Issuu on Google+

Phase II begins on Woodland Avenue project By Alyse Horn The Nail Pounding Ceremony for Phase II of the Woodland Avenue Revitalization Project was held at 4 p.m. on Thursday, November 17th at 1136 Woodland Ave. While opening the ceremony, President of Brightwood Civic Group, Angel Gober, who led the event, said that the organization “couldn’t do this by ourselves” and that it took “a lot of participation and partnerships” to get the project where it is today. Executive Director of the Northside Community Development Fund, Mark Masterson, who has partnered with BCG on the project since Phase I, said he is hopeful that

INSIDE

he and his organization will be able to do more projects of this nature on the Northside. “What [the NSCDF does] is loan money to nonprofit neighborhood organizations on the Northside, like Brightwood and Observatory Hill,” Masterson said, noting the funds supported Phase I of the Bovnue Street Project. “Fifty-two percent of our loans go towards these [projects], and we need to do more of them,” Masterson said. The Brightwood homes that are a part of Phase II are 2649 Brighton Rd., 2703 Brighton Rd., 1128 Woodland Ave., 1134 Woodland Ave., 1136 Woodland Ave. The BCG partnered with WesBanco, the NSCDF, the

-NS Bakeries, Page 14 STORIES, COLUMNS, -Trails & Travel, Page 22 FEATURES & MORE -RealStats, Page 23

Northside Leadership Conference, the Urban Redevelopment Authority, Councilwoman Darlene Harris and Mayor Bill Peduto during the second phase of the project. The BCG began this initiative in 2008 with support from the Northside Leadership Conference and currently own seven homes in the targeted areas along the 1100, 1200, and 1300 blocks of Woodland Avenue. The targeted areas were determined after collecting data that included existing land conditions, home ownership, vacancy rates, nuisance properties, property conditions and tax delinquency. The first three homes that spearheaded the project were completed in 2013.

ONLINE

WWW.NSCHRONICLE. COM.

Project receives second $10k grant for NSCM By Alyse Horn

The Elks National Foundation recently awarded the Yellow Glove Project another $10,000 Impact Grant to continue the distribution of cleaning products to those who utilize the Northside Community Food Pantry. As cleaning supplies are not covered by food stamps, handing out household cleaning items allows people to not “have to make a choice between rent, food, or a clean home,” said Anne George, the Elk and Northside Common Ministries volunteer See Yellow Glove, Page 3

-Latest Northside news -Weekly real estate transfers -Event coverage and photos


The Northside Chronicle

Page 2

THE NORTHSIDE CHRONICLE

922 Middle St. • Pittsburgh, PA 15212

Managing Editor, Alyse Horn editor@thenorthsidechronicle.com Advertising Manager, Lauren Stauffer advertising@thenorthsidechronicle.com www.thenorthsidechronicle.com Phone 412-321-3919 • Fax 412-321-1447 Mail Subscriptions are available at a rate of $35.00 per year. Distribution: 8,000 copies 2016 Advertising Rates & Rewards Available Upon Request DISCLAIMER: The viewpoints and opinions of the writers and contributors that appear in the Northside Chronicle do not necessarily reflect the viewpoints, opinions, beliefs or positions of the Northside Chronicle’s publishers, editors, staff and/or affiliates. The Northside Chronicle is not affiliated with any formal political, social, religious, educational or philosophical organization or party of any kind. The materials comprising the Northside Chronicle are provided by various organizations, community groups, advertisers, entities, writers and contributors and are provided as a service to the readers of the Northside Chronicle on an “as-is” basis for informational purposes only. The Northside Chronicle assumes no responsibility for any copyright infringement, errors or omissions in these materials and expressly disclaims any representations or warranties, express or implied, including, without limitation, any implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose regarding the correctness, accuracy, completeness, timeliness and reliability of the information provided. The Northside Chronicle is not responsible for damages of any kind arising out of use, reference to, or reliance upon such information. Reference herein to any commercial product, process or service does not constitute or imply endorsement or favoring by the Northside Chronicle. © The Northside Chronicle 2016

Pittsburgh Project collecting shoes now until Dec. 19 The Pittsburgh Project, 2801 N. Charles St., is collecting shoes from now until December 19 to raise funds for its youth development programs. The organization will earn funds based on the total weight of the shoes collected and Funds2Orgs will purchase all the donated footwear. The money will benefit The Pittsburgh Project youth development programs and any gently worn shoes can be donated, such as heels, sneakers and sandals. Those wishing to donate can drop shoes off at 2801 N. Charles St. The shoes will be redistributed

through the Funds2Ords network of microenterprise partners that help people start, maintain and grow businesses in developing nations such as Haiti, Honduras, and other nations in Central America and Africa. Proceeds from the shoe sales are used to feed, clothe and house their families. “We are excited about our shoe drive,” said Will Thompkins, executive director of The Pittsburgh Project. “We know that most people have extra shoes in their closets. We need your donations to help those less fortunate become self-sufficient.

December 2016

Community Meetings After Jail & Prison Ministry Support Mondays, 6-7 p.m. Allegheny Center Alliance Church 412.321.4333 ext. 127 801 Union Place, first floor Allegheny West Civic Council 2nd Tuesday, monthly, 7:30 p.m. Calvary United Methodist Church 412.323.8884 Brighton Heights Citizens Federation 2nd Thursday, bi-monthly, 7 p.m. Morrow Elementary School 412.734.0233 Brightwood Civic Group 3rd Tuesday, bi-month, 7 p.m. Pressley Ridge, 2611 Stayton St. 412.732.8152 Brightwood Community Emergency Response Shelter 3rd Thursday, monthly, 6 p.m. 3219 Central Ave. California-Kirkbride Blockwatch 3rd Thursday, monthly, 7 p.m. 1601 Brighton Rd., 3rd floor California-Kirkbride Neighbors 2nd Thursday, monthly, 7 p.m. 1601 Brighton Rd., 3rd floor 412.758.3898 Central Northside Neighborhood Council 2nd Monday, monthly, 7 p.m. Allegheny Traditional Academy 412.231.7742 Charles Street Area Council 1st Monday, monthly, call for times Pittsburgh Project, 2801 N. Charles St. 412.321.5567 Community Alliance of Spring Garden/ East Deutschtown 2nd Tuesday, monthly, 6:30 p.m. Fuhrer Building of St. Michael’s Church 412.977.1979 Deutschtown New Hope Council 3rd Thursday, monthly, 6:30 p.m. Community Center, 623 Suismon St. East Allegheny Community Council 2nd Tuesday, monthly, 7 p.m. Arnold’s Tea 412.321.1204 Fineview Citizens Council 4th Wednesday, monthly, 6 p.m. 1629 Sandusky Ct. 412.231.0330 Mexican War Streets Society 3rd Monday, bi-monthly, 6:30-7 p.m. 1400 Buena Vista St. 412.323.9030 Manchester Citizens Corporation

Quarterly meetings, call for times MCC Center, 1319 Allegheny Ave. 412.323.1743 Manchester Public Safety Meeting Quarterly meetings, call for times Northside Leadership Conference 412.323.1743 Northside Rotary Club Every Friday, noon Cardello Building, 2nd Floor NS Coalition for Fair Housing Board 2nd Monday, monthly, 6:30 p.m. 1821 Brighton Rd. 412.321.5527 NS Coalition for Fair Housing Members Monthly, call for times 1821 Brighton Rd. 412.321.5521 Northside Leadership Conference Call to confirm 1st Wednesday, monthly, 6 p.m. MCC Center, 1319 Allegheny Ave. 412.231.4714 North Side Lions Club 2nd and 4th Tuesday, monthly, noon Max’s Allegheny Tavern North Side Public Safety Council 1st Thursday, monthly, 5:30 p.m. 1319 Allegheny Ave. 1st floor meeting room 412.231.4714 ext. 201 Northside Toastmasters 2nd & 4th Thursdays, monthly, 6:30pm Carnegie Library, 1230 Federal St. 412-204-6018 Observatory Hill, Inc. 3rd Wednesday, monthly, 7 p.m. Byzantine Seminary, 3605 Perrysville Ave. 412.231.2887 Perry Hilltop Citizens’ Council 2nd Tuesday, bi-monthly, 6 p.m. The Pittsburgh Project perryhilltop@gmail.com 412.223.7144 The Promise Group Every other Tuesday, 6 p.m. Western Pa. Humane Society 412.321.1019 Troy Hill Citizens Council Second Tuesday of the month , 7 p.m. 1619 Lowrie St. 412.321.2852 Spring Hill Civic League Sept. 12th, Oct. 3rd, Nov. 7th. 7 p.m., Spring Hill Elementary School contact@shcl.org Summer Hill Citizens Committee 3rd Tuesday, monthly, 6:30 p.m. WPXI Television Station community room


December 2016

The Northside Chronicle

Elks Lodge awards second grant From Yellow Glove, Page 1 who applied for the grant. Additionally, feminine hygiene products are not covered by food stamps, and “they can be rather expensive,” said Jay Poliziani, director of NSCM. George said volunteers have filled about 400 “gal bags” with feminine hygiene products. Women and girls who are registered at the food pantry can request a bag, “and as long as we have them we will continue giving them out.” The main focus of the project is still on distributing household items, but surveys and feedback from daytime volunteers who run the pantry revealed that some beneficients didn’t need every item they received. George said volunteers are now working to maintain consistencyt so each visit beneficients can count on receiving toilet paper, dish soap, multi

purpose cleaner, and a tub and tile cleaner. Other products, such as body wash, are available to those who choose it from the pantry. George said donations are a welcome way to help support the drive and elongate funds. Those wishing to donate can drop off products such as lotion, body wash, soap, laundry detergent, cleaning rags and sponges, toilet bowl cleaner and feminine products. About 1,500 cloth bags are also needed to distribute the products. Donations can be dropped off at NSCM, 1601 Brighton Rd., with a note that says “Yellow Glove Project” on the box/bag, or email yellowgloveproject@gmail.com. To read our first story on the Yellow Glove Project in May, click here.On November 19, the Yellow Glove Project was awarded another $500 during the Ignite Northside Showcase Celebration hosted by New Sun Rising.

Page 3

December newsletter from Councilwoman Darlene Harris The end of 2016 is quickly approaching, and it has been a trying year for many of us. As the snow starts to fall and the temperatures drop even further, please take care of yourselves and your elderly neighbors. Be especially careful driving this month, as the foul weather might have a damaging impact on the roads, and children will be on Christmas vacation from school starting in late December. I hope everyone had a wonderful Thanksgiving last month, and please keep in mind that the season for giving and giving thanks continues into December. If you or someone you know has free time this month, please consider volunteering at places like the Northside Food Pantry or the Salvation Army.

A few hours of your day spent helping others can make a world of difference to those in need. Finally, I would like to wish everyone a Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukkah, Happy Kwanzaa, and blessings to those of us who celebrate other holidays during this season. I am extremely grateful for the diversity in the Northside, and in the face of change and challenge, I am grateful to all of my constituents for welcoming people from diverse backgrounds, religions, and traditions into their homes and hearts. As I said before, please look out for one another this season, and continue to give thanks for all of your blessings. I wish everyone a happy New Year, and I look forward to celebrating 2017 with all of you.


Page 4

The Northside Chronicle

Facade improvement grant for eligible homeowners The Urban Redevelopment Authority is offering eligible homeowners in specific areas of Manchester and Central Northside the opportunity to fix-up the facades of their residential property through the Residential Façade Improvement Grant Program. The property owner is responsible for 50 percent of the project costs and the URA can offer up to $5,000 to match the owner’s contribution. The property owner is also responsible for any excess costs. The application fee to apply is $150 and the property owner must be the applicant. The project must cost at least $500 for the property owner to apply. To be eligible, homes must be solely owner-occupied residential property, mixed residential/ commercial property, or residential rental property. Homeowners must also follow these guidelines: A project must enhance the front façade and any side of the home facing a public street (alleyways and

paper streets included); Exterior improvements should preserve the original building design and be sympathetic to the architectural character of the surrounding neighborhood; Roof, landscaping and interior repairs are not eligible. Eligible improvements can include restoration of architectural details, replacement of deteriorated or in-efficient windows and doors, cleaning and re-pointing brick, painting, removing or repairing awnings, and replacements or upgrades of porches, gutter and downspout repair/replacement, light, etc. The property where the project will take place cannot have any outstanding municipal debt, and any construction that is started before the application and approval process is completed is not grant eligible. For more information and to request an application, email qwasler@ura.org or call (412) 255-6550.

Love Your [Resilient] Block Grant Award Program Seeking Applications for 2017 Mayor William Peduto announced on November 22 that applications are available for the City of Pittsburgh’s 2017 Love Your [Resilient] Block grant award program. The block revitalization program gives organizations up to $1,500 in funds for a neighborhood resilience-building project that mobilizes community volunteers. In addition, the group with the project identified to have the most positive impact will be awarded an additional $3,000 to further their efforts. Projects will be implemented

from March 1 to August 31, 2017. Applications are available online at: http://www.pittsburghpa.gov/ servepgh/loveyourblock/grantapp. Applicants for the 2017 program must be a qualified nonprofit organization (or have the support of a nonprofit fiscal agent) and the impacted area must be within city limits. Applications must be received no later than January 6, 2017. Late applications will not be accepted. Applicants will be notified of their status on January 27, 2017. See Block, Page 6

December 2016


December 2016

The Northside Chronicle

Troy Hill unveils new welcome sign

By Alyse Horn It’s taken some time, about five years to be exact, but this month Troy Hill was finally able to install the 10′ x 12′ “Welcome To Troy Hill” mosaic sign located on Vinial Street across from Penn Brewery. The ribbon cutting ceremony, led by Troy Hill Citizens Treasurer Tony Benvin, took place on Tuesday, November 22. The town welcome sign was designed by James Simon, creator of the “Welcome To Uptown” sign which, honors fallen police officers in Bloomfield and the Liberty Avenue Musicians downtown. Benvin commented that Simon’s work is “known around the country and the world.” “We are pleased and proud to have one of his works to be the entrance to our community,” Benvin said. Sculptor James Simon (left) and THC Treasurer Tony Benvin (right)

Photo by Alyse Horn

Sculptor James Simon (left) and THC Treasurer Tony Benvin (right) during the ribbon cutting ceremony. during the ribbon cutting ceremony. was assisted in the project by the The project was headed by Northside Leadership Conference. Troy Hill Citizens, a non-profit During the design phase, neighborhood community group. community input was welcomed. It was funded by the H J Heinz The construction of the project Co. through a Neighborhood involved the individual setting Partnership Program tax credit of thousands of glass and donation administered by the ceramic tiles. Installation of Pennsylvania Department of the work was delayed until Community and Economic completion of PENNDOT’s Development. Troy Hill Citizens Route 28 reconstruction.

Page 5


Page 6

The Northside Chronicle

December 2016

University holds event to benefit NSCM By Lou Corsaro Point Park University students are piggy-backing on Penguins fever to benefit Northside Common Ministries. A Penguins big-screen watch party – dubbed Pucks N’ Gloves – will be held from 6 to 10 p.m. Monday, Dec. 12, in 200 Lawrence Hall at Point Park. The event, which is open to the public, will offer games, food, music and prizes, along with playing the Penguins game on a big-screen television. Any attendee bringing gently used denim or gloves as a donation will be entered into a drawing to win tickets to a future Penguins game. Students organizing the event are involved in Point Park’s Wood Street Communications, a nonprofit initiative within the School of Communication that assists nonprofits with their communications services. “We were drawn to Northside Common Ministries because of

its mission to provide shelter and a food pantry to the homeless community in Pittsburgh,” said Emily Miller, one of the students organizing the event. Camille Downing, an instructor in the School of Communication, said the students have been working hard all semester in teams to fully develop and market the event. Jay Poliziani, executive director of Northside Common Ministries, said the nonprofit group is excited to work with the students. “It is a great opportunity to get the word out about the lifechanging work that happens here to a wider and younger audience,” he said. “With our small staff, we always struggle to find the time to tell the stories of the homeless men like Bob, who went from sleeping under bridges to a soft bed in a new apartment. We have good stories happening here every day.” For more information on Northside Common Ministries, go to www. facebook.com/NCMinistries1.

Love Your [Resilient] Block Grant From Block, Page 4 A mandatory grantee orientation will take place in February 2017. There will be four information sessions during which applicants can ask questions about their proposals: Monday, Nov. 28, 4 p.m.; City County Building, Room 646, 414 Grant Street Wednesday, Nov. 30, 6 p.m.; CLP – Homewood, 7101 Hamilton Avenue Monday, Dec. 5, 6 p.m.; CLP – Knoxville, 400 Brownsville Road Wednesday, Dec. 7, 6:30 p.m.; CLP – Woods Run, 1201 Woods Run Avenue

To date, the program (formerly known as Love Your Block) has impacted over 400 blocks by collecting over 35,000 pounds of litter, engaging over 5,000 volunteers and leveraging nearly $500,000 in donations since its inception in 2011. In 2015, the City of Pittsburgh joined 100 Resilient Cities – pioneered by the Rockefeller Foundation. This brought a new focus on resilience to the city that aims to build the capacity of communities to adapt and overcome challenges they may face from a changing environment and transforming city.


December 2016

The Northside Chronicle

Page 7

New beer distributor carries on Kasunick’s legacy

By Alyse Horn “This building tells the story of Ray and his Dad, and making sure people had the beer they needed,” said Irv Gable, a managing partner of East Street Distributing Co., 807 E. Street. Ray Kasunick, owner of Kasunick Beer Distributor, had his last day of operation on October 16, but as Gable said, Kasunick solidified his family’s legacy by turning the store over to fellow beer aficionados — East Street Distributing Co. Gable said the company has made some updates to the facility, like signage and an additional cooler that will be installed in the next few weeks, but East Street is still about providing quality beer to the neighborhood. The company has also kept the same employees and has extended hours to make it easier

Photo by Alyse Horn

If there isn’t a beer on the shelf that customers want for the holidays, East Street Distributing Co. can order it. Orders in by Saturdays can be picked up on Mondays. for patrons to stop by and pick up a case. And soon, distributors will be able to sell six packs and single 32 oz. beers due to House Bill 1196. Some of the seasonal

beers currently available at East Street Distributing Co. for the 2016 Holiday season. “We’re trying to pick out beer that will provide a good time,” and if you can’t find

the beer you are looking for, the distributor will order it for you, Gable said. Those wishing to purchase beer that East Street does not have can submit orders by Saturdays to receive it with the beer delivery that arrives on Mondays. Currently, there are about 150 different varies of beer available at the store. Gable said Kasunick met the East Street crew through a mutual friend and it seemed like a “perfect fit.” Kasunick took over the store from his dad, totaling 62 years for the Northside distributor under the Kasunick name. “My Dad and I started the business with a vision to deliver great beer that customers love and to do it the right way,” Kasunick said in a press release. Over the years, Kasunick’s delivered beer to over 40 local bars, taverns, restaurants, hotels and sporting venues.


Page 8

The Northside Chronicle

December 2016


December 2016

The Northside Chronicle

Fund holds annual luncheon

By Alyse Horn On Monday, November 7 the Northside Community Development Fund hosted its Annual Community and Business Luncheon held at the Lexus Club in PNC Park. The keynote speaker for the event was Auditor General Eugene DePasquale, who spoke of the advancements the Northside has made through the years and how the focus of the city is changing and revitalizing its neighborhoods. “We’ll always be the Steel City, but we have become the hub for health, education, and young entrepreneurs,” DePasquale said. Executive Director of the NSCDF Mark Masterson accepted three checks during the event that will be put towards furthering the funds mission. The NSCDF aims to provide financing and development services to promote

community development and investment on the Northside and offer an array of financial products to achieve that mission. These projects are “helping to put home ownership back in the reach of working class folks,” Masterson said. The NSCDF has a total of 64 projects are either under construction or in the planning phases. Over the past five years, NSCDF has loaned more than $8.5 million to 90 non-profit organizations and small businesses. More than half of that total, nearly $4.4 million, was primarily used by nonprofit community organizations to acquire and develop strategic real estate projects in their neighborhoods. The remaining $4.041 million was loaned to businesses, with 44% going to woman-owned business and 42% to minority-owned businesses.

Page 9

Phase I of Bonvue Street Project begins in Ob. Hill

On Thursday, November 10 community members, volunteers and partners of the Bonvue Street Project gathered at 115 Bonvue St. for the first Nail Pounding Ceremony to kick off Phase I of the project in which five homes are being rehabbed. Leslee Schaffer, assistant treasurer of Observatory Hill Inc., said this project originally began rolling two years ago with the mission of gathering the “low hanging fruit like abandoned houses that have been sitting vacant for awhile and seeing which of those we could purchase” for rehabilitation. “In a short time we have made a nice leap forward in our progress,” Schaffer said. The homes that are currently under construction are 23 Bonvue St., 29 Bonvue St., 24 Bonvue St.,

111 Bovnue St., and 115 Bonvue St. Partnership with the Northside Community Development Fund, VAF Architecture, the Urban Redevelopment Authority, SSB Bank, and the Northside Leadership Conference was key in making the project possible, and Schaffer said that Mayor Bill Peduto’s office and Councilwoman Darlene Harris have been very supportive throughout the venture and getting the vacant houses under control. “It’s a good time to be apart of the neighborhood,” Schaffer said. At the event on November 10, the Vice-Chairperson for the NSCDF Walt Nalducci, said “we are here really to celebrate a new beginning for Observatory Hill and a bright future for Observatory Hill” before the nail pounding took place.


December 2016

The Northside Chronicle

Page 10


Page 11

The Northside Chronicle

December 2016


Page 12

The Northside Chronicle

December 2016


Page 13

The Northside Chronicle

December 2016


Page 14

The Northside Chronicle

December 2016

Holiday specialties from Northside bakeries

Knead to save time this holiday season? Skip baking and order sweet treats from these local bakeries By Alyse Horn

BreadWorks Bakery 2110 Brighton Rd.

It can be said that the way to a person’s heart is through their stomach. If that’s true, then pastries can bring that love to another level. Here’s what four Northside bakeries specialize in during the holiday season and information for catering orders.

Along with its “Famous Focaccias”, available Monday through Friday year round, BreadWorks covers its bases when it comes to holiday breads. BreadWorks Vice-President and Head of Distribution, Fred Hartman, said on December 23 and December 24 the shop will be offering Sweet Egg Bread, and Chocolate Babka “for your New Year’s parties” on December 31. The shop also offers holiday breads for Valentine’s Day, St. Patrick’s Day, Easter, Mother’s Day, Thanksgiving, and on October 15 which is BreadWorks’ birthday. BreadWorks, which began on the Northside in 1979, was originally called French Oven Bakery until 1984 when the name was sold to a franchise. The bakery then changed its name to The Breadworks, and dropped “the” in 1997 during the creation of the current logo.

Chateau Café & Cakery 1501 Preble Ave.

Holiday cookie trays are a popular item at Chateau Café & Cakery, as well as their homemade pies. Owner Keren DeCarlo said everything is homemade in house from scratch and there are no preservatives in the baked goods or other menu items. For December the shop is promoting $25 for a small batch of 30 cookies and $50 for a large batch of 60 cookies. Gluten free cookies are also available upon request and priced at $38 for a small batch and $75 for a large batch. The café also bakes a variety of cakes, cupcakes, scones and muffins. DeCarlo said orders are available for pick up or delivery, and that the café also does catering for holiday parties or other events throughout the year. The catering menus include an assortment of items for breakfast or lunch. DeCarlo asked that orders are put in at least 24 to 48 hours in advance for catering, but if there is an emergency to give them a call and if possible the café will try to accommodate your needs. Call (412) 8022537 to place an order.

Photos by Alyse Horn

Top photo: Priory Fine Pastries has been open on East Ohio Street since 2004 and serves up an assortment of sweets, such as cinnamon rolls, creamed horns, pies, cupcakes, and the list goes on. Bottom photo: BreadWorks bakes dozens of different loaves of breads daily, but only around the holidays does it offer specialty breads, like the Chocolate Babka and Sweet Egg Bread.

Schorr family for a little over four decades, said Kaitlyn Schorr, daughter of owners Margaret and James Schorr. Pumpkins pies and an array of cakes are top sellers around the holidays. One reason for the popularity of the cakes may be due to their Schorr Bakery decorator who is Kaitlyn’s sisterin-law and a former art teacher. 3912 Perrysville Ave. “She is good with The bakery has been in the

cake designing and does beautiful work,” Kaitlyn said. Cakes should be ordered 48 hours in advance., Other orders may be placed with 24 hours’ notice. More notice is appreciated when it comes to large orders. The bakery also makes homemade strudels, cookies, donuts and dinner rolls. Call (412) 3217568 to place an order.

Priory Fine Pastries 528 E. Ohio St.

Jim Lazeratin, Priory Fine Pastries general manager, said the bakeries cookie trays are by far the most popular holiday item sold. The small trays sell for $35 for four dozen, and a large tray is $70 for nine dozen. Lazeratin said Yule Logs are also a popular item, which are made using yellow cake and the customer’s choice of filling and topped with traditional meringue mushrooms. This time of year is one of the busiest at the bakery, and Lazeratin asked customers to get orders in as soon as possible to receive their sweets by the holidays.


Page 15

The Northside Chronicle

YINZ! Comics by Nils Balls

December 2016

The 17th Annual Mister Rogers’ Sweater Drive

Photo by Alyse Horn

Read the Northside Chronicle Online

Mr. McFeely and X the Owl getting kids excited to donate sweaters at the Children’s Museum on November 10.

Visit new web address www.nschronicle.com for more news about Northside real estate, events & more.

By Alyse Horn Mr. McFeely of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood was at the Children’s Museum in November to kick off the 17th Annual Sweater Drive. There were 108 students from Fort Cherry Elementary Kindergarten Class and Children’s Museum Pre/K-Head Start programs that is operated by Pittsburgh Public Schools. The Sweater Drive first began in Denver on the 30th Anniversary of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, and Director of Marketing Bill Schlageter said bringing the drive to the Children’s Museum was his first project when he began working at the museum in 2000. “[Mr. McFeely] and I teamed up during the first year to get this going,” Schlageter said. “It’s a very rewarding experience.” Since 2000, the Children’s Museum has collected more than 39,000 sweaters to share with families in need. This year, the collected sweaters will be distributed between

December 19-23 to families by the Presbyterian Media Mission, The Homeless Children’s Education Fund, Veteran’s Leadership Program of Western, PA, Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh Ambassadors: Kids at Heart, and other agencies that work in families and children in the region. Director of Presbyterian Media Mission Greg Hartung said these sweaters most go to families that have parents who are working two jobs and “just need help.” Sweaters are being collected until December 16 and can be dropped off at the Children’s Museum. For more information, please email hi@pittsburghkids. org or call the Museum’s Sweater Donation Hotline at (412) 322-5058 ext. 363. Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood is now available on Netflix and Amazon, and can also be viewed on PBSkids.org, or at WQED on the weekends. There is also a Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood installation at the Heinz History Museum that contains items from the set of the TV show.


Page 16

The Northside Chronicle

December 2016


December 2016

The Northside Chronicle

T HISTORIC DEUTSCHTOWN BUSINESSES T

Page 17


Page 18

The Northside Chronicle

December 2016

T CHATEAU BUSINESSES in the RJ CASEY INDUSTRIAL PARK T


Page 19

The Northside Chronicle

T NORTH SHORE BUSINESSES T

December 2016


December 2016

The Northside Chronicle

Page 20


Page 21

The Northside Chronicle

December 2016

Alphabet City to host writers from Pittsburgh, Nigeria By Alyse Horn On 8 p.m. on Friday, December 9, Marc Nieson will be giving a reading from his memoir “Schoolhouse: Lessons on Love + Landscape” at Alphabet City, 40 W. North Ave. Nieson, a professor at Chatham University and a member of the advisory board at City of Asylum, is a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and also a graduate from the New York University Film School. His experience includes children’s theatre, cattle chores, and a season with a onering circus, but he said the bulk of his book is about how the change of landscape, moving from the city streets of Brooklyn to 500 acres of open fields in Iowa, influenced his being. “It was huge for me,” Nieson said. “The education I got out in the woodlands was far more effective and transformative.” Nieson has also spent time in Minnesota and Venice, Italy. His reading on December 9

will include an excerpt from his memoir that takes place in Venice. Nieson has lived in Pittsburgh for the past 13 years in Bloomfield. After completing his studies, Nieson stayed in Iowa and became a cultural liaison for the International Writers’ Workshop. The program gathers an average of 30 established and emerging writers each fall from different corners of the globe, and Nieson helped submerge these individuals in American culture. He not only aided the writer’s interaction with other departments of the university, but also took the writers on “field trips” to submerge them in American culture. That involved rodeos, white gospel shows, and bowling alleys, and Nieson said those times were “seminal experiences” for him. Accompanying Nieson will be Ukamaka Olisakwe, a writer in the University of Iowa International Writing Program and a visiting writer-in-residence at City of Asylum. Olisakwe

is a screenwriter, novelist, and nonfiction writer from Nigeria and has had her work appear in The New York Times. She said she was invited by the university to attend the fall writing workshop. Olisakwe said her “stories focus on how marriage can change the course of a woman’s life.” Marriage was a choice for her, although it was not for her cousins and she is frustrated that women in Nigeria must marry men and have children to please their families. During the event at Alphabet City, Olisakwe said she will be reading work from Nigeria. Impressed by the community that City of Asylum has been able to create, she wished that there could be something similar in her country but does not believe it has the support structure to harbor it. During a November interview, Olisakwe said she had only gone out for walks or to buy groceries, but her favorite part about the Northside was “the mix” of people and their multicultural backgrounds.

Photo courtesy of Marc Nieson

Marc Nieson has won a Raymond Carver Short Story Award, Pushcart Prize nominations, and been noted in Best American Essays. He teaches at Chatham University, edits fiction for The Fourth River, and is at work on a new novel, “Houdini’s Heirs.”

Ed Skirtich: Aviary event showcases artwork inspired by nature Woodwork, paintings, watercolor, and photographs of birds fascinated visitors during the Wings and Wildlife at the Aviary in November. Artist explained to patrons at their booths how they became inspired by walking trails and the sights around the area. “The arts make Pittsburgh a special place to be,” said David DiCello, a featured artist at Wings and Wildlife. Views from DiCello’s photographs are of downtown Pittsburgh sights on sunny

Heinz Field, and the Point State Park fountain displayed Pittsburgh’s beauty well. Northside resident Sherri Thompson painted watercolors of birds. Her booth had a different colored bird for the fall, winter, spring, and summer. Watercolor of a bluejay by Northside “Their local Pittsburgh artist Sherri Thompson. birds you find in your Thompson said. afternoons or twilight and backyard,” With excitement, James nighttime atmospheres were shot Urbanic from Ellwood City, PA from his tripod or riding in a helicopter. DiCello’s photographs said it was interesting to have a of Mount Washington’s incline, booth with the only wood carving

of birds. In addition, Urbanic’s wood carvings appeared life sized. “I made it as lifelike as I could,” Urbanic said. Urbanic stated he made his art work from Tupelo wood from the south because it’s easy yet strong. In one of Urbanic’s exhibits, a big black raven had glass eyes and metal legs to keep the bird upright. Urbanic commented on seeing birds in their environment helped his artwork. “It’s interesting to see how birds live,” Urbanic said.


December 2016

The Northside Chronicle

Page 22

35th Annual Old Allegheny Victorian Christmas House Tour By Alyse Horn Friday, December 9 and Saturday, December 10 marks the 35th Annual Old Allegheny Victorian Christmas House Tour. Guides will bring attendees to six different restored Victorian homes including the historic Calvary United Methodist Church, which is famous for its Louis Comfort Tiffany stained glass windows. The tour will begin at the church, located on Allegheny and Beech Avenues, and free parking is available throughout the neighborhood and select CCAC parking lots. Tours will be completed in 12-minute intervals between 5 and 8 p.m. on December 9, and between 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. on December 10. According to a press release, “These guided tours afford a rare opportunity to glimpse a by-gone era and experience the warmth of the season in a truly ‘oldfashioned’ style. Most homes in Allegheny West are over 100 years old and Victorian in architectural style. Lavishly decorated for the holidays, they recall the late 19th Century birth of the traditional American Christmas – elaborately decorated mantels, towering Christmas trees and pine, holly and mistletoe on stairs and chandeliers.” One of the world’s largest

Toy Train Museums, located in Holmes Hall at 719 Brighton Ave., will be on display for attendees over the weekend. John DeSantis is the owner of the ehxibit and has been collecting trains since the age of 2. There will be over 8,000 trains on display that Top: Map of the six homes that will be featured on the house tour. take up two floors of his home. Bottom: A glimpse inside one of the Victorian homes on the house In a previous interview tour from a previous year. with The Northside Chronicle in 2013, Carole Malakoff said the Old Allegheny Christmas Tour was created by a group of neighbors and the first tour had such a powerful debut that “there were people lined up around the church to go out on tour.” Tickets for the house tour are $35 per person and $15 per person for the model train exhibit. Tickets can be bought online or by calling 1-888-718-4253. Reservations are required for the tour, and it is recommended that tickets for the train exhibit are bought in advance.


Page 23

Brighton Heights CAH 1 L.P. to Miao and Kai Jui Liu at 3547 California Ave. for $268,500. Brylee Kopel to James and Amelia Sloss at 3514 Campus St. for $304,000. Jaime Lardo Chesney to Mt. Nebo Property Solutions L.P. at 3951 Kleber St. for $20,000. Mark Hilts to James Purvis at 3689 Harbison Ave. for $119,000. Estate of Loretta Schweiger to Equity Trust Co. Cust Fbo William J Obers at 3318 Harbison St. for $70,500. Citizens Bank Pennsylvania to Paul Gaetano at 3642 Purdue St. for $45,000. Gregory Boyd et al. to Ryan Daniel and Sarah Holick at 1159 Termon Ave. for $178,500. Frank Rabick to New Lockhart LLC & RE 247 LLC at 1325 Beckham St. for $33,000. New Lockhart LLC & RE 247 LLC to Jiangyang Zhang at 1325 Beckham St. for $41,000. Estate of Peggy Coyle to Lucie Ward at 3552 McClure Ave. for $144,000. Jeffrey Knauss to Eryka Tolliver at 1827 Viruth St. for $109,000. Paul Deah to Lawrence Hopkins and Pamela Smith at 1021 Benton Ave. for

The Northside Chronicle

$40,000. Joan Straight to US Bank NA trustee at 3504 Corona St. for $2,149 by sheriff’s deed. Julie Lemke to Ryan Porter at 1022 Lapish Road for $1 (state deed transfer stamps indicate a value of $64,573). Michael Ross to Converge Real Estate LLC at Reiss St. for $3,000. Madonna Land Co. Inc. to Aysan Guvenal at 3622-3624 California Ave. for $862,000. Alice Ann Beeler to Wiley Properties LLC at 1924 Morrell St. for $90,000. Brightwood Brandon Martin to Royal Realty By TLM LLC at 2844 California Ave. for $12,500. Donna Mielke to Lisa LeRose at 1067 Smithton Ave. for $12,000. Estate of Frank Sarachman to Jason and Angela Durler at 1043 Woods Run Ave. for $2,748. IBuyPittsburgh Inc. to Fred Miller at 1412 Casement St. for $13,500. iBuyPittsburgh Inc. to Fred Miller at 1413 Forsythe St. for $13,500. Finco Development LLC to Northern Atlantic Properties LLC at 3140 Frederick St. for $10,500. Donna Sauers to Lisa McCray at 2930

Breker St. for $87,250. Harry Edward Stough Jr. to Brightwood Civic Group at 2703 Brighton Road and Woodland Ave. for $24,800. Edmond Mancini et al. to Pittsburgh Brighton FDS 713418 LLC at 3210 Brighton Road for $417,500. Ron Biernacki to Pittsburgh Brighton FDS 713418 LLC at 3210 Brighton Road for $377,500. Estate of Richard Vrane to Gunay Gursoy at 2915 Shadeland Ave. for $15,000. California-Kirkbride Neighborhood Housing Services Inc. to Equity Trust Co. Cust FBO Cathy Jo Restel at 1922 Sedgwick St. for $4,500. Central Northside Jocelyn Horner to Emily Moore at 1224 Mimosa Way for $165,000. Paul Johnson to Jeff and Kimberly Trebac at 605 Jefferson St. for $385,000. LCA Properties LLC to McIntosh Management L.P. at 410 Eloise St. for $187,500. Heidi Bartholomew to Thomas Rich Jr. and Kristine Rich at 508 N. Taylor Ave. for $407,500. Estate of Jerry Moye to Steven Singer at 1207 Palo Alto St. for $314,400. April Wiles Fusaro to Norman May at 223

December 2016

Jacksonia St. for $291,000. Lisa Gardner to Samuel and Lisa Marie Pareso at 1205 Buena Vista St. for $333,000. Roselee Crawford to Sidney Jackson at 1401 Arch St. for $8,000. East Deutschtown Pittsburgh City to Casey Droege at 911 Constance St. for $200 (state deed transfer stamps indicate a value of $4,025). Fineview Edward Doubt to Brian Mouradian at 1618 Myler St. for $159,000. John Dooley et al. to Matthew and Sarah Scollin at 1724 Meadville St. for $165,000. Historic Deutschtown Justin Bienio to Jennifer Vander Plaats at 602 Suismon St. for $197,400. Raymond Kasunick to Suismon 631 LLC at 631-633 Suismon St. for $110,000. Manchester Steen Day Super Fun Inc. to Terra Nonack and Justin Carroll at 1221 Juniata St. and 1230 Rush St. for $66,128. Felicia Davis to JPMorgan Chase Bank NA at 1124 N. Franklin St. for $57,477 (state deed transfer stamps indicate a value of $93,840) by sheriff’s deed. Good Von Lehman Co. LLC to SLC


December 2016

Manchester LLC at 1321 Liverpool St. for $165,000. Doris Hawkins to Bullychild Redevelopment LLC at 1436 N. Franklin St. for $8,600 (state deed transfer stamps indicate a value of $56,120) by sheriff’s deed. Good Von Lehman Co. LLC to SLC Manchester LLC at 1112 Sheffield St. for $285,000. Good Von Lehman Co. LLC to SLC Manchester LLC at 1110-1112 Sheffield St. and 1321 Liverpool for $285,000. Dale Allerton to Andrew and Shannon Reichert at 1132 W. North Ave. for $361,000. Estate of Joe Ellen Porter to Ernest Withrow at 1443 Nixon St. for $10,000. Marshall Stewart to Zachary Cole at 1316 Sheffield St. for $160,000. Observatory Hill Riva Ridge Enterprises LLC to Natasha Collins at 3110 Perrysville Ave. for $107,000. Andrew Balint to Yohouse Co. at 3888 East St. for $169,000. Thomas Petrola to National Residential Nominee Services In at 3031 Mt. Allister Road for $183,000.

The Northside Chronicle

National Residential Nominee Services In to James and Anne Angyal at 3031 Mt. Allister Road for $183,000. Matthew Radeck to Brylee Kopel at 24 Radium St. for $17,500. Timothy Benz to Maria Renzelli at 3108 Norwood Ave. for $171,000. Judith Wojnovich to David Ruth at 33 Bascom Ave. for $47,500. Christopher Stewart to Thuy Nguyen at 65 Bascom Ave. for $57,000. Rosemary Bohr to Travis Wanner at 128 Dunlap St. for $25,000. Federal National Mortgage Assn. to Orion Portfolio Management LLC at 3400 Portola St. for $50,500. Perry Hilltop Shoebox Homes LLC to OGR Realty 3 L.P. at 300 Langley Ave. and Honduras St. for $28,000. Donna Ambrogi to Wilmington Savings Fund Society FSB trustee at 1821 Perrysville Ave. for $5,700 by sheriff’s deed. Rebecca Metzger to Jasmine Bennings at 215 Marshall Ave. for $177,000. Alice Melensky to OGR Realty 3 L.P. at 2216 Osgood St. for $5,000. Dorothy Choy to Donna and Evan

Malchano at 543 Marshall Ave. for $50,000. BFB Enterprises Inc. to Jasmine Walton at 23 W. McIntyre Ave. for $60,770. Gary Pandolfo to Timothy and Ashley Koltonski at 2334 Osgood St. for $114,000. Donald McCartan et al. to OGR Realty 3 L.P. at 2236 Wilson Ave. for $52,500. Spring Garden Community Alliance Spring Garden East to Ralo Properties LLC at 1007 High St. for $15,500. Timothy Helch to Spring Garden Community Trust at 2542-2544 Spring Garden Ave. for $30,000. Spring Hill Daniel Stalter to Nicholas SanGregory and Frances Sand at 1424 Hetzel St. for $130,000. James Tongel et al. to Sandra Lee Gray at 16 Bly St. for $2,000. Arthur Beatty to Rabia Hassan El Haj Benali at 2018 Rockledge St. for $21,000. SS Allegheny LLC to Jordan Vescio at 1311 Diana Place for $12,500. Evelyn Agnes Snyder to Kros Nest LLC at 4 Erk Way for $51,000. Evelyn Agnes Snyder to Steve Kroser at 9

Page 24

Tank St. for $224,000. Troy Hill Philip McCall to Shawn and Lauren Cherevka at 1716 Harpster St. for $64,000. Laura Demetrion to Katie Kay Johnson at 1539 Hatteras St. for $67,000. Eva Woomer to JRN Home Rentals LLC at 1509 Claim St. for $15,000. Nickolas Leskowak to David and Mary Cherevka at 2051 Veronica St. for $35,000. Richard Pfisterer to Rodger and Saundra Neurohr at 2041 Eggers St. for $5,000. Michael McCarthy to Colleen Reyburn and Christopher Lenci at 2037 Veronica St. for $50,000. Loretta Jelinek et al. to Loretta Jelinek at 1144 Goettman St. for $1 (state deed transfer stamps indicate a value of $12,650). Loretta Jelinek et al. to Loretta Jelinek at 1300 Truax Way for $1 (state deed transfer stamps indicate a value of $14,190). Charles Dougherty trustee to C Paul and Nancy Scott at 78 Waterfront Drive for $1,100,000.


Page 25

The Northside Chronicle

December 2016

Education on the Northside

Upcoming children’s events Science Center unveils at the Mattress Factory new addition to miniature Mini-Factory Saturday, December 10 10-11 a.m. A series of programs for childen ages 3-5 years old. Children are able to explore a variety of themes and installations at the museum, participate in story time and work on a collaborative hands-on project. The theme for December 10 is Senses. The cost is $5 for one child + one parent/caregiver or free for MF Members.

ARTLab Saturday, December 17 1-4 p.m. ARTLab is designed for all ages and is a hands-on, drop-in, interactive activity. Participants are encouraged to explore, play and experiment with projects inspired by current exhibitions, artists and ideas. The cost is free with museum admission. The ARTLab activity for December 17 is Scribble Machine Wrapping Paper.

Afternoons @ the Factory Januart 11-February 15, 2017 4-6 p.m. Afternoons @ the Factory is the free afterschool program offered by the museum. On Wednesday afternoons, participating students work with artists directly to explore themes such as collaboration, tolerance, and spatial experience, all within the contect of contemporary art practice. Artists and museum educators provide academic, emotional, and creative support while broadening students’ way of thinking and increasing exposure to adults with diverse backgrounds and careers. The program is endorsed by Pittsburgh Public School and is recognized as a “Quality Campaign Member” by Allegheny Partners for Out-of-School time. The Winter Session, beginning Wednesday, January 11, will be led by Museum Educator Teresa Duff and focus on kinetics. Email education@mattress.org for more details or information on how to register.

The Northside Chronicle Education page is sponsored by:

railroad, village exhibit

By Alyse Horn

Atlas Obscura dubbed the exhibit one of nine “most incredible model trains in the world.” “I have been working here since 2008 and still notice things in the railroad that I haven’t noticed before” Rible said. “There is so much wonderful detail that is highlighting Pittsburgh from the 1800s to 1930s.” “All ages can enjoy it – from 8 to 85 it is something that will pull you in even if you’re not a model train enthusiast.” The Miniature Railroad & Village, presented by Lionel Trains, is open during the Science Center’s regular operating hours and is included with general admission. For more information about this or any other Science Center exhibits, call 412-237-3400 or visit CarnegieScienceCenter.org.

On November 17, the Carnegie Science Center reopened its Miniature Railroad & Village and unveiled a new addition to the exhibit—a model of the Westinghouse Atom Smasher. The Miniature Railroad & Village has been at the Science Center since 1992, but originated from Brookville, Pa. and was created by a man named Charles Bowdish in 1919. The exhibit displays “how people lived, worked, and played in our region during an era spanning the 1880s to the late 1930s,” according to the Science Center website. The newest addition, the Westinghouse Atom Smasher, was created in Forest Hills in 1937. According to a press release, it “was a pioneering laboratory for one of the world’s first large-scale nuclear physics research programs.” The model was created using 3-D printing technology by the Science Center staff, and it is the first piece of the exhibit to be created using a 3-D printer. Jill Rible, marketing and communications manager for the Science Center said the railroad and village are “fantastic” and that it is one of the “premier miniature railroads in the country.” Photo of the Westinghouse Atom Rible said this past May, Smasher courtesy of Jill Rible


December 2016

The Northside Chronicle

Page 26


December 2016

The Northside Chronicle

The Game Page Last Month’s Puzzle Solutions First published in a U.S. puzzle magazine in 1979, Sudoku caught on in Japan in 1986, and became internationally famous in 2005. The aim of Sudoku is to enter a number from 1 through 9 in each space on a 9×9 grid made up of 3×3 subgrids (called “regions”). Some of the numbers have already been given. You may not use the same number twice in a single row, column, or region of the grid. Completing the puzzle requires patience and logical ability.

Crossword puzzles provided by www. bestcrosswords.com / Used with permission.

Chronicle Crossword Across 1- Andean country; 5- Annoy; 8- Ball game; 12- Desktop picture; 13- Like a rock; 15- Off-broadway theater award; 16- Gator’s cousin; 17- Home ___; Culkin Movie; 18- Ink spot; 19- Self-antigen; 22- Actress Balin; 23- Tolkien ogre; 24- Breather; 26- 4th letter of the Hebrew alphabet; 29- Be worthy of; 31- Highly respectful way of addressing a man; 32- Jacket material; 34- Turkish palace; 36- At any time; 38- Pond insect; 40- Lacking; 41- Babbled; 43-Stem; 45- Rocky hilltop; 46- Floating; 48- Closer; 50- Attention; 51- Actor Gulager; 52- Not for a Scot; 54- The Christian world; 61- Golf club which can be number 1 to 9; 63- Totaled; 64- Russian parliament before 1917; 65- In addition to; 66- Below; 67- Optical device; 68Slammin’ Sammy; 69- Small child; 70- Some Ivy Leaguers; Down 1- Size of type; 2- Beige; 3- Underground part of a plant; 4- Not self-assured; 5- Electrical unit; 6- “The Time Machine” race; 7- Walk sign; 8- Lump; 9- Destroy; 10- Hero; 11- Goat’s milk cheese; 13- Sacred place; 14- Caterpillar rival; 20- Ancient Athens’s Temple of ___; 21- Capone’s nemesis; 25- Goes out with; 26- Sofa; 27- Sandlike; 28-Robbery; 29- Started; 30- Feudal Estate; 31- Sun. talk; 33- Banned spray; 35- Neighbor of Leb.; 37- Roster; 39- Voter; 42- DEA agent; 44- Cabbagelike plant; 47- First prime minister of India; 49- Rung of a ladder; 52Bites; 53- He sang about Alice; 55- Tirade; 56- ___-European; 57- Editor’s mark; 58- Shootout; 59- Old Dodge model; 60- Aggregate; 62- Code-breaking org.;

Page 27

Sudoku



December 2016