of all students, specifically those with autism, into the general classroom setting.

Timothy Mikes

Tim Mikes graduated from Kent State University with a bachelor of science in public health. He has extensive knowledge of special education since he had an IEP his entire educational career. Mikes has given a presentation with Dr. Lisa Audet on how first responders can assist college students with ASD in emergency cases. He has also been on the Autism Taskforce and assisted in creating a student organization with other students with ASD. He would like to thank his parents and many others who helped him become the advocate he is today.

Alison Miller

Alison Miller is pursuing a master’s degree from Western Michigan University in behavior analysis and is expected to graduate in December 2017. Upon graduating, she intends to pursue certification as a board-certified behavior analyst.

Matt Mobilio

Matt Mobilio is a middle school math and robotics teacher and director of technology at Linden Grove School. He has over 10 years of experience in working with students with ASD. Mobilio is credited for spearheading the integration of the LEGO education programs at LGS. In October 2015, he was the Featured Teacher in LEGO Education's e-newsletter and led a symposium on LEGO Education at LGS for the surrounding educational communities. Mobilio recently presented “Everything Is Awesome with LEGO at LGS!” at the 2016 Ohio Educational Technology Conference (OETC).

Courtney Monastra

Courtney Monastra received her moderate to intensive needs, intervention specialist degree from Bowling Green State University and a master's in literacy intervention and instruction from Cleveland State University. Monastra worked as an intervention specialist for seven years in suburban Cleveland school districts. Currently, she is an implementation specialist for Monarch Teaching Technologies, working with teachers and administrators to support VizZle in their districts.

Karen Monfort

Karen Monfort is an OT and an assistive technology specialist in Dublin City Schools. She has over 35 years' experience working with children and families across multiple settings. She has given multiple presentations and professional development training sessions for the staff of Dublin City Schools as well as the Dublin Literacy Conference, the 2010 Ohio Special Education Leadership Conference, OCALICON 2012, 2015 and 2016, and OETC in 2017.

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P RE S E N T E R S Kim Moritz

Kim Moritz earned a master's degree in education from Bowling Green State University. She has worked as a teacher in a traditional classroom setting and online, as well as for several educational technology companies. During this time, she presented at local and state conferences. In her current role as family and community engagement consultant for State Support Team 6 (SST6), Moritz combines her experience of being an educator with that of raising a child with special needs. Kim has two children, Matthew and Emma. Matthew was diagnosed as deafblind in 2010.

Cynthia Morris

Cindy Morris received her dual license to teach K-3rd grade with a 4th- and 5th-grade endorsement and K-12th-grade intervention specialist. She has taught in the multi-disability classroom in Wilmington City School district for four years. In June 2016, Morris presented at the Southern Ohio Educational Service Center Summer Learning Academy on peer autism teams and peers helping peers course. She serves on the WSC district autism team. She is a co-leader of WHS peer autism team and co-teacher of the Peer Helping Peer elective course. Morris is also the parent of an 18-year-old son with high-functioning autism.

Michelle Motil

Michelle Motil is the family support liaison for The Outreach Center for Deafness and Blindness. She received a bachelor of arts in adolescent to young adult education with a concentration in English writing from Heidelberg University. Motil is blind and has two cochlear implants. She knows braille and basic sign language, and she enjoys dancing, nature, people, and reading.

Evelyn Mylander

Evelyn C. Mylander received an undergraduate degree in child development and family relations from the University of Rhode Island, and an graduate degree in early childhood education. She holds a Pre-K license in the state of Ohio with a validation for early education of the handicapped. Mylander is an intervention specialist with Toledo Public Schools and has 25+ years' experience working with young children and their families.

Patricia Nash

Patricia Nash, M.D., director of the Down Syndrome Clinic, is a member of the Section of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics at Nationwide Children’s Hospital and a clinical associate professor at The Ohio State University College of Medicine. Her primary clinical, research, and educational interests include ADHD, autism, and Down syndrome. She received a medical degree from the Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis and completed the pediatric residency program at Indiana University Medical Center, followed by a fellowship in behavioral and developmental pediatrics at OSU’s College of Medicine and Nationwide Children’s Hospital.

Raschelle Neild

Raschelle Neild, Ph.D., completed her doctorate in special education and a master's in deaf education from the University of Kansas. She has taught PK-12th grade in a variety of settings. She is an associate professor at Gallaudet University, where she co-developed the On-Line Deaf Learners With Disabilities Certification Program. Neild's research agenda includes deaf learners with autism and special education teacher attrition and retention. She has authored several articles and book chapters, and has presented at numerous conferences. In 2015, she was awarded a Fulbright specialist grant to St. Patrick's college in Dublin, Ireland.

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Katie Nelson

Katie Nelson, M.A., CCC-SLP, graduated with a master's degree in speech-language pathology from the University of Toledo in 2009. She has worked with individuals with autism since 2006, first as a paraprofessional and then as a speech-language pathologist. In 2010, she began pursuing additional training and education in evaluating and treating individuals with no or limited verbal communication abilities. Currently, Nelson serves individuals with communication disorders in an outpatient clinic, and is a clinical program supervisor at the University of Toledo in the speech-language pathology graduate program.

Amy Nhi Nguyen

Amy Nguyen, BCBA, is an autism specialist, who advocates for family, school, and community partnership as a mother and a professional. She has 24 years of experience in special education. She is a team leader for autism support in the Los Angeles Unified School District. She had led the autism support team in program development, social emotional, and communication learning curricula for K-12 students with ASD.

Danielle Nowosiadlo

Danielle Nowosiadlo is a graduate of the University of South Florida, and is currently completing her doctorate in the University of South Florida's special education program where her research focus is autism. She teaches undergraduate preservice teachers inclusive practices. She has worked with students with exceptionalities for eight years.

Shirley O'Brien

Shirley Peganoff O'Brien, Ph.D., OTR/L, FAOTA, is a professor of OT at Eastern Kentucky University. She has clinical, research, and teaching expertise in sensory modulation, leadership, and student development theory and practice. She is published and presented on ASD, sensory issues, and implications for school performance.

Ryan Odland

Ryan Odland is an outreach consultant representing the deaf-blind constituency with the Colorado Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing. Prior to working at the commission, Odland was a regional representative serving two regions with Helen Keller National Center. Deafblind with Usher syndrome, Odland holds a bachelor degree in psychology from Rochester Institute of Technology and a master's degree in deaf education from Gallaudet University, where he taught a course on the methodological applications of the deafblind experience. He has advocated for deafblind awareness and program development at local, state, and national levels.

Allison Officer

Allison Officer, M.S., is a licensed intervention specialist (K-12) with a B.S. in education from the University of Dayton and an M.S. in education from Walden University. Officer is currently a member of the Miami Valley Autism and Low-Incidence Coaching Team, providing ongoing coaching and professional development for educational teams in using evidence-based practices throughout the Miami Valley. Prior to joining the coaching team, she taught in the Mad River Local Schools District in Riverside, OH, as a K-4 intervention specialist in a crosscategorical resource room.

Lisa Orem

Lisa Orem has been teaching for 25 years in the field of special education and in 2015 she participated in the filming of the ASD Strategies in Action training series for OCALI. Orem presented at OCALICON 2016 on how to collect data and create tasks that address individual learners' unique interests. She has also presented within Dublin City Schools to her colleagues and paraprofessionals about data collection and organizational skills within the classroom setting. Orem has supervised and mentored numerous student teachers. She is the lead intervention specialist in her current school, Thomas Elementary.

Heidi Orvosh-Kamenski

Heidi Orvosh-Kamenski, Ph.D., is a consultant with State Support Team Region 7. She works with schools around the region to build the capacity of local educational agencies to engage in systemic and sustainable improvements for students. She has taught in middle/high public schools and at the college level. She has also served as an administrator, primarily directing three comprehensive high school career and technical programs. Orvosh-Kamenski doctorate is in curriculum and instruction from New Mexico State University. She has published several journal articles and book chapters in the area of culturally relevant pedagogy.

Sandra Oxley

Sandy Oxley is chief for the Bureau of Maternal, Child and Family Health of the Ohio Department of Health. With more than 15 years of public policy, government relations and management experience, with an emphasis on children's health and system approaches, Oxley has in-depth knowledge about maternal and child health programs and the Medicaid system. Oxley most recently served as the chief executive officer at Voices for Ohio's Children.

Diane Page

Diane Page, B.A., has been a job coach for five years with the Dublin postsecondary program. Her bachelor's degree is in business administration/ psychology. As a job coach, Page's duties include finding work sites and identifying and facilitating the necessary supports for her students to become successful employees. Relationships with work sites become a partnership in receiving quality volunteer work performance for their business, while providing a work environment that teaches valuable work skills to be a good employee that can lead to a paid position. Page has a son with ASD.

Jessica Page

Jessica Page, M.Ed. is a fifth year Ph.D. student and a research assistant at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is a former teacher at Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute and has over ten years of experience as an early childhood professional primarily working in inclusive programs. Her research and professional interests focus on screening and diagnostic practices in infants/toddlers and the examination of sleep with high density electroencephalogram (hdEEG) in infants/toddlers at-risk for ASD.

Susan Palko

Susan Palko, M.Ed., is an autism program coordinator in Region 1 in Virgina. In this role, she supports Region 1 school divisions with training and technical assistance around evidence-based practices used with students with autism. She also coordinates the Communities of Leaders in Autism, a statewide initiative implemented by VCU-ACE and the TTACs.


P RESE NTE R S Ann Palmer

Ann Palmer is a parent of a son with autism, an author, presenter, and a professional who has worked with families for close to 30 years. She is a faculty member at the Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities at the University of North Carolina. She is the author of Realizing the College Dream with Autism or Asperger Syndrome: A Parent's Guide to Student Success, Parenting Across the Autism Spectrum: Unexpected Lessons We've Learned and A Friend's and Relative's Guide to Supporting the Family with Autism: How Can I Help? Palmer presents internationally on topics related to autism, developmental disabilities, and parenting.

Regina Parker

Regina Parker resides in Columbus with her husband Jeff. They have two adult daughters. The younger one has the co-occuring diagnosis of Down syndrome and ASD. Parker is a member of DSACO and an active ASCO participant. She enjoys exploring new research or commentary about co-occurring Down syndrome and ASD as her family navigates this challenging journey. In addition to coordinating day programs and various appointments for her daughter, Parker enjoys singing, reading, and spending quality time with family.

Leanne Parnell

Steve Peck

Steve Peck is a special educator with over 15 years' experience working with students who have multiple and severe disabilities, including ASD. He uses technology to augment and enhance learning and communication. Peck has built several special education programs in public schools that allow students to remain in their neighborhood school district. He has spoken nationally on teaching students with ASD and other significant disabilities strategies to keep them in the general education classroom.

Robert Pennington

Robert Pennington, Ph.D., BCBA-D, is an associate professor at the University of Louisville. He has over 25 years' experience working with individuals with disabilities, their families, and teachers. Pennington has authored 34 peer-reviewed articles and chapters related to working with persons with ASD/ID and has provided nearly 250 refereed and invited presentations to practitioners. He sits on seven editorial boards and on multiple advisory panels, including the Governor's Advisory Council on ASD. Pennington's research interests involve communication, instruction, and expanding writing repertoires for students with significant intellectual disabilities.

Leanne Parnell, B.A., is the deafblind education consultant at the Ohio Center for Deafblind Education, a federally funded project that supports children, birth through 21, with combined hearingvision loss. Parnell has a background in deaf education and earned a bachelor's degree in American Sign Language/English Interpretation. She has worked in the deaf and deafblind communities for 25 years, and has presented at both national and international conferences. Parnell recently had an article published in the Journal of Early Hearing Detection and Intervention on early identification of infants and toddlers with combined hearing and vision loss.

Ellen Perica

Leslie Paterson

Tristan Pierce

Leslie Paterson has over 35 years of experience in education, having worked with individuals with autism and related disabilities from infancy through adults. She is an OT, and also has a certificate of graduate studies in autism education. Paterson is currently the behavior support coordinator for a full inclusion program for elementary students in Massachusetts. Students are impacted with a range of disabilities, including autism and mental health conditions. All students in the program are successfully included in a rigorous academic curriculum.

Becky Payton

Becky Payton, B.S., BCaBA, is an assistant program supervisor at ABC of North Carolina, a school in Winston-Salem for children with ASD. She received a bachelor's in recreation administration from York College of PA and is credentialed as a board-certified assistant behavior analyst. Payton has led numerous parent and teacher trainings on evidence-based practices for ASD, and has presented a poster at the North Carolina Association of Behavior Analysis.

Marla Peachock

Marla Peachock is a consultant with State Support Team Region 5. Her areas of focus are school improvement, special education, PBIS, and family and community engagement. She is completing her dissertation in the area of educational leadership.

Ellen Perica, M.S., CCC-SLP, received a master's degree in speech and language pathology from Southern Illinois University. Having worked in Missouri, New Jersey, Texas, and Ohio, Perica is a member of the American Speech Hearing Association and has maintained her certificate of clinical competence throughout her career. Additionally, she has a professional license as well as teaching certification from Ohio. She has concentrated her career focus on serving the school population, with the past 15 years involved in high school education including transition. Perica has presented twice at the OSHLA annual meeting.

Tristan Pierce, B.A., MIA, is a project leader at the American Printing House for the Blind. She has worked for 37 years as a designer and creative director for educational products/publishing, with a B.A. in advertising and French and an MIA in intercultural management. She worked with teenage scholar athletes from around the world, developed art activities for international children's events, and managed a toddler house in a Haitian orphanage. She also coached swimming for 14 years at the KY School for the Blind. Pierce works part time at a campus for adults with intellectual disabilities.

Marquetta Pittman

Marquetta Pittman, MSW, is a graduate of The Ohio State University's College of Social Work and is a supervising licensed social worker. She currently serves as the regional director of special education for Summit Academy Management, where she provides oversight of special education compliance and clinical services in 13 community schools and two children's residential centers. Pittman has facilitated numerous professional development opportunities for social workers, intervention specialists, and teachers on ABA, positive behavior supports, DSM-5, clinical supervision, suicide prevention, and classroom behavior management.

Anthony Pizzuti

Anthony Pizzuti, Ph.D., PC, NCC, is a special education/school improvement consultant with the State Support Team Region 4. He is a licensed professional counselor (LPC) and a national boardcertified counselor (NCC), having received both a B.S. in psychology and master's degree in community counseling from John Carroll University, and a doctorate in urban education (counselor education) from Cleveland State University. Pizzuti has worked for over 10 years in the early childhood field as a mental health/disabilities coordinator at the federal Head Start program and as a resource teacher with the Achievement Centers for Children.

Leigh Porch

Leigh Merryday Porch is a media specialist with the Putnam County School District in Palatka, FL. She is an autism advocate and writer, whose work has been featured in the Huffington Post, What to Expect, Chicken Soup for the Soul, and The Mighty. She is the owner of and writer for the autism parenting blog Flappiness Is. Porch actively promotes the interests of autistic children and adults in Putnam County. She is the founder and president of Project Lighthouse, a nonprofit working to provide GPS tracking technology for persons vulnerable to wandering. She is a wife and mother of two, one autistic and one not.

Kristi Porter

As a training specialist for STAR Autism Support, Kristi Porter provides professional development and on-site coaching for educators and parents on implementing evidence-based practices for students with autism. She graduated from Texas Women’s University with a master’s degree in special education as an educational diagnostician. Porter has served in many different capacities in special education in Utah, Wyoming, and Texas. She had the privilege of representing educators on the Wyoming Advisory Panel for Students with Disabilities while serving as chair elect.

Greta Powell

Greta Powell has a master's degree in family and consumer studies from Kent State University. She has been an early childhood intervention specialist for over 12 years in a preschool program at the Family Child Learning Center. She has a special interest in peer intervention and working with families of children with ASD. In addition, Powell has taught a few courses at Kent State University, where she is currently completing an autism spectrum disorder certificate.

Cathy Pratt

Cathy Pratt, Ph.D., BCBA-D, is director of the Indiana Resource Center for Autism – a statewide training and technical assistance program. She has served on the board of the national Autism Society, and is immediate past chair. In 2010, she was invited to the White House. Pratt has been honored by the Autism Society, received the 2005 Princeton Fellowship Award, and has been recognized by the United States House of Representatives. In 2008, she was awarded the Distinguished Service Award by the Indiana Council of Administrators of Special Education.

Ruth Prystash

Ruth Prystash is an autism specialist and co-founder of the Reach Autism Program. She graduated from Stanford University and has worked in the field of autism for 40 years, with all ages and in a variety of settings. She is a university instructor and a private consultant with schools and families. She was a finalist for 2011 California Teacher of the Year. She is known as a lively and entertaining presenter, whose audiences are constantly surprised by her unpredictable antics and bag of toys.

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P RE S E N T E R S Caroline Pusey

Caroline Pusey is an assistive technology specialist for Anne Arundel County Public Schools. She graduated from the University of Maryland with a bachelor's of arts in hearing and speech sciences and a master's in speech-language pathology. She worked as a speech-language pathologist at Kennedy Krieger Institute, supporting students with moderate-severe cognitive and language impairments. Specializing in the implementation of AT for students with complex cognitive and communication profiles, Pusey is passionate about aiding individuals in their development of functional communication skills and loves to give a voice to a student in need!

Bhanu Raghavan

Bhanu Raghavan, M.S., OTR/L, a graduate of Indiana University and The Ohio State University, has 30 years of experience in pediatrics. In addition to being certified in pediatric neurodevelopmental treatment, she is certified in the READY Approach for SI. She has presented at the annual conferences for AOTA, the British Association of Occupational Therapy, and numerous state conferences throughout the Midwest. Additionally, she frequently gives workshops on sensory processing disorders and fine-motor development to teachers and caregivers. Watching children with autism struggle with self-care skills inspired the idea for Self-Care With Flair!

Farrah Raines

Farrah Raines, COTA/L, LMT, is employed by the East Central Ohio ESC. She has 13 years of experience in OT and 16 years in massage therapy. Raines provides OT services for the Tuscarawas County Board of DD, using her extensive background in the treatment of children and adolescents with autism and sensory processing disorders. Raines earned her degrees from Stark State College. She is certified in the sequential oral sensory (SOS) approach to feeding therapy and treats students with sensory-based feeding needs. She has been a member of the TCBDD Collaboration Team for the last two years.

Patti Ralabate

Patti Ralabate, Ed.D., a leading voice on effective instructional design for all learners, teaches for the George Washington University and CAST. Building on 25 years as a public school speech-language pathologist, nine years as the National Education Association Senior Policy Analyst for special and gifted education, and four years at CAST leading implementation and professional learning projects, Ralabate creates dynamic resources for educators, including authoring Your UDL Lesson Planner: The Step-by-Step Guide to Teaching All Learners and co-authoring Culturally Responsive Design for English Learners: The UDL Approach with Dr. Loui Lord Nelson.

Brigid Rankowski

Brigid Rankowski is artist, educator, and advocate living in Maine. She obtained a master's degree from Nova Southeastern University after her undergraduate studies at Cornell College in Iowa. Her master's degree is in developmental disabilities with emphasis on leadership and advocacy. Recently, she obtained a grant from Fund the Flow Arts to launch The Way We Move, a six-week circus/flow program for children and adults with disabilities. Her future goal is to turn it into a non-profit with a vocational track. When not doing advocacy work, Rankowski is an experienced performer. Her performance passions are storytelling and the fire arts.

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Kylee Ransbottom

Kylee Ransbottom received her bachelor's in the science of social work at The Ohio State University. She is currently the transition specialist at Bridges to Transition covering Logan and Hardin counties. She also is the facilitator for the Logan County Transition Framework Team. Ransbottom participated in the first round of MAP training through OCALI and is a MAP mentor.

Grace Reifenberg

Grace Reifenberg is a second-year OT student in the School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences at The Ohio State University, from which she also received her bachelor's of science. Reifenberg is specializing in pediatrics and has been a Nisonger Center LEND (Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities) trainee. She has presented at the Ohio Occupational Therapy Association, American Occupational Therapy Association, and Project SEARCH annual conferences, and has been published in the American Journal of Occupational Therapy.

Jenni Remeis

Jenni Remeis is the statewide coordinator for early intervention vision services and a preschool vision consultant for Statewide Support Services at the Ohio State School for the Blind. She has 19 years of teaching experience in special education. She is a board member of AERO, guest lecturer for The Ohio State University, and member of the OSU Sensory Advisory Board and Ohio EI/VI group. Remeis earned a B.A. in special education from Ohio Dominican University and an M.Ed. from OSU. Additional licensures include early childhood special education and intervention specialist-visually impaired. She is also an ACVREP-certified O&M specialist.

Kristen Clatos Riggins

Kristen Clatos Riggins is a therapeutic recreation program coordinator for the Cincinnati Recreation Commission. She facilitates a wide range of recreation and leisure services in the tri-state area of Ohio, Kentucky, and Indiana. Her professional focus has been on including individuals with disabilities in parks and recreation programs and advocating for ADA rights. She has presented at conferences such as Ohio Parks and Recreation Association, American Therapeutic Recreation Association, and other local, regional, state, and national conferences on the topics of inclusion. She is a graduate of Indiana University.

Timothy Roberts

Tim Roberts witnessed many tragedies including anger, sadness, and self-destructive behavior involving young men in the community, with many of them growing up in neighborhoods where poverty rates reached 89%. As a result, he started the B.R.I.C.K. program (brotherhood, respect, intelligence, conduct, knowledge) in 1996 to provide an alternative, helping young men think critically, solve problems, become role models, provide community service, and raise the expectations for themselves. Roberts is the father of an autistic child, who volunteers at the elementary school where he is the head of schools.

Katie Robinson

Katie Robinson works at the AT&AEM Center at OCALI in accessible materials production. She has worked in the field for seven years, producing educational materials in braille, large print, and digital text. She is a certified in both EBAE and UEB literary braille production and working toward Nemeth code certification. Robinson received her degree in computer networking administration from DeVry University. She enjoys reading, baking, and gaming.

Jan Rogers

Jan Rogers, MS, OTR/L, ATP, is the program director of the Assistive Technology & Accessible Educational Materials Center, where her work includes oversight of activities and resources designed to improve outcomes for individuals with disabilities through statewide capacity building in the area of AT supports and services. She has worked in a variety of programs serving the needs of individuals with disabilities as well as teaching at The Ohio State University and Bowling Green State University. Rogers is a frequent presenter at local, state, and national conferences and has authored peer-reviewed journal articles as well as book chapters.

Ron Rogers

Ron B. Rogers, M.Ed., is the program director of the UDL Center at OCALI, working directly with Ohio's 16 State Support Teams on universal design for learning and braiding it into an overall system of support. In the past, Rogers worked with district leadership teams through the Ohio Improvement Process (OIP), assisting districts that were in continuous improvement. Rogers received a master's of education from The Ohio State University. He has 28 years of professional expertise in the areas of education and criminal justice, and has served as a curriculum specialist, director, principal, technology consultant, and classroom teacher.

Zach Rossetti

Zachary Rossetti, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of special education at Boston University. His research examines social opportunities and friendships between students with and without intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), including autism. His research also examines the experiences of families with children with I/DD and ASD by centering on sibling roles and relationships, as well as family experiences with school collaboration and community participation. Rossetti is on the editorial board of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities.

Margaret Roth

Margaret M. Roth, M.S., is a speech-language pathologist with Toledo Public Schools’ Early Childhood Program. She received a bachelor's of arts in speech-language pathology from the University of Akron and a master's of science degree from Bowling Green State University. She has practiced nearly exclusively with the pediatric population. Her interests include speech sound disorders, language in early childhood, and vocabulary acquisition and retention, especially as they relate to literacy.

Chloe Rothschild

Chloe Rothschild is a young adult who has PDD-NOS. She enjoys using her talent and love for writing to raise awareness about autism. Rothschild is on the PSA for the Autism Society and on OCALI's advisory board. In addition, she writes blogs and operates a public Facebook page, where she shares her story. Finally, she has spoken to various groups of people and at conferences about autism from her perspective.

Angie Roush

Angie Roush is the mother to Amelia, a wonderful individual with autism.


P RESE NTE R S Michael Roush

Michael Roush is an educational technology specialist with Forward Edge and an adjunct professor of education at Wilmington College. He previously worked in the areas of school improvement and special education, specializing in instructional and assistive technology. Roush and his wife, Angie, have six children, two of whom have low-incidence disabilities. He has presented at local, regional, and state conferences on using technology to increase access to the general curriculum and universal design for learning.

Andrea Rowson

Andrea Rowson is a reading specialist with Upper Arlington schools.

Emily Rubin

Emily Rubin, M.S., CCC-SLP, is the director of the Educational Outreach Program at the Marcus Autism Center at Emory University. As an adjunct faculty member at Yale University, she served as a member of the Autism and Developmental Disabilities Clinic. Her publications have focused on early identification and programming guidelines for social-emotional development. She is a co-author of the SCERTS Assessment Process. Rubin participated on ASHA's Ad Hoc Committee on Autism Spectrum Disorders to develop guidelines for the diagnosis, assessment, and treatment of ASD.

Anne Russell

Anne Russell, a supervisor with the Franklin County Board of DD Service Coordination Department, is a licensed social worker with experience in both the mental health and developmental disabilities systems. Russell's current focus is on children, with a special interest in transition-aged children moving to the adult DD system. She has presented to hospital social workers, police officers and detectives, parents, families, and educators in the Columbus and Franklin County community.

Mohammad Nasser Saadatzi

Mohammad Nasser Saadatzi, Ph.D., was born in Esfahan, Iran, where he studied electrical engineering and received a B.Sc. and M.Sc. He later moved to the United States and received a Ph.D. in electrical and computer engineering from the University of Louisville. Upon graduation, he joined the Next Generation Systems Group at the University of Louisville as a postdoctoral research associate. Saadatzi's current research interests are advanced human-machine interfaces, assistive robotics, affective computing, and robotic and computer-based intervention for autism.

Adrienne Sande

Adrienne Sande is currently completing a bachelor of education at the University of Manitoba specializing in early years education. She is interested in maintaining an active role as a researcher, with interests in issues that impact school-aged children and their families.

Kari Sassu

Kari Sassu, Ph.D., NCSP, director of the Center of Excellence on Autism Spectrum Disorders at Southern Connecticut State University and associate professor in counseling and school psychology, earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology and a master's degree in psychological services from the University of Pennsylvania. She holds a master's degree, sixthyear professional diploma in school psychology, and a doctorate in educational psychology from the University of Connecticut, and a sixth-year professional diploma in educational leadership from Southern Connecticut State University. Sassu is the mother of three children, one of whom has an ASD.

Amy Savage

Amy Savage, M.S., CCC-SLP, is a speech-language pathologist with 20 years of experience in diverse settings. She currently works for Little Miami Schools in the integrated preschool program, where she provides therapy to create an inclusive environment for all of her students. She is passionate about providing children with the functional language skills they need to be as independent as possible across settings.

John Schaefer

John Schaefer, Ph.D., is an assistant professor at Cleveland State University. He began in special education as a student with dyslexia and later worked as a classroom teacher serving students with intellectual and developmental disabilities. As a researcher, Schaefer focuses on evidencebased practice in teaching students with IDD, assistive technology, augmentative and alternative communication, and supporting inclusion through peer-mediated interventions. He has published in a range of special education journals, including Exceptional Children, Remedial and Special Education, and Teaching Exceptional Children.

Carol Schall

Carol Schall, Ph.D., is the co-director of the Virginia Commonwealth University Autism Center for Excellence. She has over 30 years' experience supporting adolescents and adults with ASD as a teacher, administrator, researcher, and consultant. Schall provided consultation and instructional technical assistance for the Project SEARCH Plus ASD Supports program at Virginia Commonwealth University and was the research coordinator for the project. She has consulted nationally and internationally on issues related to adolescents and young adults with ASD.

Kirsten Scheil

Kirsten Scheil is a doctoral student in school psychology at the University of Kentucky. Her research interests include school experiences of students with autism as well as attitudes of peers and professionals toward students with ASD. Scheil has presented posters at several national and international conferences on research centered around bullying and inclusion experiences of students with ASD. Additionally, she was invited to give an oral presentation at the International Meeting for Autism Research in May 2015. In her work, Scheil aims to serve as an advocate for individuals with ASD and their families.

Brenda Schick

Brenda Schick, Ph.D., is a professor and chair of speech, language, and hearing sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder. She is a codeveloper of the Educational Interpreter Performance Assessment (EIPA), a tool designed to evaluate the skills of K-12 interpreters, and is a co-developer of a sign language curriculum designed for parents, Sign With Me, as well as a series of children’s books that have been translated into ASL by deaf adults and children, Read With Me. Schick has served as the school board president for Rocky Mountain Deaf School, a bilingual charter school for deaf children in metro Denver.

Macaulay Schifferdecker

Macaulay Schifferdecker is pursuing a master's degree at Eastern Kentucky University in OT. She received a bachelor's of arts degree in psychology at Transylvania University. Her interests include working with children, working in the NICU, and autism. Schifferdecker has OT expertise in leadership for ASD groups.

David Schleper

David Schleper received a B.A. in deaf education and English from the University of Northern Colorado and an M.A. in deaf education and English from Gallaudet University. He completed post-graduate studies in writing at the University of New Hampshire. Schleper taught for twenty years at all grade levels, from elementary through graduate school at the Hawai’i School for the Deaf, Kendall Demonstration Elementary School, the Model Secondary School for the Deaf, Kapi’olani Community College, and Gallaudet University. He originated and developed the Shared Reading Project, a program to teach hearing families how to read with deaf and hard of hearing children.

Celia Schloemer

Celia Schloemer has been engaged with the Ohio Supporting Families CoP from the outset. For the past two years, she has offered LifeCourse training and support to many families in Ohio. Schloemer works at the University of Cincinnati, University Center of Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UC UCEDD)

Emily Schmetzer

Emily Schmetzer received a master's degree from Ohio University. She has been an SLP in Wilmington City Schools for seven years, serving preschool through high school students. At WCS, she serves on the district Autism Team. She is co-creator of the Peer Autism Team at all levels and Peer Helping Peer class at the high school level. In 2016, Schmetzer presented at the Southern Ohio ESC Summer Learning Academy on the Peer Autism Teams and Peer Helping Peer course. She received the Southern Ohio ESC Region 14 Exceptional Achievement Award in both 2015 and 2016 for her work with the Peer Autism Teams at WCS.

Carla Schmidt

Carla Schmidt, Ph.D., is an assistant professor at the University of Cincinnati in the Department of Special Education. She is also the director of IMPACT Innovations, an adult day program for individuals with ASD with significant behavioral and communication challenges. Before coming to UC, Schmidt spent three years at the University of Hawaii as an assistant professor. She received a Ph.D. in behavior disorders from the University of Missouri followed by a postdoc at the Juniper Gardens Children's Project at the University of Kansas. She is also a doctoral-level board-certified behavior analyst.

Jennifer Schmidt

Jennifer Schmidt is an intervention specialist at Beavercreek High School in Beavercreek, OH. She has 20 years of teaching experience in both general and special education settings. Schmidt piloted the PeerSpectrum class in the fall of 2007, and the class continues in Beavercreek as well as other districts today. Her book, which is a guide to implementing the PeerSpectrum class, will be published by AAPC. Jennifer is also a faculty member at Antioch Midwest University and Wright State University.

Andrea Schneider

Andrea Schneider is the director of specialized student services for Kenton City Schools in Ohio. By training, she is a speech-language pathologist, graduating from the University of Akron. In 2015, she completed a master's certificate specializing in autism spectrum disorders from Bowling Green State University. Schneider serves as an intervention team facilitator for students with both academic and behavioral concerns, and is currently also the district autism team facilitator, and program manager for the district's after-school program, Club ROAR, funded by a 21st Century Community Learning Center grant.

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P RE S E N T E R S Grace Schoessow

Grace Schoessow is an early childhood mental health consultant with a background in clinical psychology and early intervention. She has 18 years of experience serving children and families facing emotional, developmental, mental, and behavioral health challenges. She is consultant for the Greene County ESC and co-lead for the Ohio Workgroup for the Promotion of Early Childhood Social Emotional Development. Her work is informed by her experiences as a parent, early intervention specialist, and behavioral specialist, as well as her understanding of the critical need for mental health prevention and intervention services in early childhood.

Rachel Schultz

Rachel Schultz, M.A., is the accessible educational materials specialist in the AT & AEM Center at OCALI. She holds a bachelor of science in special education and a master of arts in curriculum and instruction, with state licensure in both TESOL and special education. Schultz has worked with people with disabilities for 16 years in a variety of educational and residential settings. She is the recipient of local and national grants.

Beth Schulz

Beth Schulz is the outreach and development director for CAI’s Autism to Work Practice. In this role, she partners with organizations to implement inclusion and diversity programs in support of individuals diagnosed with ASD. Schulz specializes in delivering solutions to clients focusing on program design, job scoping, recruiting, assessment, career development, and performance management. She holds a B.S. in business administration from Indiana University, is certified as a Senior Professional in Human Resources,® and holds certification in autism through IBECCS.

LaQuita Schwartz

LaQuita Schwartz is employed as a certified, licensed speech-language pathologist in the Little Miami Preschool Program within the Little Miami Local School District in Morrow, OH. She has over 15 years of experience in a variety of settings, including schools, pediatric hospitals, Head Start programs, private practice, and early intervention programs. Schwartz enjoys working collaboratively with team members to help children overcome their communicative challenges and to increase their ability to interact/communicate with others more effectively.

Rachel Schwartz

Rachel Schwartz is a board-certified behavior analyst and special educator who has worked internationally creating and supervising programs for adolescents and adults with autism. She received a master's in teaching from the University of Georgia and is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in special education from the University of Pittsburgh. Her research interests include enhancing behavior analytic services for adults and exploring issues relating to quality of life and access to services for adults with low-incidence disabilities. Schwartz is an OAR graduate grant recipient.

Heather Shafer

Heather Shafer is a parent of three amazing children, two of whom have special needs. She has been advocating for each of them as their unique and quirky characteristics have both delighted and dismayed many along the way. She has used a combination of motherly instincts, sharp-witted humor, and a tenacity for getting to workable solutions to guide her on this unexpected journey. She hopes that her story will inspire and inform others who must also venture, ready or not, into the world of IEPs, 504s, PBIS, SPD, ADHD, and EFD.

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Hollis Shaffer

Hollis Shaffer is a sophomore at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. In 2011, he was diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome under the DSM-IV. After receiving services, he currently works for Bridgeway Services during after-school social groups, assisting other students with high-functioning ASD. He is also working on writing projects that systemize learning for others like himself. During OCALICON 2014, he presented with Kelly Mahler and Dr. Brenda Smith Myles on Interoception: The Eighth Sense. He continues to speak on topics such as spirituality and ASD and successful problem solving for students with HF-ASD.

Angela Sheets

Kari Sherwood

Kari Sherwood, M.S., M.Ed., is an instructional designer specializing in e-learning. Sherwood received a B.S. in human development and family science, an M.S. in educational leadership studies from Oklahoma State University, and an M.Ed. in special education – autism spectrum disorders from Bowling Green State University. She has a 7-year-old daughter and a 5-year-old son, both on the autism spectrum. She co-founded Pathway Inclusion Center, a nonprofit organization that offers programs and workshops for families in Port Clinton, OH.

Julie Short

Angela Sheets is a graduate of Ball State University with a bachelor's degree in special education. She has taught elementary intense interventions for 17 years. She is passionate about designing access for all students to meet their greatest potential. Sheets is also a parent of a child who has cerebral palsy, who is an assistive tech user. Sheets has co-presented at PATINS and the Indiana Principal's Association. In addition, she has served two years on the ISTAR Content Review Panel and has had guest posts on the AAC Language Lab and PrAACtical AAC.

Julie Short is a regional consultant at OCALI, where she coordinates and provides regional, statewide, and national professional development, consultation services, and technical assistance to improve outcomes for individuals with ASD. Short has participated on the National Community of Practice of Autism Spectrum Disorder. She is a member of the National Autism Leadership Collaborative and Statewide Autism/Low Incidence Collaborative. Short was a classroom teacher for 14 years, teaching both general education and special education. She is the parent of a child with autism.

Amanda Sheldon

Scott Short

Amanda Sheldon, M.S., CCC-SLP, is a speechlanguage pathologist who works for Avita Health System and provides intervention to children from birth through adulthood, with a variety of disabilities. She has served children across a variety of settings including in-home, school-based, and outpatient settings. She has a professional interest in pragmatic language and its impact on social acceptance, integration, and transition to adulthood. Sheldon's perspective is continually informed by clinical practice focused on building functionally focused integrated systems of support for her students and patients.

Corey Sheldon

Scott Short is the family coordinator liaison for the West Virginia Autism Training Center at Marshall University. He has worked in the field of ASD for the past 15 years. He spent eight years working in ASD and genetic research as a clinical studies coordinator for Duke University and University of Miami, FL. He is the father of a child with autism. He is also the founder of a nonprofit organization, H.O.P.E. Intervention, which serves as a resource for those affected by ASD in Southeast Ohio. He serves on the OCALI advisory board.

Erin Simmons

Corey Sheldon is currently a fourth-year graduate student in the clinical psychology Psy.D program at Eastern Kentucky University. He has worked with individuals diagnosed with ASD and other developmental disabilities in a number of settings, including a high school, psychiatric hospital, and both group and individual therapy. Immediately after his formal education is over, he would like to become a licensed psychologist employed in a college counseling center where he can advocate and develop interventions for individuals who have goals related to higher education.

Erin Simmons is a stay-at-home mom who attends weekly therapies and is constantly striving to learn how to improve the quality of life for her boys. Lincoln and Oskar both received a diagnosis of autism at age two, respectively. Simmons is involved in a parent support group SALSA, attends New Beginnings Assembly of God church where she is the director of the special needs children’s church, and is a parent representative on the Family and Children First committee. Simmons is adjusting to having two children on the spectrum, each day learning to find the positives together as a family, and leaning on each other through the challenges.

Rose Sheldon

Thomas Simmons

Rose Sheldon, M.A., is a speech-language pathologist at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics. She is a member of the clinical research team for Technology-Assisted Language Intervention (TALI) and focuses her clinical work on children with disabilities. She administers language evaluations and conducts the AAC language intervention for the TALI pilot study. Her expertise in administering AAC therapy interventions has been instrumental to this research.

Jessica Shelton

Jessica Shelton is a high school science teacher with a license in Ohio Adolescent Young Adult Life Sciences. She has a bachelor's of science in biological sciences and a master's of science in secondary education, life sciences from Wright State University. She has worked in Wilmington City Schools since January 2013. She previously taught at the OIC: Learning Opportunities Center in Springfield, OH.

Thomas Simmons, Ph.D., has been involved in supported employment and transition service delivery for nearly 30 years. He received his doctorate in special education and rehabilitation counseling from Kent State University. He is also a certified rehabilitation counselor. His experiences include management, supervision, and direct service in rehabilitation and special education. As such, he has managed more than 30 projects in transition, supported employment, employer collaboration, Projects With Industry, personnel preparation, and postsecondary services for persons with disabilities.


P RESE NTE R S Pat Skidmore

Pat Skidmore, Au.D., LSLS Cert. AVEd, is an educational audiologist and consultant for Hearing Intervention Services based out of the Montgomery County Educational Service Center/SST10. Hearing Intervention Services is a diverse group of audiologists, speechlanguage pathologists, and teachers of the deaf working together to serve deaf and hard of hearing students in their home schools. Skidmore converted her M.A. in audiology to the clinical doctoral degree in 2007 from AT Still University. She works with IEP teams to develop educational plans that will maximize communication growth, regardless of modality or language.

Elle Smith

Elle Smith, B.A. Ed., is a master's student in the Department of Education Studies at The Ohio State University. Her research interests include treating problem behaviors without the use of extinction for individuals with autism. Smith became a certified special education teacher in 2015, and has worked with individuals with special needs for the past 10 years.

Sheila Smith

Sheila M. Smith, Ph.D., is the assistant director at OCALI leading OCALI’s internal operations and new centers for sensory disabilities, building capacity to serve those with vision and hearing loss. Previously, Smith led the development OCALI’s online learning (Autism Internet Modules - AIM) and collaborated with state agency partners to build OLAC, OASC-E, etc. She has held positions as a professional development specialist, administrator, university instructor, and teacher across seven states. Her numerous presentations and publications reflect her wide-range of experiences within the field of special education.

Katie Sochor

L. Lynn Stansberry-Brusnahan

Lynn Stansberry-Brusnahan, Ph.D., is the parent of a young adult with autism and an associate professor at the University of St. Thomas, where she directs the ASD license, certificate, and master's program. Stansberry-Brusnahan has served on numerous boards, including the Autism Society of America, Autism Society of Wisconsin, Autism Society of Southeastern Wisconsin, Council for Exceptional Children-Division on Autism and Developmental Disabilities, Wisconsin Board for People with Development Disabilities, and Minnesota Life College.

April Stephens

April Stephens graduated from Franklin University and is a board member and secretary of the Autism Society of Greater Akron. She also is the stand-in volunteer for the Sensory Storytime Program at the Northwest Branch of the Akron-Summit County Public Library. She launched and facilitates a Summit County program called Coffee, Tea, and Autism, which provides resources, information, and referrals for all affected by autism. Stephens is the primary advocate for her son, who has autism.

Julie Stewart

Julie Stewart is an outreach specialist for The Outreach Center for Deafness and Blindness. She received a master’s of science in deaf education in Rochester, NY. After teaching for 10 years at the Ohio School for the Deaf as a classroom teacher with the Pre-K and elementary departments and teaching ASL to K-12 deaf students, Stewart joined the Center of Outreach Services at OSD as a Pre-K-12 education consultant. She has presented at conferences including the American Society for Deaf Children and Ohio Chapter Registry for Interpreters for Deaf.

Katie Sochor is a program instructor for Dublin City Schools POWER Plus Program. Sochor has over 20 years of teaching experience and was designated master teacher in 2012. She provides students and families with multiple resources to facilitate positive transitional experiences to prepare them for life after graduation. She is an integral part of the district's transition team, and has been a part of multiple presentations for both staff and parents. The work of her and her staff has been featured in multiple presentations and publications, including the ASD: Strategies in Action training series.

Lee Stickle

Carol Sparber

Deborah Stroud

Carol Sparber, Ph.D., is an instructor at Kent State University, where she teaches courses in assessment and evidence-based practices to undergraduate and master's-level students. She has conducted studies using video modeling as an intervention to improve socially based employment skills. She has also conducted research on evidence-based practices as they relate to post-school outcomes for students with disabilities using the Ohio Longitudinal Transition Study (OLTS) data. Sparber has worked in a professional capacity for more than 20 years and has presented at local and national conferences.

Melissa Spence

Melissa Spence, Ed.D., is an assistant professor at California Lutheran University. Her research interests include promoting academic achievement and communicative instruction of nonverbal students with ASD as well as prompting equitable instructional opportunities for all students with disabilities. Spence spent 10 years working for the Los Angeles Unified School District both as a special education teacher for students with ASD and as part of the Autism Support Team, supporting school staff in creating classrooms that utilized evidence-based and inclusive practices to best serve students with ASD.

Lee Stickle, Ms.Ed., is the co-director of the Kansas Instructional Support Network, which provides technical assistance and training in the area of ASD. She received her undergraduate degrees in special education, recreation, and psychology from Southern Illinois University. Stickle taught for five years in a self-contained classroom for children with emotional disturbance before taking a position in a residential center. She has worked in the area of autism for 19 years. She has spoken at state, national, and international levels.

Deborah Stroud, M.Ed., has over 20 years' experience working in the field of transition. She has a teaching license through the state of Ohio for education of the handicapped (K-12) with a TTW endorsement. Throughout her career, Stroud has worked on several transition-focused committees with the Office of Exceptional Children, including revision of the Ohio Operating Standards, Individual Education Plan forms, and implementing transition services procedures. At this time she is assisting in developing the Transition Training Modules for OEC. In addition, Stroud is teaching the TTW endorsement classes at Xavier University.

Kelli Suding

Kelli Suding is one of the PATINS specialists and has a background in general education and special education. She holds a bachelor's degree in education from Indiana University with licensing in both general and special education K-6. Suding has national, state, and regional presentation and training experience. She has a strong understanding of and ability to connect theory to practice. Suding has instructional experience with students requiring mild, moderate, and intense intervention.

Jim Sullivan

Jim Sullivan is a central states account manager for Humanware. He manages sales of braille, speech, and low vision solutions in 16 states. His responsibilities include developing reseller network and promoting products to local education agencies, state rehabilitation organizations, and the federal government.

Jennifer Suppo

Jennifer Suppo, Ed.D., is an associate professor of special education at Seton Hill University, where she teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in special education, including the online graduate autism endorsement program. She has taught in both autism support and life skills middle school classrooms. Suppo has published articles on topics in autism and related disorders. Her current research is in the area of accessibility for the arts through the lens of dance. She is also a parent of a child with autism.

TaMara Swank

TaMara Swank, M.S., assistant professor of dance at Seton Hill University, teaches undergraduate dance technique courses, dance kinesiology, and teaching of dance. She is the founder of Studio 22 Performing Arts Center and SHUDA, the Seton Hill University Community Dance Academy. Swank holds a B.A. in dance and an M.S. in exercise science with a concentration in performance enhancement and injury prevention. She has presented “Collaborative Culture in Education” in collaboration with her colleague, Dr. Jennifer Suppo, at ACRES National Conference, the Early Childhood Institute Annual Conference, and the NDEO National Conference.

Wendy Szakacs

Wendy Szakacs is an OCALI regional consultant for northeast/eastern Ohio. She develops evidencebased materials and provides technical assistance and professional development, leading projects in social competence, bullying, behavior, communication, and executive function. Szakacs collaborates with regional partners, including State Support Teams and Educational Service Centers, in the creation and presentation of professional development to local school district staff and families. Szakacs has held positions as a consultant, adjunct instructor, and intervention specialist.

Amy Szymanski

Amy Szymanski, M.Ed., has over 20 years of experience in education, primarily in the area of special education and secondary transition for students with disabilities. Szymanski currently works as a secondary transition and workforce development consultant contracted by the Ohio Department of Education, Office for Exceptional Children.

Jim Taylor

Jim Taylor has worked in the field of autism for almost 40 years. In 2015, he was awarded a Lifetime Achievement Award by the NAS. He has extensive experience in promoting and in improving services to people with ASD, and is currently involved in exciting projects in schools and adult services in Scotland and around the UK. Chair of the NAS' Standards Body, he also advises many education authorities and other providers. He has presented in Ohio on seven previous occasions, and was proud to receive the Award for Excellence in Educational Leadership from OCALI in 2015.

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P RE S E N T E R S Katie Terry

Katie Terry, LISW-S, is a social worker and scholar. Currently, she is pursuing a doctorate in social work from the University of St. Thomas, where her primary area of research is autism and translational research to address the barriers individuals with autism face. Terry has presented at state and national conferences on autism and has published “A Wrinkle in the Fold: Inclusion of People With Autism Spectrum Disorder in Faith Communities” in Social Work and Christianity. She continues to research autism spectrum disorders throughout her doctoral dissertation.

Alison Thomas

Alison Thomas holds a professional license as a K-12 intervention specialist with a transition to work endorsement. She has been in the field of special education since 2003, teaching students with autism since 2004. She received a bachelor's of education and a master's of education from the University of Toledo. Thomas has worked at the Autism Model School since 2006. She taught in the classroom until 2014, when she took over the position of job training coordinator/transition service specialist.

Beth Thompson

Beth Thompson, MSSA, LSW, is the program director for Milestones Autism Resources in Beachwood, OH, and principal staff for The Roadmap to Adulthood Project. Thompson earned an undergraduate degree from Hiram College and a master's degree in social science administration from Case Western Reserve University. She has specialized in transitionto-adulthood services for more than 10 years, and has focused on serving individuals with autism for six years. She participated on the Employment First Transition Council.

Doreen Tilt

Doreen Tilt, B.A., M.S., has been an educator for 29 years working with individuals on the autism spectrum. Her teaching career began at a Connecticut RESC, transitioning to the public school sector and holding a variety of positions over the past 15 years. For the last eight years, Tilt has worked in the Bridgeport Public Schools and is currently the supervisor of autism spectrum programs. She holds a bachelor's from Sarah Lawrence College, a master's from Wheelock College, a 6th-Year Degree from Fairfield University, and an administrative certificate from Sacred Heart University.

Lorna Timmerman

Lorna Timmerman, Ed.D., earned a doctoral degree in adult, higher, and community education at Ball State University. Her dissertation explored how varying levels of self-determination among incoming college students affect behaviors related to retention and success. Other research interests include the use of accommodations for enhancing success for college students with disabilities, growth mindset/resilience/ grit, universal design for learning, differentiated instruction, best practices for teaching, and assessment of student learning and engagement.

Brett Tingley

Brett Tingley is the parent of three amazing children, one of whom is dyslexic. She has master’s degrees in engineering and business administration from the University of Michigan. She is a real estate investor and start-up business consultant. Tingley is president of UA-KID, or Upper Arlington Kids Identified with Dyslexia, a parent advocacy group dedicated to ensuring all dyslexic children in the Upper Arlington School District reach their full potential.

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Kristin Toruno

Kristin Toruno, MAT, BCBA, is a program supervisor at ABC of North Carolina Child Development Center. She has a B.S. in psychology and early childhood special education from James Madison University as well as an MAT in ECSE.

Jennifer Townsend

Jennifer Townsend is an educational consultant with expertise in social-emotional learning differences; she co-wrote the Social Emotional Engagement Knowledge and Skills (SEE-KS) program. She has worked with school districts to build capacity for educating students with ASD and related disabilities using best practices paired with appreciative inquiry coaching, and has extensive knowledge of universal design for learning. She is an adjunct faculty member at Carroll University in the School of Education. Townsend has a master's in education and postgraduate certification in ASD, both from Johns Hopkins University.

Lynn Tramontano

Lynn Tramontano has worked with families of loved ones with special needs since 1994. For many years, she helped adults with disabilities in employment readiness and directed several non-profit organizations focusing on providing comprehensive services for persons with disabilities. Edward Jones has been helping the individual investor since 1922. With the focus on the individual investor, Tramontano has a great company to partner with as she provides personalized and individualized service. She provides full investment services, which includes insurance protection.

Amy Trautwein

Amy Trautwein holds a master of education in special education from the University of Toledo. She has worked as an intervention specialist for 4 years, serving transition-aged students with autism and other developmental disabilities. Trautwein is currently serving as assistant job training coordinator at Autism Model School in Toledo, OH. Additionally, she holds a bachelor of music in vocal performance from Morehead State University and a master of music in vocal performance from Middle Tennessee State University.

Taryn Traylor

Taryn Goodwin Traylor, M.Ed., BCBA, LBA, is a Region 1 autism program coordinator for Virginia Commonwealth University – Autism Center for Excellence (VCU-ACE). In this position, she develops and implements a comprehensive autism program to serve students with ASD within Region 1. Previously, Traylor provided technical assistance to Chesapeake City Public Schools, including training and coaching on evidence-based practice initiatives to division leaders and teachers.

Amy Tseng

Amy Tseng, M.A., is an autism support teacher in the Los Angeles Unified School District. She has her teaching credentials in both special education and elementary education. Previously, she taught students with ASD on both the general education and the alternate curriculum. She now coaches, provides direct support, and professional development to school-site staff on implementing evidence-based practices and developing quality educational programs for students with ASD. She has presented at conferences on evidence-based practices.

Amyleen Tuiza

Amy Tuiza is special education teacher with many years of teaching experience. Currently, she is a teacher on special assignment for the autism program in the Riverside County Office of Education in California. She is also a licensed OT. She has presented at local conferences and trainings about evidence-based practices for students with ASD. In 2013, she was named one of the Teachers of the Year in Riverside County and was recognized as a 2013 California Teach of the Year finalist. Tuiza is currently involved in professional learning communities, including supporting and mentoring new special education teachers.

Monica Turner

Monica Turner has a B.A. in psychology and an M.Ed. in special education from the University of Louisville. She began working at the American Printing House for the Blind in 2001 and has held positions as a research assistant, an accessible test editor, and most recently as a field services representative with an emphasis on families. Turner is also a certified braille transcriber.

Jerry Turning

Gerald Turning Jr. is a captain for the Tinton Falls, New Jersey, Police Department and the father of two. As a police officer and the parent of a child with autism, Turning has over a dozen speaking engagements sharing his unique perspective on educating the community and other law enforcement officials. In 2016, he presented a roundtable discussion, “Police and Autism: Bridging the Gap” at the Autism New Jersey annual conference. He and his wife, Mrs. Bacon, also share their writing on his blog Bacon and Juiceboxes: Our Life With Autism. He has been featured on The Mighty, Age of Autism, and Autism After 16.

Anne Turpin

Anne Turpin, a former general manager for Marriott, joined The Ohio State University in 2011. Her field experience expertise is in hotel operations, training and development, and associate relations. She currently is the leader of hospitality partnerships and serves on the Hospitality Management Advisory Board. Her main responsibilities include instructing classes, creating and fostering industry partnerships, advising HMA (student organization), and working with the advisory board to shape the program through providing unique industry-related opportunities for students.

Darlene Unger

Darlene Unger, Ph.D., is a professor of special education and disability studies at Kent State University. She has worked in the special education and rehabilitation field since 1988, holding faculty appointments at DePaul University and Virginia Commonwealth University. Her experiences have focused on the education of youth with significant disabilities and the delivery of transition-focused education and customized employment. Her publications include chapters and articles on transition, customized employment, and technology integration.

Peter Vermeulen

Peter Vermeulen is the co-director of Autisme Centraal, a training and education center for autism spectrum disorders in Gent, Belgium. He has worked with people with ASD and their families for more than 25 years, and is an internationally respected lecturer/trainer. Vermeulen is the author of more than 15 books and several articles on autism, including Autistic Thinking – This is the Title (2001), I am Special: A Workbook to Help Children, Teens and Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders to Understand Their Diagnosis, Gain Confidence and Thrive (2000, revised edition 2013), and Autism as Context Blindness (2012).


P RESE NTE R S Joel Vidovic

Joel Vidovic has been committed to the responsible and ethical application of behavior analysis to assist individuals with autism in their pursuit of happiness for over 15 years. He holds a master's degree in ABA from The Ohio State University and has been a board-certified behavior analyst since 2006. At The Autism MODEL School, Vidovic develops and evaluates educational programs in the areas of language/communication, leisure and recreation, adaptive behavior, reading, writing, mathematics, and vocational/work-readiness skills. He has delivered over 40 presentations at local, state, and national conferences.

Heather Villela

Heather Villela is a special education teacher and literacy specialist who has taught and advocated for struggling readers for over 20 years. For the past 15 years, she helped teachers at the district level in Wake County Public Schools by designing and delivering literacy professional development, collaboratively framing curriculum to include all learners, and supporting teachers and schools in crisis. She is excited to start a new venture as an independent educational consultant and literacy trainer and looks forward to working with teachers throughout the U.S. to create effective, rigorous, and engaging foundational literacy instruction for all students.

Lydia Wayman

Lydia Wayman, M.A., is an autistic advocate with a B.S. in education and an M.A. in English and nonfiction writing. Her presentations, writing, and art use her experience to educate others about ASD. She is a young leader with the Autistic Global Initiative and has led youth with disabilities at a leadership conference and spoken to Scout troops, parents, and several times at OCALICON. She writes about autism in magazines, books, and newspapers. Wayman enjoys mentoring younger autistic friends and supporting families by helping them understand how their kids see the world.

Alyx Weaver

Alyx Weaver was diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder at the age of 6 and received education in varied alternative settings prior to completing a diploma with one year of classes at a public high school. She had not been in grade-level mathematics classes since fourth grade because she was unable to advance in the subject on standardized assessments. She reached a college-level understanding and was able to complete a B.S. program in four years. Weaver currently works at Kent State University as a Ph.D. teaching assistant and does research on multiple sclerosis. She also serves on executive boards and helps on the Autism Task Force.

Lynde Webster

Lynde Webster is an intervention specialist at Jackson Intermediate School in the Lakewood Local School District. She teaches students who are autistic as well as students who have intellectual and multiple disabilities. Webster has a bachelor's degree from Ohio Dominican University. She is pursuing a master's in educational administration at Ashland University.

Sheneik Wedderburn

Sheneik Wedderburn is a post-graduate from Winnipeg, Manitoba. She works as an autism tutor within St. Amant, a comprehensive resource for Manitobans with developmental disabilities and autism. Her passion is to guide parents and caregivers in utilizing well-known strategies, as well as developing new ones to aide in child and adolescent development.

Deborah Weiss

Deborah Weiss, Ph.D,. is a professor and chairperson in the Department of Communication Disorders at Southern Connecticut State University. Areas of interest and expertise include child language disorders, autism, cultural and linguistic diversity, second-language acquisition, speech perception in bilingual individuals, dynamic language assessment, oral and written language disorders, and curricular issues. Weiss serves on the internal advisory board for the SCSU Center of Excellence on ASD, coteaches the undergraduate social cognition course in CMD, and supervises within the SCSU Center for Communication Disorders.

Mary Jo Wendling

Mary Jo Wendling is an OT with 30 years' experience in pediatrics. Since 1990, she has specialized in assistive technology. Wendling is the manager of the Toy and Technology Library at Nisonger Center and works for the Dublin City School District, where she is both a member of the AT team and an OT with the preschool population. She has provided presentations and trainings on the use of alternate computer access, software, assistive technology, adapted toys, and switches for curriculum access and modification.

Madeline Wenzel

Madeline Wenzel, B.A., has 20 years of experience working on disabilities issues. She is director of disability services at Jewish Vocation Service in Boston. As director, she designed a program model of vocational training for young adults with disabilities called the Transitions to Work program. The program has won numerous awards, including the 2016 Program of the Year Award from the International Association of JVS. Wenzel's presentations include the Hilibrand Autism Symposium, the International Association of JVS Conferences, the Jewish Leadership Institute on Disabilities and Inclusion, and the AANE Adult Benefits Conference.

Paige West

Paige West, M.A., worked as a research assistant with the U.S. Army Medical Research Unit-Europe and copresented poster sessions at the annual conference of the European branch of the American Counseling Association. She spent 3.5 years as a teaching assistant with Bartholomew Consolidated Schools serving students with autism and other disabilities. West currently serves as an autism coordinator in BCSC. She attended the UDL Conference at BCSC in 2015. She is completing her registered behavior technician certification in ABA.

Sarah West

Sarah West works as an autism resource teacher in Jefferson County Public Schools in Kentucky. She has extended her education with an emphasis in ASD. In her work as a resource teacher, she provides technical assistance to teachers and staff in the utilization of EBPs for ASD. West collaborates with school staff to develop individualized programming for students with autism. As a district resource teacher, she supports the Social Communication Program at all levels, elementary through high school.

Elisabeth Wharton

Elisabeth Wharton, MOTR/L, received a master's in OT from Western Michigan University. She has more than 25 years of experience as an OT, providing services to individuals of all ages and disabilities. She has presented at numerous inservice trainings and local colleges as well as OCALI. Working in schools inspired her interest in the relationship of visual-spatial perceptual motor skills, language development, and early literacy. Due to her strong interest in the development of early childhood literacy Wharton entered into a research study with Toledo Museum of Art regarding early childhood visual literacy and the development of language.

Abby White

Abby White is a teacher for deaf and hard of hearing students employed by the Ross County Board of Developmental Disabilities. She has a master's of education in teaching deaf and hard of hearing students from The Ohio State University and a bachelor's degree in speech and hearing science. White has an Advanced Plus rating on the Sign Language Proficiency Interview, is a trainer for Visual Phonics, and has over 10 years of experience working with individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing using a variety of communication modalities including American Sign Language, spoken English, and AAC devices.

Beth Whitman

Beth Whitman was a substitute for three years. In 2011, she assisted a student with physical disabilities as a 1:1 aide. She is presently a preschool classroom assistant.

Marie Wilbanks

Marie Wilbanks is the director of Service and Support Administration, Medicaid and Compliance, with the Pickaway County Board of Developmental Disabilities. She is a member of executive council with Pickaway County Family and Children First, is co-chair of Pickaway County Teen Task Force, and is a member of the Pickaway County Special Olympics Committee. She is currently acting as local supervisor for Pickaway County's Bridges to Transition Grant, and has assumed the role of lead coordinator with the newly launched Berger Hospital Project SEARCH program.

Tiffany Wild

Tiffany Wild, Ph.D., is an assistant professor in the Department of Teaching and Learning and coordinates the program in visual impairment at The Ohio State University. She was awarded a doctoral fellowship with the National Center for Leadership in Visual Impairments, and her dissertation received the Dissertation of the Year award by CEC's Division on Visual Impairment. Wild is the president of the Division on Visual Impairment and Deafblind and past-president of the Ohio Chapter for the Association for Education and Rehabilitation of the Blind and Visually Impaired. She has published and presented internationally.

Lisa Wilkins

Lisa Wilkins is the parent of three wonderful girls, including Sarah. Sarah has Down syndrome and works at The Savings Bank in Circleville, OH. Wilkins volunteers for Special Olympics and has coached individual skills basketball and softball for the last 15 years. Her most important accomplishment, however, is being a wonderful parent to Sarah. Sarah was featured in a short film about limited transportation options in a rural community, and Wilkins helped Sarah speak about her frustrations.

James Williams

James Williams was born in 1988, and was diagnosed with autism in 1991. He gave his first presentation on autism in 2000. Today, he travels around the U.S. lecturing on autism. He is the author of two novels featuring children with autism, Out to Get Jack and The H.A.L. Experiment, and a children's picture book, When Gary Comes to Play. He serves on the staff for Animecon.org, an organization that organizes animĂŠ conventions throughout the Midwestern U.S., and for Ohayocon, an animĂŠ convention based in Columbus, OH. He is also a member of the University of Wisconsin-Waisman Center's Community of Practice on Autism Spectrum Disorders.

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P RE S E N T E R S Lauren Hough Williams

Lauren Hough Williams works with schools and districts outside NYC to expand the reach of the ASD Nest Program. She also consults on a National Science Foundation Grant, IDEAS: Inventing, Designing and Engineering on the Autism Spectrum, designing after-school clubs to foster interest in STEM and to develop career pathways for students with ASD. Hough Williams leads innovative workshops for the ASD Nest Support Project and consults at ASD Nest elementary schools. She is the co-editor of The ASD Nest Support Model and co-author of Everyday Classroom Strategies and Practices for Supporting Children With ASD, as well as several articles on autism-related subjects.

Sondra Williams

Sondra Williams, an individual with ASD residing in Columbus, OH, is a published author and national speaker on autism and trauma-related topics. She was the 2013 recipient of the Courage Award from Governor Kasich in the state of Ohio. She serves on many local, state, and national boards. She is the founder of S.P.E.A.K.S. ART PROGRAM and loves mentoring teens and adults with autism. She is the parent of four young adults with autism, as well as four grandchildren, one of whom has ASD. Williams is in the main character in the film The Leprechaun's Wife.

Pamela Williamson

Pamela Williamson, Ph.D., associate professor at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, has expertise in reading instruction and qualitative research methodologies. Her work is published in Exceptional Children, Focus, Journal of Special Education, Social Science and Medicine, Journal of Child and Family Studies, Learning Disabilities Research and Practice, Field Methods, and Childhood Education. She is the coeditor of the book Quality Literacy Instruction for Students With Autism Spectrum Disorders.

Tara Willig

Tara Willig, M.Ed., received an undergraduate degree in special education from Indiana State University and a master's from Northern Kentucky University. In 2006, Willig began working in the Oak Hills Local School District as an intervention specialist. In this role, she focused on ensuring that students made progress towards their postsecondary goals in the inclusion setting. In 2011, she expanded her work with postsecondary preparation, when she became house principal in charge of special education for Oak Hills High School. She currently is the coordinator of student services for the Oak Hills Local School District.

Karen Wilson

Karen Wilson has been a mental health provider for deaf children and adults for 34 years. Her expertise is in the areas of mental illness, significant emotional and behavioral challenges, and individuals on the autism spectrum, including the development of the first community-based residence for deaf mentally ill persons in the state of Connecticut, the successful leadership of the school-wide development and implementation of the PBIS framework, and transforming a residential treatment program into a strengths-based program.

Nicole Wingate

Nicole Wingate, M.A., is a graduate of Ball State University with a bachelor's of science degree in speech-language pathology and audiology and a master's in speech-language pathology. She has worked in a school setting for 18 years. She is passionate about optimizing her students' communication abilities so that they may become competent communicators. Wingate has copresented at PATINS and the Indiana Principal's Association and has had guest posts on the AAC Language Lab and PrAACtical AAC.

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Amber Wolf

Amber Wolf was a life skills classroom teacher for 14.5 years. She participated in the Universal Design for Learning Team at her school. She has been successful in integrating students with disabilities into the general education classroom using the framework and principles of UDL. For the past year, Wolf has been providing support and services to individuals with autism and other disabilities in the educational setting as an autism coordinator. She has completed her master's degree in ABA, and is currently accruing hours towards her boardcertified behavior analyst certification.

Kathryn Woodburn

Kathryn Woodburn, M.Ed., has been a teacher at The Family Child Learning Center for nine years. With her master's in early childhood intervention and certification in behavioral intervention from Kent State University, she enjoys working with young children using a balance between play and structured learning activities. Woodburn has co-presented on the use of technology with preschoolers for SMART Teachnologies Cleveland Conference (2010), and The University of Michigan's Teachers Teaching Teachers about Technology Virtual Conference (2012). She has also co-taught a graduate course at Kent State University.

Christopher Woodfill

Christopher C. Woodfill is the associate executive director of Helen Keller National Center (HKNC). Prior to working for HKNC, Woodfill was a teacher at Wisconsin School for the Deaf and at the English Language Institute at Gallaudet University for 16 years. He holds master's degrees in Latin American studies from the George Washington University and in deaf education from McDaniel College. He is a current board member of American Association of the DeafBlind and World Federation of the DeafBlind.

Sydney Wright

Sydney Wright is a junior high school student at Wilmington High School in Wilmington, OH. She is a member of the Interact Club, Peer Autism Team, volleyball team and cheerleading squad. She has been a member of the Peer Helping Peer class since its creation in 2016, assisting a peer within the classroom with his academic performance. She has completed portions of the autism certification through OCALI. She received Scholar Athlete in 2014-2016. She has also received the Exceptional Achievement Award from Region 14/Hopewell Center in 2016 for her work on the Peer Autism Team.

Carrie Yasenosky

Carrie Yasenosky, M.Ed., is a board-certified behavior analyst with Solutions Behavioral Consulting. She has a B.S. in education as an intervention specialist and an M.Ed. as an early childhood intervention specialist. She has been working with children with special needs for 15 years, including serving as an intervention specialist for nine years. In 2011, Yasenosky received a BCBA certification. As a BCBA with SBC, she is providing behavioral services to Strongsville Schools. She enjoys being part of a collaborative team working to keep students in their LRE while providing quality services.

Alexandra Zimmer

Alexandra Zimmer is an undergraduate student at the College of Saint Rose pursuing a B.S. in childhood and special education with a concentration in English. At the college, Zimmer is involved with many organizations for children, including Big Brothers Big Sisters, Friday Knights/Friday Knight Fishes, Council for Exceptional Children, and the Association for the Education of Young Children. She is also community service chair of the Tau Theta chapter of Kappa Delta Pi education honor society. Zimmer is working as a substitute teacher assistant in a BOCES program for students with emotional/behavior disorders.


I NDE X


I N DE X Aebker, Susan

21, 28, 34, 40, 74

Calem, Joanie

36, 44, 76

Fielders, Natalie

20, 26, 79

Campano, Mark

21, 29, 34, 41, 53, 56, 76

Filler, Chris

53, 56, 79

Canaday, Erin

19, 24, 76

Firn, Greg

34, 41, 79

Fox, Diane

34, 40, 79

Carl, Diana Foster

36, 38, 45, 48, 53, 54, 56, 59, 76

Frank, Heather

19, 25, 79

Frank, Kathryn

20, 27, 79

Freeman, Maggie

20, 26, 79

Gaffney, Amy

19, 24, 79

Gagnon, Desiree

21, 28, 79

Gallagher, Trisha

23, 32, 79

Gamez, Alejandra

Alber-Morgan, Sheila

35, 42, 74

Alexander, Taylor

20, 25, 74

Allen, Angela

36, 45, 74

Apple, Lance

36, 44, 74

Arballo, Jorgina

37, 47, 74

Carnahan, Christi

19, 25, 77

Avellone, Lauren

34, 40, 74

Carrasquillo, Nicole

20, 26, 77

Bacon, Melissa

37, 46, 74

Carroll, Bridie

34, 41, 77

Baer, Robert

54, 59, 74

Clancy, Shannon

39, 50, 77

Balum, Elaine

19, 24, 74

Clarke, Laura

36, 44, 77

Banner, Keith

54, 57, 74

Baraga, Susan

39, 50, 74

Clouse, Diane

34, 41, 54, 58, 77

Barczak, Mary

39, 50, 74,

Barlow, Melane

53, 57, 74

Barrozo, Jekereen

55, 59, 74

Bauder, Debra

19, 25, 39, 50, 74

Bavry, Jen

19, 24, 74

Beck, Lilian

21, 28, 74

Beckman, Noah

Collins, Jodi Collins, Stacy Collins-Harris, Maggie

35, 43, 54, 59 53, 56, 77 19, 25, 77

Hughes, Patrick Henry

9, 15, 18-19, 25, 82

Humble, Karin

37, 46, 82

Hutchinson, Charla

20, 27, 82

Jackson, Doug

22, 30, 82

Jackson, Lori

23, 31, 82

Jankowski, Regina

34, 40, 82

Johnson, Selene

39, 49, 82

Jones, Phyllis

36, 44, 82

Jones, Susan

22, 30, 82

36, 43, 79

Joseph, Brittany

22, 31, 36, 44, 82

Ganz, Katy

55, 60, 80

Kaplan, Jacob

54, 59, 82

Garland, Kelly

22, 30, 80

Kazin, Alayne

54, 58, 82

Garner, Kim

37, 46, 80

Keith, Joe

54, 58, 82

Gifford, Michelle

38, 47, 80

Kelly, Sarah

53, 56, 82

Gist, Corinne

54, 59, 80

Kemp, Charles

38, 48, 82

Gladstone, Kate

20, 27, 80

Kennedy, Michael

21, 28, 83

Kettle-Rivera, Laurie

21, 29, 34, 41, 83

Kinder, Lezlie Fahl

34, 41, 83

King, Mackenzie

20, 27, 83

Kirk, Jodi

34, 41, 83

Klonne, Erin

19, 24, 83

Klusman, Renee

38, 49, 83

Knisely, Judy

23, 31, 83

Koehler, Karen

39, 50, 83

Konrad, Moira

35, 42, 83

Combs, Lisa

21, 28, 34, 35, 40, 42, 77

Conway, Carol

34, 41, 77

Goings, Jan

34, 41, 80

Cook, Barbara

37, 46, 77

Golden, Rebecca

55, 60, 80

54, 59, 74

Cook, Sheri

34, 41, 54, 59, 77

Gombash, Laurie

54, 58, 80

Belhorn, Tabitha

22, 30, 53, 57, 74

Cooper, Heather

23, 31, 77

Bellan, Meagan

53, 56, 75

Cowan, Richard

53, 56, 77

Bennett, Jessica

39, 50, 75

Croyle, Christine

54, 59, 77

Cunningham, Patty

38, 48, 77

Benson, Shawna

34, 36, 37, 38, 40, 45, 47, 49, 75

Curry, Cynthia

Birri, Nicole

22, 31, 75

36, 38, 45, 48, 53, 54, 56, 59, 78

Bishop, Nicole

23, 32, 75

Blecher, Stacy

53, 56, 75

Blumhorst, Justin

23, 31, 75

Boblitt, Angela

34, 40, 75

Boerio, Gregory

22, 31, 75

Boettcher, Sara

20, 27, 75

Bogicevic, Vanja

34, 40, 75

Boone, Barbara

36, 45, 75

Boone, Chad

22, 29, 75

Borgio, Stacy

36, 44, 75

Bowen, Cindy Andree

35, 43, 75

Bowyer, Ronni

22, 30, 75

Doehring, Peter

21, 29, 78

Boyle, Jason

36, 43, 75

19, 25, 78

Boyle, Sara

53, 56, 75

Domoracki, Sandra Brotman Donovan, Lizzy

39, 49, 78 19, 22, 25, 30, 54, 58, 78

Breckenridge, Jye

38, 48, 76

D'Andrea, Frances Mary

54, 59, 78

Davenport, Carrie

35, 42, 78

Davis, Belinda

37, 46, 78

Daviso, Alfred

38, 49, 54, 59, 78

Daviso, Rae Lynn

21, 28, 38, 49, 78

DeLuke, Susan

53, 57, 78

DeMange, Lynn

34, 35, 40, 42, 78

Devine, Tabatha

38, 48, 78

Dittoe, Carol

20, 26, 35, 42, 78

Brent, Barbara

54, 55, 59, 60, 76

Doyle, Kathryn

Bridgman, Heather

21, 29, 76

Dueker, Scott

Brock, Matthew

37, 39, 46, 50, 55, 60, 76

Brockman, Blaine

21, 28, 76

Brooke, Alissa Molinelli Brothers, Karen

34, 40, 76 19, 24, 76

Brown, Kristopher

20, 27, 76

Bujisic, Milos

34, 40, 76

Bundy, Myra Beth

20, 26, 76

Burmeister, Carol

22, 29, 76

Buti, Mo

53, 57, 76

Buzo, Amanda

96

34, 40, 76

Gons, Maggie Good, Melissa Good, Sarah Gorman, Kevin Govender, Jennifer

35, 42, 80 20, 25, 80 54, 58, 80 34, 36, 37, 38, 40, 45, 47, 49, 80

Graham, Joshua

37, 47, 80

Grattan, Amy

35, 43, 80

Koppenhaver, David

36, 37, 38, 45, 47, 49, 83

Gray, Amanda

21, 28, 80

Koren, Heather Rushmore

53, 57, 83

Greene, Elizabeth

38, 48, 80

Koss, Elizabeth

20, 26, 83

Grether, Sandra

21, 29, 80

Krumins, Jennifer

Grzybowski, Deborah

39, 50, 81

20, 23, 27, 31, 36, 44, 83

Hackett, Erica

22, 30, 81

Kunreuther, Elizabeth

23, 32, 83

Kuzmickas, Andrew

39, 50, 83

LaCava, Paul

20, 26, 35, 37, 43, 46, 83

Lamarre, Judi

37, 46, 83

Larson, Joan Breslin

55, 60, 84

Lavelle, Tara

21, 28, 84

Leach, Andy

54, 59, 84

Lee, Bryston

38, 47, 84

Leighner, Ross

39, 50, 84

Levesque, Danielle

38, 48, 84

Lezark, Tracy

36, 44, 84

Likens, Nancy

20, 26, 84

Logan, Ashley

21, 28, 84

Loomis, Jim

21, 27, 84

Louk, Michele

22, 29, 84

Love, Abigail

37, 47, 84

Luedde, Kim

20, 27, 84

Luft, Pamela

38, 48, 84

Lusk, Kelly

54, 59, 84

Hague, Jason

35, 43, 54, 59, 81

Hall, Sarah

55, 60, 81

Hammer, Julie

35, 42, 81

Hanks, Christopher

37, 46, 81

Harding, Catina

22, 31, 81

Harrington, Chris

54, 59, 81

Harsh, Cariann

20, 25, 55, 60, 78

22, 30, 80

Hartman, Connie Haselberger, Becky Haskins-Berger, Melissa Hatkevich, Beth Ann

19, 25, 81 20, 26, 81 37, 47, 81 38, 48, 81 22, 31, 81

Dunn, Haley

54, 58, 78

Haupt, Rachel

53, 56, 81

Durany, Daniel

20, 27, 78

Helling, Kristen

53, 56, 81

Earley, Jennifer

22, 29, 78

Elton, Kelly

22, 31, 79

Embury, Dusty Columbia

36, 44, 79

Eren, Ruth

21, 27, 79

Holladay, Stephanie Horn, Sharon Hough, Britta Hubbell, Sophie

35, 43, 81 36, 44, 81 54, 57, 81 34, 40, 82

Espe-Sherwindt, Marilyn

22, 30, 79

Huber, Amber

38, 49, 82

Everette, Teirra

37, 47, 79

Huffman, Bobby

34, 41, 82

Mahler, Kelly

19, 24, 39, 50, 84, 90

Farrell, Erin

35, 43, 79

Hughes, Jocelynn

20, 27, 82

Malkovits, Denise

22, 31, 84

Fenton, Kyle

20, 27, 79

Marble, John

53, 57, 84


I NDE X Marks, Dee

19, 24, 85

Marquis, Bonnie

55, 60, 85

Mataya, Kerry

34, 40, 85

May, Andrea

38, 48, 85

Mayberry, Erin

34, 41, 85

McDonald, Ginger

23, 31, 85

McDonough, Jennifer

19, 25, 34, 40, 85

Porter, Kristi

19, 22, 24, 30, 87

Remeis, Jenni

19, 25, 88

Michaud, Amanda

37, 46, 85

Riggins, Kristen Clatos

54, 58, 88

Mikes, Timothy

39, 50, 85

Roberts, Timothy

37, 47, 88

Miller, Alison

55, 60, 85

Robinson, Katie

54, 59, 88

Mobilio, Matt

21, 28, 85

Rogers, Jan

36, 45, 54, 59, 88

Monastra, Courtney

53, 56, 85

Monfort, Karen

37, 47, 53, 56, 85

O'Brien, Shirley Odland, Ryan

20, 26, 86 23, 31, 86

53, 57, 93 36, 44, 93

19, 25, 39, 50, 90

53, 54, 55, 57, 59, 60, 85

36, 44, 86

34, 40, 93

White, Abby

Simmons, Thomas

Meyer, Lisa

Nowosiadlo, Danielle

23, 32, 93

Wharton, Elisabeth

34, 40, 90

20, 26, 88

37, 47, 55, 59, 86

36, 45, 93

West, Sarah

Simmons, Erin

Reifenberg, Grace

Nguyen, Amy Nhi

19, 25, 93

West, Paige

19, 24, 90

38, 49, 85

38, 48, 86

Short, Julie

Wenzel, Madeline

Short, Scott

Mendel, Marina

Nelson, Katie

53, 56, 93

19, 24, 36, 45, 90

55, 60, 88

21, 28, 88

37, 46, 86

37, 46, 93

Wendling, Mary Jo

Raines, Farrah

Ransbottom, Kylee

Neild, Raschelle

Weiss, Deborah

36, 44, 90

23, 31, 85, 88

34, 41, 85

37, 46, 86

39, 49, 90

Sherwood, Kari

Raghavan, Bhanu

Meeker, Heather

Nash, Patricia

Shelton, Jessica

36, 45, 88

39, 50, 88

34, 40, 86

21, 28, 93

Pusey, Caroline

Rankowski, Brigid

54, 59, 86

Wedderburn, Sheneik

55, 59, 87

22, 30, 85

Mylander, Evelyn

21, 29, 90

Prystash, Ruth

McNulty, Daniel

Motil, Michelle

55, 60, 93

Sheldon, Rose

37, 46, 87

54, 58, 88

39, 49, 86

39, 50, 93

Webster, Lynde

Pratt, Cathy

Ralabate, Patti

Morris, Cynthia

Weaver, Alyx

20, 26, 90

37, 46, 87

38, 49, 85

37, 38, 46, 48, 86

38, 49, 90

Sheldon, Corey

Powell, Greta

McElfresh, Christine

Moritz, Kim

Sheldon, Amanda

Rogers, Ron

21, 22, 28, 30, 88

Rossetti, Zach

55, 60, 88

Roth, Margaret

34, 40, 88

Rothschild, Chloe

19, 24, 34, 38, 40, 48, 88

Roush, Angie

35, 43, 88

Roush, Michael

23, 32, 35, 43, 89

Rowson, Andrea

54, 58, 89

Rubin, Emily

17, 22, 29, 89

Russell, Anne

36, 43, 89

Saadatzi, Mohammad Nasser

35, 42, 89

Sande, Adrienne

21, 28, 89

Sassu, Kari

Skidmore, Pat

23, 31, 91

Whitman, Beth

Smith, Elle

54, 59, 91

Wilbanks, Marie

38, 47, 93

Wild, Tiffany

39, 50, 93

Smith, Sheila

34, 36, 37, 38, 40, 45, 47, 49, 91

Wilkins, Lisa

38, 47, 93

Sochor, Katie

37, 47, 91

Williams, James

19, 20, 24, 27, 93

Sparber, Carol

54, 59, 91

Williams, Lauren Hough

19, 24, 94

Spence, Melissa

37, 47, 55, 59, 91

Williams, Sondra

34, 40, 54, 58, 94

Stansberry-Brusnahan, L. Lynn

21, 28, 35, 43, 91

Williamson, Pamela

22, 31, 94

Willig, Tara

38, 49, 94

Wilson, Karen

20, 26, 94

Wingate, Nicole

54, 58, 94

Wolf, Amber

36, 45, 94

Woodburn, Kathryn

37, 46, 94

Woodfill, Christopher

23, 31, 94

Wright, Sydney

39, 49, 94

Yasenosky, Carrie

39, 50, 94

Zimmer, Alexandra

53, 57, 94

Stephens, April

37, 47, 91

Stewart, Julie

34, 36, 37, 38, 40, 45, 47, 49, 91

Stickle, Lee

37, 46, 91

Stroud, Deborah

38, 49, 91

Suding, Kelli

22, 30, 91

Sullivan, Jim

53, 56, 91

Suppo, Jennifer

53, 56, 91

Swank, TaMara

53, 56, 91

Szakacs, Wendy

36, 45, 91

Szymanski, Amy

53, 56, 57, 91

21, 27, 89

Taylor, Jim

38, 47, 91

Savage, Amy

38, 49, 89

Terry, Katie

36, 44, 92

Schaefer, John

20, 25, 37, 46, 89

Thomas, Alison

55, 60, 92

Thompson, Beth

54, 58, 92

Officer, Allison

20, 26, 35, 42, 86

Orem, Lisa

37, 46, 86

Orvosh-Kamenski, Heidi

21, 28, 86

Schall, Carol

19, 24, 34, 40, 89

Tilt, Doreen

21, 27, 92

Oxley, Sandra

38, 48, 86

Scheil, Kirsten

37, 47, 89

Timmerman, Lorna

54, 58, 92

Page, Diane

22, 29, 86

Schick, Brenda

54, 59, 89

Tingley, Brett

54, 58, 92

Page, Jessica

36, 45, 86

Schifferdecker, Macaulay

20, 27, 89

Toruno, Kristin

35, 43, 92

Palko, Susan

19, 24, 86

22, 29, 92

23, 32, 87

Schleper, David

Townsend, Jennifer

Palmer, Ann

39, 50, 54, 59, 89

Parker, Regina

37, 46, 87

Schloemer, Celia

53, 54, 57, 59, 89

Tramontano, Lynn

38, 47, 63, 66, 92

Parnell, Leanne

37, 38, 46, 48, 87

Schmetzer, Emily

39, 49, 89

Trautwein, Amy

55, 60, 92 19, 24, 92

Paterson, Leslie

37, 46, 87

Schmidt, Carla

19, 22, 25, 30, 54, 58, 89

Traylor, Taryn

Payton, Becky

35, 43, 87

Tseng, Amy

Peachock, Marla

36, 45, 87

Schmidt, Jennifer

34, 38, 41, 49, 89

37, 47, 55, 59, 92

Tuiza, Amyleen

55, 59, 92 53, 57, 92

Peck, Steve

23, 31, 87

Schneider, Andrea

35, 42, 89

Turner, Monica

Pennington, Robert

21, 29, 35, 42, 87

Schoessow, Grace

21, 29, 90

Turning, Jerry

Schultz, Rachel

36, 45, 90

35, 43, 54, 59, 92

Schulz, Beth

36, 45, 90

Turpin, Anne

34, 40, 92

Schwartz, LaQuita

38, 49, 90

Unger, Darlene

39, 50, 92

Schwartz, Rachel

20, 26, 90

Vermeulen, Peter

9, 15, 33, 35, 42, 92

Shafer, Heather

55, 60, 90

Vidovic, Joel

55, 60, 93

Shaffer, Hollis

34, 40, 90

Villela, Heather

36, 44, 93

Sheets, Angela

54, 58, 90

Wayman, Lydia

34, 40, 93

Perica, Ellen

38, 49, 87

Pierce, Tristan

20, 26, 35, 42, 87

Pittman, Marquetta

38, 48, 87

Pizzuti, Anthony

36, 45, 87

Porch, Leigh

35, 43, 54, 59, 87

97


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OCALICON 2017 Program  

Official program for OCALICON 2017 – the nation's premier autism and disabilities conference. Nov. 15-17, 2017 | Columbus, OH

OCALICON 2017 Program  

Official program for OCALICON 2017 – the nation's premier autism and disabilities conference. Nov. 15-17, 2017 | Columbus, OH

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