Page 1


first edition

2016 spring summer


featured

race car driver

Milka Duno

10

Q + A with NowVIZ Photos by Andrea Mead Cross

LIVE from

sebring International raceway

48 Q + A with NowVIZ Photos by Andrea Mead Cross

Cover photo by Andrea Mead Cross she worked with Milka Duno in MIami’s chic Design District.


22

jason richardson: Intro by Mark Saffieri, Q + A with NowVIZ unfiltered Photos by Andrea Mead Cross

the evolution

contents spring summer edition 2016

here come the trials

of Holly Beck Obermeyer

36

by Mark Saffieri Photos by Andrea Mead Cross

NowVIZ sports + beyond ezine where the usual rules don’t apply.


contributors

Andrea Mead Cross

Mark Saffieri

Andrea Mead Cross is a former world-class athlete in two sports, swimming and as a professional triathlete. In both sports(careers) she traveled across the globe competing on USA Teams nationally and internationally, sponsored by top companies in the industry, and ranked among the top 10 in the world at her best. When leaving her athletic career, she had already transitioned into the design world, starting her own business and working with many national and international clients, including Parade, Huffington Post, ESPN, and HSBC. When time permitted she also taught Visual Communications as an adjunct professor for both Florida International University and Miami Dade College. Photography ultimately became her main focus and now a professional photographer, she works with some of the best athletes in the world. Commercially her images have been featured with companies such as, Johnson and Johnson, Target, McDonald’s, BP Global, and Koss Headphones. Her work is published in magazines, including Sports Illustrated, National Geographic, Outside Magazine, Fitness, and MORE, and featured on Oprah Winfrey’s, “Super Soul Sunday” and ABC World News Tonight with Diane Sawyer. Additionally, her photographs added immeasurably to the projects of well-known athletes published by Random House, Penguin, Knopf, and Crown Publishing. Andrea just released her own photography book titled, Sports Souls the book, featuring over 25 world-class athletes and available on Amazon. Best known for his insights on women’s ice hockey, Mark Staffieri is based in Canada’s capital region and has reported on events such as the Clarkson Cup and the Women’s World Football Games. With works included on Bleacher Report, along with features for Hockey Canada during its coverage of the 2013 IIHF Women’s World Championships, Mark has also covered WWCFL football. Among a group of writers that recently voted for the inaugural NWHL Awards, Mark is currently a regular contributor to Women’s Hockey Life and Women Talk Sports.

Peter N. Jones is a photographer, writer, and athlete, focusing his pursuits on the mountains and the sports and lifestyle surrounding them. Born and raised in Colorado, he has been a professional athlete in several sports, written for many magazines, books, and websites, and his photographs have been published across numerous media platforms. Peter holds a PhD and is Co-Editor of Boulder Running Journal and author of the book,The Best Front Range Trail Runs. Peter N. Jones


side orders

beyond the bod

20

Beyond the Numbers: A Journey to Healthy Living By Jocelyne Lamoureux-Davidson and Monique Lamoureux-Morando

Design sports + beyond

46

DESIGNing beyond By Juan Marco

politically correct

58

athletes with

Soul

Athletes help promote animal awareness as the Olympic Games approach in RIO.

out takes

60

Screamin’ pics by Photographer Peter N. Jones

NowVIZ sports + beyond is a new hip online visual magazine that evolved because we wanted a place to showcase all things sport in a different perspective. We are committed to presenting exceptional work in design + photography. The usual rules don’t apply. -Enjoy.


contributors

Jocelyne Lamoureux-Davidson on left (Millie front and center!)

Monique Lamoureux-Morando on left

Kelley Kwiatkowski

Jocelyne Lamoureux-Davidson is a member of Team USA Women’s Ice Hockey. She is a 2x Olympic silver medalist, 5x World Champion, and a World Champion runner-up. During her collegiate career, she was a 2x All-American, 2x Academic All-American, recipient of the NCAA Top 10 Award (awarded to the Top 10 senior athletes in all of NCAA sports), a member of the North Dakota Sports Hall of Fame, along with many other athletic and academic accomplishments. She graduated from the University of North Dakota with a degree in Exercise Science and finished her Master’s in Kinesiology. She continues to train and prepare for the 2018 Olympics, as well as, work full-time as both a Performance Specialist at Sports Advantage Powered by EXOS and Head Strength Coach for Women’s Hockey at The University of North Dakota in Grand Forks, North Dakota. She is also passionate about the Special Olympics and providing equal opportunities for girls in sports. Monique Lamoureux-Morando has been a part of Team USA Women’s Ice Hockey since 2009. She is a 5x World Champion and 2x Olympic silver medalist. Monique played at the University of North Dakota where she was a 3x All-American, Academic All-American, leads All-Defenseman in career scoring, and received the 2013 Grace Rhonemus Award for Female Athlete of the Year. Monique will be inducted into the North Dakota Sports Hall of Fame in 2016, with her twin sister Jocelyne, and was also named USA Hockey’s 2016 Bob Allen Female Hockey Player of the Year. She has a Bachelor’s in Exercise Science and Masters in Kinesiology. She currently works for Altru Sports Advantage Powered by EXOS as a Performance Specialist and conducts hockey camps through a company she created called, Lamoureux Hockey. Kelley Kwiatkowski has always had sports in her blood, as she came from a family that lived and breathed them. Football was the main conversation, with both her father and uncles playing pro ball or coaching at colleges across the country. So to follow the family’s athletic trend, she became a professional triathlete and for over a decade became one of the best, racing for the USA worldwide on National Teams, World Teams, and the Pan Am Team. When she finished racing, her right brain took over and with a background in Industrial Design, she worked in NYC at one of the top product design firms in the country, designing for companies such as, American Airlines, ATT, and Canon. She then left NYC to start her own design business in South Florida featuring a wide spectrum of design for companies such as, Disney and Warner Brothers. She also taught Industrial Design as an adjunct professor at Florida International University to both undergraduate and graduate students. And now for almost a decade, she’s been working with photographer Andrea Mead Cross, producing her projects and designing all visual content for her media. Her most recent design work can be seen in Sports Souls the book, by Andrea and this edition of NowVIZ sports + beyond!


One of the most successful female race car drivers in the world today.

beauty INTERVIEW WITH NOWVIZ PHOTOGRAPHED BY ANDREA MEAD CROSS

M


y + brawn

Milka Duno


There are


very few women

in the elite sport of car racing who have broken through the ranks and risen to such an extraordinary level and none are more dynamic and complex then Milka Duno. Her career highlights are impressive and the respect to accomplish what she’s accrued is monumental. After winning the Rolex Series Miami Grand Prix, she became the first woman in history to win a major international race in the USA. She’s the first Hispanic female race car driver that can claim qualifying for the prestigious Indianapolis 500 not once, but three consecutive years. She’s the first Hispanic female to race in the IndyCar Series and to lead a race in that series. She’s the first Hispanic female to compete in a NASCAR National Series (and lead race laps), NASCAR’s Nationwide Series, and NASCAR’s Camping World Truck Series. She’s also the first Hispanic woman to compete in the ARCA Racing Series and second highest finishing woman in overall driver point standings. She’s got three wins to her name in the Rolex Grand American Series and five wins in the American Le Mans Series. The list goes on. Milka was also the first Venezuelan athlete to be inducted into the Latin American International Sports Hall of Fame in 2010. And this is where the complexity of Milka is so interesting, the success she has on the track parallels her success in the endeavors and interests she has off the track. And one being, Milka is as committed to her education as she is to her racing. She currently holds four master’s degrees and is a Naval Engineer (that’s one!), the other three include, Organizational Development, Naval Architecture Aquaculture, and Maritime Business. Also in 2004, Milka created a program to give back called, “Milka’s Way” whose mission is to inspire children and students to “Aim for the Stars” and achieve academic excellence. Milka’s Way visits, inspires, and motivates, students to focus on their education by helping them understand that a strong academic background will benefit them for their entire life - in all aspects of their life - and in any career they choose. Milka has taken this message to children, students, parents, and teachers at all school levels around the world, including her home country of Venezuela, Malaysia, Canada, Japan, Peru, Colombia, Argentina, Chile, Guatemala, Mexico, Puerto Rico and across the United States.

ake up Artist: Shirley St. Fort Make up Artist: Shirley St. Fort

She’s also infused her many talents onto the big screen and in 2007, Milka was chosen to play “Kellie Gearbox” in the 2008 Warner Brothers live-action movie Speed Racer. Also in 2014, Milka joined the Univision Deportes Networks as a commentator for the entire 2014 Formula One Championship Series season.

+spo rts

Milka is one of the most successful female race car drivers in the world today. She’s competed in more types of race cars and in more different racing series than any other current female driver. We can only imagine that she will continue this trend for success in whatever endeavor she aligns herself and that her passion to do so definitely goes beyond the norm.

b e y on d

spring summer 2016

www.NowVIZ.com

13.


NowVIZ: Dealing with the physical demands of car racing can be challenging, for example, the interior of the car gets extremely hot! How do you physically train and prepare for this and every other challenge that you face in the driver’s seat? Milka: Drivers must endure intense physical and mental training in order to condition their minds and bodies to handle being inside a race car for hours. Drivers travel at high speeds, while trying to simultaneously maintain control and fight for position. In order to prepare myself, everyday I do a lot of aerobic exercise in all types of difficult conditions. For example, I’ll run or bike in the extreme heat, which helps train my body to handle high temperatures in the car. NowVIZ: How do you stay mentally focused during a race with speeds exceeding 230mph and cars moving within one inch of each other!? Milka: You can possess physical talent, get more seat time than anyone, and or have the best car on the track, but these do not guarantee success in racing. A lack of confidence, indecision, or making too many mental mistakes can negate the fact that you have the fastest car. Your mind controls the body. What the mind thinks (or believes to be true) is replicated by your body. If you believe you can win - you more than likely will. If you have a negative attitude, typically you won’t get very good results. The only way to stay mentally focused during a race is to continually practice and utilize your mental skills. You must stay calm under pressure, focus on what’s important, rebound quickly from mistakes and failures, develop self-confidence, and manage negative thoughts and self-doubt. As a driver, practicing your mental skills are extremely important and the first step towards improving mental toughness is understanding the significance. It requires a complete commitment to refining and mastering skills such as, attention awareness, concentration, anticipation, visualization, and staying in control of one’s emotions. NowVIZ: How do you deal with the fear factor that is inherent in racing cars? What keeps you getting back in the car after close calls? Milka: Racing is - in a high percentage of cases - a mental game. Drivers need to be confident and fear needs to stay out of their minds. A driver can not afford to panic on the track, but instead must remain calm and in control of the situation. NowVIZ: One of the challenges in racing cars is all tracks aren’t designed the same. How do you train and prepare for different courses, as well as, different track conditions? Milka: To learn different types of tracks, drivers often spend a lot of time working with simulators, which help to assimilate the course. In relation to different track conditions, there really is no way to learn that in advance. The driver must be prepared both physically and mentally to drive under all types of circumstances, as well as, adjust to driving all types of tracks.


She is the first Hispanic female driver in history to compete in a

NASCAR National in the

Series

United States.


NowVIZ: Can you think of an occasion where you weren’t sure you would make it to the end of the race? Milka: A race car can experience many problems during a race. A driver must always make every effort to adapt to the prevailing conditions and always try to finish the race. NowVIZ: Many people don’t realize only a handful of drivers in the world qualify for some of the top races each year, for example the Indy500, which you’ve raced three consecutive seasons! What are some of the challenges in qualifying each year and how do you choose what races to gear and focus towards? Milka: There are many different problems that can confront a driver when qualifying for a race. Each qualifying session is a new challenge and one should always do their best to achieve the best result. NowVIZ: Racing at the top level is not only about being a great driver-you also have to have a great team/support behind you. Can you tell us a little about your team/support success on and off the track? Milka:The team is as essential as the car in order to be successful. For example, a driver can be leading a race and lose all possibility after a bad pit stop - and there can be many reasons in which the team’s work can be key - so that a driver can have a good race - and even more for the driver and team to win! The team, including engineers, mechanics, tire specialists, and engine specialists, all of whom must work in harmony to execute the same strategy in pursuit of the same goal: winning the race. As a driver, you are the leader in the group. You have to make everybody feel that you can win that race.


NowVIZ: Not too many drivers in car racing can say that they have a Master’s degree in one subject let alone four and worked as a Naval Engineer before you began racing! In what way have your studies helped you in car racing? Milka: Driving a race car is far more complicated than most people realize and one of the main elements is that the driver must provide essential and adequate feedback to their race engineer about what’s happening with the car. A driver must understand how the car is performing and be able to communicate that information to the engineer. Adjustments can then be implemented to help improve the performance and development of the car. My studies in engineering have helped me understand those elements and how they help the car perform, as well as, working with the engineer to accomplish that goal. NowVIZ: You have managed through your career to be involved in many pursuits and activities outside of racing, including television. What is your latest interest? Milka: I love racing, it’s very important to me. But you need support from companies to help raise money for the required and necessary sponsorship(s). It can be a difficult process and without that sponsorship you can’t race. I also love to spend time and communicate the importance of education to children and students of all ages. NowVIZ: You’re one of the top race car drivers in the sport and an inspiration to both men and women on and off the track. Can you give any advice to those that might be interested in getting into the sport? Milka: One must believe in your dreams to make them a reality and it is important to never give them up! NowVIZ: Thank you Milka! You’re awesome-All the best to you!


The Journey to Healthy Living Beyond the Numbers

eyond the bo

I think a brief history of my experience is necessary to understand how strength and conditioning has impacted my life, both as a professional athlete and as a working professional in the human performance industry. I am a two-time Olympic silver medalist in ice hockey (2010 and 2014) and I’m currently training for the opportunity to compete in my third Winter Olympics in 2018. I started training in 7th grade (13 years old) with my twin sister Monique who has been a part of my journey every step of the way. Let me clarify that when I say training, I mean deliberate focused training that requires social sacrifice. I remember my mom telling us in 8th grade that it takes eight years of deliberate practice or training to become elite. (And I’d like to emphasize that my mom in no way pushed us to train), but she saw that Monique and I had an unusual drive to do our absolute best. So to train for success, the weight room has been one of the most important tools in our daily regimen. Not only has strength training helped me in athletics, it’s also the place where as a professional, I’d like to impact as many individuals to physical health as possible. And so when training both athletes and adults a few common things we focus on are, increasing verticals and 1RM(1 rep max), decrease sprint times, decreasing back pain, and even strengthening hip replacement patients back to normal or beyond their norm! I love the varied spectrum of individuals I’ve had the opportunity to work with, but one of the most common requests I have across the board is to help my clients reach and maintain their ideal body weight. For example, there is the group that wants to fit back into their clothes-two sizes ago, those that aspire to keep up with the kids or grandkids, and those that would like to discontinue taking prescribed medication due to being overweight. And as we work with those individuals to ultimately attain their goal weight, not only do they begin to like how they look and feel, but their confidence improves tremendously. To reach that ideal goal weight, I don’t begin with programming, periodization, or nutrition, but rather I work on changing the mentality that “the magic number” on the scale is not necessarily the ultimate goal. Yes, that number can tell us a lot, but it DOES NOT tell us everything. Often times it’s not a true indicator of what changes have occured to one’s body, or to the effort level dedicated to previous exercise and diet regimens. So how then do we accomplish successful results? Working at Altru Sports Advantage Powered by EXOS, we have all our adult clients strength train. We do not provide a cardio based workout routine for anyone. Adults will perform steady state and interval training throughout the week, but never just straight “cardio” work. This includes adults who have varied experiences with strength training, adults who have only exercised on cardio equipment, and even former NCAA divison one athletes who know what it takes to be physically elite. Most of our men and women are open to strength training, but there is often the misconception that in order to get lean, “you only need to run for an hour or go to a spin class and get a good sweat.” If you want to increase lean body mass, move more efficiently, and or decrease whatever pain is present (based on each individual scenerio), strength training will be prescribed to you in our facility. When an individual begins their journey towards weight loss, or as I prefer to call it, living a healthier more sustainable lifestyle, we look beyond the number on the scale. The scale is often a point of stress and even when other tools are showing progress, the scale is somehow the determiner to achieve the optimum result. If there is an increase in muscle mass with no fat loss, we’ll gain weight; if we lose a pound of fat and gain a pound of muscle, we don’t lose weight, this is intuitive reasoning. At Sports Advantage powered by EXOS, we use many ways to help assist in accomplishing one’s goal, such as, our performance dietician utilizes the Bodymetrics program, body scanning to show progress in muscle and fat density, body pictures, and girth measurements. More often than not, pictures and measurements are the best way to show adults their results. Next, we continue our dissussion on the importance of strength training and how it applies to women.

by Jocelyne Lamoureux-Davidson + Monique Lamoureux-Morando

Ice Hockey 2x Olympians 2x silver medalists


Strength training has many benefits for women. There is endless research on the positive effects on athletic performance, but more importantly strength training can impact not just athletes, but women of all ages in many aspects of their life. In my athletic career strength training has helped me reach my goals, feel confident in my skin, feel strong athletically and mentally, and feel good about my overall health. In my experience as a performance specialist, I’ve found that many female clients and athletes want to avoid strength training because they think they’ll get big bulky muscles. They desire a “toned” body and think the path to that is on cardio machines or in spin class. But, this isn’t the case. Not only can resistance training help women achieve their physical goals, without the mass they assume comes with strength training, but incorporating this type of training into their routine can be extremely beneficial to their overall health and well-being. Here are the top 5 reasons why women should strength train: 1. Overall Health Benefits When women think about strength training, they think about the physical effect it could have on their appearance. What is more important is the long-term impact it can have on their health. Here are some of the health benefits of strength training: -Decreased chances of Alzheimer’s and increased cognitive function for those already diagnosed -Decreased risk of osteoporosis, or reduces its severity -Lowers cholesterol levels (specifically increases HDL and decreases LDL) -Decreased risk in cardiovascular disease -Reduce PMS symptoms -Decreased risk of breast cancer -Lowers blood pressure -Decreased risk for diabetes -Decreased chance of colds and illnesses -Reduces stress and anxiety 2. Proactive Approach for Injury Prevention We all have performance goals we have to meet on a daily basis, whether it’s achieved at the gym, at work, or at home chasing the kids! Being stronger helps us perform tasks with more ease and efficiency, which decreases the chances of getting injured. For example, a nurse who has to help move a patient, a mom picking up her three year old, carrying groceries to your car, slipping on the ice, or walking up a flight of stairs - these are all likely scenarios that could cause an injury, but could be avoided simply by being stronger. 3. Enhances Performance of Everyday Tasks If the tasks mentioned above in (2.) also tend to tire you out easily, strength training can help with that too. When an individual becomes stronger they are able to perform everyday tasks with more ease and efficiency, such as, walking up the stairs, playing with the kids, moving boxes at work, or walking to your car, the list goes on. If we’re stronger we can attack daily tasks with new found confidence without fear of struggle and failure. 4. Tone Muscles, Decrease Body Fat (clothes fit better!) Getting stronger does not always equate to muscle mass/bulk, but strength training will increase your metabolism. Your body continues to burn calories hours long after a strength training session. Strength training will increase muscle mass and decrease body fat, which will give muscles a more defined look. Although body weight might not necessarily decrease right away, your clothes should start fitting better and waist measurements should decrease. 5. Positive Psychological Benefits Strength training has shown to improve psychological well-being and increase positivity with one’s body image. Some of these psychological benefits include: -Better sleep quality, which decreases cortisol levels that can impact weight-loss and metabolism -Better sleep will also help handle stress more effectively -Increases confidence in one’s own ability to perform tasks -Improves body image

Strength Training:

The Secret Weapon to Improving Overall Health for Women


u


d e

r e

t l i f

n ujason

richardson 110 meter Hurdler Olympic silver medalist with his eye on Rio INTRO BY MARK SAFFIERI PHOTOGRAPHED BY ANDREA MEAD CROSS


As the Rio Summer Games represents the continuation of a quadrennial sporting event, providing with it opportunities for immortality and redemption, world class hurdler Jason Richardson falls into both categories. Having turned 30 years young last April, he is still convincingly capable on the track. Raised in Cedar Hill, Texas, his sensational track career first took flight in 2003, capturing gold in the 110-meter and 400-meter hurdles, subsequently winning the USA Track and Field Youth Athlete of the Year award. Although such an accomplished athlete would be expected to have the persona of an alpha male, Richardson is studious and philosophical, definitely challenging such convention. During those formative teen years in Texas, Richardson’s scholarly skills were just as stupendous. Representing his school’s debate team at the national level was just as impressive a feat, testament to his character and insightful commitment. Highly respectful of his parent’s wishes to pursue an education, he enrolled at the University of South Carolina, majoring in sports and entertainment management. Turning professional in 2009, his performance at the 2012 London Summer Games heralded his euphoric arrival, shining on the world’s brightest sporting stage. Clocking in at an exceptional 13.04 seconds in the 110-m hurdles, which was actually 0.12 seconds faster than his gold medal time at the 2011 Track and Field World Championships, Richardson emerged from London with a silver medal. In the aftermath of such a career milestone, Richardson would place fourth in the same event at the 2013 edition of the World Championships. After suffering an injury to his heel bone last year, such an exceptional athlete was thrust into the role of an underdog, as uncertainty defined his future. Richardson’s comeback story on the road to Rio is one that holds the potential to be of much acclaim. His preparation for the US 2016 Summer Games Trials brought him to ESPN’s Wide World of Sports Complex at Walt Disney World. Under the tutelage of acclaimed coach Brooks Johnson, whose skillful familiarity with track spans several decades, Richardson was joined by a pair of luminaries who experienced golden glories at Beijing 2008; LaShawn Merritt and April Holmes, one of the most successful American sprinters in Paralympic Games history. Regardless of the final outcome in Rio, Richardson’s enthusiasm and maturity represent more than just the celebration of an exceptional athlete, but the celebration of an incredible individual. With a career consisting of so many exemplary moments of seminal achievement, his poignant personality has admirably flourished in the twilight of his world-class track career. Such a significant evolution sees the focus not on resurrecting past glories but reinventing.


“play hard-but train harder has always been my motto-it keeps me balanced.�


NowVIZ: This is an Olympic year with the goal and focus obviously on RIO, but as a USA athlete vying for your second Olympic team-give us an idea of how incredibly competitive and challenging the US Olympic trials are and how do you train both mentally and physically for that pressure? JaiRich: The US Olympic Trials in the Men’s 110 Hurdles is far more competitive than the Olympic games themselves because of the depth of American hurdling. Making the USA Team to Rio makes you an automatic medal favorite, double-edged sword. Deconstructing the training process helps relieve pressure and maximize preparation. NowVIZ: How has your training changed over the past decade and with that experience what advice can you share that has attributed to your success? JaiRich: I’m not the new kid on the block anymore so in this last chapter of my career I’ve shifted my efforts from quantity to quality. With age comes wisdom; I’ve definitely learned what elements of training work best. Change is inevitable and fighting against it shortens an athlete’s career. My advice would be to adapt to new training techniques that arise in the sport while sticking to your signature fundamentals. NowVIZ: Who or what do you draw inspiration from? JaiRich: I’m a spiritual person so wringing dry every ounce of talent God gave me is my eventual goal. Gospel music is always blasting at ear deafening decibels in my headphones at meets so you know I’m serious about my praise. Outside of my spiritual inspirations, making my parents proud and having some tangible medals to show for my efforts are always motivating. NowVIZ: As a world-class athlete, tell us about one of the most difficult obstacles you’ve had to overcome? JaiRich: At last year’s US Trials for the World Championship I jammed my heel bone and had difficulty standing and bearing weight on it. The beautiful mistake at times of an objective sport means the clock doesn’t care how you look or your handicaps. With that in mind, I said a prayer and hobbled my way down the track. To my surprise I ran the fastest time of my season and learned a valuable lesson that I’m crazy enough to try almost anything athletically. NowVIZ: How do you get away from it all--what do you do to get away from the stress and pressures of your job? JaiRich: I have the greatest collection of misfits that masquerade as my friends. None of my closest friends live in the same state as I train so most of my free time involves traveling and getting into as much trouble as possible. Play hard but train harder has always been my motto to keep me balanced.


NowVIZ: This is an Olympic year with the goal and focus obviously on RIO, but as a USA athlete vying for your second Olympic team-give us an idea of how incredibly competitive and challenging the US Olympic trials are and how do you train both mentally and physically for that pressure? JaiRich: The US Olympic Trials in the Men’s 110 Hurdles is far more competitive than the Olympic games themselves because of the depth of American hurdling. Making the USA Team to Rio makes you an automatic medal favorite, double-edged sword. Deconstructing the training helps relieve pressure maximize preparation. NowVIZ: This is process an Olympic year with theand goal and focus obviously on RIO, but as a USA NowVIZ:athlete How hasvying your training changed over the past decade and with thatidea experience what advice cancompetitive you share that has atfor your second Olympic Team-give us an of how incredibly tributed toand yourchallenging success? the US Olympic Trials are and how do you train both mentally and JaiRich: I’m not the new kid on the block anymore so in this last chapter of my career I’ve shifted my efforts from quantity to physically for that pressure? quality. With age comes wisdom; I’ve definitely learned what elements of training work best. Change is inevitable and fighting US Olympic Trials in the Men’s 110 Hurdles is far moretechniques competitive than the against it JaiRich: shortens anThe athlete’s career. My advice would be to adapt to new training that arise inOlympic the sport while stickGames themselves, because of the depth of American hurdling. Making the USA Team to Rio ing to your signature fundamentals. makes you an automatic medal favorite and it’s also a double-edged sword. Deconstructing the NowVIZ: Who or what do you draw inspiration from? training process helps relieve dry pressure and maximize preparation. JaiRich: I’m a spiritual person so wringing every ounce of talent God gave me is my eventual goal. Gospel music is always blasting at ear deafening decibels in my headphones at meets so you know I’m serious about my praise. Outside of my spiritual NowVIZ: has your training changed over the pasttodecade with that experience what inspirations, makingHow my parents proud and having some tangible medals show forand my efforts are always motivating. NowVIZ:advice As a world-class us about one of the most difficult obstacles you’ve had to overcome? can youathlete, sharetell that has attributed to your success? JaiRich: AtJaiRich: last year’sI’m USnot Trials thekid World Championship I jammed mythis heellast bone and had standing and bearing thefor new on the block anymore, so in chapter ofdifficulty my career, I’ve shifted weight onmy it. The beautiful mistake at times of an objective sport means the clock doesn’t care how you look or your efforts from quantity to quality. With age comes wisdom; I’ve definitely learned what elementshandicaps. With thatof in training mind, I said a prayer and hobbled my way down track.against To my surprise I ranan theathlete’s fastest time of myMy season and work best. Change is inevitable and the fighting it shortens career. learned a advice valuablewould lessonbe thattoI’m crazy enough to try almost anything athletically. adapt to new training techniques that arise in the sport, while sticking to your NowVIZ:signature How do you get away from it all--what do you do to get away from the stress and pressures of your job? fundamentals. JaiRich: I have the greatest collection of misfits that masquerade as my friends. None of my closest friends live in the same state as I train so most of my free time involves traveling and getting into as much trouble as possible. Play hard but train harder has NowVIZ: Who or what do you draw inspiration from? always been my motto to keep me balanced. JaiRich: I’m a spiritual person, so wringing dry every ounce of talent God gave me is my eventual goal. Gospel music is always blasting at ear deafening decibels in my headphones and at meets, so you know I’m serious about my praise. Outside of my spiritual inspirations, making my parents proud and having some tangible medals to show. NowVIZ: As a world-class athlete, tell us about one of the most difficult obstacles you’ve had to overcome. JaiRich: At last year’s US Trials for the World Championship, I jammed my heel bone and had difficulty standing and bearing weight on it. The beautiful mistake at times of an objective sport means the clock doesn’t care how you look or your handicaps. With that in mind, I said a prayer and hobbled my way down the track. To my surprise, I ran the fastest time of my season and learned a valuable lesson-that I’m crazy enough to try almost anything athletically. NowVIZ: How do you get away from it all--what do you do to get away from the stress and pressures of your job? JaiRich: I have the greatest collection of misfits that masquerade as my friends. None of my closest friends live in the same state as I train, so most of my free time involves traveling and getting into as much trouble as possible. Play hard-but train harder has always been my motto, it keeps me balanced. NowVIZ: You’ve mentioned early on that your parents stressed the importance of education. Can you tell us if it has enabled you in any way to become a better athlete? JaiRich: There’s a sporting IQ that an athlete develops, to know how to train and how to compete intelligently. Coming from a family of academics, my attention to detail and thoroughness has been inherited.

spo rts + bey o n d

spring summer 2016

www.NowVIZ.com

29.


NowVIZ: Life after track! Can you paint what that ideal picture would be? JaiRich: You’d probably find me as a TV correspondent getting paid to ramble and opine. I also have a quiet passion for fashion, so I’d love to have my own clothing line and merge both interests; a talk show on ESPN and image consultation for athletes. NowVIZ: What’s on your headphones right now? Or what’s currently on your favorite playlist? JaiRich: Adele is probably playing out of my noise canceling earphones and making me blindly unaware I’m off key trying to keep up. Any playlist that has R&B or gospel can never go wrong. NowVIZ: Is there a question you’ve never been asked that you’d like to answer? JaiRich: Solid questions NowVIZ: Thank you JR! We wish you the best at the upcoming Trials-Kick it!

Follow Jason to the Olympic Trials this summer! Twitter @JaiRICH Instagram @JAIRICH


nowviz sports + beyond

! e l b a l i a m v o A c . W N O NO Z A M A on

sports souls

the book

My passion + World-class athletes + For a cause photography by Andrea Mead Cross

spo rts + bey o n d

spring summer 2016

www.NowVIZ.com

33.


Sports Souls the book Av


sports souls the book

began with a love of photographing world-class athletes, a passion for helping animals in need, and the ambition to combine the two successfully. Over a two-year period, Andrea Mead Cross traveled across the country to capture an up close and personal moment with each athlete. The beautiful full color portraits are unassuming and fresh with a unique perspective away from the competition arena. The bold series includes and features renowned athletes Misty May-Treanor, Beach Volleyball star and three-time Olympic gold medallist. Taylor Phinney, two-time Olympian Cycling; Jocelyne and Monique Lamoureux, two-time Olympian silver medalists Ice Hockey; Sam Mikulak, Olympian and seven-time NCAA champion Gymnastics; Lauryn Williams, two-time Summer Olympian; gold and silver medalist for Track and Winter Olympian, silver medalist Bobsled and Diana Nyad, history-making Marathon Swimmer. Also featured Christy Gardner, USA National Sled Hockey Team; Tony Azevedo, four-time Olympian and silver medalist Water Polo; Mirinda Carfrae, Triathlete and three-time Ironman World Champion; Connor Jaeger, Olympian and American record holder Swimming; Anna Tunnicliffe, Olympian Gold medalist for Sailing; Steven Langton, Olympian and two-time bronze medalist Bobsled and more! The athletes also write their inner struggles, philosophy on life, and what it takes to be the best. The body of work is truly inspirational for those who appreciate awe-inspiring images and the quest for perfection. Andrea is recognized as one of the premier sports photographers in the country. Her work has been published in numerous magazines including Sports Illustrated, National Geographic, Outside, Fitness, has been shown on Oprah Winfrey’s “Super Soul Sunday” and on ABC World News with Diane Sawyer. Additionally, her photographs can be found in the projects of well-known athletes published by Random House, Knopf, and Crown Publishing. Proceeds benefit animal charities.

Be Soulful. For more info: @AndreaMeadCross @AndreaMeadCross

AndreaMeadCross.com

vailable on Amazon.com


BY MARK SAFFIERI PHOTOGRAPHED BY ANDREA MEAD CROSS

of holly


definition

of

Evolution is the progress from a simple form to a more complex one and nothing

typifies

Holly

more. The surf goddess morphed her way into a savvy

businesswoman,

mother, and naturalist, now living in Nicaragua.

the evolution

Webster’s

y beck obermeyer


TO THE

MARCHING

BEAT OF HER OWN DRUMMER,

Holly Beck Obermeyer is staying true to her dreams. Embodying the spirit of a renaissance woman, she balances business, instructing, parenting, and an overall love of life while finding time to cultivate in her garden. Athletic yet entrepreneurial, well-travelled yet inspiring, Beck Obermeyer is an intriguing personality, whose surfing roots can be traced back to her teen years in Palos Verdes, California. With four younger sisters whose given names also begin with H, Heidi, Hannah, Helina, and Hayla, they too enjoyed a shared love of the beach and the residual feeling of refreshment and rejuvenation that accompanied it. On the surface, it may look like Beck Obermeyer enjoys a very casual approach to life, but everything is stemmed in the value of hard work and the courage to make a decision. Although she had the drive and ambition to pursue a professional career in surfing, acquiring her first surfboard and wet suit at the tender age of 14, helping challenge social convention about traditionally male-dominated sports, such commitment also applied to her postsecondary education. Graduating with a major in Psychology at The University of California, San Deigo, in later years, she would earn an MBA in Marketing, which was also the catalyst that triggered her business venture. While an exciting decade was spent balancing surfing and a modeling career, an objective to branch out and share her love of fitness while preserving the adventurous feelings that defined her athletic goals, involved a bold business plan for a Women’s Surf School. The end result was an empowering endeavor called Surf With Amigas. Founded in 2010, it offers both surfing and yoga programs for women, along with the occasional co-ed and couples offerings. While her approach to work is one defined by a labor of love, it succeeds in helping to extend her goal of connecting with new people and instilling self-assurance. Overall, the substance goes far beyond the blend of retreat and fitness, it is about cultivating confidence and creating a pleasant environment where seeds can be planted for new friendships, all in the objective of encouraging women to go beyond their comfort zone and feel the confidence that comes with overcoming obstacles and succeeding at something new. Shifting from residences in Costa Rica and a remote fishing village in northern Nicaragua, Beck Obermeyer has established firm roots, putting behind a lifestyle trekking to exotic locales such as Fiji, Haiti, New Zealand, the Seychelles and Tahiti among others. Not only does she enjoy hiking barefoot and climbing waterfalls, her life in Central America has proven to be a spiritually enriching experience. Marrying her best friend Kim Obermeyer in March 2013, their family would expand with the addition of their daughter Luna in September 2014. As a side note, Beck Obermeyer surfed while she was seven months pregnant, naturally nurturing a love of the water and establishing an eminently profound connection between mother and daughter. Part of the family experience also involves an online chronicle with her husband, sharing their greater appreciation of the natural environment and the need to create a sustainable future.


NowVIZ: What personal qualities can you share that helped you become one of the best surfers in the world? Holly: I think a lot of successful people struggle with low self-confidence, which makes them work extra hard, as they’re always seeking approval from others and never thinking their good enough. That together with my Type-A personality and being completely in love with surfing and the ocean, turned into a successful combination for me. NowVIZ: Is there anyone or anything that has been an influence to you throughout your surfing career? Holly: Of course, I’ve been influenced by many people in different stages of my career. In the early days, I had a friend who worked for Surfing Magazine, who took me under his wing, introduced me to some key players in the industry and it really jump started my career. I then had a manager who took that one step further and taught me how important the media is and how to market myself. I always connected more with the marketing managers rather than the surfers on tour. I was interested in the business side from the beginning and tried to pick up anything I could to improve myself on that front. NowVIZ: You are formerly one of the best surfers in the world, how is training or preparing for competitions different from your surfing now? Holly: Surfing now is a lot more fun and relaxed. I do it because I love it and nothing more. I surf less for sure. If the waves aren’t very good, I’ll take the time to do something else, rather than forcing myself to go out as I did when I was competing. Teaching surfing comes naturally to me. I don’t need any preparation for that, so when I have free time, I just enjoy being in the ocean and riding waves, which is a nice change from the stress and pressure I use to put on myself when training to be the best surfer I could be. NowVIZ: Women’s competitive surfing has grown in the past decade, how has it changed and where do you see it going in the future? Holly: I don’t follow competitive surfing to closely anymore. It does seem that the women now have more opportunities, more spotlight, etc., and maybe as a result more respect. I think in general surfing as a sport has improved and the women have been able to benefit along with the men. The girls are definitely ripping these days and hopefully for their sake, it continues to improve. NowVIZ: Pro athletes transitioning from their competition life to “real world” life can be tough. Would you tell us about your journey and what your doing now? Holly: I was really lucky, because I was able to step away from it when I was ready, vs getting pushed out. I made the decision I was finished, while competing in 2008. I also continued receiving sponsor support for a few more years, to travel for photo shoots and editorial trips.Then at one point, I realized I was really sick of the non-stop travel and wanted to settle down in one place and have things I’d never had before, a dog, a garden, a normal relationship. During this time, I had also started my women’s surf yoga retreat business and it quickly became successful. So the transition financially and emotionally went smoothly. And I still don’t consider myself a member of the “real world,” which is nice!

spo rts + bey o n d

spring summer 2016

www.NowVIZ.com

41.


NowVIZ: You have a Masters degree in marketing, which is kind of unusual for the surfer stereotype. Why did you pursue it and how have you found it useful? Holly: I get bored easily, and I love to read. I was always a good student, finishing high school with a 3.8 GPA. I then went to The University of California, San Deigo and graduated in just 3 years, so I could get on tour. Then once I graduated I got bored.You can’t surf all day and remain stimulated, so after a few months I needed something to keep me mentally motivated. So I started working with some of the older girls on tour Rochelle Ballard, Layne Benchley, Kate Skarratt, Megan Abubo, etc. with a non-profit that they had started called IWS (International Women’s Surfing). The goal of the organization was to have a platform to petition for their rights within the governing body of professional surfing (then called the ASP). I got involved and helped transform it into a membership organization, getting young girls involved, help raise money, and help sponsor events. We were even able to sponsor a few of the girls on tour who weren’t able to get sponsorship (and not because of their lack of talent.) It was a great learning experience and it kept me busy, but after a few years I realized I was doing all the work and none of the others were helping, so I quit. I then met a woman who was the Marketing Director for PADI (the dive company) who inspired me to continue my education. So I decided to go after a masters degree in marketing. I found marketing to be really interesting and learned a lot. The most useful part of the degree for me was we were required to write a business plan and mine was to start a surf camp in Nicaragua. I then realized it was feasible and something I actually might want to do! NowVIZ: Your Surf with Amigas-Surf and Yoga Retreats sounds amazing! What types of women are you finding most interested that come to your retreat? Holly: We get all types of women coming to retreats. We’ve had everything from age 11 to 68! While people have come from all over the world, most come from the US and Canada. The average participant is in her late 30s, early 40s. Single, no kids, working a highly skilled job (doctors, lawyers, nurses, advertising), who want to get away on an adventure, but don’t have other women friends who are able to travel. 90% of our guests arrive solo, but leave the retreat with a new group of like-minded friends. Surfing is our primary focus, but it’s really only a part of the retreat. We strive to help people have the very best vacation of their lives, push their limits and overcome fear, leaving the week inspired and motivated to go back to their “real lives” knowing they can achieve anything. We get a lot of repeat clients, (the record is 8 retreats) which is the best feedback to have knowing that we’re doing something awesome. (*The main retreat is in Nicaragua) NowVIZ: What do you enjoy most about living in Nicaragua? Holly: I just love the lifestyle. I like running around barefoot all day. wearing a bikini and board shorts to work, running the dogs off-leash to an empty beach every afternoon, and diving into the warm water to bodysurf. I also love that I could afford to buy land, build a house, and create a home without having to work so much I never have time to enjoy it. I do miss first world benefits like fast internet, easy shopping, and unlimited restaurant options. Our internet is stone age, the nearest grocery store is 45 minutes away, and we have a total of three restaurants nearby, but it’s worth it.


Make up Artist: Adriana Madigan


NowVIZ: Your now a new mom! How has a child changed your life? Holly: Wow, my life is totally different now. First off, I don’t sleep, I don’t surf as much, and I rarely have a minute to myself. But, when I look at that sweet smiling face, it’s all worth it! Now that she’s 16 months old, she’s running around, learning to swim, riding horses, and she’s even caught some waves with me, so it’s fun sharing all that with her. And even though I’m exhausted most of the time, I’m stoked! NowVIZ: Is there a question that you would like to be asked that you have never been asked? And what would that answer be? Holly: Um....I’ll have to think about that. I’ll let you know if I come up with anything! NowVIZ: Thank you Holly!

check it out SurfWithAmigas.com


by Juan Marco, design student, The University of Michigan


design: sports + beyond As a designer, I’m constantly challenging myself to improve products that can enhance our lifestyle both visually and functionally. And as an outdoorsman, I love to hike and explore all kinds of terrain. My goal was to create a messenger bag that could endure both the rugged back country and the day to day student grind. In my final design, infusing sustainable materials and learning a new craft(sewing and pattern making), were essential to its construction. I used recycled denium, old leather shoe strings, and worn book bags, to give it a tough exterior, yet cool style. It’s not in stores yet, but maybe in the future!

spo rts + bey o n d

spring summer 2016

www.NowVIZ.com

47.


The Lamborghini Supe

NowViz sports + beyond was at the Sebring International Raceway in November for the Lamborghini Super Trofeo World Finals

3

We caught up with P1 Groupe race car drivers and NowVIZ ezine did a short Q+A interview with each driver-Check it out!


er Trofeo World Final

converges on Sebring, FLA

PHOTOGRAPHED BY ANDREA MEAD CROSS


NowVIZ: Before a race what’s on your playlist? Madison: Nothing in particular, usually the standard pop music that’s all over the radio. NowVIZ: Favorite race track and car? Madiison: Daytona would be my favorite track, I’ll have to let you know about my favorite car after I have a couple of races under my belt in the new Lamborghini! NowVIZ: When your not at the track what are you doing? Madison: At work! I work at a steel fabrication plant. Either that or working on my offroad Jeep.

NowVIZ: Favorite restaurant / anywhere? Madison: I like Mexican and Italian food. NowVIZ: Traveling to your favorite city or country-where would that be? Madison: I go to Canada a bit and really like it up there, however I had the chance to travel to Innsbruck, Austria a short time ago and really enjoyed that place!! NowVIZ: What other sports do you like to watch? Do you follow a favorite athlete(s)? Madison: Don’t watch any other sports, Follow dirt biking and offroad racing a little. NowVIZ: Do you have a pet? Madison: Nope. NowVIZ: Favorite TV / Movie / and or Video Games? Madison: I love Pirates of the Caribbean, as well as, James Bond movies and have watched all the old ones. I don’t do any video games.


madison snow

Madison started racing go-karts at the age of 5.


52.

ww w. NowV IZ . com spring summer 2016

s p o r t s + be y o n d

Professional race car driver - 2015 Lamborghini Super Trofeo Champion Semi-retired Motorcross racer- Shitty golfer - wannabe Vegas Highroller

@dylanmurcott


dylan murcott


NowVIZ: Before a race what’s on your playlist? Dylan: I usually listen to some Lil Wayne to get me in the mood before I get behind the wheel of a race car. NowVIZ: Favorite race track and car? Dylan: Watkins Glen in NY is my favorite track. And of all the race cars I’ve driven, definitely the Lamborghini Super Trofeo Gallardo is my favorite. NowVIZ: When your not at the track what are you doing? Dylan: When I’m not racing, I’m usually coaching at local tracks and or at a casino playing blackjack. Sometimes that’s more stressful then actually racing! -haha. NowVIZ: Favorite restaurant-anywhere? Dylan: My favorite restaurant is PF Changs-the food is just amazing. NowVIZ: Traveling to your favorite city or country-where would that be? Dylan: California is awesome, I love it out there. Especially Monterey, California. I have yet to go to LA or Vegas, I’m really hoping to make it out there next year. NowVIZ: What other sports do you like to watch? Do you follow a favorite athlete(s)? Dylan: I watch a lot of football, basketball, and racing. I don’t have a favorite athlete. To be a pro athlete in any sport, it takes full determination and I respect that. NowVIZ: Do you have a pet? Dylan: I have a 4-year old black cat named midnight, and I love him to death. NowVIZ: Favorite TV / Movie / and or Video Games? Dylan: Smoking Aces and Funny Games are my two favorite movies. Also, GTA5(Grand Theft Auto V) has to be my favorite video of all time.

”Dylan Murcott is the definition of a dedicated racer.” -iRacing.com


Brandon qualified as the fastest solo Pro-Am driver for the Lamborghini Super Trofeo.


NowVIZ: Favorite musician or band? Brandon: Favorite band is U2 NowVIZ: Favorite race track and car? Brandon: Favorite track is Watkins Glen in New York for a road course and Bristol Motor Speedway in Tennessee for a circle track. Favorite car is a Legend. NowVIZ: When your not at the track what are you doing? Brandon: If not at the track, I’m probably working on race cars or doing some kind of traveling for racing. NowVIZ: Favorite restaurant-anywhere? Brandon: Anything Italian. NowVIZ: Traveling to your favorite city or country-where would that be? Brandon: I really want to go to Australia. NowVIZ: What other sports do you like to watch? Brandon: I’ll watch motocross and occasionally lacrosse. NowVIZ: Do you have a pet? Brandon: No pets, animal lover though. NowVIZ: Favorite TV / Movie / and or Video Games? Brandon: Anything with Jim Carrey.

brandon gdovic spo rts + bey o n d

spring summer 2016

www.NowVIZ.com

57.


Supporting Animal Awareness

John Mann Olympian Water Polo

Georgina Bloomberg Pan Am Equestrian


Kendyl Stewart US National Swimmer

Tony Azevedo Olympian Water Polo

Kerri Walsh-Jennings Olympian Beach Volleyball

politically correct sports + beyond This summer a select group of athletes competing in Rio and Rio hopefuls were brought together and are to be featured in an animal awareness campaign called Athletes with Souls(AWS). Athletes involved such as, Beach Volleyball, 3x Olympian, 3x gold medalist, Kerri Walsh-Jennings; Water Polo, 4x Olympian, silver medalist, Tony Azevedo; and Rowing Paralympian, bronze medalist, and Cross-country Skiing, winter Paralympian, silver medalist, Oksana Masters are a part of the campaign that will highlight the global need for all animals to be spay, neutered, and adopted. To promote the campaign’s message, dynamic banner designs were created that include bold black and white photos of each athlete. As the athletes compete this summer, the AWS banner series will launch on social media in hopes of raising animal awareness to those following the Olympics in Rio. Athletes with Souls spearheaded by Sara and her husband Olympian Tony Azevedo are both long time animal advocates and Stanford graduates. After years of living in foreign countries, while Tony was playing professional water polo, they had the opportunity to see worldwide the differing attitudes and lack of regard for cats and dogs. So they saw the need to reach out. The AWS project is also in collaboration with photographer Andrea Mead Cross and her creative group, who executed and worked with the athletes to produce the photos and banner designs. And since the launch of publishing her most recent photo book titled, Sports Souls the book (with proceeds benefiting animal charities), the AWS campaign was something Cross just couldn’t resist being a part. Look for the Athletes with Soul campaign on social media this summer during the road to Rio! You’ll know exactly when and where by following us on: Twitter @NowVIZmag


rocky

mountain high


out takes sports + beyond

Photos by Peter N. Jones Aaron Hampshire bending light beams around the corner.


Greg Paproski finding the Golden Line on an early morning dawn patrol.


Photographing these

skateboarders is an honor.

Downhill skateboarding, especially at this level, involves a small group of riders who keep their activities amongst themselves. These riders are pushing speeds upwards of 50+ mph on an open highway just outside of Denver, Colorado. In order to maximize safety and not to run into any cars, early morning dawn patrol sessions are the norm. To gear up and shoot these guys means getting up at 4am, making sure I have all my lenses and gear, and bringing a bunch of extra clothing. The location, set high up on a sharp right-hand corner on the side of a mountain is often windy and cold, and standing around between each drop can chill the bones! I’ve worked out a system where I can see the riders begin the initial drop higher up on the mountain before I rush into shooting position, then I wait for the sound-a low rumbling almost like a concentrated rush of wind moving down the highway. Once I hear that sound, I know I have about five seconds before the skaters come hauling around the corner anywhere between 40-50mph, then they are gone and it’s over. The intensity of that few seconds where I am shooting and panning my lens as they fly around the blind corner is electric. Despite the early mornings, the cold, and the brevity of the moment, sometimes I’m lucky enough to get that magical shot where the light is just right, the skater is in the perfect position, and everything just clicks. It makes it all worth it! These skaters have welcomed me and I can’t thank them enough; it’s been a privilege to shoot these amazing athletes. Often by eight in the morning the skate session is over, everyone has gone to work, and only the skate lines of urethane melted onto the asphalt are left to indicate the craziness that just took place. --Peter N. Jones

You can follow Peter: Twitter @RockyMntRaiderX Instagram @rockymntraider


Photographer Andrea Mead Cross and her crew on location in Miami’s Design District working with race car driver Milka Duno.


edition01.

credits + (more) Huge thank you to Mark Saffieri for his efforts and mastery in writing the Feature’s for both Track Star, Jason Richardson’s Unfiltered and for Pro Surfer, The Evolution of Holly Beck Obermeyer. His work and talent are incredible! We’re very fortunate to have him onboard at NowVIZ sports+ beyond! To our girls in North Dakota! Twins and Olympians, Jocelyne + Monique Lamoureux! They’re two of the most gracious individuals we’ve had the opportunity to work with and we’re super excited they’ve taken their time to write and infuse their expertise into NowVIZ sports + beyond’s First Edition! Check them out in the Beyond the BOD section! (Shout out to the Fam + Millie!) Additional thank you to photographer Peter N. Jones for his downhill skateboard piece, Rocky Mountain High, including his killer pics! We discovered each other on social media and we’re stoked he’s agreed to be a part of NowVIZ sports + beyond’s First Edition. We hope you all dig his work as much as we do! And to photographer Andrea Mead Cross who has been intricle in the inception, development, and launch of the NowVIZ sports + beyond Ezine! Her vision and creativity continue to exceed expectations and we’re fired up she is part of the NowVIZ Team! Thank you AMC rock on! Thank you: Miami Design District Design Within Reach

even the smallest thing counts.

NowVIZ sports + beyond Ezine Magazine Design and Layout: by Kelley Kwiatkowski Hope you enjoyed the ride-see you soon!

Follow us on

@NowVIZmag

All inquires please email us at: NowVIZmag@gmail.com 2016 All Rights Reserved NowVIZ sports + beyond Ezine and NowVIZ.com COPYRIGHT 2016 No part of this magazine may be reproduced without written permission. This magazine is viewed with the understanding that the information present is from varied sources for which there can be no warranty or respondsibility by NowVIZ.com as to the accuracy or completeness.


See y

ou al

l in th

“dwell in possibility” -Emily Dickinson

e Fal

l for o

ur ne

xt iss

ue!

NowVIZ issue 01. / Milka Duno  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you