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2 Northfield named

6 MyPlate promises

7 Early detection

to ‘100 Best’ list for youth

better dietary choices

key to treating Alzheimer’s

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N o r t h f i e l d H o s p i ta l & C l i n i c s

FamilyHealth Fall 2011 • Vol. 16, No. 4

507-646-1494

Complex surgeries performed routinely at Northfield Hospital Not much can come between a Minnesota grandmother and her California grandson. But then again, as Lisa Anderson learned, there is acute diverticulitis. In March of 2010, just as she was packing for a flight west, a flare up laid her low. Lisa tried to manage it for a time with antibiotics and diet, but her condition was not improving. In June, she opted for a complex colon resection surgery. Because it was performed laparoscopically, she needed only one overnight at Northfield Hospital, and then she went home for what she describes as a “really easy” recovery. A few weeks later, she was in California, playing with her grandJose Fulco, MD son. Lisa is still amazed at the exper- Lisa Anderson is back doing what she enjoys, capturing fall colors with her camera. tise she found in her hometown of scopically, and I sailed right through.” Northfield. She had the benefit of Anderson’s case is just one example of the comtwo experienced surgeons – Jose plex surgeries that are being performed on a rouFulco, MD, and Chris Nielsen, MD tine basis at Northfield Hospital. Dr. Fulco said the – who have the training and the percentage of surgeries performed with minimally skills to do complex surgeries using invasive laparoscopic technique is well above the minimally invasive laparoscopic Christopher Nielsen, MD national average and similar too, if not well above technique. that of high-volume surgical centers in major metro “I was delighted with my care,” politan areas. Anderson said. “The doctors were impressive. Going “People are often surprised at the range and in, they weren’t sure if my case would require a full Continued, page 7 incision or not, but they were able to do it laparoTo sign up for our monthly e-newsletter, go to our clinic home page at www.familyhealthclinics.org/northfield


A D O L E S C E N T H E A LT H

Northfield receives ‘100 Best Communities’ designation for youth for third time since 2005 Northfield is a good place for kids, according to America’s Promise Alliance, a national organization dedicated to positive youth development. The organization recently recognized Northfield as one of the nation’s “100 Best Communities for Young People.” It is the third time Northfield has received the designation since the program was created in 2005. The competition recognizes communities across the country that focus on reducing high school dropout rates and providing service and support to youth. Northfield was cited for promoting youth involvement and providing opportunities for youth leadership. The Northfield

application, one of 300 submitted, was organized and written by high school juniors and seniors who serve on the Mayor’s Youth Council (MYC). Among the reasons Northfield was selected a 100 Best is the presence of a community food shelf, the promotion of school success through free afterschool and summer enrichment programs and an array of mentoring programs. Northfield’s commitment to education is evi-

dent in its 95 percent graduation rate and the TORCH program Tackling Obstacles and Raising College Hopes), which has increased the graduation rates for Latino students in Northfield from 36 percent to more than 90 percent, the Alliance said. As a “100 Best” winner, Northfield will receive a $2,500 grant, signage identifying the community as one of the nation’s 100 Best Communities for Young People, and access to America’s Promise Alliance’s community development resources. The America’s Promise Alliance is sponsored by ING, a financial institution, through its foundation.

Parents must help kids navigate digital age The Search Institute’s Erin Walsh, an expert on parenting in a digital world, has no illusions. Digital technology is here to stay. And so it falls to parents to help their children understand its power, maximize its promise and minimize its risks. “Media are not inherently good or bad,” she told an audience at a recent parent event sponsored by the Lakeville and Farmington school districts. “They are powerful. The good and the bad depend on how you use them.” She encourages parents to actively talk with their children about what it means to be a good digital citizen, 1) Think before you post; 2) Help others; Walsh 3) Don’t go online angry, and to help them understand the consequences of their actions. Teens need to be reminded that technology is a privilege.

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Walsh recommends that electronic devices be kept in public spaces in the home, not in bedrooms, and that parents impose a “techno curfew.” Come 10 p.m., all portable electronic devices go in a common basket in the living room, paving the way for digital-free sleep. For more information on parenting in a digital age, go to: www.search-institute.org or www.drdavewalsh.com.


H O S P I TA L N E W S

Clinical expansion moving forward The clinical expansion project for Infusion Services/Chemotherapy and Sleep Medicine at Northfield Hospital has reached its midpoint. Work is on pace to be completed in April of 2012. The $2 million remodeling project will improve the patient experience by providing better access and more “THE GOAL IS…COMFORT AND privacy for HEALING FOR PATIENTS…AS THEY both infusion JOURNEY THROUGH CANCER services and TREATMENT.” sleep studies. – MARY QUINN CROW The project includes moving the admitting desk closer to the hospital’s front entrance, allowing patients and visitors to connect more quickly with hospital personnel. The new space for Infusion Services will provide a custom-designed, therapeutic environment for oncology patients and non-oncology infusions. There

will be space for consultations with oncologists, nutrition therapists, and Social Services. The Sleep Center will have more amenities and greater privacy in which to conduct diagnostic sleep studies. Mary Quinn Crow, Vice President and Chief Operating Officer for Northfield Hospital & Clinics, said one of the major objectives is to enhance the cancer care at Northfield Hospital. “The goal is to create an environment that will promote comfort and healing for patients and their families as they journey through cancer treatment,” she said. “We will use natural light, warm colors and an environment that will keep caregivers close to their patients.” She said she is grateful to the Northfield Hospital Auxiliary for its gift to the Infusion Center. The $30,000 they donated this year will be used to purchase heated, leather treatment chairs. The auxiliary has pledged $150,000 to the project over five years.

Flu vaccine available at FamilyHealth Medical Clinic Flu vaccine is still available at FamilyHealth Medical Clinic. Public health officials say vaccine is the best method of protection from seasonal flu and recommend anyone six months or older be vaccinated. If you need flu vaccine, call 507-646-1494 for an appointment. This year’s flu vaccine is the same as last year’s. It is a three in one that will protect you against two strains of seasonal influenza, an influenza A and an influenza B, in addition to H1N1. It will protect you from getting sick from these three viruses, and it

fluenza virus strain. The vaccine is recommended even if you were vaccinated last year. Influenza is a contagious respiratory caused by a virus that attacks the nose, throat, and lungs. It can cause mild to severe illness and at times can lead to death. Influenza symptoms come on quickly in the form of fever, dry cough, sore throat, headache, extreme tiredness, stuffed-up nose, and body aches. These symptoms can be severe and put you in bed for several days. can make your illness milder if you get a related but different in-

Childbirth Education class dates set for 2012 Northfield Hospital’s 2012 childbirth education class schedule is now available. The first sessions for Pregnancy Plus, a one-time class for couples in early and mid-pregnancy, and Prepared Childbirth begin in January. The flyer is available in at http://www.northfieldhospital.org/womenshealthcenter/.

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CLINIC SERVICES

Now practicing at a clinic near you! Northfield Hospital & Clinics provides primary and specialty care at seven clinics that serve Northfield, Lonsdale, Farmington and Lakeville Here are the physicians that are available to serve you.

Additional Medical Specialities:

Subhadra Chereddy, MD

Julia Kelley, MD

Patrick Enders, MD

Mayo Clinic Health System

Mayo Clinic Health System

Mayo Clinic Health System

Rhonda Meyer, CNP

Jay Charles, PA-C

Gerard O’Halloran, MD

Mayo Clinic Health System

Mayo Clinic Health System

Private Practice

Family Medicine

Family Medicine

• Medical Oncology

Pediatrics

Physician Assistant

Pediatrics

Ear, Nose & Throat

• Adult Cardiology • Pediatric Cardiology • Nephrology • Vascular Medicine • Otolaryngology • Maternal Fetal Medicine Adam Ailabouni, MD

Mary Ann Scheid, MD

Katherine Helgen, MD

Randolph Reister, MD

Mayo Clinic Health System

Mayo Clinic Health System

Mayo Clinic Health System

Mayo Clinic Health System

Todd Amunrud, DO

Ben Flannery, DO

Melinda Burnett, MD

Mayo Clinic Health System

Mayo Clinic Health System

Mayo Clinic Health System

Christopher Nielsen, MD

Jose Fulco, MD

Michelle Muench, MD

Surgical Care Consultants, P.A.

Surgical Care Consultants, P.A.

Private Practice

Family Medicine

Greg Randall, MD

Mary Ann Scheid, MD

Mayo Clinic Health System

Mayo Clinic Health System

Family Medicine

Family Medicine

Pediatrics

Family Medicine

Internal Medicine

Pediatrics

Internal Medicine

Neurology

Lonsdale FamilyHealth Medical Clinic

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General Surgery

General Surgery

Ophthalmology


CLINIC SERVICES

Dana Olson, MD OB/GYN

Mayo Clinic Health System

Melanie Dixon, MD OB/GYN

Alice Suchomel, MD

April Fitzloff, PA-C

Paul Jacobson, MD

Mayo Clinic Health System

Mayo Clinic Health System

Mayo Clinic Health System

Kristine Matson, MD

Kerry Ace, DO

Mayo Clinic Health System

Mayo Clinic Health System

Family Medicine

Mayo Clinic Health System

Physician Assistant

Family Medicine

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Lakeville FamilyHealth Medical Clinic

Farmington Eric Stroemer, MD Orthopaedic Surgeon

Orthopaedic & Fracture Clinic, P.A.

FamilyHealth Medical Clinic

Pediatrics

Pediatrics

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Robert Shepley, MD Orthopaedic Surgeon

Orthopaedic Surgeon

Surgical Care Consultants, P.A.

Orthopaedic & Fracture Clinic, P.A.

Orthopaedic & Fracture Clinic, P.A.

Melinda Burnett, MD

Christine Braun, MD

Deb Suppes, MD

Mayo Clinic Health System

Mayo Clinic Health System

Mayo Clinic Health System

General Surgery

Christine Braun, MD

Melanie Dixon, MD

Mayo Clinic Health System

Mayo Clinic Health System

OB/GYN

OB/GYN

Neurology

Deb Suppes, MD

Dana Olson, MD

Mayo Clinic Health System

Mayo Clinic Health System

OB/GYN

Brad Wille, MD

Jose Fulco, MD

OB/GYN

OB/GYN

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OB/GYN

Northfield FamilyHealth Medical Clinic Women’s Health Clinic Northfield Eye Physicians & Surgeons (2019 Jefferson Road)

Orthopaedic & Fracture Clinic (1381 Jefferson Road)

Orthopaedic Surgeon

Orthopaedic Surgeon

Brad Wille, MD

Clint Muench, MD

Eric Stroemer, MD

Orthopaedic & Fracture Clinic, P.A.

Orthopaedic & Fracture Clinic, P.A.

Orthopaedic & Fracture Clinic, P.A.

Orthopaedic & Fracture Clinic, P.A.

Robert Shepley, MD

Orthopaedic Surgeon

Orthopaedic Surgeon

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H E A LT H U P D AT E S

MyPlate promises to better inform dietary choices

Eby

The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) new MyPlate graphic will better communicate the principles of a healthy diet, said Courtney Eby, RD, LD, a nutrition therapist at Northfield Hospital & Clinics. “This is a vast improvement over the old food pyramid,” she said. “MyPlate is more intuitive and speaks more plainly about what is included in a healthy diet.” Diet is destiny, and there are many chronic health conditions that can be avoided by being more intentional about what we eat. MyPlate provides

visual cues on how to build a healthy plate at mealtime. It names the five basic food groups and suggests the proportions that will best meet caloric and nutritional needs. Eby encourages people to visit the USDA’s ChooseMyPlate.gov to learn more about the foods they should bring to the table more often and those not so much. “My hope is that this new representation will inform people and make it easier for them to be thoughtful about what they consume,” said Eby. If you have questions about MyPlate or other nutrition issues, contact Courtney Eby or Kristi Von Ruden, RD, LD, at 507-646-1410.

–[eat more: VEGETABLES AND FRUITS Fill half your plate with fruits and vegetables; A variety of vegetables, especially dark green and red and orange vegetables, and beans and peas. WHOLE GRAINS Whole grains such as brown rice, whole-wheat bread, oatmeal and whole-wheat pasta. Check the label for those with the most fiber. DAIRY Fat-free or low-fat milk and milk products, such as milk, yogurt, cheese or fortified soy beverages. PROTEIN A variety of protein food, such as seafood, lean meat and poultry, eggs, beans and peas, soy products and unsalted nuts and seeds; Seafood. Choose twice each week. Oils in place of solid fats where possible. For example, choose olive, canola or peanut oil over stick butter, margarine or baking grease.

–[eat less:

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SODIUM Reduce your daily sodium intake to less than 2,300 mg from the American average of 4650 mg. For those who are 51 and older and those of any age who are African American, or have hypertension, diabetes or chronic kidney disease, reduce intake to 1,500 mg. SATURATED AND TRANS FATTY ACIDS For a person eating 2,000 calories a day, the goal would be to consume less than 200 calories from saturated and trans fats, about 22 grams. For example, avoid cake, cookies, ice cream, doughnuts full fat cheeses and fatty meats, would help you meet this goal. ADDED SUGARS The World Health Organization and the USDA recommend that 10 percent or less of our daily calories come from added sugar. That is still the equivalent of 13 teaspoons of sugar a day. The present average is more than 42 teaspoons. A typical 20-ounce soda contains 15 teaspoons of sugar. If alcohol is consumed, it should be consumed in moderation – one drink per day for women, two drinks per day for men – and only by adults of legal drinking age.


CLINIC NEWS

The announcement that the legendary Pat Summitt, the University of Tennesee’s women’s basketball coach, has early onset Alzheimer’s disease, was a wakeup call for many. Alzheimer’s, the most common form of dementia, is an irreversible brain disease that over time steals memory, affects personality and destroys cognitive abilities. At 59 years of age and someone who exudes mental toughness, Summitt doesn’t fit the profile. But she has the disease, and is now a candidate to become a very visible spokesperson for Alzheimer’s. Melinda Burnett, MD, a neurologist at FamilyHealth Medical Clinic, said Alzheimer’s affects more than five million Americans and is becoming more common because people are living longer. She says its symptoms are distinctly different from those of normal aging. “With normal aging, people occasionally forget names, misDr. Burnett place their keys or have trouble finding the right words,” Dr. Burnett says, “but it usually doesn’t get much worse over time. “With Alzheimer’s, people forget how to perform familiar tasks, they have trouble walking or driving to familiar places without getting lost, or they have trouble doing things that require a progression of steps, such as following a recipe.”

And their capacity gets noticeably worse over time. There is no known cure for Alzheimer’s, but Dr. Burnett says researchers are actively working on both treatment and diagnosis. Medications that will slow the progression of the disease have not yet fulfilled their promise. “It is thought that medications are failing because we are treating the disease too late,” says University of Tennessee women’s basketball coach Dr. Burnett. “It might be Pat Summitt. easer to cure it if treatment begins when the disease is mild or even before symptoms emerge. We have also learned that some people metabolize the medications differently, making them less effective than they should be.” Much of today’s research is focused on early detection through brain imaging and the testing of spinal fluid. These tests are still in development, but they are contributing to a better understanding of the disease and its treatment.

Photo by Doug Benc/Getty Images

Early detection may be key to treating Alzheimer’s

Melinda Burnett, MD, sees patients at FamilyHealth Medical Clinic in Farmington and Northfield. Her physician services are provided by Mayo Clinic Health System.

Surgery: Minimally-invasive, wide ranging From page 1

the volume of surgeries we do at Northfield Hospital using laparoscopic technique,” said Dr. Fulco. “We use it for hernia repair, anti-reflux operations and colon and rectal surgeries among others. Our experience is recovery is shorter with less discomfort.”

Dr. Fulco has 19 years of experience, Dr. Nielsen 14 years. Both came to Northfield after practicing for many years at high-volume surgery centers in the Twin Cities, where they both handled their share of difficult cases. Now the two partner in Surgical Care Consultants, P.A. They see patients at both Allina

Clinic and FamilyHealth Medical Clinic and operate exclusively at Northfield Hospital. A complete list of the surgeries performed at Northfield Hospital can be found at: http://www. northfieldhospital.org/medical/ general-surgery-procedures. html.

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Presorted Standard U.S. Postage PAID Northfield, MN Permit No. 171

FAMILYHEALTH is published as a community service for households served by Northfield Hospital & Clinics. Additional copies are available by calling Community Relations, 507-646-1034.

Mark Henke President and CEO

Dixon Bond Chair, Board of Trustees

Randy Reister, MD Clinic Medical Director

Scott Richardson Editor

2000 North Avenue Northfield, MN 55057

Information in FAMILYHEALTH comes from a wide range of medical experts. If you have any concerns or questions about specific content that may affect your health, please contact your health care provider. Contents copyrighted. All rights reserved.

POSTAL CUSTOMER

Northfield Hospital Roundup

HeartChase has a successful first year Northfield Hospital & Clinics participated in the American Heart Association’s HeartChase October 8 in Northfield. The fundraising event was a pilot project that married two reality television concepts, “The Amazing Race” and “Minute to Win It,” to create a fundraising event that is both educational and T.J. Heinricy, an American Heart Association trainer from Northfield, demonstrated hands-only CPR to one of the Heartcompetitive. Teams used GPS navigation Chase teams. to visit ten different stations in and around downtown Northfield. They had to perform a task or learn a skill all related to heart health before moving on to the next station. Organizers were pleased and plan to do it again next year.

Book Fair dates set for 2012 Save those books. The 51st Annual Great Northfield, Minnesota Book Raid, the Northfield Hospital Auxiliary’s annual used book sale, is scheduled for Tuesday, April 24-Saturday, April 28, at the Northfield Ice Arena in Northfield. Books will be collected at the arena in April. If you need to donate

before then, call Jan Matthews at 507645-8747 or Janet Hahn at 507-6458917. Funds raised from the event will support the clinical expansion of Infusion Services/Chemotherapy at Northfield Hospital and the expansion of the Sleep Center.

Clinic office hours FamilyHealth Medical Clinic – Northfield 507-646-1494 2000 North Avenue Northfield, Minn. 55057 8 to 8, Monday, Tuesday and Thursday 8 to 5, Wednesday and Friday 9 to 12, Saturday FamilyHealth Medical Clinic – Lonsdale 507-744-3245 103 15th SE Lonsdale, Minn. 8:30 to 5, Monday through Friday FamilyHealth Medical Clinic – Farmington 651-460-2300 4645 Knutsen Drive Farmington, Minn. 55024 7:30 to 6, Monday and Wednesday 7:30 to 5, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday FamilyHealth Medical Clinic – Lakeville 952-469-0500 9974 214th St. West Lakeville, Minn. 55044 8:30 to 5, Monday through Friday 8 to noon, Saturdays Women’s Health Center 507-646-1498 2000 North Avenue Northfield, Minn. 55057 8 to 4:30, Monday through Friday Orthopaedic & Fracture Clinic 507-646-8900 1381 Jefferson Drive Northfield, Minn. 55057 8:30 to 5, Monday through Thursday 8:30 to 4, Friday Northfield Eye Physicians & Surgeons 507-645-9202 2019 Jefferson Road Northfield, Minn. 55057 8 to 4, Tuesday and Thursday

Our focus is to provide a positive and healing environment that is patient centered. If you are interested in becoming a member of our highly-skilled and compassionate staff, please view our employment opportunities at www.northfieldhospital.org.


FamilyHealth newsletter, Fall 2011