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Fall sports has begun! See page 10 for scrimmage pctures! mage Volleyball Scrim High School The Woodbine l show off wil volleyball team prepare for d their skills an rimmage at sc the season in a . The public 5 6 p.m. Aug. 2 d. en is invited to att

The Woodbine Twiner The Official Newspaper of Woodbine, Harrison County, Iowa

www.woodbinetwiner.com August 17, 2011

Volume 133, Issue 33

$1.00

SHORT C&M opens doors near downtown district TAKES Rural School Stories Wanted Harrison County Genealogical Society President Craig Pool would like to invite those that have attended a rural school to share their stories on Applefest Day. Those wishing to share at a public event at Merry Brook School on Applefest Day, may attend to share themselves or submit their stories in writing to be read aloud. Please RSVP or send stories to Linda Dickman, 2810 190th Trl., Woodbine, IA 51579 or to Craig Poole at cpoole@unmc.edu.

Crimestoppers to meet

NIKKI DAVIS Editor It wasn’t really what Chris Mathison had envisioned when he began “playing” in his basement, but what began as a hobby has now developed into a Woodbine Main Street business, C&M Machine. Mathison began his ever growing business adventure in the basement of his Woodbine home 13 years ago, packing the space with a lathe, mill and a surface grinder. “I wanted to do some thing on my own with ideas in my head,” he said. “I was mainly just building stuff for myself like modifying fishing

poles – just playing around with those ideas in my head.” It didn’t take long for news to spread via word of mouth about Chris’ ideas and talents. Chris admits it only took about eight months in his basement shop before friends told friends and soon he wound up sharpening lawn mower blades, extracting broken bolts and other small, odd jobs. Those little jobs added up. It only took two years before Chris outgrew his little, basement shop. So he moved to the garage. He continued to add tools and equipment to his modest beginnings … which led to a garage See C&M Page 6

The Woodbine Main Street-Chamber Business Improvement Committee welcomed C&M Machine Shop to Woodbine’s downtown district on Aug. 3. Pictured here, left to right, is Woodbine City Administrator Joe Gaa, Business Improvement Committee Member Mike Hicks, Business Improvement Committee Member Paul Fouts, Business Improvement Committee Co-Chair Bob Sullivan, C&M owner Chris Mathison, daughter Brooke Mathison, C&M owner Marilyn Mathison, Business Improvement Committee Member Darin Smith, daughter Mackenzie Mathison (holding Bentley Mathison) and Business Improvement Committee Member Chad Soma. Photo: Nikki Davis

Kuehn participates in ‘Warrior Dash’ Magnolia’s

Harrison County Crimestoppers will meet at 7 p.m. Aug. 17 in the Logan Public Library meeting room, located in the library’s basement.

HC Republicans to meet The Harrison County Republican Party will meet Aug. 18 at the Junction Cafe Meeting Room in Missouri Valley. Dinner between 6 and 6:30 p.m., meeting called to order at 7 p.m. On the agenda will be preparations for the Harrison County Republican Women Fundraiser scheduled for Sept. 1. For further information contact Sheila Murphy at sheilagop@msn.com or (712) 642-2849.

Dems to meet Logan’s sixth, annual run/walk will be held Sept. 17. The event will start in front of the Harrison County Courthouse at 5 p.m. with the route being the same as 2010. For registration forms and more information about the event log on to www.loganiowa.com or contact Steve Eby at (712) 644-2160 or speby@loganet.net.

American Legion Auxiliary to meet The American Legion Auxiliary will meet at 2 p.m. Aug. 25 at Rose Vista Home. Following a short meeting Auxiliary members will sponsor a bingo party for Rose Vista residents. Auxiliary members, please bring cookies and bingo prizes. Any questions please call Lavonne at 647 3220.

Angie Kuehn crawls her way through one of the obstacles scattered through out the Warrior Dash in Kansas City on July 31. Photo: Submitted NIKKI DAVIS Editor Angie Kuehn wasn’t afraid to get a little bit dirty. In fact, she wasn’t even afraid to crawl under barbed wire through a gigantic mud puddle. But of course, she knew that’s what she would be up against when she agreed to attend the Warrior

Dash event July 31 in Kansas City with her “Boot Camp Family.” Kuehn has been attending boot camp at Reality Wellness in Omaha, Neb. with season three Biggest Loser contestant Marty Wolff as the instructor. Those that attend, according to Kuehn, consider themselves more than workout friends – they’re family.

The ‘family,’ complete with their own Facebook page, decided amongst themselves via Facebook, that attending the Warrior Dash might be worth looking in to. “I’ve been at Marty’s boot camp for almost a year and we do a lot of 5k’s and other events together. One member found out about the Warrior Dash and posted it on our Facebook wall. We all thought we’d do it as our first ‘family vacation,’” Kuehn said, smiling wide. So 18 of the boot campers made the trip to try their luck at the somewhat distorted version of a 5k run/walk. “It’s like a 5k – only in the mud with obstacles,” Kuehn explained. “This one had 11 obstacles throughout the course. Some were like jumping over small fire pits and there was another one where you had to go over this board and under another and over, under, over, under. There was also a ‘dead man’s drop’ where you went up a ladder and crawled across a net rope and down the other side.” As she stepped up to the line, she was nervous. “I just didn’t think I could do See KUEHN Page 6

Woodbine presents ... a Step In Time NIKKI DAVIS Editor Penny Peterson taught dance lessons for 24 years, before retiring in 2009. Her daughter, and 2009 Woodbine High School graduate, Danielle Peterson, has been dancing since she was 5. The motherdaughter pair will now be bringing their collaborative 40 years of dance experience to Step In Time, a new dance studio, opening its

Woodbine doors Sept. 26. The new studio will be bringing an array of dance to the community. “We plan on teaching tap, jazz, hip-hop, lyrical … all kinds of flavors,” Penny said. Enrollment, which is currently taking place, is open to any pottytrained 3 year olds, through high school students and will even

offer fitness dance classes for adults. All classes are for females and males. And the classes should prove to be beneficial, not in just learning one

dance for one recital, but by teaching technique. “For our younger students, we’re not just going to work on a dance. Sometimes it’s hard for little ones to stay See DANCE Page 6

Old Settlers to mark 125 years

Katie Church entertained along the Old Settler’s parade route in 2010. Photo: Mary Darling MARY DARLING For The Twiner It’s been 125 years since the first Old Settlers reunion drew a crowd to Magnolia. That first year, approximately 1,000 people gathered in the grove surrounding the schoolhouse for the very first Old Settlers meeting. Since that time, Old Settlers has become a historic event in Harrison County and various committees have kept it running year after year. This year’s committee includes president Dave Weigelt, Janette Weigelt, Chuck and Darlene Lamberson, Bill and Deb Harvey and boys, Donna Norris, Kaylee Billmeier, Dave Cox, Kelie Haken, Ruth Beck and family, Marcus and Evelyn Weigelt, Rhonda McHugh, Joetta Alexander, Tina Harper and Jo Lyman. This year, to mark the special anniversary, it will be held over two See MAGNOLIA Page 6

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2

The Woodbine Twiner

August 10, 2011

Editorial

“A newspaper is a circulating library with high blood pressure.” ~Arthur Baer

CHAMBER CONNECTION WOODBINE MAIN STREET-CHAMBER MAIN STREET OFFICE

Volunteer rate: High in Woodbine, High in Iowa Thank you. Iowa Governor Terry Branstad announced this month that for the second year in a row, Iowa has achieved the second-highest volunteer rate in the nation with 37.9 percent of Iowans devoting time to help others in 2010. That surpasses the 2008 rank of fifth, according to the recent Volunteering in America report released by the Corporation for National and Community Service. “Volunteers are an amazing resource, and no state has more devoted or more passionate volunteers than Iowa,” said Governor Branstad. “I am honored to tout this recognition on behalf of all Iowans who are making a tremendous difference in our state.” Woodbine Main Street echoes that sentiment; the program simply doesn’t exist without the volunteers. With only one part-time staff person and a lot of activities (grant reports, agendas, work plans, market studies, minutes, reports, fundraising, planting, planning, promoting, designing, and building), a successful Main Street Community is nothing without its dedicated volunteers. Last week, due to volunteer efforts in every facet of the program, Woodbine once again met the criteria: WE’RE PROUD TO BE A 2011 NATIONAL MAIN STREET COMMUNITY. In Woodbine, it is almost a certainty that many of the people you meet coming out of the grocery or that you visit with in line at the bank are signed up for at least one volunteer commitment. Volunteering our energy makes our community and school sustainable…a place future generations can call home. The percentage of Iowans mentoring youth has increased from 17th to fourth in the nation over the last few years. Woodbine TeamMates, a wonderful organization which sprang from the Horizons Study Circles, matches students and caring adults one hour per day in the school. Those volunteers are making a difference; just one powerful example of Twiner volunteers in action. Iowans devoted a total of 93.4 million hours to volunteering in 2010 and provided more than $2 billion in services to Iowa. Twiners contributed their fair share to those statistics. Since Governor Branstad created the Iowa Commission on Volunteer Service in 1994, Iowa has made persistent efforts to build and support a local infrastructure to support volunteerism and strong volunteer management. Nearly 150,000 more Iowans volunteer today than they did in 1989 prior to the creation of the commission. And the most amazing statistic of all? All these volunteers really need is a simple show of support and gratitude. You know who you are. . .and we cannot do it without you! Thank you.

www.woodbinetwiner.com

The Woodbine Twiner Published in Woodbine, Iowa. A Western Iowa Newspaper Group Publication of Midlands Newspapers, Inc. Nikki Davis – Editor ndavis@woodbinetwiner.com Loyal Fairman – SALES Coordinator loyal.fairman@woodbinetwiner.com Daryn Morriss – Account Representative daryn.morriss@woodbinetwiner.com Mary Lou Noneman – Production Supervisor marylou.noneman@woodbinetwiner.com P.O. Box 16 • Woodbine, Iowa 51579 Phone – 712-647-2821 Fax – 712-647-3081 E-mail – news@woodbinetwiner.com Official Newspaper for the City of Woodbine and the Woodbine Community School District. Periodical Class Postage Paid at Woodbine, IA 51579 USPS 690-340

SUBSCRIPTION RATES College/Academic (9 Months) – $24.00 Senior Citizen (62 or older) in Harrison County – $33.00 Harrison County, Panama, Portsmouth & Moorhead – $40.00 Rest of Iowa and Nebraska – $43.00 U.S. Outside of Iowa and Nebraska – $47.00 All items, including ads and news articles, intended for publication in this newspaper must be received AT the Woodbine Twiner office by NOON the preceding Friday. LETTERS POLICY: The Woodbine Twiner welcomes signed letters to the editor. Letters must include the writer’s telephone number for verification purposes and should contain fewer than 300 words. The Woodbine Twiner reserves the right to edit all letters. Send letters to P.O. Box 16, Woodbine, IA 51579, fax to 712647-3081, or e-mail to news@woodbinetwiner.com. The contents of this newspaper are protected by copyright. Other than non-commercial, personal use of a limited nature, no part of this publication may be copied and reproduced in any way without the prior written consent of the editor.

Do you remember when?

W

ant to wander back with me to those days long ago (longer to some of you than will you remember)? Back when grass was what grew on the lawn, and coke was a soda? Back when the ice cream truck’s bell called young and old to enjoy a cold, summer treat? Back before cell phones, internet, i-Pods and even way back before air conditioning and TV? Well here we go! Remember when all the male teachers wore suits and neckties and the females sported dresses and high heels? Mom was home when the kids got home from school? Everybody sat on their front porch in the evenings and “visited” back and forth about the depression, the drought and what that idiot Hitler was up to? When it was a big treat to be taken out to a real restaurant with your parents? When a quarter was a decent allowance, and pennies were still saved? No one ever asked where the car keys were because they were always in the car, and your doors were never locked? Nothing from the store came with safety caps and hermetic seals, because no one had yet tried to poison some kid on Halloween? Remember when being sent to the principal’s office was nothing compared with what you faced at home if you had misbehaved? Nobody feared for their lives from drive-by shootings, gangs, drugs, etc.? It was safe to walk around town with friends, or even by yourself? Remember Red Rover? Pom Pom Pullaway? Darebase? Catching lightning bugs and putting them in jars? Running through the sprinkler? Refreshing yourself with Kool Aid? Decisions made by “Eeny-meeny-miney-mo? Being toted on the handlebars of that cute neighbor boy’s bike? That that neighbor boy never came home from Omaha

MEANDERINGS LOU WAITE GUEST EDITORIALIST Beach? Race issues meant arguing about who ran the fastest? The worst embarrassment was being chosen last for a team? Water balloons were the ultimate weapon? Running through the dewy grass barefoot? Contemplating life from the old tire swing? Your first day of school and the shiny new shoes of which you were so proud? Learning to dance at someone’s house, where the carpets had been rolled back, and music was provided by a fiddle, a banjo, a guitar and maybe a piano? (The drum beats were provided by those musicians stamping their feet to the music)? Your first prom, and your anxiety that no one would ask you to dance? The thrill when some gangling, teenage boy did? Ah, I could fill the page. But do you ever wish you could slip back in time and savor the slower pace, the innocence, the youthful joy of living, the comfort of being loved and cared for, the surety that God was in his heaven and all was right with the world? How many time have I said it or written it: We remember the times that once were, and will never be again – not in the lives of we who lived them, and not on this earth. And to those reading this, especially you “youngsters,” someday you will reach the autumn of your lives, as I have. And as your winter approaches, as does mine, perhaps you will remember.

Of butter and more ...

D

ay one of the Iowa State Fair and I splurged and sampled a deep fried butter on a stick! Yes, that is what I said – fried butter; the most recent strange foodstuff to grace the fairgrounds. Here is a simple recipe: take a stick of real butter and dip it in a cinnamony batter and deep fry it. Slather it with goopy icing and then eat it hot. Although that will likely be my last sampling of this “treat,” I will say it was at least edible … but you really, REALLY have to like butter. Picture a small cinnamon roll with a quarter pound of butter, and you get the idea. But what the heck, the State Fair only comes once a year, and particularly in this, the centennial year of the butter cow, it only seemed right to do. I went to the State Fair to judge 4-H exhibits in agriculture and natural resources. Six of us took two days to evaluate nearly 400 exhibits from around Iowa. That whole experience continues to impress me with the creativity of some of Iowa’s youth, and Harrison

County was well represented! Fair time also lets me touch base with old and new friends and to share experiences with them. State Fair also represents the peak of summer. That itself serves as a minor marker for a few things. A couple of weeks ago I wrote about the Japanese beetles that were first reported from the county last year, and posed some questions this year. They will, no doubt, pose even more questions next year. I did get a couple agronomic (corn and wine grapes) questions about Japanese beetle feeding this past month. I mention this because in Iowa experience, there is one generation of beetles that damage plants and those adults die off about at the start of the State Fair. Because we are at the beginning of the Japanese beetle establishment, I can only share with you what has been noticed farther east. In about 2004, central Iowa saw their first beetles. The first two or three years’ infestations were pretty intense. Such an

EXTENSION OFFICE RICHARD POPE Harrison County Extension Program Coordinator ropope@iastate.edu observation is likely twofold: there are few natural defenders and even plant responses to ward off the onslaught, and it is a new thing to observe, which makes it seem more intense. After an initial few years, the beetle barrage seems to become more manageable, and daresay maybe tolerable. State Fair time is also when farmers go to the field and start to assess grain set and begin preharvest planning. I have been in a few cornfields with obvious patchy poor pollination. Likewise, I have been in other fields with really thorough pollination. The bad areas aren’t incredibly bad, just noticeable, and the good tend to be really good. My best bet is that any fields that were at the height of pollen shed and reception when the

week-long oppressive heat struck (think entry day of the Harrison County Fair) may have suffered, but thankfully only a little. Soil moisture is a little dry now but ok throughout most of our area, and irrigation is obvious in the valley. Depending on the next two weeks, most areas away from the Missouri River should be setting up in good shape for the fall harvest. On a final note this week, farmers can learn a bit about soybean leaf diseases that are pretty easy to find now. There is a new threefold publication we have in the office that is a great guide to the common foliar diseases of soybean. Best of all, they are free for now! For more information, contact us at the Harrison County Extension Office at 712 644 2105.

Letter to the Editor DEAR EDITOR: The Iowa State Fair begins Aug. 11 and runs through Aug. 21. I encourage all to attend the Iowa State Fair and see for yourself why Midwest Living magazine named the event one of the “Top 30 things Every Midwesterner Should Experience.” It ha also been featured in the New

York Times best-selling travel book “1000 Places to See Before You Die.” The fair has something for all ages from food, music, animals, exhibits, midway and much, much, more. From 2002 to 2009, Fair attendance was over 1,000,000 visitors each year. The fair educates and entertains people

from every walk of life. Did you know that the first fair was held in 1854 in Fairfield, with an estimated 7,000 to 10,000 people in attendance? It moved to Des Moines in 1878 and the fairgrounds and adjoining 160 acres of campgrounds are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Visit www.iowastatefair.org for more about the fair. This is a wonderful tool for planning your fair itinerary. Take a day or two out of your busy schedule, relax and visit the Iowa State Fair. You will not be disappointed! SINCERELY, Leonard Johnson Missouri Valley


3

The Woodbine Twiner

August 17, 2011

Church PEO cookie book fundraiser The Woodbine PEO Chapter saw an opportunity to fundraise for their Scholarship and Project Fund – and they took it. The PEO will be offering Our Iowa magazine’s “Best of Country Cookies” cookbook through Sept. 2. “Best of Country Cookies” contains sweet treat recipes ranging from cookies to bars to brownies and more. Over 34,000 cookie recipes were entered in Our Iowa’s national contest, and the top 277 recipes were selected and bound into a 114 page cookbook. The PEO is selling “Best of Country Cookies” for $9.99, with 50 percent of the profits going towards the club’s Scholarship and Project Fund, funds due upon delivery. A few of the tempting recipes include items such as Apple Doodles, Butterscotch Banana Drops, Chocolate Caramel Bars, Double Chocolate Sprinkle Cookies, English Tea Cakes, Final Exam Brownies, Ginger Nut Crisps, Hearty Whole Wheat Cookies, Frosted Cherry Nut Bars, Jeweled Thumbprints, Kitchen Sink Cookies, Pumpkin Cheesecake Bars and Lemon Leaves Pistachio. “These will make great Christmas presents,” PEO member Nancy Foutch said. “And the recipes look delicious. They make me want to go home and bake. Beat the rush for Christmas ideas and order early.” Contact Nancy Foutch at 647-2271 or vnfoutch@iowatelecom.net to place order prior to Sept. 2.

National Guard to hold reunion in Little Sioux A gathering at the Little Sioux Park and Campground is being planned for all members of the Ida Grove, Mapleton and Denison Iowa National Guard units. “We invite all current and retired members with ties to these units to attend,” retired member of the Mapleton National Guard Randy Archer said. “Many of these soldiers are scattered throughout Iowa and we are in hopes of reaching as many as we can.” A weekend campout Sept. 9-10, activities and noon potluck on Sept. 10 are among the planned

Iowa KidsNet, the statewide organization that recruits, trains, licenses and supports Iowa’s foster and adoptive families, will hold an information session in Council Bluffs on Aug. 18 for individuals interested in becoming foster or adoptive parents. Foster care is the temporary placement of children with families outside of their own home due to abuse, neglect or other family crisis situations. The goal is for loving families to provide children with a safe, stable and nurturing environment. There is no typical foster family. Foster families can be single, married, homeowners or renters and can

“Are any among you suffering? You should pray. Are any among you sick? You should call for the elders of the church and have them pray over you, anointing you with oil in the name of the Lord. The prayer of faith will heal the sick.” James 5:13-15

A Healing Service will be held August 28 at the Woodbine United Methodist Church during the 9:30 a.m. worship service. All are invited to come and receive prayer and anointment. Rev. Dr. J. Samuel Subramanian, Ph. D.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH Disciples of Christ Pastor Mike Brown 647-3078 647-2761 9:30 a.m. Sunday School, 10:45 a.m.Worship Service Worship leader: RTBD Elders: Jenny Hall & Dencil Hammack Deacons:Peter Ryerson, NOrma Rock, Fred McBath, Tom & Judy Erlewine and Joe Book Deaconess: Sherrill Lubbers Song Leader: Dencil Hammack Greeters: Dorothy Warner and Donna Jean Robinson FIRST UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Pastor Steve Wiemeyer 46 Fifth St. Woodbine, IA Sun.: 10:30 a.m.,Worship. FOLLOWERS OF CHRIST 77 Fifth Street Woodbine, IA Church - 647-2006 Richard Tiffey, Jr.

Woodbine Farm Supply Seed - Chemicals -Feed Steel Buildings

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644-3297 Sun., Early Worship 9:15 a.m. 9:30 Sunday School 10:30 Worship Service 6:30 class. Wed. 7:00 p.m. prayer service SACRED HEART PARISH CATHOLIC CHURCH Father Howard Fitzgerald 647-2931 643-5808 Masses: Sunday morning at 10:30 a.m. Sacred Heart, Woodbine. Saturday 4 p.m. at Holy Family in Mondamin. Saturday 5:45 p.m.,Sundays 8:45 a.m. at St. Patrick, Dunlap COMMUNITY OF CHRIST Noel Sherer, Pastor 647-2014 647-2695 Wed.: Zion’s League. Sun.: 9:30 a.m., Sunday School; 10:15 a.m., worship; 10:30 a.m., worship. IMMANUEL LUTHERAN CHURCH Logan, IA Jerry Firby, Pastor 644-2384 642-2842 Sun: Worship; 9 a.m. Fellowship; 10 - 10:15 a.m., Sunday School 10:15 - 11:15 a.m. Adult Bible Study - 10:15 - 11 a.m. LIFELINE ASSEMBLY OF GOD CHURCH Assoc. Pastor Hank Gruver 1207 Harrison St., Dunlap, IA - 643-5475 Sun.: 9:30 a.m., Sunday School; 10:30 a.m., Morning Worship; Thurs.: 7 p.m., Intercessory Prayer. THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER DAY

Harrison County Rural Electric Cooperative Serving the rural Woodbine Community

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Farmers Trust & Savings Bank

Woodbine • 647-3375 Earling • 747-2000 Member Harlan • 235-2000

National Guard unit was part of the 34th INF and was ordered into active duty for WWII and Vietnam. Three members of the unit were killed in action in Vietnam. The armory in Ida Grove was closed in 1983 and its members where moved to the Denison Iowa unit. The Mapleton National Guard opened

KidsNet to host information session

9:30 A.M. HEALING SERVICE AUGUST 28

FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Pastor Rev. J. Samuel Subramanian, Ph.D. 647-2304 647-2347 Sunday 9:30 a.m. Worship9:30 a.m. Sunday School Summer June 12, July 10 and August 14 at 9:30 a.m. 7-8 p.m. Key Club Meet Tues., Thrift Shop 9 - 2, 6: p.m.- 7 p.m. Wed., 6 p.m. Prayer Group; 1 & 3 Thurs. 7 a.m. Weight Loss Group; 6:00 p.m. Tae Kwon Do. Ushers: Melissa & Reide Meeker

festivities. Soldiers who are interested in attending this year’s reunion are asked to contact Randy Archer at (712) 239-0879 or em a i l mapleton133rd@yahoo.c om for more information and a newsletter about the event. About the units: The Ida Grove Iowa

SAINTS Logan, IA Vance Gardiner, Branch Pres. 644-3495 646-2310 Sun.: 10 a.m., Sacrament meeting; 11:15 a.m., Sunday School; 12:10 p.m., Priesthood and Relief Society. Wed.: 7:00 p.m., YM/YW Scouts ST. JOHN LUTHERAN CHURCH, E.L.C.A. Dunlap, IA Carla Johnsen, Pastor 643-5495 643-5575 10:30 a.m.Worship with Holy Communion 11:30 a.m. Fellowship Coffee Hour BETHESDA LUTHERAN CHURCH, E.L.C.A. Moorhead, IA Carla Johnsen, Pastor 8:45 AM Worship 9:45 AM Fellowship/Coffee Hour REMNANT CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER DAY SAINTS Missouri Valley, IA Terry Patience, Pastor Sun.: 9 a.m., Church School; 10 a.m.,Worship Service. THE BELIEVERS TRAINING CENTER Carmen Goodrich, Pastor 647-3233 647-2223 Wed.: 7:30 p.m., Bible Study and Youth. Sun.: 9:30 a.m., Worship; 7 p.m., Evening Service.

come from all racial, ethnic and religious backgrounds. This information session gives attendees a basic overview of the process involved in foster care and adoption and an understanding of the characteristics of children in the child welfare system. There is no obligation to continue in the process by attending. In 2009, the average number of Iowa children in foster care, shelter care or a highly structured group care placement in any given month was nearly 3,400 children. To register for an upcoming information session or to learn more, call Iowa KidsNet at (800) 243-0756 or visit www.iowakidsnet.com to see future session dates. Registrants will receive an information packet to fill out before attending the session. Iowa KidsNet is a statewide collaboration of agencies that utilizes a unique, cohesive approach to provide Missouri Valley, IA 712-642-3708 0Sunday School; 10:50 a.m.noon, 6-7 p.m., Celebration Service. Wednesday: 7 p.m. - ?, Prayer Service. MOORHEAD CHRISTIAN CHURCH Pastor Mike Brown Sun., Worship 9 a.m., Coffee Hour 8 a.m. Sunday school 10:00 Elders: Don Lamb, Krys NIchols, Barb Wacheldorf, Barb Rice Deacons: Deb Thoreson, Eric Thoreson,Alan Cumming, Kathy Holverson Deaconess: Noreen Miller Greeters: Gary and Terry Savery MONDAMIN BAPTIST CHURCH Pastor Harley Johnson Mondamin, IA Sunday school 9:30 a.m., Sunday Worship Service 10:30 a.m.; Sunday - Youth Group ‘Magnolia Fire Escape’ 7:30 p.m. at Magnolia Fire Hall Wednesday Family Nights 6:30 p.m. - 7:45 p.m. (during school year. FIRST UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Missouri Valley, IA Rev. Barbara Todd Sun.: 9:00 a.m.Adult Sunday 10:00 a.m.,Worship

MISSOURI VALLEY SUNRISE COMMUNITY Rev. David McGaffey Church of the Nazarene 2225 Hwy. 30,

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Woodbine Woodbine 647-2641 647-2641

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recruitment, training, licensing and continued support to individuals who wish to become foster and adoptive parents. Iowa KidsNet is a partnership of six Iowa social service agencies, including Four Oaks, Boys and Girls Home and Family Services, Children’s Square USA, Family Resources, Lutheran Services in Iowa and Quakerdale. For more information, call (800) 243-0756 or visit www.iowakidsnet.com. Join us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/iow akidsnet, Twitter at @iowakidsnet or our blog at http://www.potentialforgreatness.blogspot.co m.

in 1948 as Battery B, 194th INF BN and was put into active duty for WWII, Korea, and Vietnam. Three members of this Mapleton unit were also killed in Vietnam and this unit was the only Iowa National Guard unit called into active duty for both Korea and Vietnam. The unit was reorganized in 1988 and designated CO E 2nd BN Mech, 133rd INF and prior to its closing in 2004 it had been redesignated as Det 1 Co D 1-168 IND The Denison National Guard unit is active and just recently had a return of soldiers from Afghanistan.

Woodbine school lunch menu Wed., Aug. 17: Hamburgers, French fries, green beans, fruit, peanut butter bar. Thur., Aug. 18: Chicken gravy, rice, corn, fruit, cottage cheese. Fri., Aug. 19: G o u l a s h , broccoli/cauliflower, fruit, rolls. Mon., Aug. 22: Chicken sandwich, potato wedges, green bean casserole, fruit. Tues., Aug. 23: Burrito, lettuce, fruit, cookie. Wed., Aug. 24: Sloppy Joes, French fries, corn, fruit.

Community Memorial Hospital 631 N. 8th St. Missouri Valley, IA

712-642-2784

AUGUST OUTPATIENT SPECIALTY CLINICS For Scheduling Appointments Call 712-642-9347

AUDIOLOGY Rhonda Ward, M.S., CCC-A....................,..August 1 & 15 CARDIAC Heart Consultants..........Every Wed. all day & Friday PM Heart & Vascular Services..Mon. & Wed. P.M. & Fri. A.M. CARDIAC/PULMONARY REHABILITATION Cindy Sproul, R.N.......Every Monday, Wednesday, Friday CARDIOVASCULAR NON-INVASIVE STUDIES..................................................Every Mon AM EAR, NOSE, THROAT Iris Moore, M.D.........................................August 1 & 15 GENERAL SURGERY Roalene J. Redland, M.D...........August 5, 12, 19 & 26 Andrew Y. Reynolds, M.D....Every Thurs. A.M. and Wed. OB-GYN Sami Zeineddine M.D...............................August 2 & 16 ONCOLOGY Heartland Oncology & Hematology..Aug. 4, 11, 18 & 25 OPHTHALMOLOGY Michael Feilmeier, M.D..................................August 16 ORTHOPEDICS Thomas Atteberry, M.D...............1st, 3rd, 5th Thurs A.M, 2nd & 4th Thurs. all day PODIATRY John Weremy, DPM................................August 11 & 25 Indergit Panesar, M.D................................August 4 & 16 UROLOGY Larry Siref, M.D...............................August 8, 22 & 29

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By Sheriff Pat Sears Aug. 5 • Sheriff Sears and Deputy Killpack assisted the state patrol with a vehicle pursuit south of Little Sioux. The pursuit ended after the vehicle drove through a farm field and rolled over. A female and male were arrested and charged by the state. Aug. 6 • Deputy Klutts took a harassment complaint from a subject on Monroe Avenue. • Deputy Doiel and Deputy Sieck responded to a residential alarm in Melody Oaks. All was found to be secure. Aug. 7 • Deputy Cohrs responded to the Boyer River Bridge south of Missouri Valley for suspicious activity. Three young men were located and told to move on. Aug. 8 • Deputy Klutts found an ATV parked on the side of the road of Austin Avenue in the early morning. No key was in the switch and

there was damage done to the gauges. No one was around so the ATV was towed for safe keeping and further investigation. • Deputy Cohrs is investigating an attempted burglary of a residence on Lima Trail. • Deputy Knickman assisted Dunlap Police with a traffic stop in Dunlap. The driver was arrested and charged with OWI by Dunlap Police. • Deputy Knickman is investigating the theft of wire from a bin site off 315th Street. • Deputy Knickman and Deputy Klutts responded to an attempted burglary on 270th Street. The house is vacant at this time. The property was secured by the owner. Aug. 9 • Deputy Killpack responded to Pisgah for a reported stolen vehicle. The report was taken and Deputy Killpack checked the area. The reported stolen vehicle was

August 17, 2011

The Woodbine Twiner

COURTHOUSE found parked in town. The vehicle was stolen and may have run out of gas. • Deputy Cohrs was called to Willow Lake to take a theft report. Items were taken from a car that was parked in the parking lot. Aug.10 • Deputy Heffernan is investigating criminal mischief that occurred south of Magnolia. Aug.11 • Deputy Clemens responded to reported suspicious activity around Overton Avenue. The area will be patrolled. • Deputy Cohrs charged two juveniles from Missouri Valley with burglary. The juveniles were interviewed then charged with burglary to a residence. • Deputy Clemens is investigating the theft of copper wire from a bin site off Niles Trail. Any criminal charge is merely an accusation and the defendant is presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty.

MARRIAGES • Rebecca Kay Dugdale, Missouri Valley and Adam Daniel Vokt, Logan SMALL CLAIMS • Gemini Capital Group LLC vs Kent Clodfelder, Logan • Razor Capital LLC vs Louann Finken, Logan • TFRG LLC vs Kimberly Knudsen • ABA Recovery Services, Inc. vs Stacy Coberly, Woodbine • General Service Bureau, Inc. vs Tammy M. Wendt, Missouri Valley • General Service Bureau, Inc. vs Darrel Conrad, Woodbine • Asset Acceptance LLC vs Mary Birdsall, Missouri Valley SEAT BELTS • Sean Hall, Logan • Paige Thurman, Missouri Valley • Matt Staley, Logan • Kristen Collier, Missouri Valley • Gary Shearer, Modale • Heather Freihage, Pisgah • Larry Collins, Honey Creek • Jason Winchester, Logan SPEEDING • Jay Clark, Onawa • Scott Ford, Missouri Valley • Elena Thomas, Missouri Valley • Cherri Shannon, Missouri Valley • Jenise Bryan, Crescent • Patricia Reyes, Missouri Valley • Michael Staben, Woodbine • Roy Pepple, Moorhead VIOLATIONS • Randal Moore, Modale, financial liability

• Jason Winchester, Logan, financial liability • Randal Moore, Modale, use of light restricting device • Brian Green, Dunlap, possess/purchase alcohol by person under 21 • Shasta Smith, Moorhead, failure to carry registration card; financial liability • Jordan Bresette, Logan, failure to maintain control • Audrey Jensen, Logan, financial liability • Anthony Peterson, Missouri Valley, no valid driver’s license • Kati Groll, Dunlap, failure to have valid license • Melanie Cox, Logan, no proof of insurance DISTRICT COURT • State of Iowa vs Melissa Marie Dunn, OWI first. Deferred judgment for one year; placed on unsupervised probation for one year; $1,250 civil penalty plus costs. • State of Iowa vs Joseph R. Smith, OWI, first. Ninety days in jail with all but seven suspended; fined $1,250 plus costs; unsupervised probation for one year; ordered to obtain alcohol/drug evaluation and complete drinking driver’s school.

Pasture Walk Aug. 24 ‘Medium Rare’ to hit the stage Aug. 26-28 Cattle producers and others with interest in pasture management are invited to a pasture walk on the evening of Aug. 24. The walk will take place at the Merle and Greg Christiansen farm north and west of Beebeetown and will start at 6 p.m. The pasture is located two miles north and 2.5 miles west of Beebeetown on 315th Street. From Logan, take Overton Road south five miles and continue another mile south on Ozark. Turn right on 315th and continue another mile and a half to the site. Topics covered on the walk include the following: • The establishment and maintenance of grazing systems, including continuous, high-intensity and mob systems for cattle production • Watering and Fencing Systems • Dry weather supplementation and Co-Products to maintain profitability during weather-stressed times • Weed Identification and management • Extending fall forage with alternative crops, including turnips, peas, rye, etc. The Harrison County Cattlemen will be grilling ribeye sandwiches for attendees to be served at the end of the evening. The pasture walk is jointly sponsored by Harrison County Soil and Water Conservation District and Iowa State University Extension, Harrison County and USDA-NRCS in Harrison County. For questions contact the Harrison County Extension Office at (712) 644-2105.

Medium Rare, a melodrama by Steve Hogue, Pioneer Drama Service, has been selected by Boyer River Arts for its initial production. It is the story of Harry and Bunny Polk, first-time homeowners, whose new purchase, surprisingly, comes with an in-house grandma, Nina Smeltenmelter (played by Fonda Allen). Medium Rare is slated for the stage in the Woodbine City Park. Playing Harry Polk is Tim Daugird, from Chapel Hill, N.C., now a Woodbine resident. Daugird is new to drama but has

Waite. A large cast includes, besides Daugird, Bush and Allen, Virgil Lary, Sue Lary, Kevin Polson, Sabrina Christiansen, Norma Coret, Michelle Brunow, Misty Nelson, Alana Smith and Catherine Dublinski. The production is scheduled for 7 p.m. Aug. 26 and 27 with an added 2 p.m. matinee, Aug. 28. “Bring lawn-chairs and blankets and be prepared for a most entertaining comedy,” Waite advised. Tickets may be purchased at the gate. Children, 12 and under, with parents, are free.

$30,000 grant to help Anhydrous Amonia Facilities EPA has awarded the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship $30,000 to assist with outreach, education and implementation of the Clean

Farm Leasing Arrangements meeting Harrison County Extension will be sponsoring a Farm Leasing Arrangements meeting from 10-11:30 a.m. Aug. 19 at the ISU Extension office in Logan. The Extension office is at 304 E. Seventh St. ISU Extension Field Agricultural Economist Tim Eggers will be the presenter. Eggers will be explaining land value trends, cash rental rate trends, how to calculate a

extensive experience in the music world as composer and lead musician, “The Life of Oranges” and guitarist, “Jesus Christ Superstar.” Misty Bush, as Bunny Polk, was seen on the Woodbine stage, in 2009, in the melodrama, “Curse You Otis Crummy.” Later, she performed in “The Boardinghouse.” As Bunny, she works to pacify and calm Harry and assure grandma she won’t be thrown out. Bunny cooks hamburgers and Smeltenmelter wants hers “Medium Rare!” Directing Medium Rare is Lou

fair cash rental rate and how property taxes on ag land are determined. The Farm Leasing Arrangements meeting costs $15 per person, which includes the 100page Farm Leasing Arrangement booklet. Pre-registration is required by Aug. 17. To pre-register, call the Harrison County Extension office at (712) 644-2105 or toll free at (888) 644-2105.

Air Act’s Risk Management Program. All fertilizer facilities that handle, process or store more than 10,000 pounds of anhydrous ammonia are subject to EPA’s chemical safety requirements. There are approximately 700 agricultural retail anhydrous ammonia facilities in Iowa. “This grant is designed to prevent releases and protect the health and safety of area residents, and enhance communications with local emergency responders and regulated facilities,” regional administrator Karl Brooks said. “IDALS is receiving this funding to conduct onsite audits, workshops and follow-up safety

assessments at agricultural retail anhydrous ammonia facilities in Iowa.” Anhydrous ammonia is generally safe provided handling, storage and maintenance procedures are followed. However, it is toxic and can be a health hazard. Inhaling anhydrous ammonia can cause lung irritation and severe respiratory injuries. EPA Region 7 receives more accidental release reports for ammonia than for any other chemical. In addition to releases caused by transportation accidents, human error and equipment failure, a number of releases have been caused by anhydrous ammonia thefts.

Anhydrous ammonia is a key ingredient in the illegal production of methamphetamine. When stolen, the toxic gas can be unintentionally released, causing injuries to emergency responders, law enforcement personnel, the public and the criminals themselves. Retailers were first required to be in compliance with the Risk Management Program in 1999. EPA then started facility inspections and enforcement of the program, which includes five components: hazard assessment system, management, accident prevention, emergency response and submittal of a risk management plan.

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August 17, 2011

5

The Woodbine Twiner

Community Promotion Committee donates to Harrison County Cure Crusaders

On Aug. 11, Promotion Committee member Sharron Kindred, far right and Bracinda Blum, Woodbine Saddle Club, were pleased to award a $300 donation to one of the Harrison County Cure Crusader organizers, Patty Reisz, center, with daughter, Tally Reisz. Photo: Nikki Davis The Woodbine Rodeo’s 2011 theme was apparent throughout rodeo weekend: “Tuff Enough to Wear Pink” which promoted cancer awareness. In light of the themed event, the Woodbine Main Street-Chamber’s Promotion committee offered T-shirts for sale, with profits to be donated to Woodbine’s Susan G. Komen Walk for the Cure group, the Harrison County

Cure Crusaders. “The response from the community was amazing. We sold out the night before the parade. The Promotions Committee wanted a ‘sea of pink’ for the parade. It was a great theme that people relate to and the Woodbine community really got behind it,” Main Street Program Director Deb Sprecker said.

Appreciation dinner being organized As the Missouri River flood waters ever so gradually recede, a growing number of grateful citizens feel it is time to express their gratitude for the protection provided by the historical and new levees in western Harrison County and northern Pottawattamie County. These levees, so far, have kept large portions of the local floodplain dry during this risky time. In an attempt to express thanks for the hard work and diligence to the effort performed by neighbors who had the vision and energy to take on the task, an appreciation picnic is being planned. Your help is needed.

Assistance from citizens, businesses, churches, etc. in the planning and putting on of the picnic would be appreciated. This will be a local floodplain wide event with volunteers from Little Sioux, Mondamin, Modale, California Junction, Missouri Valley and rural areas all encouraged to participate. The first planning meeting for the appreciation picnic is scheduled for 7 p.m. Aug. 17 in the Modale United Methodist Church Community Center. If unable to attend the first meeting and are willing to help in the future, please provide your name and contact

information to AppPicnic@gmail.com. If you know of individuals, agencies, businesses, etc. who should be recognized, please let committee members know at the meeting, or send an email with names and a brief description of their contribution. “Remember, we planned for the worst and prayed for the best,” appreciation dinner organizers said. “Thanks to the hard work of a handful of our neighbors, for the most part we have been fortunate. Come help in making this appreciation picnic event a success – just one way of expressing our thanks.”

Farm Credit Services announces midyear results Farm Credit Services of America, a financial cooperative with more than 92,000 customers and $15.8 billion in assets, announced financial results for the first six months of calendar year 2011. Net income for the first six months of 2011 was $217.8 million compared to $163.6 million for the same period in 2010. The increase in net income was primarily due to net interest income from the growth in loan volume and a reduc-

tion in the provision for credit losses due to improvement in credit quality. Members equity increased to $2.766 billion from $2.550 at year end. Total loan volume decreased by $603.9 million, from $15.5 billion at yearend 2010 to $14.9 billion, due to the sale of $972.7 million in trade credit financings originated under FCSAmerica’s AgDirect program. The loan volume decrease was partially offset by increases in the real estate portfolio.

Manure Management and Runoff Control demonstration slated for Aug. 26 Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is hosting a manure management and runoff control demonstration from 13 p.m. Aug. 26 at the ISU Armstrong Research Farm located near Lewis. The purpose of this demonstration is to review lowcost options for managing runoff water and manure from small to medium size beef and dairy feedlot operations. “Small and medium size open feedlots can potentially discharge significant amounts of nutri-

ents to streams,” ISU Extension field agricultural engineer Shawn Shouse said. “The nutrients can cause water quality problems in streams and present a loss of valuable fertilizer nutrients for the farm.” Recent compliance enforcement from both Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Agency has put the focus on runoff from small to medium size feedlots. Iowa State has partnered with EPA, DNR and the Iowa Cattlemen’s

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Association to look at feedlot control systems that will reduce runoff from feedlots and is more economically feasible to install for smaller feedlots. This demonstration will look at a vegetated treatment area and pumping effluent into cropland as a possible low-cost handling option for feedlot runoff. According to Kris Kohl, ISU Extension field agricultural engineer, “Pumping effluent onto cropland is not a common practice in Iowa, but by doing so we can reduce the potential for nutrients

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Remarriage May Require Refocus on Financial Goals If you’re planning to get remarried, you have plenty of company: More than 40% of all U.S. weddings are second marriages for at least one of the participants, according to an estimate by the National Stepfamily Resource Center. Naturally, a second marriage will bring many changes to your life — not the least of which may be changes in your financial strategy and goals. In fact, your remarriage should cause you to take a close look at these areas: • Past financial obligations — Before even discussing your investments, you and your new spouse should decide how to handle past financial obligations such as child support, alimony and debts. Consider temporarily managing three accounts – his, hers and ours – to keep track of these various payments. • Retirement accounts — You and your new spouse may want to examine your respective retirement accounts — such as your 401(k)s and Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs) — to determine if there are areas of duplication that you may wish to avoid. If you both have the same types of investments, you may be more susceptible to downturns that primarily affect one

industry or economic sector. By diversifying your holdings, you can reduce the effects of volatility on your portfolios. Keep in mind, though, that diversification cannot guarantee a profit or protect against loss. • Insurance — Evaluate your medical insurance plans to decide which policy is more economical and comprehensive for you, your spouse and any dependents. You may also want to review disability insurance to ensure appropriate coverage is in place. Also, review life insurance policies and update beneficiaries and coverage. • Income taxes — When you consult with your tax professional to discuss the tax implications related to your marriage, be sure to adjust your tax withholding on Form W 4 to reflect your marital status. You may also want to discuss whether your Social Security benefits will be impacted if you remarry and are under age 60. • Estate considerations — Remarriage almost certainly will require you to work with a legal advisor to make changes to the following: will, living will, durable power of attorney, health care power of attorney and trust. If

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you have children, this step is critical toward ensuring your wishes will be carried out. You can also speak with your legal advisor if you are considering a prenuptial or postnuptial agreement. And perhaps above all else, you need to communicate effectively with your new spouse about your respective ideas on managing finances and investments. To develop a joint investment strategy that addresses your goals and your individual differences, you may want to consult with a financial professional. Your remarriage can be a joyous occasion. And by making sure you and your new spouse are “on the same page” with regard to your financial situation and goals, you can make a positive contribution to your new life together. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

to reach the stream and the effluent can provide nutrients and water to a growing crop.” In addition to the manure control options, the field day will also include information on manure production and nutrient content of feedlot manure, how to sample manure for nutrient analysis, stockpiling regulations and an update on rules for medium size operations as well as review of other types of manure control practices. The ISU Armstrong Research Farm is located Shawn Shouse and vegetated treatment area. at 53020 Hitchcock Ave., Photo: Submitted Lewis, Iowa, 11 miles east of Oakland or 11 miles west of Atlantic on Hwy 6, then half mile south on 525th Street (M53) and half mile east on Hitchcock Avenue.

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6

August 17, 2011

The Woodbine Twiner

C&M opens doors near downtown district From C&M Page 1 expansion around 2006. After the expansion, Chris worked happily out of the garage for the next five years. But word of mouth never ended – and neither did his dream of owning and operating his own shop. “I got so crammed up in the garage that I couldn’t move,” Chris said. “I was tripping over my work which was all over the floor because I had no where to put it. I’d back up to move something and bump into another machine. I couldn’t work like that anymore, so I had to expand again.”

However, Chris realized that what began as his hobby, no longer really belonged in a residential neighborhood. The hobby had officially bloomed into a business. “I didn’t want to get in bad with the city, so I just thought I should go about this the right way,” Chris said with a smile and small laugh. “I think I was pushing it being in the garage but the city was very tolerant. I figured I shouldn’t push my luck.” So in June, Chris purchased the industrial zoned building, located at 308 Lincoln Way. It was a move that both

excited and terrified him. “This was new to me,” he admitted. “I had always paid for everything up front and actually had to take a loan out for this. I just worry … what if businesses slows down and I can’t pay the bill?” But it doesn’t look as if that will happen as he has already landed five major accounts including businesses such as Tommy Gate in Woodbine, Plum Rose in Council Bluffs, Farm Land in Denison and Vulcan Industries, originally from Missouri Valley. Chris has been

making molds, dies and parts and pieces for specialized equipment. Not just for them, though. He hasn’t forgotten those that got him to where he is and still enjoys producing parts and pieces for other’s equipment, souping up lawn mowers, working on farm equipment and more. He admits, though, especially as the business grows, that he can’t do it on his own. “Marilyn, my wife, does all the paper work,” he said. “I don’t touch it. She has to be there or I just don’t get it.”

His children, Mackenzie and Brooke, also help him part time, including making deliveries for him. Since he moved to his new location, Chris also hired one full time employee on top of the part time employee he has had for the past year. The job demand, added clients and added employees are proof he shouldn’t have to worry about a thriving new business on Main Street. Chris, however, has a new worry. As he looked around his shop when Woodbine Main StreetChamber Business

Committee members welcomed him on Aug. 3, he answered question after question before the simple question was asked, “How long do you think it will take you to outgrow this place?” Chris smiled and didn’t miss a beat before answering, “Eight months.” Questions about the new, main street business may be directed to Chris or Marilyn Mathison at C&M Machine, reachable by calling 647-2609 or 5921964 or available via email at cmmachine@iowatelecom.net.

Magnolia’s Old Settlers to mark 125 years From MAGNOLIA Page 1 days – Aug. 19 and 20 – with a number of activities added to make the event one to remember. Friday, Aug. 19 events include: Little king and queen contest; ladies hat contest; beard contest; to show your spirit, come dressed in authentic wear (Old Settler outfits). There will be a hot roast along with marshmallow roast and from 8 to 11 p.m., with DJ Mark Zack. Aug. 20, parade entries will line up at 9:30 a.m. with the parade to begin at 10:30 a.m. The committee is looking for citizens 80 years and over to ride in the parade. Call Janette at 712-648-2313 to leave your name for a reservation. Awards will be given following the parade. There will be a lunch stand on the grounds serving chicken, maidrites, hotdogs, nachos and chips all day. For the kids there will be games and inflatables. The log cabin will be open for tours and the

American Legion will sponsor bingo. Other events include: 1:15 p.m., pedal tractor pull; 2 p.m., horse shoe tournament (registration at 1 p.m.); new this year is a bean bag tournament and at 3 p.m., local talent on stage. At 5 p.m., Rick Powell and friends will perform. In its heyday, the annual reunion drew hundreds of area residents to Magnolia, filling the town to capacity. In an excerpt from the Logan Observer dated Aug. 30, 1900, it said, “At an early hour the grounds were filled, but still the mass of human beings poured in until about 1,000 were there, all with one thought and purpose, that of exchanging greetings with old-time friends and having a good time.” When Old Settlers was first organized, the town of Magnolia from 1853 through 1870 was basically the only town in the county. Historical records say it was the center of

official power, the center of trade and commerce, and its school and churches were the pride of the county. About 120 years ago, Magnolia was so remote that it was at least 1,000 miles from a railroad. According to newspapers at the time, President Lincoln was assassinated on a Friday and Magnolia residents didn’t learn of the incident until Sunday. The construction of the log cabin now located in the city park has quite the history. The idea for the building came from Alma Fyrando, secretary of the association in 1926. It was built in memory of, and as a memorial to the pioneers of Harrison County. Living descendents furnished the logs that went into its making. A log-rolling and measuring was held that year beginning in May with the cabin completed in July. It was built to last for many years and be a

place to display artifacts. It is open each Old Settlers Day and by appointment for viewing. The tradition of the parade began in 1946 with a total of 34 entries. It was led by the Beebeetown band. That same year a cement floor was laid in the park for dances and other entertainment. In 1953, one of the largest crowds, estimated at 10,000 took part in the Magnolia and Harrison County Centennial celebration. A total of 75 entries filled the parade led by the American Legion with the colors and the Magnolia band in its first marching performance. As far as organizers can remember, only two meetings are known to have been missed. One was in 1943 due to food and gas rationing and the other in 1948 when a polio epidemic was prevalent in the county At left, Jo Lyman with helpers Tristan and Billy Jo and state Highway 127 Harvey, painted poles in the Magnolia city park to was under construction. give it a facelift for the celebration Aug. 19 and 20.

Kuehn participates in ‘Warrior Dash’ July 31 From KUEHN Page 1 this,” she said. Then she openly admitted that she didn’t attempt all the obstacles. But there was more than one reason for that. The temperatures reached above the 100 degree mark and over 55 participants were hauled off the course with injuries or due to heat

exhaustion. “I was determined to try all the obstacles, but just standing there waiting I was feeling light headed and dizzy,” she said. “When we first got there it was really exciting and the atmosphere was charged. One of my boot camp friends said of one of our before pictures, ‘Look! We’re all

Angie Kuehn, far left, was one of the last participants of the July 31 Warrior Dash to get to complete the course. Photo: Submitted

smiling!’ But that’s because we had no idea what we were about to go through.” Kuehn said their trainer and leader, Wolff, encouraged them before the race, wanting them just to do their best. “We’re not boot campers that are in shape, we’re the ones trying to get in shape. We’re not, by any means, athletic,” Kuehn said, laughing. With no shade at the starting line, Kuehn felt dizzy, admitting she was drenched with sweat just from waiting. As they waited and time got closer, the group was already drained of energy – and it made her nervous. Kuehn didn’t make it through all the obstacles, but did try a few, such as army crawling under barbed wire through a mud pit. She was disap-

pointed when she reached the end of the race – only at first. “Initially I felt like I cheated,” she said. “But we all sat down and talked afterwards and Marty said you all accomplished something just by getting off the couch and doing something. So I’m proud I finished. It was so much more difficult than I thought it would be.” And she didn’t know it at the time, but she was one of the last groups to even get the opporutnioty to finish. One more “heat” began after hers, but she was among the last to finish as the race was called off due to heat suffered injuries. “I was worried about that as I came upon three bootcamp friends that had to be taken out of the race. One callapsed on the trail. She didn’t

even know her birthday or Social Security Number and had to be rushed to the hospital. Her blood pressure went crazy way up and way down. It made me afraid,” she said. Days later, after all of the ups and downs of the “family vacation” were complete, Kuehn was surprised to learn that a fit, 20-somethingyear-old, Jeremiah Morris, would never get the chance to finish his race. “From what I understand he collapsed from heat exhaustion. I didn’t know him and his race was the day before mine and I knew he was in the hospital. He died the following Tuesday morning,” she said. Kuehn’s emotions ranged from being scared to compete to thrilled she finished to mournful for those who

didn’t. She believes a few changes will be necessary and believes organizers realize that. “There were only two water stations set up along the entire route,” Kuehn said. “And they ran out of water. I am willing to be they rethink that for next year. People were just collapsing because they were dehydrated.” As she crossed that finish line on her own two feet, she was handed a medal and a, “fuzzy helmet with horns.” She opted to keep both safe in their bags as she was covered with mud from braids to toes. And, despite the heat and scares, Kuehn said she would recommend the event to anyone willing to try it. “It was really fun. I would definitely recommend it,” Kuehn said. “It was kind of cool.”

Peterson mother, daughter team up for a Step In Time From DANCE Page 1 focused, so we’re going to mix things up. We’re not only going to work on steps, but we’re going to work on technique – work on counting,” Penny said. “Within the hour, we’ll have touched on a large range of things, not only for the concept of dance, but for coordination. Like skipping, running, jumping – we’re going to throw vocabulary at them like, ‘Pose!’ Statue! Jerk, bounce, swing, sway … and work on the counting concept so they’ll know what an introduction is to music, know how to count once the curtains open and be able to pose and dance – without their teachers on stage with them. All of

that is important. It develops good leadership skills and creativity – not just coordination. We’re going to keep them g o i n g . ” Penny’s excitement for the new studio and love of the sport and its participants is obvious when she talks about it. Her daughter, Danielle, is just as excited – but also a little nervous. Danielle gained her first teaching/coaching experience during the 2010-11 school year when she coached West Harrison’s dance team. Her mother had retired from teaching dance two years earlier, but it was Danielle’s coaching job that steered the pair back to their dance roots.

“It wasn’t my dream,” Danielle admitted. “But after I moved to Mondamin and was asked to do the drill team there, I liked it. Mom helped me with it and then we began to talk about a studio more and more.” So when Tammy Barrett approached them about opening their studio in the soon-to-be Movers and Shakers building, located on Fifth Street next to StephanyCoe Insurance in Woodbine’s downtown, the timing couldn’t have been better. After Danielle got her feet wet with coaching and choreographing, she knew she liked teaching. And, by helping her

daughter, Penny remembered why she loved dance. “I love working with kids. I miss the creative choreographing and putting a show and dance together. It’s just … fun. And Danielle has one quality that is so important. She enjoys with and is good at working with kids. She can relate to them,” Penny said. “And kids are capable of doing so much. It just amazes me. And, I think, in having a studio like this, being able to offer dance and Tae Kwon Do is just a unique thing Woodbine has to offer.” Penny and Danielle both, listed a slew of advantages to a local dance studio, including

reasonable rates for classes, saving on gas money driving to surrounding communities and their own knowledge of the importance of money. “In other studios, there’s a lot of uniformity. You have to have a certain leotard and certain shoes – and that all costs money,” Danielle said. Penny even added that even their shows will be money conscious. “In the past, we’ve taken regular attire and just made it work for the number,” Penny said. “It’s just more affordable.” Classes will be offered for one hour per week at a cost of $30 per month. The only required attire will be the appropriate

shoes for the class, such as tap shoes, jazz shoes, etc. And the hope is for the students to be able to use their supplies until they graduate – or outgrow them. The goal is for Danielle to take sole ownership of the studio – some day. “I’m sure mom will go until she can’t walk anymore,” Danielle joked. “But my interest is there. I’m just a little nervous, but I’m looking forward to it.” An open house of the studio will be available on Applefest day, Sept. 24. Please contact Penny Peterson at 647-2725, or Danielle Peterson at 5920750, with questions or to enroll.


August 17, 2011

7

The Woodbine Twiner

Golden Age Center Meal Menu

Community Wed., Aug. 17: Beef stroganoff, baby red potatoes, California blend vegetables, Oroweat fiber bread/margarine, blueberry muffin. Thur., Aug. 18: Taco salad, taco

meat, shredded cheese, shredded lettuce, tomatoe, kidney beans, sour cream/taco sauce PC, tortilla chips, banana. Fri., Aug. 19: Macaroni and cheese, Oregon

blend vegetables, spinach side salad/dressing, Oroweat fiber bread/margarine, cubed cantaloupe. Mon., Aug. 22: Western omelet, tater rounds, orange juice cup, fresh baked bis-

cuit w/gravy, applesauce. Tues., Aug. 23 – Cheesy chicken and rice with broccoli, cowboy caviar, cinnamon raisin bread/margarine, banana. Wed., Aug. 24: Hot

Region 17 4-H Table Setting Championship

Harrison County’s entrants in the Region 17 Table Setting Championship, from left to right: Emily Dickinson, Logan; Catherine Dublinski, Dunlap; Justin Thomas, Logan; Shelby Oloff, Logan; and Alexis Christians, Logan. Photo: Submitted

4-H’ers representing Harrison, East Pottawattamie, West Pottawattamie, Mills, Montgomery, Fremont and Page counties participated in the Second Region 17 4-H Table Setting Championship held at the Carson Community Center. 4H’ers competed in their home counties to earn a spot at the Table Setting Championship with members representing both formal and casual table settings in three age divisions, Junior (fourth, fifth and sixth grade), Intermediate (seventh

and eighth grade) and Senior (freshmen through seniors). Formal, themed place settings would include candles, more than three pieces of flatware, china, tablecloth and/or mats and cloth napkins. Formal themes would be for occasions where you would dress up. Casual themed place settings could be planned for indoors, outdoors, use any type of cover (tablecloth, blanket or paper) and any type of table service. Casual themed parties would include themed birthday parties,

90 degrees in the shade C O N T E S T

C O N T E S T

TOTAL DAYS JULY 20 - Aug 12

11 Days 90 Degrees or Above

sports parties or other themed party where the guests might come for a fun meal. Participants in the Region 17 Table Setting program chose a theme for their formal or casual table setting, and a menu of what would be served, then arranged a full single table setting with flatware, glasses, plates and bowls as needed to serve that meal to guests at their dinner or party. They also chose a centerpiece for the table that could be constructed or chosen by them to fit the theme. All of this would be set up on a card table or for informal table settings such as for a picnic could be arranged on a blanket on the floor. All of the contestants also wore clothing that went

along with the theme to strengthen their presentation on the table setting. The purpose of the program is to provide youth the opportunity to plan a meal around a theme learning the skills of planning, developing a theme, selecting or making matching centerpieces and clothing to go along with that theme, planning a nutritious and fun meal and developing hospitality skills through communicating their planning process and table setting with a judge through conference judging. Hosting a party, learning where all of the silverware, napkins, plates, bowls and glasses are properly placed on the table are all skills that youth will need as they plan or participate in family gatherings, formal dinners for work, or understanding what all those forks are for at a formal work function. Awards were presented to the 4-H’ers at the end of the evening contest hosted by East Pottawattamie County Extension staff and Region 17 4-H Specialists. In the Senior Formal 4-H Table Setting Division, Jessica Lowthorp, Fremont County received Champion and Victoria Holcomb, West Pottawattamie County received Reserve Champion Senior Formal 4-H Table Setting. In the Intermediate Formal 4-H Table Setting Division, Catherine Dublinski , Harrison County was awarded Grand

Mike Carson

Carson Clark

Insurance & Investments 712-647-3268 • 877-647-3268 416 Walker St • Woodbine, IA

Champion. In the Junior Formal 4-H Table Setting Division, Anna Hull, Page County received Grand Champion and Reserve Champion went to Olivia Dobben, West Pottawattamie County. Receiving a purple award was Savanna Clark-Moffett, Montgomery County and Blue Awards went to Alexis Christians, Harrison County and Emily Welch, Fremont County. In the Senior Casual 4H Table Setting, Emily Dickinson, Harrison County received Champion and Ashley Gilbert, Fremont County received Reserve Champion Senior Casual 4-H Table Setting. Senior age members receiving blue awards were Jessika Lynn, Mills County and the team of Mariah Lombard and Shelby Storesund, Montgomery County. In the Intermediate Casual division, Champion 4-H Table Setting was awarded to Megan Ryan, West Pottawattamie County and Reserve Champion to Chrissy Vinton, Mills County. Receiving Purple Awards were Delaney Carroll, East Pottawattamie County and Vincent Breedlove, Montgomery County. Receiving Blue Awards were Kalob Davies, Page County and Justin Thomas, Harrison County. In the Junior Casual 4-H Table Setting Division, Champion was awarded to the team of Kate Wise and Kyley Nelsen, East Pottawattamie County and Reserve Champion to Shelby Oloff, Harrison County. Receiving Purple Awards were Elayna Mincer, Fremont County, Hannah Vial, Montgomery County and Lydia Wede, East Pottawattamie County.

beef sandwich with gravy over Oroweat bread, mashed potatoes, chuckwagon corn, double orange jello-o or sugarfree orange jell-o. All meals served with 2 percent or skim milk, coffee.

Farmer’s Market holding ‘Biggest’ contest On Aug. 18, the Harrison County Welcome Center Farmer’s Market will host a “Biggest Tomato, Potato and Zucchini Contest.” Entries in each category will be judged by weight, and will be accepted from 3:30-6 p.m. during regular market hours. Contestants will be able to keep their entries as produce will be weighed and returned. Winners in each category will receive a $10 gift certificate to be used either in the Welcome Center gift shop or at the farmer’s market vendors. “With the Iowa State Fair currently showcasing some of the biggest and best from throughout Iowa, we thought a local ‘biggest’ contest during the farmers market would be fun,” Coordinator Kathy Dirks said. “Hopefully many of our local gardeners will agree and stop by with their entries.” The Welcome Center Farmer’s Market will be held every Thursday from 3:30-6 p.m. until Oct. 13. For additional information on the market and future market events such as the “Grilling with Vegetables and Herbs” demonstration on Sept. 1, please call (712) 6422114 or check out the Harrison County Iowa Welcome Center Facebook page.


8

The Woodbine Twiner

Community/Legals Woodbine Municipal Light & Power audit report Dean M. Broich, P.C. released an audit report on Aug. 12 for Woodbine Municipal Light & Power, a component unit of the City of Woodbine, for the fiscal year ended June 30. Dean M. Broich, P.C. reported the Utility’s receipts totaled $1,305,073 for the fiscal year ended June 30, a 7.26 percent increase from the prior year. The receipts included $ -0- in property tax, $0 from the state, $0 from federal government, $5,854 in interest on deposits and investments and $0 in bond/note proceeds. Disbursements for the fiscal year totaled $1,292,687 a 7.68 percent increase from the prior

year, and included $0 for community protection, $0 for human development, $0 for home and community environment, $1,259,678 for policy and administration and $39,009 for non-program.

Grants to assist with value-added agricultural projects USDA Rural Development State Director in Iowa Bill Menner announced grants are available to assist producers and producerowned businesses who want to add value to the commodities they produce on their farms. The deadline for applying for the 2011 Value Added Producer Grant Program administered through USDA Rural Development is Aug. 29. Value-added products are created when a producer increases the consumer value of an agricultural commodity in the production or processing stage. Value Added Producer Grants from USDA Rural Development can be used for planning that establishes a viable value-added marketing opportunity, or for working capital to operate a value-added business. “This grant program can help with the development of local foods systems and can spur the

economy by supporting local producers,” Menner said. “I encourage producers interested in starting or expanding their valueadded business to give us a call.” Grants are available to independent producers, agricultural producer groups, farmer or rancher cooperatives and majority-controlled producer-based business ventures. Planning grants can be used for feasibility studies, marketing and/or business plans. Grant funds can be used to pay consultants who guide producers through the development processes. The planning activities must be related to the marketing of a value-added product. Working capital grants can be used to pay the operating expenses of new ventures just starting out. Examples of previous grant recipients in Iowa include wineries, branded meat marketers, as

well as pork, specialty soy oil and cheese and milk processors. Application information, including a link to the eligibility rules and application procedures included in the June 28 Federal Register can be found at www.rurdev.usda.gov/ia by clicking on Business and Cooperative and then Grant Programs. Further information on this and other programs offered by USDA Rural Development is available by calling (515) 284-4663, by visiting www.rurdev.usda.gov/ia or at any local area office.

LEGAL PUBLIC NOTICE HARRISON COUNTY SUPERVISORS CLAIMS GENERAL BASIC FUND Betty Abrams, emp. mil. ...$65.28 Agriland FS ...................1,195.49 Alamar Uniforms, wearing Apparel & uniform ..........746.91 Alegent Health OHS/EAP, Utilities payments ..........200.00 Alegent Health Clinic, cont. Education .......................183.00 AT&T...................................34.91 Auditor of State, acct., audit Service ...........................625.00 Kathy Baer, emp. mil. .......174.06 James Baxa, deputies Salaries ..........................200.00 Connie Betts, meeting reg..50.00 Bill’s Water Cond. .............421.35 Elizabeth Block, emp. Mileage...........................120.05 Bomgaars ...........................99.98 Bonsall TV & App., ..........825.00 Patty Booher, emp. mil. ......12.29 Breezy Hills Winery, sales Items ..............................701.40 Nichole Briggs, emp. mil.....93.58 C&H Hauling ....................361.00 Care Facts Info. Sys., service Contracts........................793.50 Carpenter Paper Co., custodial Supplies .....................1,113.86 Casey’s General Stores .....76.04 Cheetah Tech. Integration, Office & data proc. .........115.00 Cheryl Smith Cleaning Service, Other personnel .............540.00 City of Dunlap................1,247.73 City of Little Sioux ............115.96 City of Logan ....................318.95 Clark Pest & Termite Control ...........................40.00 Control Services, equip., Repair & maint. ..............765.00 Ladeena Coolman, utilities Payments ........................64.80 Susan Corrin, emp. mil.....167.68 Dr. Herbert Coulter ...........136.00 Counsel Office & Document, Service contracts ..........953.24 Creighton Medical Labs. ..287.00 Dr. Robert Cunard ..............70.00 Sandra Dickman, emp. Mileage .........................157.79 Dollar General ....................68.25 Doug Johnsen Const.....4,765.50 Dunlap Senior Citizens, Congregate meals.......1,500.00 Eby Drug ............................87.70 ECOLAB, laundry exp. .....435.32 Emergency Services, office Equip. & furn. ................977.00 Farm Plan, parts...............120.95 Farner Bocken Co., food & Provisions....................2,224.01 Fazzi Associates, Inc., service Contracts.......................911.00 Julie Florian, emp. mil. .......39.27 Fourth Ave. Building Corp., Service contracts ...........120.00 Dixie Frisk.........................473.00 Judson Frisk .....................600.00 The Globe Pequot Press, sales Items .............................371.30 Reanna Gochenour, emp. Mileage .........................131.22 Graham Tire Co., ..........1,067.88 Amanda Hall, emp. mil. ......17.85 Lois Hall, service Contracts.......................600.00 Linnea Handbury, emp. Mileage .........................159.32 Harr. Co. Auditor, bldg. Maintenance .................200.00 Harr. Co. Dev. ..............10,902.12 Harr. Co. Landfill .................22.00 Harr. Co. Law Enforcement, Service contracts ............14.00 Harr. Co. Public Health, Juvenile programs......2,010.00 Harr. Co. REC................1,884.96 Harr. Co. Secondary Road, Fuel & oil ........................483.80 Patricia Hazen, cont. ed. ....65.00 HERC Publishing, office Supplies ........................114.55 Home Town Hdw. .............520.20 Hy-Vee................................40.41 IKON Financial Services, Office equip. & furn. .......455.21 Independent Pub. Group, Sales items ...................141.54 IA Counties Pub. Health, Dues & memberships .....75.00 IA Dept. of Natural Resources, Abandon well exp. & Water.............................300.00 IA Dept. of Veteran’s Affairs, Misc............................2,854.59 IA Law Enforcement Academy, Cont. ed..........................460.00 IA state medical Examiner ....................1,372.50 Jeanette Jensen, emp. Mileage ...........................18.10 JM Auto Body ................2,427.75 Kohl’s Pharmacy & HC.......73.04 Lerner Pub. Group, sales Items ...............................80.45 Little Sioux Senior Citizens, Congregate meals.........500.00 Dr. Mary Lob.....................105.00 Logan Auto Supply ...........180.05 Logan Do It Best Hdw. .....667.39 Logan Meal Site, congregate

Meals .........................1,500.00 Logan Mini Mart ...............782.30 Logan Postmaster ............720.00 Logan Super Foods.......2,225.75 Logan Woodbine Newspaper, Legal notice...................457.65 Loganet ..............................25.00 Mail Services, DOT renewal Notices ..........................555.26 Maintenance Eng., electrical Supp. & par. ..................148.61 Matt Parrott, office supp. ..439.94 Teresa McCandless, emp. Mileage ...........................27.72 Dean McIntosh, mileage ..167.66 Diane Meeker, emp. mil........5.88 Rod Meeker, bldg. Maint. .900.00 Gay Melby, emp. mileage ...24.63 Tabitha Melby, emp. mil. .....48.96 Menards, ..........................450.36 MidAmerican First Call, Autopsy & coroner exp.....75.00 MidAmerican Energy.....3,629.80 Galen Mikels, cont. ed........65.00 Miller Fuel & Oil, fuel And oil ........................2,612.88 John Mock, dues & Memberships....................30.00 Mondamin F&F Senior Citizens, cong. Meals ....500.00 Carrie Montanez, emp. Mileage .........................102.81 Moore Medical, health supplies And equip. .....................413.52 MPS Accounts Receivable, Sales items ....................402.64 Mumm Law Firm ...........3,881.96 Mundt Franck & Schum....620.70 Myrtue Medical Center.....160.00 Scott Nelson, postage ........20.65 Nifty Lawns.......................420.00 Norms’ Tires .......................10.00 Kim Nunez, mileage .........264.26 Office Stop, office equip. & Furniture......................1,206.09 On Trac, service contracts..92.45 Onawa Democrat, magazines Periodicals.......................32.00 William Ouren, autopsy & Coroner exp....................150.00 Parents as Teachers National, Dues & memberships.......75.00 Kristina Pauley, emp. mil. .279.48 Pat Perry, mileage ............340.64 Pisgah Senior Citizens, Congregate meals..........500.00 Pitney Bowes, office supp.261.90 Pleasant Hill Cemetery, Care of soldiers graves1,930.00 Qwest .................................84.08 Recognition Works, office Supplies ...........................13.10 Reserve Account, Postage .....................2,300.00 Alan Ronk, custodial Services ...........................75.00 Marty Rose, extra help Salaries ..........................237.50 Rush Family Care Service, Funeral service ..........2,500.00 Stacy Salter, emp. mil.......364.22 Brenton Saron, emp. mil.....15.30 Scheels..........................1,497.00 Rhonda Sears, emp. mil. ..155.29 Seeley Service ...................72.50 Seiler Instrument & Mfg., Off. & data proc. .............206.00 Senior Citizens of Western Har., congregate meals1,500.00 Shaw Screenprinting ........252.00 Shelby Co. Auditor, bldgs. Rent.............................1,162.50 Shelby co. Environment Heal., Safety & prot. Supp. ......100.00 Shirley Sigler, emp. mil.......12.24 Sirchie Finger Print Lab, Off. Supp. .........................57.82 Dewey Sloan, utilities Pmts. ...........................1,162.70 SW IA Housing Trust, contrib.. Other-gov. ..................3,000.00 SW IA Plan. Co., contrib.. other Gov. ...........................10,191.00 Stephens-Peck Incorp., office Supplies ..........................70.00 Cindy Stessman, deputies Salaries .........................600.00 Linda Stueve, emp. mil. ....137.09 SWI Juvenile Emergency Serv., Juvenile deten. Costs14,323.60 T of C Comm. Laundry.........7.40 Telrite Corp. ......................293.80 Lorie Thompson, emp. mil. .20.40 Tribune Newspapers, adv. 155.00 Ultra No Touch....................52.00 US Bank ........................6,672.88 UTC Spectrum Services, radio And communication ........60.00 Walter Utman, emp. mil. ...252.96 Valley Times News, board Proceedings ...................607.66 Verizon Wireless...............460.90 Dwayne Walker, mileage ..105.04 Wall Lake Popcorn, sales Items ................................65.10 Tim Ward, rent pmts.........150.00 Sherrill Webb, emp. mil.....243.84 West Group, magazines Periodicals.....................543.75 West Monona Comm. School, Juvenile programs......2,000.00 Western IA Tourism, misc.500.00 Williams & Co. PC, acct., Audit service ..............1,800.00 Windstream ...................1,638.01 Sherry Wohlers, cont. ed. .103.00 Woodbine Golden Age Center,

Congregate meals......1,500.00 Woodhouse Auto Fam.17,000.00 Yellow Book, mag. Period...67.50 SHERIFF GUN PERMIT Brownells, office supp. .....405.90 City of Logan ......................80.00 Claritus, off. Supp. ............209.96 GENERAL SUPPLEMENTAL FUND Julie Florian, emp. grp. Ins.166.66 Amanda Hall, emp. grp.ins.166.66 Brian Heffernan, emp. grp. Ins. ................................166.66 Rene Hiller, emp. grp. Ins. 166.66 Christina Holcombe, emp. Grp. Ins. ........................166.66 IMWCA, workmen’s comp Ins. ...........................15,741.00 IA Comm. Pool Admin., Real property ins.....229,633.42 Elizabeth Lenz, emp. grp. Ins. ................................166.66 Tabitha Melby, emp. grp. Ins. .................................166.66 Richard Ohl Sr., emp. grp. Ins. ................................166.66 Floyd Pitt, emp. grp. Ins....166.66 Pott. Co. Sheriff, sheltered Care .................................64.00 Quakerdale, sheltered Care ...........................1,399.50 SilverSTone Group, emp. Grp. Ins. .....................7,000.00 Lorie Thompson, emp. grp. Ins. ................................166.66 Walter Utman, emp. grp. Ins. .................................166.66 RURAL SERVICES BASIC FUND Ed Eberlein, motor veh.....150.00 Harr. Co. Landfill dues & Memberships.............13,433.00 Woodhouse Chev.-BuickPont..........................46,326.00 JAIL G&M Refrig. & App.............74.49 Leg. Serv. Ag., personal Items & clothing .............200.00 Loftus Htg. & AC...............133.87 US Bank ...........................729.86 MH-DD SERVICES FUND Alegent Hth. The Mercy Center, outpatient.............76.00 Cass Inc., work act. Services .....................3,066.63 Concerned, work act. Services .....................7,830.85 Country Care Center Corp., RCF............................8,618.54 County Rate Info Sys., tech. Assistance...................1,210.00 Crossroads of Western IA, Work act. Services ....29,746.79 Elec. Trans. Clearin., tech. Assistance..................4,728.00 Harr. Comm. Mental Hth., Outpatient....................8,333.33 Harr. Co. Homemakers, supp. Comm.. living ................696.40 Heartland Family Service, Outpatient.......................428.00 Home Care Services, Other .............................585.75 Horizons Unlimited Palo Alto, Work activity services ....954.96 Ida Services, work activity Services .....................1,600.62 Narmi Joseph, legal rep. ..240.00 Morse Ent., RCF ...........4,510.98 Nishna Prod., work act. Services ......................1,626.30 Partnership for Progress, RCF............................2,336.99 Pott. Co. Comm. Svs., sheriff Transportation ...............370.38 Pott. Co. Sheriff, sheriff Transportation .................35.00 The Pride Group, RCF ..2,951.18 Seasons Center, outpat......70.55 SW IA Plann. Co., other 1,909.09 Treas. State of IA, inpatient/ Hospital ......................3,422.64 Vocational Dev. Ctr., sheltered Workshop ....................1,266.14 Wesco Ind., supp. Comm.. Living.............................945.51 SECONDARY ROAD FUND AA Wheel & Truck Supply, Lubricants .......................62.95 Agriland FS .................50,602.51 Aramark Uniform Services, Elec. light & power ..........56.35 Atco International, lub. .....350.00 Barco, minor MV pts. & Accessories....................101.70 Baum Hydraulics, minor MV pts. And access. ..................251.59 Bedrock Gravel, cover aggregate And sand ...................15,286.61 Ronald Bell, meals & Lodging ............................41.00 Bi-State Motor Parts, minor MV Parts & access. ..............143.54 Bill’s Water Cond. ...............23.25 Bonsall TV & App. ..............47.85 Certified Appliance ...........424.38 Cheryl Smith Cleaning Serv., Building maint. ..............220.00 City of Logan ....................145.41 City of Missouri Valley ........16.25 Diamond Mowers Inc., minor MV pts. & access. .........309.16 Electronic Eng., office Supplies .........................129.00 Hallett Materials, flood & Erosion const. St. ..........250.65 Harr. Co. REC...................880.01 ICEOO, meeting reg.........150.00

IA Prison Ind., traffic & st. Sign material ..............2,053.60 Jensen’s Ace Hardware .....19.52 Loess Hills Co. Corner .....223.65 Logan Auto Supply ...........514.92 Logan Do It Best Hdw. .....353.15 Matheson Trigas Inc., minor Equip. & hand tools .......247.20 MidAmerican Energy.....1,456.00 Mo. Valley NAPA ...............128.53 New Sioux City Iron, safety Items ................................32.56 Northern Safety Co., safety Items .............................221.17 Nuts & Bolts, minor equip. & hand tools ..................216.36 Powerplan, minor MV parts & Access........................4,324.89 Qwest .................................52.67 Regional Water...................43.00 Reliable Office Supplies, Office supplies ..............166.42 Ri-Tec, lubricants...........1,194.00 Rubber Inc., tires & tubes 146.45 Sam’s Club .......................185.36 JT Stoner, meals & lodg.....56.00 Thermo King Christensen, minor MV pts & access. ............27.35 Ultra No Touch....................58.00 US Bank ...........................649.47 Verizon Wireless...............208.08 Wick’s Sterling Trucks, minor MV pts & access. ...........425.73 Windstream ......................654.58 Wise-Mack Inc., minor MV Pts & access. .............1,574.90 Wright Express Fleet Serv., Fuel & oil ....................3,011.51 Ziegler Inc., minor MV pts. And access. ..................383.58 FLOOD AND EROSION Shearer Contractors Co., Flood & erosion Const.8,912.50 Sundquist Eng., flood & erosion Const. St. ...................1,270.50 E911 SERVICE COMMISSION AT&T..............................3,476.00 Bill’s Water Cond. ...............46.50 Bonsall TV & App. ............304.95 D&D Comm., radio & related Equip. ............................493.00 Harr. Co. REC.....................46.81 IA Dept. of Pub. Safety, Misc.............................5,220.00 Mainstay Sys. Inc., misc. ..237.00 MidAmerican Eng...............15.47 Qwest ...............................477.91 Tip Top Comm., radio and Related equip. ...............100.00 Windstream ...................2,659.27 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT City of Logan ......................74.82 Counsel Office & Document, Off. & data proc. .............115.62 Loftus Htg. & AC.................57.37 Logan Do It Best ..................6.99 MidAmerican Energy........736.32 Larry Oliver, meals & Lodging ............................73.81 Sam’s Club .......................214.33 Ultra No Touch....................21.00 US Bank ...........................363.91 Verizon Wireless.................59.62 CONSERVATION LAND ACQUISITION TRUST FUND Logan Do It Best Hdw. .....117.87 Next Phase Env., park land Dev. ..........................41,309.84 Alan Ronk, park land dev. 193.50 Treas. State of IA, tax and fee Disbursement ................487.00 US Bank ...........................132.00 ASSESSOR Bonsall TV & App. ............175.00 Counsel Office & Document, Office supplies .................13.44 Office Stop .......................444.99 Solutions, office & data Processing ..................3,100.00 Verizon Wireless.................37.91 Windstream ........................25.13 JULY 2011 WITHHOLDING GENERAL FUND FICA ............................18,071.10 IPERS..........................20,877.55 SHERIFF GUN PERMIT FICA ...................................23.56 IPERS.................................34.82 GENERAL SUPPLMENT FICA ............................24,820.81 IPERS..........................28,694.26 AFFINITY CARE ..............168.30 LINCOLN FINANCIAL ......387.30 BC/BS..........................53,460.31 FIRST HORIZON ..........4,224.29 RURAL SERVICES FICA ...................................38.63 IPERS.................................39.07 SECONDARY ROAD FUND FICA ............................22,902.29 IPERS..........................24,171.82 AFFINITY CARE ................91.80 LINCOLN FINANCIAL ......211.80 BC/BS..........................35,777.10 FIRST HORIZON ..........2,056.11 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT FICA ..............................4,912.16 IPERS............................5,169.76 AFFINITY CARE ................20.40 LINCOLN FINANCIAL ........48.00 BC/BS............................6,335.43 FIRST HORIZON .............295.66 ASSESSOR FUND FICA ..............................1,910.98 IPERS............................2,038.32 AFFINITY CARE ..................7.65 LINCOLN FINANCIAL ........18.00

BC/BS............................3,027.04 JULY SALARIES Margie Heffernan ..........1,177.45 F. Irene Churchill...............592.75 Janet Wilderdyke ..............495.87 Shirley Sigler ....................120.91 Nichole Briggs ...............1,088.81 Ruth Heim ........................348.50 Juanita Johnsen ...............534.66 Susan Gilfillan ....................75.00 Gay Melby .....................3,862.44 Patty Booher.....................564.21 Pearl Pinkham ...............1,886.94 Dedra Hatcher ...............3,185.15 Kandice Wallis ..................189.00 Diane Meeker ...................326.12 Carrie Montanez...............700.20 Elizabeth Block..............1,280.70 Deanna Neil ..................1,623.28 Corrine AesophMangiaruca ................1,739.76 Sara Bonham ...................510.75 Donald Rodasky .................36.10 Craig Kelley ......................125.00 John Burbridge.................100.00 Royla Roden.....................100.00 Clifford Raper ...................656.32 Richard McIntosh ...............50.00 Eugene Jacobsen...............31.66 Gail Witt..............................75.00 Kenneth McIntosh ..............75.00 Michael Hack......................75.00 Thomas Schafer ...............280.50 Gary Wenninghoff .........1,989.84 Ron Greenwood ...............290.43 Kyle Lindberg ...................113.36 Lyle Gilfillan ........................75.00 Carter Oliver..................1,939.50 Thomas Maaske............2,106.00 33-1

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PROBATE OF WILL, OF APPOINTMENT OF EXECUTOR, AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS Probate No. ESPRO14299 THE IOWA DISTRICT COURT HARRISON COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF GERALD A. CUSTER, DECEASED. To All Persons Interested in the Estate of Gerald A. Custer, Deceased, who died on or about 23rd day of May, 2011: You are hereby notified that on the 1st day of August, 2011, the last will and testament of Gerald A. Custer, deceased, bearing date of the 30th day of March, 2004, was admitted to probate in the above named court and that Pearl Irene Custer was appointed executor of the estate. Any action to set aside the will must be brought in the district court of said county within the later to occur of four months from the date of the second publication of this notice of one month from the date of mailing of this notice to all heirs of the decedent and devisees under the will whose identities are reasonably ascertainable, or thereafter be forever barred. Notice is further given that all persons indebted to the estate are requested to make immediate payment to the undersigned, and creditors having claims against the estate shall file them with the clerk of the above named district court, as provided by law, duly authenticated, for allowance, and unless so filed by the later to occur of four months from the second publication of this notice or one month from the date of mailing of this notice (unless otherwise allowed or paid) a claim is thereafter forever barred. Dated: August 1, 2011. Pearl Irene Custer, Executor 1109 Normal Street Woodbine, IA 51579 Patrick T. Deren, ICIS PIN No: AT0002016 Attorney for executor Firm Name: Salvo, Deren, Schenck & Lauterbach, P.C. Address: 711 Court St., Box 509 Harlan, IA 51537-0509 Date of second publication 17 day of August, 2011 32-2

PUBLIC NOTICE REGULAR MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES WOODBINE MUNICIPAL LIGHT & POWER JULY 13, 2011 The Woodbine Municipal Light & Power Board of Trustees met in regular session July 13, 2010 at 12:00 noon in the conference room. Present were board chairman Donald Kenkel, board trustees Charles Warner Jr. and Jean Clark, superintendent Chris Waite, office manager Theresa Corrin. Also in attendance, Missouri River Energy Services representative, Jody Peck. Motion by Warner, seconded by Clark with all in favor to approve the agenda.

Motion by Warner, seconded by Clark to approve the minutes of the June 13, 2011 regular meeting. All were in favor. The following bills were presented and approved for payment by a motion from Clark and a second from Warner. All were in favor. June checks signed after meeting: MBMECA, transmission Service .....................5,360.36 MRES, supplemental Power......................32,893.40 WAPA, WAPA power....30,856.48 Employees, payroll ......12,796.65 Collection Services Center Payroll deduction .........218.50 Loganet, service.................39.95 Wellmark, insurance......4,084.70 Woodbine Manufacturing Rebate ......................6,300.00 West Central Community Action Refund .........................214.70 Collection Services Center Payroll deduction .........218.50 Shaw’s Family Kitchen Meeting..........................35.00 United Western Coop Truck fuel .....................174.03 Internal Revenue Service Payroll tax .................3,889.69 IPERS, retirement tax ...1,840.78 Treas. State of Iowa State WHH...................700.00 Anita Whitmore Contract labor ..............425.00 July checks: Ameripride, mats ................37.57 Babb, George, rebate.......425.00 Border States, Materials ......................256.80 Corrin, Theresa, Co-insurance ...............334.00 Counsel Office & Document Maintenance ................118.46 First Bankcard, charges ...320.59 Home Town Hardware Supplies.........................49.58 Horizon Equipment Supplies.........................16.56 IAMU, dues.......................604.40 Matt Parrott, supplies .......395.70 Michel, Ryan, co-insurance 95.82 Moores Plumbing machine rental ...............50.00 Office Stop, supplies ..........93.55 Peterson, Jason Co-insurance .................75.00 Petty Cash, misc. Expenses.......................23.15 Pryor’s L & K Parts Supplies...........................8.43 Soft Touch Water Supplies.........................73.68 Treas. State of Iowa Sales tax...................2,306.00 Waite, Chris, uniforms ........38.50 Walker’s Services Truck fuel .....................175.00 WESCO, materials ........8,620.88 West Central Comm. Action Refund .........................220.00 Windstream, service.........106.49 Woodbine Twiner, Ads & Publishing ....................325.03 Woodbine, City of Misc. charges ..............227.40 The monthly operating reports were reviewed and discussed. Motion by Warner, seconded by Clark to approve the report as presented. All were in favor. June’s revenues were $113,388.33 and expenses were $115,045.33. The Board discussed the details of the health insurance plan. After reviewing the options, a motion was made by Warner, seconded by Clark to continue with the same policy for the coming year. All were in favor. Motion by Warner, seconded by Clark to approve renewing our contract in the ACH program with Farmers Trust & Savings Bank. All were in favor. Motion by Warner, seconded by Clark to approve the following financing request for our 0% financing program and paid out as the funds become available: Veronica Pauley for the installation of an energy efficient central air conditioner for $2,305.80. All were in favor. Waite reported on the initial implementation of the new Load Management Program. This program is in conjunction with Missouri River Energy Services. We are serving as one of two pilot communities involved with this program. Waite also reported on the addition of Dunlap to the West Central Iowa Safety Alliance which is a chapter of the Iowa Association of Municipal Utilities. The next regular meeting will be August 12th at 12:00 noon. There being no further business, a motion was made by Warner and seconded by Clark with all in favor to adjourn at 12:38 p.m. Donald Kenkel, Chairman ATTEST: Theresa Corrin, Secretary 33-1


August 17, 2011

9

The Woodbine Twiner

Classifieds WANTED WANTED: Paying for unwanted, old motorcycles - running or not. Prefer titled, but not a deal breaker without. Please call Jeff, 712310-6503.

HELP WANTED HELP WANTED: Full-time Sports Reporter/Photograp her needed at the Lexington ClipperHerald. Duties include: Covering 5 local high school sports teams, photography, other local stories of interest, experience in J o u r n a l i s m writing/QuarkPhotos hop helpful, competi t i v e wage/401K/Insuranc e benefits. Send resume to David Penner, Editor, Lexington ClipperHerald, P O Box 599, Lexington, NE 68850. MCAN HELP WANTED: The Federal Public Defender for Districts of South

Dakota & North Dakota is accepting application for an: Assistant Federal Public Defender in the Bismarck, North Dakota office. This is a full time attorney position dedicated exclusively to criminal defense work for indigent defendants before the U. S. District court and the U. S. Court of Court of Appeals. Travel & work in branch offices may be required. Job qualifications include excellent oral advocacy and writing skills, along w/recent, substantial trial experience. Salary’s negotiable based on qualifications and experience and compensation includes federal gov’t benefits. Also accepting applications for an: Administrative Offficer. This position oversees all operational aspects of the organization and reports directly to the Federal Public Defender. A full description of duties

Tommy Gate Co. a leading manufacturer of lift gates has an opening for an Engineering Technician at the Woodbine plant. Engineering Technician is needed to assist in building prototypes, drawing prints, writing manuals, writing CAM programs and other non-design functions. Successful candidates will need to have the following: • High School diploma, Associates Degree a plus. • Knowledge of CAD, CAM and Solid Works programs. • Skilled in problem solving. • Proficient in computer (i.e. Microsoft Office suite) and pertinent equipment skills. • Have excellent interpersonal, teamwork and communication skill. • Ability to self pace and meet deadlines. • Motivated and self starter. Tommy Gate offers an excellent wage and benefit package. Candidate must be able to pass skills test and drug screening. If you meet the above requirements, please e-mail, fax or mail your resume to: Marian Bosak, HR Manager 83 Bus Brown Drive, Woodbine, IA 51579 mbosak@tommygate,com FAX: 712-647-2572

PUBLIC AUCTION WEDNESDAY NIGHT AUGUST 17

6:30 P.M.

Metal building on corner of Windom and Huron Street Household Items and Furniture Owner: Eleanor Harvey Go to www.gochenourauctioneering.com to see full listing

and qualifications is available at http://sd.fd.org/. Qualified applicants should send a resume and 3 references by Aug. 26, 2011 to: Neil Fulton, Federal Public Defender. P. O. Box 1258, Pierre, SD 57501 or via e-mail to: neil-fulton@fd.org. Subject to a Preemployment background check. Equal O p p o r t u n i t y Employer. MCAN HELP WANTED: Box Butte General Hospital in Alliance, Nebraska is seeking Labor and Delivery Full-time Nights RN. Desiring a full range of learning and professional experiences. We offer a competitive salary and a full range of benefits including paid continued education certifications. Ask about our sign on incentives. All offers of employment are subject to a background check and drug screen. We invite you to apply at www.bbgh.org to download application or contact. Nebraska W o r k f o r c e Development 302 Box Butte, Alliance, NE 69301. EOE. Phone 308-763-2935 - Fax 308-763-2936 Jill.Langemeier@neb raska.gov. MCAN HELP WANTED: The Panhandle Humane Society is actively seeking an Executive Director. This person is responsible for all activities of the shelter including animal welfare, personnel,

and fundraising. Phone Calls or in-person communications will not be accepted. For job description, application and submission requirements please visit our website www.panhandlehumanesociety.org under our Links seciton. HELP WANTED: Looking for hard working, honest, individual to work on a dairy farm in Lingle, Wyo. Looking for a full-time worker. Based on experience $20,000-$40,000 yearly with paid vacation. Ask for Tim 307534-5119 MCAN HELP WANTED: Work for Dept. of Health & Human Services. View current job openings at w w w. d h h s . n e . g o v MCAN HELP WANTED: OTR Drivers for flatbed operation. Must have CDL and a minimum 5 years, exp. Newer equipment 308-432-2843, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. MCAN

FOR RENT FOR RENT: House, 608 Lincoln Way Woodbine! 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1260 sq. ft., 1 car detached garage, all appliance included, New Carpet! $650 per month, utilities not included $500 Deposit and Reference Required, NO inside pets or smoking. Call Mindy @ 712-592-1127 for application and showing.

OROZCO ROOFING & SIDING Tear Off - Free Estimates Local Resident 317 S. 3rd Ave., Logan

402-238-8744 712-216-2024

WEDNESDAY NIGHT TOOLS AND SOME ANTIQUES Platform Scale, cream seperator, band saw, drill press, radial saw Go to www.gochenourauctioneering.com for full listing

Boustead Real Estate Services APPRAISALS, CONSULTING, MANAGEMENT & SALES

www.Bousteadrealestateservices.com 3229 210th Street, Woodbine 8.86 acres, with 2 bedroom home, horse barn, numerous updates!

$105,999

G

IN 205 Weare St., Woodbine, PEN3DBd,Ba.......................$55,000

Please contact: Kathy Baer RN Program Director 712-644-3437 Harrison County Homemaker Agency 111 N. 2nd Ave., Court House Logan, IA 51546

GARAGE SALE MISCELLANEOUS SALE: Several people, Community Room Woodland Apartments, 1105 Park, Saturday, Aug. 20, 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. GARAGE SALE: Aug. 20, 27 108 C o l o n i a l , Shenandoah, IA. Vintage cameras, enamelware, tools, books, china, dinnerware, linens, Dekalb collectibles, MidCentury Modern dining set, furniture, housewares. OWL

LOST & FOUND LOST - 2 year old male lab, last seen Aug. 10 near Melody Oaks. Reward. Call 402-350-9338.

Drivers Midwest regional or OTR. $5000 Sign On Bonus for new lease ops & $2500 for company. Good pay & benefits. 888-514-6005 w w w. d r i v e h m l . c o m (INCN) JOHNSRUD TRANSPORT, Food Grade Liquid Carrier, Seeking Class-A CDL drivers. Home flexible weekends. 5 years experience required. Will train for tank. Great Pay/Benefits 1-888200-5067 (INCN) “You got the drive, We have the Direction” OTR Drivers APU Equipped Pre-Pass EZ-pass Pets/passenger policy. Newer equipment. 100% NO touch. 1-800528-7825 (INCN) Drivers-No ExperienceNo Problem. 100% Paid CDL Training. Immediate Benefits. 20/10 program. Trainers Earn up to $.49 per mile! CRST VAN EXPEDITED 800-326-2278 w w w. J o i n C R S T. c o m (INCN) INSTRUCTION, SCHOOLS ALLIED HEALTH career training- Attend college 100% online. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 8 0 0 - 4 8 1 - 9 4 0 9 www.CenturaOnline.co m (INCN) Place a 25 word classified ad in over 250 newspapers in Iowa for only $300. Find out more by calling 800227-7636 or this newsp a p e r . w w w. c n a a d s. c o m (INCN)

ADOPTION ADOPTION = LOVE. A secure, happy, loving home awaits your baby. Exp. paid. Susan & Frank, 1-866-664-1213 www.wewishtoadopt.ne t (INCN)

Social Security Disability Claim Denied? We specialize in appeals and hearings. FREE CONSULTATION. Benefit Team Services, Inc. Toll Free 1-888-836-4052. (INCN) ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal,*Computer s, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 8882 2 0 - 3 9 6 0 www.CenturaOnline.c om (INCN) ADOPTION P R E G N A N T ? C o n s i d e r i n g Adoption? Call us First! Living expenses, housing, medical and continued support afterwards. Choose adoptive family of your choice. Call 24/7. Adopt Connect. 1-866743-9212 (INCN) ANNOUNCEMENTS Become Dietary Manager (average annual salary $40,374) in eight months in online program offered by T e n n e s s e e Technology Center at Elizabethton. Details www.ttcelizabethton.e du, 1-888-986-2368 or e m a i l patricia.roark@ttcelizabethton.edu. (INCN)

Swine Wean-Finish Site Manager. Site manager for family owned Farrow-Finish operation. Excellent compensation package. Extensive production experience required. Contact 319330-3579 (INCN)

P R E G N A N T ? Considering Adoption? Call us First! Living expenses, housing, medical and continued support afterwards. Choose adoptive family of your choice. Call 24/7. Adopt Connect. 1866-743-9212 (INCN)

Earn $$$ watching your Woodbine athlete!

The Woodbine Twiner is currently seeking stringers to cover volleyball and cross country. We are looking for someone to take photos and potentially write articles with a deadline of Mondays at 9 a.m. Contact Nikki Davis at

The Woodbine Twiner at 712-647-2821 or ndavis@woodbinetwiner.com if interested.

The Family of Amanda Pape would like to say

Now Accepting Applications For: 1

Part-Time Home Care Aide. Qualifications include a current CNA certificate, must be able to work independently, valid driver’s license., dependable auto. Requires flexibility in work times and the ability to work independently, Competitive Wages.

FOR SALE: La-ZBoy recliner, blue, good condition $75. Call 712-644-2108

Gas leaks, Day: 647-2550 Evening & wkends 647-2345

Metal building on corner of Windom and Huron St.

The Harrison County Homemaker Agency needs a

FOR SALE

NOTICE

6:30 P.M.

bedroom apartment at Boyer View Apts., Logan, IA. Quiet complex, stove & refrigerator furnished. Rent based on income. 62 years or older or persons with disabilities of any age. Call 1-712-647-2113 or 1-800-762-7209. Boyer View is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

FOR RENT: Apartments for rent in Odd Fellows Building located on Woodbine Main Street Contact Now! 2 bedroom, 2 bathroom apartment, with all appliances i n c l u d i n g washer/dryer, $550 a month. Wood floors with 12 ft. ceilings. Attached garage space available. Contact Mindy at 712-592-1127.

HELP WANTEDTRUCK DRIVER

STATEWIDESA

PUBLIC AUCTION AUGUST 24

FOR RENT: 6 Weare St., Woodbine. $500/month. Deposit required. HUD approved. Stove, refrigerator included. Available Setp. 1. If interested call 402871-4385.

301 Lincolnway-Woodbine Beautiful 2 story, 3-4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, 2 car garage..............PRICE IMPROVED.........$99,100 LAND FOR SALE: 20 Acres, 7.7 crop acre, ..................$86,000 LOT FOR SALE: 60’x180’ Normal St...., ..................$16,000

Marilyn Boustead, Broker/C.G.A. 712-647-2442 or 1-800-789-3330 As of August 8th HOURS: M. Tu, Th, Fr.........9-4 Wed. 9-11 a.m. Other times by Appt.

CLOSED AUG. 29th to SEPT. 6th 510 Walker St.- Woodbine Check out our website

www.bousteadrealestate services.com

hT ank You

to all those involved with making the 2nd Annual Amanda Jean Pape Memorial Golf Tournament a huge success. We are deeply appreciative to all those who donated time, money, prizes, golf carts and other support; and to those who participated in the golf tournament. The turnout was overwhelming and we are once again comforted and proud to know that Amanda meant so much to so many. It truly keeps us going to see that her spirit and fun loving ways live on and are not forgotten.

• Peeka and Papa • Grandma and Grandpa Pape • Scott and Brenda Pape Leaders’ Salvage • Frances Barnett • Mike’s Garage (Mike Beers) • Progressive Ins. • Berne Coop • Gurney’s • Hall Body Shop (Bob Hall) • Twisted Tail • Hall Welding (Wes Hall) • Austad’s Golf • N&N Construction (Lee & Tony Nuzum) • Pendelton WhiskeyKurt Boustead • Mark’s Home Improvement (Mark Flint)

• Papa Joe’s • Hoffman Agency • Midstates Bank • Farmer’s Trust & Savings Bank • Quaker Steak & Lube • Dunlap Livestock • Moorhead Feed & Supply • Horizon Implement • Bank of the West • Bonsall’s TV & Appliance • Gary’s Ag Supply • Jiffy Mart • State Farm Insurance • Adam DickinsonChannel Seeds • Gary DickinsonAgriland FS • Rick & Leigh Meeker • Casey’s General Store • Al & Jodi Swand

• Schenkelberg Implement • Heine-Richards Irrigation Electric Justin Richards • Logan Car Wash • Adam Bradfield • Colton & Kylie Henschen • Marcy Olson • Patty NiedermeyerTupperware • Sharon Neill • Marilyn BousteadBoustead RE • Annette KnottTastefully Simple • John & Joleen Larson • United Life Insurance Mike Sears • Harrison County REC • Mike & Lori Williams

• Greg Wonder Trucking • Cory Jackson Family • Washington County Bank • Travis Shearer Family • Fatboyz • E. Drew Howard • Heather & Troy Hall • Ryan & Gina Henschen • Todd & Lori Cohrs • Aaron Herman • Dustin Henschen • Angele Boehm • Sue Shreve • Twin Valley Veterinary


10

August 17, 2011

The Woodbine Twiner

Sports/Community Football season begins: Scrimmage snapshots, 2011

Photos: Nikki Davis & Jeff Davis

Iowa Farm Bureau Federation presents adopted resolutions The county policy development committee, chaired by Lynn Stamp of Persia, with members Randy Olsen, Travis Shearer, Leonard and Jan Johnson, formed proposed resolutions based on the tabulated results of members’ returned opinionnaires. These proposed resolutions were presented to members attending the meet-

ing. After much discussion, the following resolutions were adopted. These adopted resolutions were sent to the Iowa Farm Bureau Federation in West Des Moines where consideration will be given to them becoming state policy. The adopted resolutions include:

Woodbine Location Please come in and see us for all your fencing needs. We carry Red Brand Barb wire and Hutcheson gates & steel posts plus all other fencing materials.

We do offer a 5% discount on all bundled creosote wood posts. Please stop in or give us a call at

712-647-2511 Jim or Michele

Animal Production & Health & Ag Biosecurity: 1.We believe that an individual that provides on-farm custom slaughter and meat processing should be State regulated. 2. We believe that livestock should be included with small scale poultry regulations. 3. We believe Iowa should participate with USDA oversight and allow interstate shipment of meat products from state inspected facilities. Conservation & Natural Resources: 4. We believe that regulation should be based on targeted locations and practices. 5. For conservation program funds, we believe funds should be prioritized

based on environmental benefit. Energy: 6. We believe the current ethanol tax credit system should be left alone. & Environmental Other Regulations: 7. We support taking voluntary steps to reduce air emissions. 8. We support voluntarily managing fertilizer applications to reduce ammonia emissions and we support shutting off engines instead of idling. Waters of the State Definition-(State): 9. We believe Iowa should only regulate rivers, streams, public lakes and aquifers. Agency Federal Access to Private Property-(National): 10. We believe a Federal

NOTICE Harrison County REC Woodbine, Iowa is offering a

$1,000.00 Reward For information leading to the arrest and conviction of any person or persons found tampering with, vandalizing or stealing copper wire or other materials from distribution utility poles and other facilities owned by the members of Harrison County Rural Electric Cooperative. Anyone found to be involved will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law. If you notice unusual activity or apparent damage to utility structures in remote rural areas please notify our office at 712-647-2727 OR 1-800-822-5591 or contact the Sheriff’s office 1-712-644-2244. This may include dangling wires or other hardware hanging loosely from poles or suspicious activity along roadways late at night.

agency inspector should only be allowed to enter private property with the consent of the owner. Confidentiality (State & National): 11a. We believe that no information should be publicly available. 11b. We believe no information should be made available to the public. 12. We do not believe a person should be allowed to file an anonymous complaint with the DNR, EPC, or IDALS. Risk Management & Farm Programs: 13. We believe that, if the Federal budget is reduced, all farm programs should be cut equally. Farm ProgramPayment Limitations14. We (National): believe that farm eligibility should not be restricted by income or net worth. Farm Program-Pay ACRELimit for (National): 15. We believe that ACRE payments should not be limited when the next farm bill is written. Conservation Reserve (CRP)Program (National): 16. We believe that enrollment in CRP should be maintained and encouraged on highly erodible land. 17. We believe that CRP enrollment rates are appropriate. 18. We believe that CRP rental rates should reflect local land rental rates. Conservation Compliance-(National): 19. We believe that

Federal crop insurance premium subsidies should not be added to the list of farm program benefits that are subject to conservation compliance. 20. We believe crop insurance eligibility should not be tied to conservation compliance. Beginning Farmers(State and National): 21. We support lower operating loan interest rates for beginning farmers. ReportsCrop (National): 22. We believe the current USDA crop reporting system should stay the same. Condemnation of Land for Lake Development-(State): 23. We do not believe there should be a change in how the size of a drinking water lake is determined. Nuisance Lawsuits(State): 24. We believe a plaintiff who loses a nuisance lawsuit involving a farm should pay the defendant’s costs, such as court costs, attorney fees, and expenses. 25. We believe the damage of a nuisance lawsuit should be limited. 26. We believe the time allowed to file a nuisance lawsuit should be limited. Corps Of Engineers: 27. We believe that the corps’ Manual for operations of the Missouri River basin should be rewritten to its original intent with the highest priority being flood control.


Woodbine Twiner 8-17-11