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SCHEDULE

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B R E A KO U T D E S C R I P T I O N S

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GLOSSARY OF TERMS

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MAIN SESSIONS

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B R E A KO U T O U T L I N E S & N OT E S


N O R T H

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P O I N T C O M M U N I T Y C H U R C H

MAIN SESSIONS B R E A KO U T S E S S I O N S RESTROOMS MEALS R E S O U R C E S STO R E

THE STUDIO Located in the front Atrium of the church, this is the place to go if you want to talk to a Groups staff member during the conference. Feel free to stop by at any time for prayer, questions, or a break. We look forward to meeting you!


C O

DAY ONE M O N DAY, M AY 7

N F E R

CHECK-IN

E

8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

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MAIN SESSION ONE

E

10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. East Auditorium

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LUNCH

C

11:30 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.

H E

BREAKOUT ONE

D

12:45 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

U L

Developing Your Groups Strategy Factory

E

Four Characteristics of an Influential Leader Theater Investing in Women Zone Onboarding New Leaders Attic Tensions in Group Leadership Cafe D O U B L E - TA L K T R AC K Launching: Getting Off on the Right Foot Warehouse

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BREAK

2:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.

BREAKOUT TWO 2:15 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Groups in the Workplace Factory Handling Polarizing Conversations Zone Making Vision Stick Theater Motivating Singles to Join Groups Cafe Teaching Theology for Life and Leadership Attic D O U B L E - TA L K T R AC K Enlistment: Leader Pipeline Warehouse

BREAK

3:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.


BREAKOUT THREE 3:45 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Connecting Adults to Groups Theater Groups Ministry With or Without Staff Factory Measuring What Matters Attic Mobilizing Small Groups to Serve Cafe Providing Care Beyond Group Zone D O U B L E - TA L K T R AC K Development: Making Leaders Great Warehouse

DINNER

5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. West Auditorium

MAIN SESSION TWO 7:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. East Auditorium

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C O

DAY TWO T U E S DAY, M AY 8

N F E R

BREAKOUT FOUR

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9:00 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.

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A Starting Point Zone

E S

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Developing Your Groups Strategy Factory Leading Groups Without Leaders Cafe

C H E

Questions That Lead to Self-Discovery Theater

D U

What We Can Promise in a Group...Really Attic

L E

D O U B L E - TA L K T R AC K Connections: Creating and Marketing Events Warehouse

BREAK

10:15 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

BREAKOUT FIVE

10:45 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Creating a Strong Leadership Culture Theater Encouraging Unity in a Group Cafe Mentoring the Millennial Generation Through Groups Attic Onboarding New Leaders Zone Reaching and Engaging Men Factory D O U B L E - TA L K T R AC K Strategy: Partner Transfer Warehouse

LUNCH

12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.

MAIN SESSION THREE 1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. East Auditorium

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BREAKOUT DESCRIPTIONS

BREAKOUT ONE Developing Your Groups Strategy Cliff Atfield Can your team tell you why groups matter and identify the principles behind them? We’ll share key principles and questions you can ask to create the most intentional and successful groups in the context of your specific church.

Four Characteristics of an Influential Leader Tim Cooper To have influence, you need the right posture for approaching people that see things differently than you. Learn how to develop leaders that move toward culture and meet the people they lead where they are.

Investing in Women Sue Bates & Elaine Scott Developing women is a great way to strengthen and grow the church. We'll explore best practices for investing in women.

Onboarding New Leaders Steve Giddens & Krista Glasscock

These two talks will present a strategy for starting new groups effectively. Learn best practices for the crucial first 90 days of a group. We'll give you some practical applications for helping launch groups well for both leaders and members.

BREAKOUT TWO Groups in the Workplace Doug Hurley How do you reach those that may never set foot inside your church walls? We’ll talk about creating a nonthreatening environment for people outside the faith to discover their best next steps in their spiritual journeys.

Handling Polarizing Conversations Adam Boyle & Libby Hempen

How do you teach new volunteer leaders the fundamentals of leading a group? We'll tell the story of an “aha” moment that completely changed our approach to training leaders.

More and more, people have diverging thoughts about what is going on in the world. Learn best practices for handling polarizing conversations and helping your leaders do the same in their groups.

Tensions in Group Leadership Bill Willits

Making Vision Stick Jenny Boyett

Anyone who has led a small group knows there are tensions in leading one. Since most group systems are dependent on volunteers leading off-campus groups, a small group is the least programmed, least controlled, most organic ministry a church can offer. In this breakout, we will talk about some of the most prevalent tensions in leading a group and how to address them well.

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D O U B L E - TA L K T R AC K Launching: Getting Off on the Right Foot Dustin Oprea & Chris Allen

If vision is about what could be and should be, why are you stuck with what is? Learn how to communicate your vision in a clear and compelling way in order to influence your organization.


Motivating Singles to Join Groups Rodney Anderson

Measuring What Matters Philip Duffie

Singles make up 40 percent of the U.S. population and 30 percent of our churches. We'll explore unique strategies to get singles to move from rows into circles.

Measuring ministry effectiveness is the only way to know if you're making progress. But how do you know if you're asking the right questions and gathering the right data? We'll show you what our ministry dashboards look like and how the information we gather reflects and influences our progress.

Teaching Theology for Life and Leadership Reggie Sumpter How do you equip leaders theologically—not so they have all the answers, but so they can have helpful conversations with those they lead? We'll share the unique way we combine teaching with conversation to equip people for life and leadership.

Mobilizing Small Groups to Serve Bryan Apinis

D O U B L E - TA L K T R AC K Enlistment: Leader Pipeline Sue Bates & Jared Smith

Providing Care Beyond Group Debbie Causey

Hear two talks about what we do to recruit and vet leaders. There are people in your church that would make great group leaders. Explore strategies for finding, vetting, and approving them.

BREAKOUT THREE Connecting Adults to Groups Teresa Cook & Jane McLain How do you convince an adult to take a first step into a small group? In this breakout, we'll talk about GroupLink and Short-Term Groups as strategic first steps that encourage people to enter into community.

How do you cast a vision that makes serving compelling and attractive for groups? We'll share what we're learning about equipping small groups to give, serve, and love in their communities.

A group provides care to its members. But what happens when someone needs help beyond what a group can provide? There are ways to support group leaders and members outside of group as they face things like grief, addiction, mental illness, or parenting an LGBTQ+ child. We'll explore the church's role in providing care outside of group.

D O U B L E - TA L K T R AC K Development: Making Leaders Great Holly Goddard & Laurie Kimbell Explore ways to support volunteer leaders in two talks. Once you've placed volunteers in leadership roles, it's vital to coach and pastor them well. For group leaders to succeed, you should develop them around what they need to know, do, and be.

Groups Ministry With or Without Staff Tracy Atfield & Mike Davis Creating a groups ministry can be tough, especially if you don't have a team to do it. Learn how we coach churches in building a groups ministry, with or without staff. 11


BREAKOUT DESCRIPTIONS

BREAKOUT FOUR A Starting Point Tim Cooper The church should be a place that attracts people who are far from God. You have to give people a safe and easy first step toward meaningful conversations about faith. We’ll introduce you to principles for creating helpful and compelling next steps for people who are curious about or new to faith.

Check out these two talks about connecting adults into community. If you want your groups ministry to thrive, you have to create a connection strategy and market long-term community to attendees.

Developing Your Groups Strategy Cliff Atfield

BREAKOUT FIVE

Can your team tell you why groups matter and identify the principles behind them? We’ll share key principles and questions you can ask to create the most intentional and successful groups in the context of your specific church.

Creating a Strong Leadership Culture Chris Kim

Leading Groups Without Leaders Stuart Makinson What do you do when there aren't enough leaders for your groups? We'll tell you about the challenges we've faced and the strategies we've created to fill the leadership gap.

Questions That Lead to Self-Discovery Justin Elam When you have an others-first mindset, you ask questions instead of offering answers. Learn how asking good questions is essential to our development as leaders.

What We Can Promise in a Group...Really Bill Willits What we think community should be and what it actually is don’t always match. We’ll equip you to create alignment between your vision and reality and then communicate clear and realistic expectations for both leaders and group members.

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D O U B L E - TA L K T R AC K Connections: Creating and Marketing Events Jenny Boyett & Misti Mancini

Finding leaders is an ongoing challenge for most groups ministries. We’ll explore how a culture built on three key characteristics produces more leaders who are more effective.

Encouraging Unity in a Group Alysia Dicks People are messy. How do you create a cohesive group made up of people with different personalities and backgrounds? Learn how to embrace each individual so your groups can thrive.

Mentoring the Millennial Generation Through Groups Beau Johnson What are you doing to reach the next generation? We'll explore what we've learned from our Just Married and Just Grad groups.

Onboarding New Leaders Steve Giddens & Krista Glasscock How do you teach new volunteer leaders the fundamentals of leading a group? We'll tell the story of an “aha” moment that completely changed our approach to training leaders.


Reaching and Engaging Men Robby Angle & John Woodall Men are notoriously difficult for the church to reach. We'll share what we're learning about how to connect, challenge, and develop men.

D O U B L E - TA L K T R AC K Strategy: Partner Transfer Andy Lowry & Shane Norcross Check out these two talks about how to make the North Point model work in your church. When it comes to the North Point vision and mission, how do you know what will work at your church? Staff from Athens Church will share their strategies for success as a North Point Partner. And, if you don't have the resources to hire dedicated staff, consider the coaching model. Staff from Northpoint Church in Austin will talk about how it has worked for them.

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GLOSSARY OF TERMS GROUP LIFE TERMS S H O RT - T E R M G R O U P S Groups that meet for six to eight weeks to discuss a specific topic; for adults of all ages and stages of life, regardless of spiritual maturity

CO M M U N I T Y G R O U P S Groups of eight to twelve adults in the same stage of life and area of town that meet regularly for a year or more to pursue healthy relationships and spiritual growth

CO M M U N I T Y G R O U P L E A D E R Volunteer responsible for monitoring the spiritual growth of everyone in a Community Group and making sure the environment as a whole supports connection and growth

D I R E C TO R O F CO N N E C T I O N S Staff member responsible for connecting people into community by organizing GroupLink events as well as online connection options

GROUPLINK Event where people meet and connect with others in their area of town and stage of life to start a Community Group

G R O U P S D I R E C TO R Staff member responsible for shepherding and leading 80 to 100 group leaders

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G R O U P L E A D E RS . O R G

STA RT I N G P O I N T

Website with blog posts, leader tools, and resource suggestions for Community Group leaders. [NOTE: If a leader is looking for curriculum options, send them to groupleaders.org/studies-resources. Leaders can sign up at the bottom of the blog to receive emails when new posts are published. Blog posts are great reminders of best practices and new resources for groups.]

Eight-week conversational small group environment for people who are investigating Christianity (seekers), are new to a relationship with Jesus Christ (starters), or have some church experience but have been away for a while (returners)

M U LT I - L E A D E R GAT H E R I N G A meeting with a Groups Director and 3+ leaders sharing common group issues with the purpose of developing leader skills and emotional intelligence. Minimum of two times a year.

ONE-ON-ONE A meeting with a Groups Director and one leader (or leader couple) to work on personal and group-specific issues with the purpose of personal development and care (also for leader onboarding if first one-onone). Minimum of two times a year.

CG LO ( CO M M U N I T Y G R O U P L E A D E R O R I E N TAT I O N ) Training event for new Community Group leaders; generally takes place the month following GroupLink (February/March or September/ October)

I N T E RS E C T Initiative to make serving in the community simple for our attendees

LT R ( L E A D E R T R A I N I N G A N D RESOURCES) Multicampus department tasked with developing the leader training strategy within Groups. Responsible for developing resources that enhance the group experience, whether directly through a group curriculum or indirectly by providing campuses content for leader training, Short-Term Groups, and other resources.

THEOPRAXIS Environment for equipping leaders biblically and theologically

N E W TO CO M M U N I T Y A person who has never been in a Community Group, Short-Term Group, or Starting Point group

D I S CO N N E C T E D A person who is not new to community but has not been in a Community Group in the last two years


NEXT-STEP W I N

R E STO R E

K I D ST U F

When a person moves from one of these environments to the other within a 12-month period:

Ministry designed to help a person understand what they are experiencing and to give them tools to grow in the midst of their grief

Monthly shared experience for families of elementary school children that launches the Big Idea kids learn on UpStreet each month

• From NEXT or a Short-Term Group into a Community Group, ShortTerm Group, or Starting Point group • From a Starting Point group into a Community Group or Short-Term Group • From a Community Group into another Community Group • From a Singles Gathering into a Community Group, Short-Term Group, or Starting Point group

CA R E M I N I ST RY TERMS T WO TO O N E P R E M A R I TA L M E N TO R I N G Ministry that pairs mentor couples with engaged couples to help them prepare for a successful marriage

RE:NEW One-on-one mentoring for those who are experiencing difficult circumstances

MONEYWISE Ministry that pairs mentors with people facing financial struggles in order to help them apply biblical principles to their finances

OA S I S D I VO R C E R E COV E RY Place of comfort, encouragement, healing, and learning for those experiencing the pain of separation and divorce

THRIVE

NEXT

Conversational small group environment to help married couples understand God’s plan for marriage and gain new insight into themselves and their spouses

Thirty-minute overview of our mission, strategy, and environments to help attendees determine their best next steps

OT H E R M I N I S T RY ENVIRONMENTS BE RICH North Point Ministries’ annual giving and serving campaign

G LO B A L ( X ) Division of North Point Ministries that partners with leaders all over the world who are effective in leading people into a growing relationship with Jesus Christ; organizes shortterm mission trips

G U E ST S E RV I C E S Welcomes, informs, and serves the people that attend our churches

INSIDEOUT Small group-focused Sunday afternoon environment for high school students that emphasizes seeing God build students from the inside out

S I N G L E S GAT H E R I N G S Six-week environments in which 30 to 50 single adults come together to connect relationally

THE LIVING ROOM Weekly worship and teaching environment for Atlanta-area college students

TRANSIT Small group-focused Sunday environment for middle school students that helps them develop a faith of their own as it prepares them to navigate the challenges of high school

U P ST R E E T Small group-focused Sunday environment for elementary-aged kids that tries to make three ideas stick: (1) Make the WISE choice, (2) TRUST God no matter what, and (3) Treat OTHERS the way I want to be treated

WAU M B A L A N D Sunday environment that teaches children six weeks old through Pre-K that God made them, God loves them, and Jesus wants to be their friend forever

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S P E A K E R B I O

MAIN SESSION ONE

C O N F E R E N C E

Clay is the lead pastor of North Point Community Church, providing visionary and directional leadership for the local church staff and congregation. As the original and largest campus of North Point Ministries, NPCC averages over 12,000 people in attendance. Clay has worked his way through many organizational levels of North Point Ministries and knows all too well the challenge of authority deprivation. Clay holds a degree in Industrial Engineering from Georgia Tech as well as a master’s degree and doctorate with an emphasis in Online Church from Dallas Theological Seminary. He lives in Forsyth County, Georgia, with his wife, Jenny, and their five children.

R E : G R O U P

C L AY S C R O G G I N S


M A I N

S E S S I O N

01

19


M A I N

20

S E S S I O N

01


S P E A K E R B I O

MAIN SESSION TWO

C O N F E R E N C E

Adam is the lead pastor of Browns Bridge Church and has spent the last 10 years in a variety of roles throughout North Point Ministries. He and his wife, Kelly (a North Point staff alum), love to spend time creating adventure with their four sons Ryland, Roddic, Jett, and Cashman. Adam went to the University of Georgia, where he played wide receiver on the football team (Go Dawgs!), and later earned a master's in Biblical Studies from Dallas Theological Seminary.

R E : G R O U P

A DA M J O H N S O N


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M A I N

S E S S I O N

02

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S P E A K E R B I O

MAIN SESSION THREE

C O N F E R E N C E

Jeff is the lead pastor of Gwinnett Church, a campus of North Point Ministries in Atlanta, Georgia. Prior to this, he served for eight years as the lead pastor of Buckhead Church, North Point’s first multi-site location. Before serving as a pastor, Jeff worked in marketing and advertising, including leading Chick-fil-A’s sports marketing and beverage partnerships for six years. Jeff is the co-founder of Champion Tribes, Launch Youniversity, Pastor Circle, and Preaching Rocket, which have served thousands of dads, pastors, and entrepreneurs. Jeff and his wife, Wendy, have been married 21 years and have a daughter, Jesse, and son, Cole.

R E : G R O U P

JEFF HENDERSON


M A I N

S E S S I O N

03

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M A I N

26

S E S S I O N

03


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F I N D N O T E S F O R

BREAKOUT SESSIONS

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Y O U R

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Groups Ministry With or Without Staff Tracy Atfield & Mike Davis

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Measuring What Matters Philip Duffie

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Mobilizing Small Groups to Serve Bryan Apinis

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Providing Care Beyond Group Debbie Causey

S E S S I O N

Four Characteristics of an Influential Leader Tim Cooper

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Investing in Women Sue Bates & Elaine Scott

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A Starting Point Tim Cooper

Onboarding New Leaders Steve Giddens & Krista Glasscock

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Leading Groups Without Leaders Stuart Makinson

Tensions in Group Leadership Bill Willits

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Groups in the Workplace Doug Hurley

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Handling Polarizing Conversations Adam Boyle & Libby Hempen

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Making Vision Stick Jenny Boyett

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Developing Your Groups Strategy Cliff Atfield

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Connecting Adults to Groups Teresa Cook & Jane McLain

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Questions That Lead to Self-Discovery Justin Elam What We Can Promise in a Group...Really Bill Willits

Creating a Strong Leadership Culture Chris Kim

Motivating Singles to Join Groups Rodney Anderson

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Encouraging Unity in a Group Alysia Dicks

Teaching Theology for Life and Leadership Reggie Sumpter

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Mentoring the Millennial Generation Through Groups Beau Johnson


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Reaching and Engaging Men Robby Angle & John Woodall

D O U B L E - TA L K T R AC K S

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Launching: Getting Off on the Right Foot Dustin Oprea & Chris Allen Enlistment: Leader Pipeline Sue Bates & Jared Smith Development: Making Leaders Great Holly Goddard & Laurie Kimbell Connections: Creating and Marketing Events Jenny Boyett & Misti Mancini Strategy: Partner Transfer Andy Lowry & Shane Norcross

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DEVE LOPIN G YOUR GROUPS STRATEGY C L I F F AT F I E L D I.

C O N T E X T F O R D E V E LO P I N G A S M A L L G R O U P S S T R AT E GY A. Your best small groups strategy flows from your context.
 B. Our context is based on our vision and mission. Steering Questions: 1. Why does our church have a small groups ministry? 2. How is our strategy helping us accomplish our vision and mission? Guiding Principles: 1. Our church’s vision is to create churches unchurched people love to attend. 2. Our church’s mission is to lead people into a growing relationship with Jesus Christ. 3. Our Group Life vision is to connect people relationally so they can grow spiritually.

I I. FO U R CO M P O N E N TS O F AN E F F ECT I V E S M A L L G R O U P S S T R AT E GY A. Vision Casting 1. Steering Question: Am I regularly inspiring people toward our vision for groups? 2. Guiding Principle: Inspired people figure out how. B. Leader Identification 1. Steering Question: What posture do you desire in a leader? 30


2. Guiding Principle: "First who, then what." —Jim Collins, Good to Great C. Leader Development Steering Questions: 1. What information and skills are important to leading well? 2. How are we delivering information and skills to group leaders? 
 Guiding Principle: Adults learn on a need-to-know basis. D. Connection Solution 1. Steering Question: How are we forming groups? 2. Guiding Principle: “Think steps, not programs.” —Andy Stanley and Lane Jones, 7 Practices of Effective Ministry

CO N C LU S I O N 1. One small groups strategy will not work for everyone.
 2. Your best small groups strategy flows from your context. 3. Every strategy may not be infinitely scalable, but the questions are.
 4. Ask and answer these questions continuously.

RESOURCES Start With Why Simon Sinek

Deep & Wide Andy Stanley

The Seven Deadly Sins of Small Group Ministry Bill Donahue and Russ Robinson

Building a StoryBrand: Clarify Your Message So Customers Will Listen Donald Miller

Good to Great Jim Collins

7 Practices of Effective Ministry Andy Stanley and Lane Jones

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FOUR CHA RACTE RISTICS OF AN IN FLUE N TIAL L EADE R T I M CO O P E R INTRODUCTION We all want to influence our culture, but do we know what it takes to do so? In this breakout, we will talk through four questions designed to help us simplify our jobs so we can have a bigger impact on our culture.

I.

W H AT I S YO U R J O B A S A C H U R C H L E A D E R ? “...the main reason why Christian believers today have not had the influence in the culture to which they have aspired is not that they don’t believe enough, or try hard enough, or care enough, or think Christianly enough, or have the right worldview, but rather because they have been absent from the arenas in which the greatest influence in the culture is exerted.” —James Davison Hunter, To Change the World

A. Our job as a church is to influence. B. Influence is intensely personal. 1. Influence can be a long road. 2. Influence without relationship often has a shallow root. Groups > Classes The more intense the need, the smaller the relational ratio.

• •

I I . W H AT D O E S T H E N E W T E S TA M E N T T E AC H U S ABOUT CHURCH LEADERS’ RESPONSIBILITIES? A. Only one New Testament letter is written directly to a non-Jewish church leader. B. The purpose of the letter to Titus was to explain how to influence a nearly impossible culture. 32


C. Paul instructs Titus to influence this evil culture relationally. D. Paul sets an unbelievably high bar for leadership. E. The high bar remains for leadership and influence in our culture, but the qualifications change based on the needs of the culture.

III. WHO ARE THE MOST EFFECTIVE L E A D E R S I N O U R C U LT U R E ? “The average person in the West carries around in their head a set of assumptions that are culturally imbibed. Assumptions such as the idea that spirituality is preferable to organized religion, that love is a feeling not a discipline, that if something is mundane it must be boring, that individual freedom trumps the collective, that travel broadens the mind, or that we can do what we like as long as it does not hurt anybody.” — Mark Sayers, The Road Trip that Changed the World

A. We have found that there is not a right way to influence culture, but there is a helpful posture. B. Our most effective leaders aspire to the same posture: 1. Humble 2. Teachable 3. Curious 4. Intentional C. This leader posture builds relationships, which makes influence possible.

I V. H OW D O W E R E P L I C AT E T H E M ? A. We need to set the example. B. Interview, train, and lead people toward this posture. C. If our goal/responsibility is influence, then we need to aim all of our effort and energy at creating influencers.

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INVE STIN G IN WOME N S U E B AT E S & E L A I N E S C OT T INTRODUCTION Women in your church will show up. Women will serve. Women will fill roles and take on tasks. Women will run events and manage logistics. But what if we invested in women as leaders? How do we get women to lead? How do we keep women leading? Why is this important?

I.

W H Y I S I N V E S T I N G I N WO M E N I M P O RTA N T ? A. They are the pastors for your women’s community. B. They will multiply your investment. C. Your investment will change the way women see themselves.

I I . H OW D O W E G E T WO M E N TO L E A D ? A. Cast vision. 1. Invite them in. 2. We don’t want volunteers; we need leaders. B. Address their fears. 1. Failure 2. Inadequacy 3. Inexperience 4. No Time C. Cultivate confidence through equipping. 1. Give them tools. 2. Give them community.

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I I I . H OW D O W E K E E P WO M E N L E A D I N G ? A. Attend to their hearts. 1. Model vulnerability. 2. Appreciate and value them. B. Attend to their hands. C. Model healthy leadership. 1. Challenge them to shift from consumer to contributor. 2. Encourage them to reproduce themselves. CO N C L U S I O N God has equipped every woman with gifts and abilities for the purpose of making the church stronger. When we intentionally invest in and equip them to leverage their leadership gifts, the result is a vibrant, more effective church that makes an even greater impact in our local communities and beyond.

RESOURCES BrenĂŠ Brown (TED Talks/books on vulnerability)

Half the Church Carolyn Custis James

Clout Jenni Catron

The Blue Parakeet Scot McKnight

Gifted to Lead Nancy Beach

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ON B OARDIN G NEW LEADE RS S T E V E G I D D E N S & K R I S TA G L A S S C O C K INTRODUCTION As the saying goes, “Give a man a fish, and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, and you feed him for a lifetime.” We all want to develop leaders that lead for the long haul, but how do we begin that process with our new leaders? We’ll share what we’ve learned, how we’ve failed, and the strategy we’re pursuing in onboarding new leaders.

I.

W H AT ’S T H E P R I M A RY R O L E OF A GROUP LEADER? A. Group leaders aren’t primarily Bible scholars. B. Group leaders aren’t primarily social chairs. C. Group leaders aren’t primarily teachers. D. Group leaders are environment creators.

I I . H OW C A N W E C R E AT E A G R O U P E N V I R O N M E N T T H AT ’S C O N D U C I V E TO G R O W T H ? A. Make it relational. B. Make it predictable. 1. Group Meetings Social time (20–30 minutes) Study time (1 hour) Reflection time (20–30 minutes)

• • •

2. Group Term C. Make it safe. D. Make it helpful. We want our leaders to consistently drive conversations toward three key questions:

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1. How is God leading you? 2. How are you responding? 3. How can we help?

I I I . H OW C A N W E B E S T E Q U I P G R O U P L E A D E R S I N T H E F I R S T 9 0 DAY S TO C R E AT E A N E N V I R O N M E N T F O R S P I R I T U A L G R OW T H ? A. Leader Interview 1. Objective 1: Assess 2. Objective 2: Inform Roles and responsibilities of the group leader Role the church will play in supporting and developing them as they lead

• •

B. Community Group Leader Orientation 1. Objective 1: Model how to lead a group. 2. Objective 2: Cast vision for the purpose of groups. C. First one-on-one meeting between group leader and Groups Director 1. It should occur within the first 90 days of the start of their group. 2. Questions to ask: What is working well for you in group? What are you most excited about? Is there anything going on in group that you are struggling with? How can we best support you? How can I be praying for you?

• • • • •

D. Group resources: Group Agreement and first group study

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I V. H OW D O W E P R OV I D E O N G O I N G D E V E LO P M E N T A N D R E S O U R C E S F O R L E A D E R S ? A. When: Find convenient times that work for their schedules. B. How: Practice the Know, Do, and Be of leader development (delivered via one-on-one meetings and large trainings). C. What: Provide great group resources that foster engaging group conversations. CO N C L U S I O N Unique leadership challenges will surface in every group, and how God grows an individual through leadership will vary from one group to the next. We must, however, keep the fundamentals of leadership continually in front of us as we seek to create optimum group environments for God to work in the lives of those we lead.

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TE NS I ONS IN GROUP LEAD E RS HIP BILL WILLITS I.

INTRODUCTION A. Because of their organic nature, small groups tend to be the most challenging ministry a church can offer. B. A leader can have the best-intended plans for a group meeting, but if three people cancel or someone comes in with bad news, your plan is shelved and the direction of your night changes. C. Leading a small group well requires tension management (e.g., solid execution and sound judgment).

I I . T E N S I O N S TO M A N AG E W H E N LEADING A GROUP A. Reasonable or Unreasonable: When are group expectations reasonable and when are they not? B. Launching or Delaying: What are the easiest times to start a group and what are the most challenging times? C. Book Study or Bible Study: What do we study and who should determine it? D. Adding or Not Adding: When should we add new members and when should we not? E. Influence or Own: What aspects of spiritual growth can the leader influence and what must the member own? F. Conversation or Instruction: When do I encourage the group to wrestle with the answer and when must I provide the answer? G. Acceptance or Challenge: When do I accept and when do I challenge?

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H. Core or Peripheral: When do I jump in and solve theological tensions and when do I allow the group to wrestle with them? I. Disregard or Confront: When do I disregard problem members and when do I confront them? J. Leading or Delegating: When do I lead and when do I delegate? K. Meeting or Breaking: When do we meet and when do we take breaks? L. Continuing or Ending: When should we keep going and when should we end?

I I I . W H AT E V E RY G R O U P L E A D E R N E E D S A. Clarity and Simplicity 1. Clarity defines success. 2. Simplicity makes it possible. B. Vision and Development 1. Leaders need a compelling vision. 2. Leaders also need spiritual, tactical, and personal development. C. Strategy and Spirit 1. Leaders need a clear plan. 2. Leaders need complete dependency. D. Launching and Ending Well 1. The first 90 days are the most critical. 2. Ending well enables the value of community to live on.

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GRO U P S IN T HE WO R KP L AC E DOUG HURLEY INTRODUCTION Christians in the marketplace often find it intimidating and awkward to talk to their co-workers about God. What if there was a simple way to equip people at your church to make a spiritual impact in the lives of their friends at work? In this breakout, we’ll talk about how we’ve created a nonthreatening workplace environment for people outside the faith to discover their best next steps in their spiritual journeys.

I.

LO C A L B U S I N E S S E S A R E T H E L A R G E S T O P P O RT U N I T I E S F O R O U T R E AC H . A. Over one-third of people in the marketplace never plan to enter a church. B. Going to church is no longer a first step. C. Lay leaders spend the majority of their waking hours in the office.

II. CHRISTIANS CAN BE APPREHENSIVE A B O U T S H A R I N G T H E I R FA I T H . A. They don’t want to offend anyone. B. They don’t want to seem out of touch. C. They don’t know what to say. D. They don’t want to get in trouble. E. They don’t want that responsibility. F. They don’t understand God’s perspective on work.

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I I I . U N B E L I E V E R S A R E T Y P I C A L LY AT O N E O F F I V E FA I T H T H R E S H O L D S . A. Trusting a Christian B. Becoming Curious C. Opening to Change D. Seeking After God E. Becoming a Christian

I V. W E H AV E I D E N T I F I E D S O M E H E L P F U L P R I N C I P L E S T H AT C R E AT E A S U I TA B L E O U T R E A C H E N V I R O N M E N T TO E N GAG E P E O P L E I N T H E W O R K P L AC E . A. Forming relationships must be prioritized over presenting theology. B. Biblical principles need to be presented in a safe, practical, and engaging way. C. A clear next step should be made available. D. Avoid creating a Bible study or Christian club. E. Manage expectations for Christians around saving their “lost� co-workers.

V. O U R WO R K P L AC E O U T R E AC H M I N I S T RY I S C A L L E D L I F E L E S S O N S OV E R L U N C H . A. Life Lessons Over Lunch is a group environment at work. B. Participants watch a message from a carefully curated library characterized by content that is safe, attractive, and relevant. C. Leaders host these groups in their offices and provide a free lunch to their participating co-workers as an incentive. D. These groups prioritize the experience of unchurched attendees by eliminating prayer and discussion time. 42


CO N C L U S I O N We need to bring the church to the workplace with the right approach, not just with what we believe.

RESOURCES I Once Was Lost Don Everts and Doug Schaupp 5 Faith Thresholds video: groupleaders.org/blog-feed/5-faith-thresholds

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HAN DLIN G POLA RIZIN G CON VE RSATION S A DA M B OY L E & L I B BY H E M P E N I.

JAMES GIVES US A CLEAR AND S I M P L E M E T H O D F O R H E A LT H Y C O N V E R S AT I O N S ( J A M E S 1 : 1 9 ) . A. As leaders, our default should be a listening posture. 
 B. There are some things that should anger us, but we should be slow, measured, and grace-filled in getting there. C. We should maintain the postures of curiosity, humility, teachability, and intentionality.

I I . A P P R OAC H I N G A C O N V E R S AT I O N W I T H T H E S E F O U R G U I D E L I N E S W I L L M OV E I T F R O M P O L A R I Z I N G TO P O S I T I V E . A. Choose to trust. B. Communicate a common goal. C. Seek to understand. D. Expect discomfort.

I I I . C O N V E R S AT I O N S I M P R OV E W H E N W E S E E P E O P L E , N OT C AT E G O R I E S . A. Resist biased narratives and embrace stories. 1. N arratives are myths we create to justify our opinions. 2. Stories are the lived experiences of others. 3. In narratives, we ascribe meaning to events and motives to behaviors. 44


4. Stories speak for themselves and build trust as we take the storyteller at their word. 5. Narratives dehumanize. 6. Stories dignify. B. The pinnacle of a healthy, empathetic conversation is to affirm, “If I experienced what you did, I might see it like you do.�

I V. W E A L L H AV E F I LT E R S T H R O U G H W H I C H W E P R O C E S S R E A L I T Y. A. Identify your filters. B. Lay down your filters. C. Seek to understand the other person's filters.

V. LO O K I N G F O R A N D R E S P O N D I N G TO P H YS I CA L C U E S CA N H E L P K E E P T H E C O N V E R S AT I O N I N A H E A LT H Y P L AC E . A. Monitor body language and physiological changes. B. De-escalate by taking a moment to pause, breathe, break, or physically move. C. Re-engage by rallying toward common goals and prayer.

V I . A H E A LT H Y R E S P O N S E W I L L B R I N G R E S O L U T I O N TO T H E C O N V E R S AT I O N . A. Determine a proper response considering relevant factors. B. Respond with sympathy, empathy, and compassion.

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MAKIN G VISION STICK J E N N Y B OY E T T INTRODUCTION Groups are important. People are busy. So, how do we break through their busyness and inspire them to join groups? A sermon once a year isn't enough. In this breakout, we'll give you an inside look at the processes, products, and strategy that help us keep community in the forefront.

I.

S TAT E YO U R V I S I O N S I M P LY. A. A great vision statement is memorable. 1. It should be portable. 2. It should be simple. B. A great vision statement is incomplete. 1. It won’t capture your entire philosophy. 2. It won’t represent your entire theology.

I I . C A S T I T C O N V I N C I N G LY. A. Define the problem. B. Offer a solution. C. Explain why you and why now.

I I I . R E P E AT I T R E G U L A R LY. A. You can’t say it too much. B. Emphasize the elements of personal engagement.

I V. C E L E B R AT E I T SY S T E M AT I C A L LY. A. This clarifies the vision. B. What’s celebrated is repeated. 46


V. E M B R AC E I T P E R S O N A L LY. A. Model it privately. B. Champion it publicly.

V I . T H R E E T H I N G S TO M O N I TO R A LO N G T H E WAY : A. New projects and programs B. Prayer requests C. Complaints

CO N C LU S I O N 1. Clarifying vision is complex. 2. Vision has no autopilot. 3. Vision requires constant care and attention.

RESOURCES Visioneering Andy Stanley

Making Vision Stick Andy Stanley

Start With Why Simon Sinek

Made to Stick Chip Heath and Dan Heath

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MOTIVATIN G SIN GLE S TO JOIN GROUPS RODNEY ANDERSON INTRODUCTION In August 2014, single adults began to outnumber married adults in the United States. When you take into account the current divorce rate and couple it with the rise in the age that people first marry, this trend will only continue. We are no longer a nation that graduates college students who then go on to get married and start families in a short amount of time. We have a massive population of single adults and a massive population of single-again adults. Given this trend, how should the church respond?

I.

WHY SHOULD THE CHURCH RESPOND? A. It meets the felt need of friendship. B. It can grow your church’s reputation. C. It connects people quickly. D. It builds your volunteer base.

I I . H OW S H O U L D W E R E S P O N D ? A. Use a start/stop model. 1. It builds momentum. 2. It keeps it fresh. B. Create quality environments. C. Recognize that connecting people is more art than science.

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III. OUR RESPONSE A. Singles Gatherings 1. They are unapologetically social. 2. They are based on age and interests. B. Singles Stages 1. We cast vision. 2. We deliver helpful content. C. Singles Events 1. We prioritize fun. 2. We make them meaningful. CO N C L U S I O N No one in culture is doing a very good job of creating meaningful connections for single people. But the felt need for friendship is as strong as ever. Single people want to be where other single people are. Imagine what it would look like if the church took the lead on this. Imagine if we created spaces outside the walls of the church for people to find what they needed. It would change and grow the reputation of the church.

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T EACH IN G TH EOLOGY FOR LIFE AN D L EADE RSHIP REGGIE SUMPTER INTRODUCTION Ultimately, we want our leaders and attendees to be self-feeders and responsible for their own spiritual growth. But how can the church help make that happen? Too much theological training can lead to arrogance, but not enough leads to confusion. In this breakout, we'll share our strategy for combining teaching, community, and application.

I.

O U R T H E O LO G I C A L E Q U I P P I N G E M B R AC E S T H E R E A L I T Y O F O U R LO C A L C H U R C H C U LT U R E . A. Many of our leaders and attendees had little church experience and no theological training before coming to our church. B. We noticed a gap between most group studies and formal theological training. C. We wanted our attendees to process theology, not simply receive it.

I I. W E D E T E R M I N E D T H E CO N T E N T O F O U R T H E O LO G I C A L T R A I N I N G BY A S K I N G K E Y Q U E S T I O N S : A. What do we want our leaders to know? B. What do we want our groups to know? C. What’s the best way to provide our leaders and groups with what we want them to know?

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I I I . H OW W E D E L I V E R T H E CO N T E N T VA R I E S B A S E D O N T H E TO P I C A N D E N V I R O N M E N T.

A. We have a collection of modules that range from one to three sessions. 1. Some modules are for leaders only. Group leaders aren’t primarily teachers. 2. Some modules are for groups to experience in a large setting. 3. Some modules are for groups to do on their own. 4. Some topics have overlap and are presented in different ways based on the environment. 5. Some topics are tactical in nature, while others are open-ended. B. For leaders-only training, we want to provide a step into theological equipping, but it’s not as comprehensive as a seminary class. 1. Modules are as much facilitated as they are taught. 2. We try not to resolve tensions too quickly. 3. It must be a safe place. 4. Most sessions include a table game or interaction.

I V. E XC E R P T F R O M A T H E O P R A X I S M O D U L E

RESOURCES groupleaders.org groupleaders.org/theopraxis

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CON N ECTIN G ADULTS TO GROUPS T E R E SA CO O K & JAN E M C L AI N INTRODUCTION We believe that in order to grow spiritually, you need to be connected relationally. We often say that circles are better than rows. So, how do you get adults to take that first step into a circle—to join a small group? In this breakout, we’ll talk about how GroupLink and Short-Term Groups are strategic environments to move adults into long-term community.

I.

M U LT I P L E I N S I G H T S H AV E I N F O R M E D O U R S T R AT E G I E S TO H E L P C O N N E C T A D U LT S I N TO LO N G - T E R M G R O U P S . A. Chemistry is the biggest factor. B. The second most important factor is geography. C. The third strongest factor is stage of life.

I I . G R O U P L I N K I S O U R P R I M A RY S T R AT E GY F O R C O N N E C T I N G P E O P L E I N TO LO N G - T E R M G R O U P S . A. Overview 1. GroupLink is an event held at the church where people connect with others in their same stage of life and area of town to form Community Groups. 2. The event typically lasts 60–90 minutes. 3. We host GroupLink twice a year, in January and August. B. Attendees come to GroupLink with tensions:

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1. They want to have choices. 2. Choices require relational effort. 3. Relational effort can be awkward and scary. C. GroupLink has four key components: 1. We pre-match an initial connection so people will have others to connect with when they arrive. 2. People are free to stay with their initial connection but are encouraged to connect with others in the room. 3. Groups form and people are seated in circles. 4. A video message from the pastor casts vision and sets expectations for the groups. D. Results 1. W e move over 90 percent of group seekers into groups by the end of the event. 2. Of those that join groups, 84 percent stay with their groups for an additional 18–24 months.

I I I . F O R T H O S E N OT Y E T R E A DY F O R A LO N G - T E R M G R O U P C O M M I T M E N T, W E H AV E S H O RT - T E R M G R O U P S . A. The purpose of Short-Term Groups is to provide an easy first step into community with a shorter commitment. 1. Groups meet for four to eight weeks. 2. Groups focus on a particular topic, such as family, finances, or gender-related content. B. We launch Short-Term Groups in the spring, summer, and fall.

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I V. TO P O I N T P E O P L E TOWA R D C O M M U N I T Y, W E R E LY O N T H R E E M A J O R M A R K E T I N G S T R AT E G I E S . A. Introduce B. Inform C. Inspire

RESOURCES Creating Community (Book) Bill Willits and Andy Stanley

Circle Up – North Point Resources (Small Group Study)

groupleaders.org

northpoint.org/grouplink

anthology.study

grouplink.org

insidenorthpoint.org/groups

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GRO U PS M INISTRY WITH OR W IT HOU T STAFF T R A C Y AT F I E L D & M I K E DAV I S I.

K N OW YO U R W H Y S . “Everyone on the planet knows what they do. Some know how they do it. But very few people or organizations know why they do what they do.” — Simon Sinek

A. Establish your personal why. B. Clarify your ministry why.

II. FIND THE RIGHT PEOPLE. A. Look for people who are humble, teachable, curious, and intentional.

N TE

T

EXP

ER IEN

CE

CON

B. Develop them at the right pace.

RELATIONSHIPS

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I I I . E M P OW E R T H E T E A M . A. Create an ownership culture. 1. Be openhanded. 2. Beware of burnout. 3. Share responsibility. “The question we should ask ourselves is this: Are the people I’m leading here for me or am I here for them?” —Clay Scroggins, How to Lead When You’re Not in Charge

B. Deploy the team. 1. Give the team influence with group leaders. 2. Have them own events.

CO N C LU S I O N

Leadership: Own the why of your ministry and cast a •• Visionary compelling vision for a shared future. Leadership: Be the glue that holds the stakeholders •• Connecting of your ministry together as you work toward a common goal. Leadership: Remain relationally engaged with those •• Pastoral that serve in your ministry, partnering with them, encouraging

them, and supporting their spiritual growth. Model the pastoral leadership you hope they engage in with the other members of your ministry.

*Adapted from categories of leadership found in Primal Leadership by Goleman, Boyatzis, and McKee.

RESOURCES Primal Leadership Goleman, Boyatzis, and McKee

Simon Sinek TED Talk tinyurl.com/yb87dx97

Making Vision Stick Andy Stanley

How to Lead When You’re Not in Charge Clay Scroggins

Deep & Wide Andy Stanley 56

groupleaders.org


M EAS U R ING WHAT MATT ERS PHILIP DUFFIE INTRODUCTION Measuring ministry effectiveness is the only way to know if you’re making progress. But how do you know if you’re asking the right questions and gathering the right data? In this breakout, we’ll show you what our ministry dashboards look like and how the information we gather reflects and influences our progress.

I.

M E A S U R I N G I S E S S E N T I A L TO M I S S I O N . A. Measurements assist us as we work toward our mission and vision. 1. Our mission is to lead people into a growing relationship with Jesus Christ. 2. Our vision is to create churches unchurched people love to attend. B. All measurements should point back to people. 1. All dashboards are derived from the involvement of individuals. 2. Each number we evaluate represents a person’s engagement with the local church.

I I . W E L E V E R AG E F I V E B E S T P R AC T I C E S . A. Only measure what you’re willing to address. B. Collaborate when establishing measurements. C. Use percentage measurements as much as possible. D. Utilize dashboards to gauge progress. E. Track over time to establish targets.

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I I I . W E M E A S U R E M O V E M E N T A N D AT T I T U D E S . A. Movement is a quantitative measure. B. Attitude is a qualitative measure.

I V. W E T R AC K A N D E VA L U AT E F O U R A S P E C T S O F I N VO LV E M E N T. A. We want our attendees to be connected in groups. B. We want our attendees to be serving on teams. C. We want our attendees to give strategically. D. We want our attendees to be investing in friends.

V. D O N ’ T M A K E D E C I S I O N S B A S E D O N M E A S U R E M E N T S A LO N E . A. Initiate conversations. B. Start explorations. C. Celebrate successes. CO N C L U S I O N As church leaders, we are responsible for the management of the church. To manage well, we must have measurements that matter. Effective measurements result from collaboration and tie to the church’s strategy for accomplishing its mission and vision. We use these measurements to gain insights alongside stories, rather than as determinants used in isolation.

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M O B IL IZING S MALL GRO U P S TO S ERVE B R YA N A P I N I S INTRODUCTION When groups serve in the community, the mission of the church advances, groups bond, and individuals are inspired. Most groups want to serve, but many times they don’t know where to begin. It can seem overwhelming to pick a project that works for the group, coordinate schedules, and put a plan in place. While mobilizing small groups to serve is not easy, it is possible with a strategic approach, inspiring promotion, and simple service opportunities.

I.

W H AT I S YO U R O R GA N I Z AT I O N A L S T R AT E GY F O R S E R V I C E ? A. Assumption: Serving in the community is part of your church’s existing activity. B. In order to gain long-term traction, you must have a mechanism for mobilizing people to serve. C. Our answer: The Intersect Project 1. Intersect exists to make serving simple. 2. We approach service as a value. 3. We partner; we don’t pioneer. We leverage our resources to help our partners go further faster. It multiplies our influence in the community. This strategy allows us to mobilize more people to serve. It ensures that we are helping instead of hurting.

• • • •

I I . H OW W I L L YO U I N S P I R E G R O U P S TO S E R V E ? A. Assumption: We want all groups to serve.

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B. Be clear on vision. 1. Craft consistent and compelling answers to the following questions: Why does our church make serving a priority? Why should small groups serve? What is the role of service in spiritual formation?

• • •

2. Our answers: We believe the church should be known for its compassion and generosity. Serving together creates shared experiences, infuses purpose, and fosters relationships. We want to move people from ignorance to awareness to engagement to lifestyle.

• • •

C. Be committed to promotion. 1. C ommunicate vision, broadcast over multiple channels, and share stories. 2. Our approach: Follow existing momentum within the church. Leverage existing means of communication.

• •

D. Be intentional in equipping. 1. W hen we mobilize and equip, people will “do good well.” 2. Our approach: We benefit from a healthy volunteer culture. We request that our partners orient volunteers. We carefully craft our messaging.

• • •

I I I . H OW W I L L YO U M A K E S E R V I N G S I M P L E F O R YO U R G R O U P S ? A. Assumption: People like the idea of service more than they like to serve. B. You may not be able to remove complexity from the process, but you can change who bears responsibility. 60


C. We must manage the tension between encouraging service throughout the year and giving it focused promotion. 1. E ncouraging service throughout the year prompts group members toward a lifestyle of service. 2. Giving focused promotion to service makes it simple and compelling for group members to serve together. D. Our answer: 1. F or a group that inquires about serving, we offer nonprofit partner info and/or specific DIY projects. 2. We leverage existing momentum for a targeted season (or two) when we ask every group to serve. 3. In planning, we distinguish between service opportunities that require project preparation and those that don’t. CO N C L U S I O N Mobilizing small groups to serve is hard work. Doing it effectively requires three things: strategy, inspiration, and simplicity. When we have a strategy, we’ll gain traction. When we inspire groups, we’ll create energy. When we get these right, it can be a game changer for groups and for our churches. It’s a catalyst to faith growth. It leads to authentic community. It furthers the church’s mission. All of that is at stake as we work to mobilize groups to serve together.

RESOURCES When Helping Hurts Steve Corbett and Brian Fikkert berich.org buckheadchurch.org/intersect

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P ROVIDIN G CARE BEYON D GROUP D E B B I E CAU S E Y INTRODUCTION A group provides care to its members. But what happens when someone needs help beyond what a normal group can provide? There are ways to support group leaders and members outside of group as they face issues like grief, addiction, mental illness, or parenting an LGBTQ+ child. We'll explore the church's role in providing care outside of group.

I.

W H AT W E K N OW A. We were designed to live in and be supported by authentic community. B. People drift toward being alone. C. At times, people need care beyond what our groups can provide.

I I . W H AT W E L E A R N E D A. Our current strategy for Community Groups doesn’t/can’t serve everyone in our churches. 1. Crop Circles illustration 2. What do the people that can’t be served in typical community look like? B. Community is still the strategic answer for every attendee of our church. 1. Rat Park experiment 2. The opposite of addiction is not sobriety; it’s connection. C. Connecting individuals in the corners requires customized care. 62


1. Specialized leaders are needed. 2. The best community is created when we provide opportunities for people to feel truly known by others. 3. Shared pain/experience is a critical component in specialized community.

I I I . W H AT W E A R E C U R R E N T LY D O I N G A. We can provide community to those in the corners. 1. Sometimes they can continue in long-term community. A family member has a mental illness. A family member is LGBTQ+.

• •

2. Sometimes they need to leave group to receive the care they need. They have a mental health issue causing dysfunction. They have an active addiction. They are in a high-conflict marriage.

• • •

3. We can provide community when they can’t be in a group. Counseling referrals Mentoring Peer-to-peer Local recovery groups: AA, NA, SA

• • • •

4. We can provide community when they can be in a group. Divorce Recovery Groups MoneyWise Groups Restore Parent Connect Family to Family Local recovery groups: AA, NA, SA

• • • • • •

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B. Your church doesn’t have to staff every need. Partner with those in your community that are doing it well.

I V. W H AT W E C A N D O A. Get to know and empathize with your audience. 1. What are their needs, struggles, and current trials? 2. What are their hopes, dreams, and desires? B. Get them connected into customized community. 1. Identify specialized leaders to lead them. 2. Find others going through a similar experience. C. Give them a mission. 1. Parent Connect Love your kids well. Figure out where God has you on the journey.

• •

2. Families of the Mentally Ill Become educated on coping strategies. Find resources for your family.

• •

3. Restore Grieve well. Find the support you need.

• •

CO N C L U S I O N Individuals feel most known in community. We can provide community to every attendee of our church as long as customized community care that includes shared experiences and specialized leaders is considered.

RESOURCES

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Restore

DivorceCare

Parent Connect Conversation Guide

nami.org

Financial Peace University

embracingthejourney.org

psychologytoday.com


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A STA RTIN G POIN T T I M CO O P E R INTRODUCTION People near our churches are ready to have spiritual conversations. Where can they go? In this breakout, we’ll share our answer to that question.

I.

U N D E R S TA N D I N G H OW P E O P L E G R OW W I L L H E L P U S C R E AT E T H E I R B E S T N E X T S T E P. A. There are spiritually curious people within driving distance of every church. B. Churches are generally not perceived as the safest places to ask questions, express doubts, or share disagreements. C. The church should be the best place to have those conversations. D. People cross five thresholds on the path to a growing faith: 1. Trusting a Christian 2. Becoming curious about faith 3. Being open to change 4. Seeking God 5. Entering into a relationship with God

I I . W E M U S T B E I N T E N T I O N A L A B O U T C R E AT I N G T H E B E S T E N V I R O N M E N T F O R P E O P L E TO H AV E S A F E C O N V E R S AT I O N S A B O U T FA I T H . A. Creating the right environment begins with understanding who the environment is for. We can create environments where God can cause heart change.

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B. The priority is to create a safe place for participants to explore faith at their own pace. C. The content is driven by a conversation, not a presentation. D. During a Starting Point group, participants experience Christian community, perhaps for the first time.

III. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF THE ENVIRONMENT DEPENDS ON THE POSTURE OF OUR LEADERS. A. There is not a right way to lead Starting Point, but we have found there is a right posture. B. Leaders who embody this posture ask great questions. 1. Ask “what” and “how,” not “why.” 2. Respond to questions with questions. C. Remember...method trumps message every single time.

RESOURCES I Once Was Lost Don Everts and Doug Schaupp Starting Point Conversation Guide

startingpoint.com spleaders.com

Story Cards

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L EADIN G GROUPS WI THOUT LEADE RS S T U A RT M A K I N S O N INTRODUCTION A. What is ideal? B. What are the two paradigms that create tension and require a strategy? 1. P aradigm 1: Leaders are essential to group success, so every group needs a leader. 2. Paradigm 2: Based on North Point’s mission and strategy, we don’t turn away group seekers. C. What is real?

I.

I D E N T I F Y I N G A L E A D E R I S N OW T H E TO P P R I O R I T Y. A. Set their expectations. Let the group know why having a leader is important and that we have a plan. B. Communicate leader expectations. Detail the requirements, responsibilities, and support. C. Adjust your expectations. “Leadership is a journey, not a destination. It is a marathon, not a sprint. It is a process, not an outcome.” —John Donahoe, Chairman of the Board for PayPal and former CEO of eBay

I I . M A I N TA I N G R O U P M O M E N T U M U N T I L A L EAD E R I S I D E N T I F I E D. A. Identify who will own the process (staff or volunteer). B. Communicate to everyone—often.

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C. Set expectations for the group environment: relational and logistical. D. Supply standardized curriculum.

I I I . H AV E A P L A N TO T R A I N , S U P P O R T, A N D D E V E LO P T H E N E W L E A D E R . I V. W H E N A L E A D E R D O E S N ’ T S U R FAC E , DON’T GIVE UP HOPE. A. Acknowledge and own our responsibility in the failure. B. Provide next steps. C. Stay connected and follow up.

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QUE STION S THAT LEAD TO SE LF-DISCOVE RY JUSTIN ELAM INTRODUCTION “The wise man doesn't give the right answers. He poses the right questions.” —Claude Levi-Strauss

I.

E V E RYO N E D E S I R E S G R E AT E R I N F L U E N C E . A. We all want someone to do something. B. Influence is the catalyst of human change.

II. THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN INFLUENCE A N D M A N I P U L AT I O N . . . A. Manipulation wants something from people. B. Influence wants something for people.

I I I . C O M M U N I C AT I O N I S T H E P R I M A RY I N F L U E N C E TO O L . A. The goal of communication is action. B. People tend to act when they believe it’s in their best interests.

I V. K E Y I N S I G H T S P R E C E D E A N D I N I T I AT E AC T I O N . A. Insights are created by combining knowledge and belief. B. Insights gained through self-discovery are superior. 1. What we work for, we value. 2. What we work for, we own.

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C. Insights we discover (work for) are more valuable to us. 1. The harder our brains work, the more we own the ideas. 2. We are more likely to act on our ideas.

V. T H E C H A L L E N G E : B R A I N S C R AV E E F F I C I E N C Y. A. Brains aren’t lazy—they’re extremely busy. B. Brains prefer shortcuts, not shovels.

V I . C O M M U N I C AT I N G W I T H Q U E S T I O N S E N C O U R AG E S S E L F - D I S C OV E RY. A. Questions cause other brains to dig (work). B. When their brains dig, they discover the insights. C. People are more likely to act on their discoveries. D. Questions are the “golden shovels” of influence.

V I I . G R E AT I N F L U E N C E R S R E G U L A R LY USE QUESTIONS. A. Jesus frequently used questions. B. Sunday messages regularly end with a question. CO N C L U S I O N Great Leaders – Give Away – Golden Shovels

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WHAT WE CAN PROMISE IN A GROUP...REALLY BILL WILLITS I.

INTRODUCTION A. Our need for community is universal. B. Though the need is universal, there is a difference between what every person needs and what every group will provide. 1. All groups will not be equal at delivering community. 2. All groups will not be equal at delivering it because all relationships are not equal at providing it.

I I . R E S E A R C H S U G G E S T S W E A L L H AV E F O U R B A S I C T Y P E S O F R E L AT I O N S H I P S : P U B L I C , S O C I A L , P E R S O N A L , A N D I N T I M AT E . A. Most small groups will be comprised of social and personal relationships. B. The deepest community is realized through personal and intimate relationships. C. Some groups are more like paths to community than actual experiences of community. D. Some groups are more like ministries than community. E. God has a purpose for every group and everyone in every group.

I I I . E V E RYO N E N E E D S AT L E A S T T H R E E “ I N T I M AT E ” ( L A S T 1 0 % ) R E L AT I O N S H I P S . A. Can you name your three “intimates”? B. If not, here are two suggestions for how to find these relationships: 72


1. Increase the frequency of interactions with your infrequent but naturally deep connections. 2. Increase the depth of interactions with your frequent but less deep connections.

I V. W E C A N M A K E F O U R P R O M I S E S W I T H E V E RY G R O U P : A. We can promise a connection for most. B. We can promise growth for many. C. We can promise a path to community for some. D. We can promise a ministry for you.

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C REATIN G A STRON G L EADE RSHIP CULTURE CHRIS KIM INTRODUCTION In this breakout, our goal is to strengthen your ability to develop effective small group leaders.

I.

EFFECTIVE LEADERSHIP BEGINS W I T H C L A R I T Y A N D S I M P L I C I T Y. A. Increasing clarity around success and responsibility is the foundation of effective leadership. 1. Clarity on the definition of success reduces frustration and creates greater focus. 2. Leaders need to know exactly what they are responsible for. B. Simplicity makes clarity portable through common language. 1. Common language builds a shared culture. 2. A shared culture creates consistency and raises standards.

I I . L E A D E R S N E E D TO B E SY S T E M AT I C A L LY E N C O U R AG E D A N D E Q U I P P E D TO T H R I V E O V E R T H E LO N G T E R M . A. Regular encouragement must be a part of any leadership development system. B. Equipping should be both personal and contextualized. C. Equipping is most important in the beginning, while encouragement is essential later on.

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III. LEADERS NEED FREEDOM AND TRUST IN O R D E R TO R E AC H T H E I R P OT E N T I A L . A. Accountability is important; control is demotivating. B. When you trust your system, you can trust your leaders. C. The development of effective leaders needs to account for the diversity of personality types. CO N C L U S I O N Finding a sufficient number of effective leaders is an ongoing challenge for every groups ministry. By creating systems that are simple and clear and where leaders are regularly trusted and encouraged, we build a healthy leadership culture. This will generate far more effective leaders than traditional recruiting methods.

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EN COURAGIN G UN ITY IN A GROUP A LY S I A D I C K S INTRODUCTION People are messy. Creating a cohesive group of people with different personalities and backgrounds is possible. Learn how to embrace each individual so your groups can thrive.

I.

E S TA B L I S H A B R OA D V I S I O N F O R G R O U P S . A. Rethink the “ideal” small group. B. You can’t grow spiritually unless you are connected relationally. 1. Spiritual growth, not spiritual maturity, should drive the group’s direction. 2. Any step forward is growth.

I I . C U LT I VAT E R E L AT I O N S H I P S . A. Friendships are essential to the group experience. 1. Build fun into the rhythm of the group. 2. Get together outside of group. 3. Create shared experiences. B. Leverage personal stories to facilitate connection. 1. When you know where someone has been, you can embrace who they are now. 2. True connection requires vulnerability. C. Be a student of yourself and one another.

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I I I . S H A R E T H E LOA D . A. If you want the group to buy in, you need the group to weigh in. B. Shared ownership is vital for the health of your leaders. C. Challenge appropriately.

RESOURCES FREE ONLINE ASSESSMENTS

BOOKS

Spiritual Gifts, Spiritual Pathways & Temperament Assessments groupleaders.org

Personality Plus Florence Littauer

Myers-Briggs Assessment 16personalities.com 5 Voices Assessment 5voices.com/assessment

The Five Love Languages Gary Chapman The Sacred Enneagram Christopher L. Heuertz

Enneagram enneagramtest.net

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ME N TORIN G T HE MILLE N N IAL GEN E RATION T HROUGH GROUPS B EAU J O H N S O N INTRODUCTION What are you doing to reach the next (two) generations? We'll explore what we've learned from our Just Married, Just Grad, and Leader Development groups.

I.

HELPING MILLENNIALS STICK A. Where should we invest our energy? B. Who is currently disconnected? C. Who returns to group?

I I . T H E N E X T T W O G E N E R AT I O N S A. Millennials B. Generation Z

I I I . E N GAG I N G G E N E R AT I O N S A. Challenges of Engagement B. Lessons from Porsche 1. Embrace technology. 2. Create test tracks. 3. Maximize vital touchpoints.

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I V. M E N TO R - B A S E D G R O U P S A. Characteristics 1. Mentor-guided 2. Established content 3. Defined peer group 4. Time-bound B. Goals 1. Create a great first-group experience. 2. Help group members take next steps. C. Types 1. Just Grad Groups 2. Just Married Groups 3. Leader Development Groups

V. B E S T P R AC T I C E S A. Common experiences B. Specific invitation and direction C. Challenge and support CO N C L U S I O N Find out who is not connected. Look for ways to form groups that meet their needs. Use your best leaders.

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R EACHIN G AN D ENGAGIN G ME N R O B BY A N G L E & J O H N WO O DA L L INTRODUCTION Men—whether single or married—are notoriously difficult to reach. In this breakout, we'll share what we’re learning about developing, supporting, and connecting men.

I.

OUR VISION Our vision is to be a community of men who are fully alive. A. Rooted in Jesus B. Known by a few C. Engaged in their unique calling

I I . O U R S T R AT E GY A. Determine our destination. B. Assess where we currently are. C. Plan how to get where we want to be. 1. Develop leaders. 2. Support leaders and groups. 3. Connect men into groups.

III. CLARIFYING QUESTIONS A. Do you have a “champion”? B. Do you have a vision, mission, and strategy that is compelling for men?

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C. How do you connect, develop, and support them? D. What is your next step? CO N C L U S I O N Imagine a world of men who are fully alive — rooted, known, and engaged in their unique calling.

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T H E F I R S T 9 0 DAY S CHRIS ALLEN

What three practices can a group leader focus on to open the door for a group to start well?

What foundation needs to be built in the first 90 days to help your groups reach their desired destinations?

T R A C K

B E S T P R AC T I C E S DUSTIN OPREA

D O U B L E - T A L K

LAUNCHING:

GETTING OFF ON T H E R I G H T F O OT

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E N L I S T M E N T:

LEADER PIPELINE VETTING LEADERS JARED SMITH

What are you doing to uncover hidden talent?

How do we know if this potential leader has what it takes to be a quality leader?

D O U B L E - T A L K

T R A C K

FINDING LEADERS S U E B AT E S

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Who are the 5s, 6s, and 7s in your group model and what’s your plan to develop them?

C OAC H I N G A N D PA S TO R I N G L E A D E R S L AU R I E K I M B E L L

T R A C K

W H AT L E A D E R S N E E D TO K N OW, D O , A N D B E H O L LY G O D DA R D

D O U B L E - T A L K

DEVELOPMENT:

MAKING L E A D E R S G R E AT

“As iron sharpens iron, so one person sharpens another.” Proverbs 27:17 85


CONNECTIONS:

C R E AT I N G A N D MARKETING EVENTS

MA R K E T I N G CO N N ECT I O N EV E N TS MISTI MANCINI

Look at everything your church asks people to do on an annual basis and ask, “Where are we pointing people and why?”

How well do you know the people you’re trying to connect into community?

D O U B L E - T A L K

T R A C K

C R E AT I N G C O N N E C T I O N E V E N T S J E N N Y B OY E T T

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C OAC H I N G SY S T E M : N O RT H P O I N T C H U R C H I N A U S T I N SHANE NORCROSS

What do you need help accomplishing? Who can help you?

What can you do today to direct and support group leaders in ways that don't require additional staffing?

T R A C K

T R A N S F E R R I N G T H E N O RT H P O I N T S T R AT E GY TO AT H E N S A N DY LOW RY

D O U B L E - T A L K

S T R AT E GY :

PA RT N E R TRANSFER

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R E : G R O U P

2018


R E : G R O U P

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R E : G R O U P

2018

@ 2 0 1 8 | N O RT H P O I N T M I N I S T R I E S , I N C .


Regroup18 conference book online  
Regroup18 conference book online  
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