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EQUINE E N T H U S I A S T Published by News Media Corporation. www.EquineEnthusiast.com EQUINE E N T H U S I A S T is a FREE quarterly publication. 10,000 copies are distributed throughout the state of Wyoming and the Nebraska Panhandle region. It is available at feed and retail stores, event centers, hotels and other equine-related businesses.

SUMMER 2012

PUBLISHER Jim Wood jimwood@EquineEnthusiast.com

FEATURES

EDITOR Allen Thayer athayer@torringtontelegram.com

PONY EXPRESS: 10-DAY DEDICATION TO HISTORY ............................... 6-8 AN IMPRESSIVE ‘PIECE OF THE PIE’ .......................................................... 10 CHUKKERS, MALLETS AND FLEET-FOOTED PONIES ......................... 13-14 COWGIRL CONFRONTS CANCER HEAD-ON ....................................... 16-17 A BOYHOOD FASCINATION LEADS TO A LIFETIME OF WORK ......... 18-20 PROFFIT RANCH HORSE SALE: PRESERVING THE ORIGINAL ‘COW HORSE’ ......................................................................................... 22-24 DRESSAGE: A FANCY WORD FOR TRAINING............................................ 26 A HEALTHY HOOF IS A HEALTHY HORSE................................................. 28 ‘THE ONLY FRIEND I HAD’ .................................................................... 29-30 UW STUDENTS TEACH EQUINE CLASSES ABROAD ........................... 32, 48 OUT OF THE SNOW AND INTO THE FIRE ........................................... 33-34 HOMES SOUGHT FOR WILD HORSES .................................................. 36-37 WITH THE ABSENCE OF FEAR, YOU HAVE THE POWER OF TRUST....... 38 JUST A BIT OF HORSING AROUND ............................................................ 42 TA GUEST RANCH: THE PERFECT GETAWAY ..................................... 44-46 NEED HELP? LET THE HORSE AID IN THE SOLUTION ............................ 50 TRAVEL PREPARATIONS ........................................................................ 52-53

Matt Roberts editor@uintacountyherald.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Mike Jensen mjensen@EquineEnthusiast.com ADVERTISING OFFICES Cheyenne, WY 307-632-5666 Evanston, WY 307-789-6560 Kemmerer, WY 307-877-3347 Lusk, WY 307-334-2867 Lyman, WY 307-787-3229 Pinedale, WY 307-367-2123 Scottsbluff, NE 308-635-3110 Torrington, WY 307-532-2184 Wheatland, WY 307-322-2627 GENERAL INFORMATION Get the Word Out! EVENT CALENDAR Submit a short description of your club, business or organization’s event for our calendar. Be sure to include relevant dates, times, locations and contact information. E-mail your event to: athayer@torringtontelegram.com

PONY EXPRESS: 10-DAY DEDICATION TO HISTORY

Advertise in the CLASSIFED MARKETPLACE! Line Class ads are at $15 Display Classified ads are $25 Call 307-532-2184 for information. jwright@EquineEnthusiast.com Celebrate local horsemanship: FEATURED HORSEMAN/WOMAN Nominate a local horse person to be Equine Enthusiast’s featured local Horseman/woman of the year. E-mail your nomination to: athayer@torringtontelegram.com

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ON THE COVER EQUINE E N T H U S I A S T

A.J. West rides into Henry, Neb., to make the mail exchange with the Nebraska Pony Express Association. Photo/ Andrew Towne

BRASKA WYOMING/NE TION EDI PANHANDLE

READ MORE ABOUT THE PONY EXPRESS ON PAGE 6 4

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COWGIRL CONFRONTS CANCER HEAD-ON PAGES 16-17

A BOYHOOD FASCINATION LEADS TO A LIFETIME OF WORK PAGES 18-20

WITH THE ABSENCE OF PROFFIT RANCH HORSE FEAR, YOU HAVE THE SALE: PRESERVING THE POWER OF TRUST ORIGINAL ‘COW HORSE’ PAGE 38 PAGES 22-24

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TA GUEST RANCH: THE PERFECT GETAWAY PAGES 44-46 COLUMN

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UTAH’S EQUINE EDGE UTILIZES CUTTING EDGE AI TECHNIQUES PAGES 64-66

WITH BITS, QUALITY COMES WITH A COST PAGE 67 EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

PONY EXPRESS: 10-DAY DEDICATION TO HISTORY RE-RIDE OFFERS REMEMBRANCE OF VENTURE THAT LASTED ONLY 19 MONTHS By Dylan Slusher STAFF WRITER

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vast journey spanning almost 2,000 miles for the 33rd annual Re-Ride of the Pony Express Trail began June 13 in Sacramento, Calif., and concluded June 23 in St. Joseph, Mo. Between those start and end points, riders of the National Pony Express Association made a stop at tiny Henry, Neb., with a population of around 100. On the cool morning of June 20, the Pony Express rode through to exchange mail in an old-fashioned, yet iconic way – being carried in four different pockets in a mochila — the Spanish word for knapsack. The re-ride is a 10-day, 24-hour a day event to commemorate the Central Overland California and Pikes Peak Express Company founded by Russell, Majors and Waddell, a Missouri freighting firm. It carried letters and telegrams from April 1860 to November 1861, to prove the Central Route passable year-round and win a federal mail contract. It also celebrates the 152nd anniversary of the Pony Express. “It connected the East Coast to the West in a very critical time in the history of the U.S.,” Les Bennington, Wyoming president of the NPEA, said. The effort not only earned the company a federal mail contract, but also demonstrated a “legacy of daring and bravery.” Until then, the only other means of mail transportation was by sea, which would involve a ship sailing all the way around North and South America just to get from one coast to the other. This took more re than a month. speeaking, “Historically speaking, ort time tiime it was a very short ngtonn frame,” Bennington said. “They triedd to me decrease the time so they could doo it by horsebackk in 10 days in thee summer months.” xBut the Pony Express venture was st short-lived, lastingg jus just 19 months. givinngg a new This re-ride is giving generation a chance to experience the Pony Express Trail, and gives others a chance to receive mail in a unique way, without any spoons or arrows. “It’s a neat thing, especially when you get the

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Photos/ Andrew Towne

A.J. West rides into Henry, Neb., on June 20 to make the mail exchange with the Nebraska Pony Express Association. young kids involved,” Bennington said. In Henry, a gro group of more than 15 riders eage e awaited the areagerly rival off the Wyoming team so tth that they could take th thee mail and be on th h way to Bridgetheir pport, Neb., on the oother side of the N North Platte River uun under the coordinatio o of Lyle Gronetion wold d the Nebraska wold, NPEA president. With the thh trail stretching 1,966 miles fro o the Sacramento from River to the Missouri River, Wyoming and

DEDICATION continued on page 7

Dr. Mark Hartman, of Scottsbluff, Neb., signs the bag of mail before it departs for its trek across Nebraska on June 20. SUMMER 2012 | Published by News Media Corporation


DEDICATION continued from page 6 Nebraska make up about half of that distance. “There is 1,966 miles of the original trail, and we probably ride over 2,000 now because of the jogging we have to do,” Bennington said. Wyoming accounts for about 500 miles of the route, split into divisions ranging from between 40 to 100 miles each. Bennington chose to participate to preserve the history of the Pony Express in the United States. The NPEA is a great association for kids to be involved in, as schools don’t teach as much about the Pony Express as he would like, he said. “We try to follow along the national historic trail as close as we can,” Bennington said. The organization is a large collective of several volunteers who care about the history of the Pony Express. To many volunteers, it’s a family

tradition with brother and sister, mother and father riding together. All of the more than 600 riders who participate are members of the National Pony Express Association, and must swear an oath before taking to the trails. Members wear the traditional outfit of a red shirt, vest and symbolic yellow ribbon. Such uniformity and oath was demonstrated in the parking lot of a fireworks vendor in Henry. The oath was followed by a moment of silence to remember Brian Lafler, a former postmaster of Mitchell and Alliance, Neb., who died of cancer in March. At 8:51 a.m. on June 20, A.J. West rode down Highway 26 into Henry with the mochilamounted horse, along with two other riders and a police escort. This team of riders started in Glendo, Wyo., late the previous night. The team was scheduled to arrive by 8 a.m., but a thun-

Published by News Media Corporation | SUMMER 2012

derstorm the night before delayed them. As too much lightning can scare the horses, the riders waited until the storm passed. In about five to 10 minutes, the mochila was signed by all of the riders and their families, exchanged and was on its way to Bridgeport with a set of riders from western Nebraska. The Glendo team then took a group photo to forever remember their trip. The journey to St. Joseph ended on June 23, and the mail carried by the mochila was put into the United States mail system. The stretch through Wyoming had a few bumps on the trail, including a severe thunderstorm and the death of a horse. Toward the

HISTORY continued on page 8

Matt Cawiezel, of Morrill, Neb., leads a riderless horse in honor of Brian Lafler, who died of cancer in March.

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

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HISTORY continued from page 7 western area of Wyoming, a rider had a horse quit on them after a mile, as it was a fairly old one at 21 years. Because of this tribulation, the mochila and saddle were taken off and put on a different horse. Last year, a horse bucked its rider off and began to advance in the opposite direction of the destination with the mochila on its back. The team had to track down the runaway horse in order to continue the journey. Horses and weather are not the only obstacles the Pony Express riders face, as they could have a shortage of riders on short notice due to a family emergency or other calamity. Riders’ horses must travel at least 10 miles per hour to cover the distance of the trail within Wyoming – they only have 54 hours to do so. Each horse travels about one mile each, and is then switched out with another. This process repeats a few times until the team arrives at their destination. The reason for just a one-mile stretch is because a typical horse is not in the same shape as it used to be. A horse would tend to get worn out after riding for ďŹ ve miles straight. Heat is also a major factor in this event, as the heat index gets higher the farther east one travels. Bennington mentioned a case where a horse simply refused to move as it came out of its trailer. It was suffering from heat exhaustion

Photo/ Andrew Towne

Members of the National Pony Express Association from Wyoming pose for photos following the exchange with the state of Nebraska. caused by the weather and tight conďŹ nement with other horses. “That would be about 120 degrees.â€? Bennington said. The Pony Express today delivers United

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

AN IMPRESSIVE ‘PIECE OF THE PIE’ PALOMINO EQUALLY ADEPT AT WORKING CATTLE AND BARREL RACING By Adam Louis STAFF WRITER

A

young Palomino made a gentle, warm impression on Dick and Connie Baker when they first met him. “Our stud was off to mare at the time, and the biggest thing we liked was he was still on his mother at the time, and he walked right up to us,” Dick said. “He just likes to be around people.” It was the friendly disposition, among other things, that drew the Bakers to Guy’s Piece of the Pie, their Palomino stallion. The couple purchased him from Bill and Deb Myers, of St. Onge, S.D. Dick and his wife, Connie, have been in the horse business since 1985. He works as a brand inspector, where he brands and inspects brands on livestock that cross county and state lines. Dick said he’d been working with horses since he was little, and the couple got their start raising horses when their four children wanted to show horses in 4-H. The couple was looking for a horse with cow in him, as well as a gentle demeanor, and they indeed found it in Guy’s Piece of the Pie. His bloodline includes Frenchman’s Guy and Pie in the Sky. Frenchman’s Guy is a multiple award-winning sire described as “a top WPRA, PRCA Badlands Circuit and Barrell Futurity/Derby competitor” with an extensive list of credentials on the Myers Traning Stables website, www.frenchmansguy.com. According to Myers’ website, the late Pie in the Sky was the leading maternal grandsire of barrel horses in 2006. Dick said Guy’s Piece of the Pie’s breeding is certainly set up for barrel racing, and he has a lot of cow in him. “He’s been training [in barrel racing] since he was 2; he’s 5 now,” Dick said. “He’s bred with the ability to work cattle, and mostly for barrel racing.” Dick said Guy’s Piece of the Pie

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

Photo/ Brad Jones, of Hot Springs, SD

A rider guides Guy’s Piece of the Pie through a barrel course. Guy’s Piece of the Pie belongs to Dick and Connie Baker, who prize him for his gentle, friendly demeanor and barrel-racing abilities. has done very well in barrel races in Torrington, Wyo., Rapid City, S.D., and Edgemont, S.D., placing either first or second in each venue. For the future, Dick said he’s going to try to push Guy’s Piece of the Pie

to rope steer and goats. Dick and Connie Baker live fi ve miles north of Lusk, Wyo. Their children live elsewhere: Toni Gaukel lives in Keeline, Wyo., while her twin sister lives in Idaho. Ty, Dick and Connie’s

son, lives in New York City now. For more information about Guy’s Piece of the Pie, the Baker’s other horses or other information, contact Dick or Connie at (307) 334-3344.

SUMMER 2012 | Published by News Media Corporation


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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | TRAIL TALK

TRAIL DETAILS Difficulty: Easy Type: 10-mile out-and-back County: Sublette Trailhead: Green River Lakes Directions: Located at the mouth of the Green River, take Wyoming Highway 352 north of Cora 30 miles until the pavement stops and the U.S. Forest Service Road begins. The campsite and trailhead is about 17 miles farther down the road. Base elevation: 8,000 feet Elevation change: Approximately 500 feet. Facilities: Campgrounds, corrals, parking, potable water and restroom facilities are available at the trailhead. There is no horse camping at the lake. Fees: None Season: May through mid-October

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Courtesy

One of the many views of Square Top Mountain available on the trail.

RIDE TO TOP OF SQUARE TOP CATCH SIGHT OF WHERE MIGHTY COLORADO RIVER GETS ITS START

H

ead out toward the Green River Lakes in early May, and the winding dirt road will be a traffic jam of cow and calf elk, with the calves gamboling across the meadows surrounding the Green River. The river starts wide and calm, meandering through the valley before it hits tributaries and starts to build up speed. The river starts north upstream of the Green River Lakes, but the two lakes are often thought of as the headwaters for the river that provides much of the western U.S with water once it hits the Colorado River. The trailhead provides access to the Highline Trail – part of the Continental Divide National Scenic Trail – the Clear Creek Trail, Roaring Fork Trail

and Porcupine Creek Trail, but the perfect, relaxing day ride takes riders along both of the Green River Lakes, offering meadows to play in and lakesides begging for a quick swim to beat the record temperatures the area has been having. Start the ride on the east (left) side of the first lake, crossing the river at lake’s base. One option is to take the trail that skirts the lake, keeping it and Square Top Mountain almost always in view. Another option is the upper trail, which rises and follows the top of the hill line. If taking the upper trail, take a right, dropping down into valley after about two miles. Follow the valley trail along the river and to the upper lake, stopping to water horses in the river or take a quick dip

at the western end of the lake. Square Top is one of the iconic scenes of Wyoming, and this spot gives you a direct view, making it appear just out of reach across the lake. The trail continues along the north side of the lake to its inlet, where continuing will take riders to Three Forks Park. For a quick afternoon ride, this is the perfect place to picnic and turn around. When heading back to the trailer, cross the bridge over the river between the two lakes, and return on the west side of the lower lake, giving both rider and horse respite from the sun by following the lakeside trail in the trees. The roundtrip for the short ride is between eight to 10 miles, depending on which route is taken.

SUMMER 2012 | Published by News Media Corporation


EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

CHUKKERS, MALLETS AND FLEET-FOOTED PONIES QUITE A FEW COWBOYS CONTINUE TRADITION OF AMERICAN POLO By Matthew Manguso STAFF WRITER

I

t’s seven minutes into the second chukker, and the warning bell sounds. The crowd cheers with excited anticipation as the ponies thunder down the green, grassy field. The ball rolls in front of the forward defensive player, who thoroughly swats it with his mallet and puts it directly between the goal posts. The audience cheers, the chukker ends and the crowd rushes the field to partake in the “divot stomp.” Sound like a Sunday afternoon on a pristine English estate? Nope, it’s just another day on the Melody Ranch in Jackson, Wyo., where the Jackson Hole Polo Club (JHPC) is continuing the tradition of American polo. Begun in 1957 by Paul Von Gontard, the JHPC is an organization dedicated to keeping the sport of polo alive and well. To date, the club has about 25 members and plays games

every Wednesday, Friday and Sunday from June until August. It may seem odd to have such an “English” sport associated with a place that is distinctly American, but the skills used every day by Wyoming’s cowboys translate extremely well onto the polo field. “We have quite a few cowboys who play,” Craig Ramsby, manager for the JHPC, said. “The sport is played in English equipment, but it’s really western riding with neck reining, slide stops and hard turns.” It may look complicated and elitist, but the rules of play are quite simple and very similar to fast-paced field games like soccer and hockey. Like most U.S. polo clubs, the JHPC follows the rules set forth by the U.S. Polo Association. Polo is played in matches, and each match has four to six chukkers, or periods, that last

Photo Courtesy of the JHPC

PONIES continued on page 14

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PONIES continued from page 13 7 1/2 minutes. Goal posts mark each end of the ďŹ eld, and the objective is to put the ball between the two posts, no matter how high, to earn points. Following a goal, the teams change direction and, at the end of each chukker, the players change horses. “Two mounted umpires accompany the players, and a ‘third man’ sits near the middle of the ďŹ eld to referee in case of a questionable call between the mounted umpires,â€? the USPA website states. Outdoor polo matches consist of four players on each team, and each player is assigned a position and a corresponding number. “Number one is the offensive forward player. Number four is the back, and his responsibility is defense. Numbers two and three are usually the highest rated and most experienced players, with number three often being the quarterback or ďŹ eld captain, and number two being responsible to push the play both on offense and defense at all times,â€? the USPA rules state. Players are expected to cover their numerical opposites and, like many other sports, anticipating your opponent’s next move is crucial, especially since a player is expected to play their position, be able to use their equipment and control their horse all at the same time. In polo, horses are called ponies because,

Photos Courtesy of the JHPC

At 80 years old, Paul Von Gontard is still the driving force behind the JHPC. He started the club in 1957 and plays to this day. early in polo history, the height of the horse was restricted to pony size. Over the years, this has changed and, according to the USPA, the average size of a modern “polo pony� is

l WYO a u n n 12th A

15 to 15.3 hands. Traditionally, quarter horses and thoroughbreds made up the equines on the ďŹ eld but, so long as a player has a good level of horsemanship, any horse breed can be used. “In most cases, thoroughbreds rule, but in the U.S. there’s been some phenomenal straight quarter horses,â€? Ramsby said. “Thoroughbreds recover quicker than quarter horses because they have less mass muscle, but I believe an appendix horse [a mix of thoroughbred and quarter horse] can outdo most thoroughbreds.â€? A broke horse will do anything, Ramsby added, but regardless of breed, polo players should look for a horse “that is deep in girth for a large air capacity, a short back for quick maneuvering and conformationally correct legs for a lengthy career,â€? the USPA explains. Due to the possibility of collisions, the ponies wear bandages on the legs topped with protective “bootsâ€? on the front and back feet. Usually, the mane and forelocks are shaved, and the tail is tied up to prevent any entanglements. The players, too, are well protected with helmets and leg pads that stretch from the foot to the knees. “It can get a bit rough,â€? Rambsy said. “When 2,000-pound horses come together at 35 mph, things can get a little exciting. But we try to

minimize the danger and maximize the thrill.â€? The most English thing about the game, Ramsby explained, is the tack. Polo players use a at, English-style saddle and bridle with two reins and a martingale, so that is something a rider accustomed to a horned saddle might have to get used to. But overall, the game is completely inclusive to anyone who can ride a horse and likes high-speed action and competition. “It’s a simple game,â€? Ramsby expressed. “It just takes a little while to get used to the mallet and the gear, but the rest comes real natural. You know right away if this sport is for you.â€? Besides the JHPC, there are clubs all over Wyoming, the west and the country. Sheridan has the oldest polo club in the U.S. and, Ramsby explained, getting involved in polo is as easy as contacting a club and showing up with your horse. Be it an English lord or a Wind River cowboy, Ramsby said the best advice he could give to a prospective polo player is to “just take a deep seat and a far away look.â€? For more information on upcoming JHPC games, events or to take a lesson visit the club’s website at www.jacksonholepoloclub. com. To ďŹ nd a club near you, visit the USPA at www.us-polo.org.

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

COWGIRL CONFRONTS CANCER HEAD-ON BADURA WANTS TO WATCH HER BOYS GRADUATE FROM HIGH SCHOOL By Gib Mathers STAFF WRITER

Beau Badura, of Clark, Wyo., was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2002. It’s been a rough journey, but Badura is still kicking and still riding to this day.

Photo/ Gib Mathers

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hough diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 29 in 2002, there is no quit in Beau Badura. The Clark, Wyo., cowgirl faces her disease head-on with grit and a grin. Now Badura’s cancer is in remission, but she is by no means out of the woods. “Even when they say you’re in remission,” Badura said, “it doesn’t mean you’re cured.” Badura smiles often and maintains an optimistic outlook. “I never want to be remembered as the girl that died of cancer,” she said. “I want to be remembered as the girl that went down smiling, riding her horses.” Indeed, Badura is a member of

Chaps and Chapeaus, a women’s riding group that stands out at parades in 19th century garb. Nicole Michaels, co-administrator for Chaps and Chapeaus, described Badura as a “very plucky gal who also barrel races and ranches for a living.” Badura also is a member of U are a Barrel Racing Champion (UBRC), similar to the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association. Her cancer was diagnosed as HER2-plus – human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 – the nastiest breast cancer gene, she said. “They didn’t know if I was going to come back from it,” she said. “It was pretty aggressive.”

CANCER continued on page 17

SUMMER 2012 | Published by News Media Corporation


CANCER continued from page 16 She was treated at the Mayo Clinic and hospitals in Billings, Mont., and Powell and Cody, both in Wyoming. She endured a year of chemotherapy and radiation treatment, plus 16 surgeries in four years to rid her body of cancer cells that insidiously kept emerging. “The scars are battle wounds,” Badura said. “ T h e y ’r e my Purple Hearts.” Since her right side was subjected to radiation treatment, it now feels like her ribs are permanently broken, she said. Chemotherapy causes patients to lose skin pigmentation and all body hair, Badura said. Some folks act as though cancer is contagious, she said. When the chemo claimed her hair, she feared the wind would snatch her hat and thus frighten children. Badura met her husband, Mark, a fourth generation rancher, while she was battling her disease. Doctors said she couldn’t bear children, but she had two: Logun and Reigan. “There’s days when I wake up and I’m in so much pain,” Badura said. “Oh my gosh, I can’t do it.” Then Mark steps in. “Come on,” Mark exhorts, “you can do it!” “He knows what I need,” Badura said. Like a bronco-busting wrangler being thrown from the saddle, she plants her feet in the stirrups and climbs back on. When Badura was sick from chemo and radiation, she still climbed into the saddle, even if it required strapping her in. “Once I’m up there, I’m good. I just need that support system,” Badura said. Fetching a stool to lift her into the saddle or hoisting her onboard is sort of emblematic of her support. Her husband, children, horses, God, Chaps and Chapeaus – those are Badura’s boosters, plus many other good people, she said. The Chaps and Chapeaus ladies are true-blue friends. “They’re just great people,” Badura said. “It’s a hoot. I love it.” Like successful barrel racers everywhere, Badura is one with her horse. Badura and her horses wear pink – the symbolic color for the battle

against breast cancer – with pride. She sewed a bright pink Christmas horse blanket, complete with ribbons and other adornment. It captures the eye, making it unlikely observers will miss the fact that Badura is facing her cancer tenaciously. Badura hopes to reach her goal of seeing her boys graduate from high school, and perhaps more. “It makes you think, how do I want to help others? How can I be remembered?” Badura said. Badura’s advice to one late-night caller with cancer was her axiom: “Don’t give up.” (The Powell Tribune first met Beau Badura around Christmas 2010. Despite undergoing another surgical procedure recently, Badura remains the optimist and planned to take part in the Cody Stampede in July. “Everything’s great,” she said.)

We welcome our readers to submit editorials on achievements, milestones, local equestrian stories and organizations!

Josh Thompson Opening Act The McClymonts Saturday Aug 4th PRCA Rodeo July 27th - 28th 7:00 pm Wiener Dog Races July 28th 1:00 pm 29th Annual Rubber Check Race Wed Aug 1st Mud Bog & ATV Races Friday Aug 3rd Bull Riding Thursday Aug 2nd

Carnival Tuesday July 31st -Aug 4th Purchase advance tickets at Murdoch’s in Scotts bluff and The Coffee Cabin located at the Pick & Hammer rock shop in Mitchell Sweeney Family Band Aug 1st - Aug 4th Rodney Dangerfield Impersonator Aug 1st - Aug 4th Ray Thompson Hypnosis Aug 1st - Aug 4th Demolition Derby Saturday Aug 18th Senior Day Aug 2nd Live Stock Sale Aug 4th 1:00 pm SPONSORS ARE: Headliners Pepsi, Murdoch’s Farm & Ranch, Nebraskaland tire group

Platinum Heilbruns Napa Auto Center,VAP Construction Inc, Fisher Roofing & Restoration Steve’s Cleaning & Restoration, Progress Rail Services Premium Fremont Motors, High Plains Feed & B& W Trucking, Lucky Keno, B&C Steel Gold Level S&S Plumbing,Wolf Auto Center, Dooley Oil, High Plains Budweiser, Walmart, Sandberg Implement, Hampton Inn & Suites,Panhandle Feeders. Bronze Kelley Bean, Panhandle Coop, Snells Services, Raganis Auto Center Dodge Ram, McDonalds, Perkins Restaurant, J G Elliott Co. Western Trial Chiropratic, Pizza Hut, Booster Level 2, Oregon Trial Plumbing, Regional West Medical Center Booster Level 3, HorizonWest Inc Booster Level 4, First State Bank Booster Level 5, Tommy Johnny’s Kwik Stop, Anderson & Shaw Construction Inc, Gering Valley 1 Hour Heating & cooling, First National Bank

Do you know a local horse person who deserves to be Equine Enthusiast’s featured local horseman/woman of the year? Please feel free to contact us with any comments or suggestions to help EQUINE ENTHUSIAST best suit YOUR needs!

Published by News Media Corporation | SUMMER 2012

Allen Thayer

307-532-2184 EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

A BOYHOOD FASCINATION LEADS TO A LIFETIME OF WORK WHITING CAN BUILD A SADDLE FROM SCRATCH IN 70 HOURS By Virginia Giorgis STAFF WRITER

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ayne Whiting has finetuned the art of leatherwork in his creation of quality saddles. The Wyoming resident can trace his interest in saddle making to “growing up on the wrong side of the tracks in Evanston.” He had a part-time job at Tubb’s Boot and Saddle Shop for the four years he was in high school. Whiting said his job was to “sweep the floor,” but he was also able to watch Tubb repair and build saddles. “Growing up poor on potatoes and cheese,” Whiting said he wanted a horse. But this dream had to wait until he was older. With a touch of grey in his hair and a twinkle in his eye, Whiting’s humor comes through as he talks about the saddles he has repaired and built, and he demonstrated his knowledge of the saddle industry. Tubb took Whiting under his wing and let him help with the tear down of the saddles before they were repaired. Whiting said he had to “learn the weakness of the saddles, learn where they broke down” before Tubb would let him help with anything else. Then, finally, Tubb decided Whiting had learned enough to let him help with the repair work itself. His apprenticeship with Tubb has lead to more than two decades of saddle repair and fixing under his belt. He said he left southwestern Wyoming for a while and didn’t work on saddles, but when he came back, he got back into the craft. Whiting said he had no idea how many saddles he had built or repaired, but something like “probably 30 or more that I built or repaired the way they needed to be repaired.” His saddles have found homes in

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Photos/ Virginia Giorgis

Wayne Whiting stands in his saddle shop between the sewing machine he uses for leather and a saddle he made. The black machine behind his left shoulder will be used for boot repair in the future. places as distant as Oklahoma, Nebraska, Nevada and Alaska. He said some of his repair work has also been for the Uinta County Sheriff’s Posse. Due to today’s economy, Whiting said most of the work is in repairing saddles. Cheap saddles, according to Whiting, have the “tree riding the horse.” A prime importance for a quality saddle is for the entire saddle to ride the horse. He has repaired saddles that demonstrate the tree, not the saddle, has ridden the horse. The underliner and the skirt need to be fitted to the tree. Whiting said that makes the saddles sturdier and helps to distribute the rider’s weight

WORK continued on page 20

Wayne Whiting cuts the sheep skin skirt away from the outer leather skirt of a youth saddle he is repairing.

SUMMER 2012 | Published by News Media Corporation


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WORK continued from page 18

across the saddle. Today’s saddles, according to Whiting, use sheep hide on the underskirt. Saddles from a long time ago used things like burlap and flannel. About 50 hours is what Whiting said he puts into the saddles, if he uses a Flat Creek Packer pattern. He builds the saddle from the tree up with a screen, makes the underliner and heavy leather skirts, and also puts all the finishing touches on the saddle. Without a pattern, Whiting estimated it takes him about 70 hours to build a saddle. The increase in time is necessary to make a pattern for the saddle. Whiting said he makes saddles with seats from 14 inches to 17 1/2 inches, with 95 percent of the riders taking a 15-16 1/2-inch seat. Whiting’s knowledge of saddles also form the focus for the rest of his business plans for Wild West Products. His saddle shop is in a reconstructed tie camp cabin, which he moved log by log. The old logs were twisted, Whiting said, so they had to be soaked and then screwed down one at a time to build the saddle shop. The old cabin had an attic, as well. This was removed, so the building now has a cathedral ceiling. The base support for the ceiling is a de-limbed ponderosa pine tree with its bark. The cross-member logs were special ordered from a local sawmill. Lining the logs are antique saddles Whiting has picked up. They date back to the Civil War. One has an open tree. Whiting said saddles were often built in the early days with open trees. These saddles are destined for a museum he has planned adjacent to his saddle shop. He plans to move a homesteader cabin to his property south of the Urie crossroads in the Bridger Valley in southwestern Wyoming. In addition to his leatherwork, which also includes custom saddlebags, chaps, holsters and scabbards, Whiting makes horse-training buggies that feature a double hydraulic brake. The brakes are used in training draft horses to turn left or right, and to stop. A horse motel is another facet of Whiting’s plans. Just off of I-80, Whiting said the motel would provide a good service for people transporting horses. It would give the owners a place to take their horses out of their trailers and let them stretch their legs.

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Photos/ Virginia Giorgis

A reconstructed tie camp, moved “log by log” houses the saddle shop of Wayne Whiting. Future plans include a museum and a horse motel adjacent to the saddle shop.

Far left: Custom saddlebags, holsters and canteens are some of the other leather items Wayne Whiting makes in his saddle shop in Bridger Valley, Wyo. Right: These are three of the antique saddles Whiting plans on displaying in his saddle museum. The one on the right dates to the Civil War.

SUMMER 2012 | Published by News Media Corporation


g n i m o y Cutting Horse Lloyd Brower W Memorial Slide Association Futurity IDAHO REINING HORSES ASSOCIATION

July 12th - 14th 2012 • NRHA-IdRHA-CSRHA-Event • All IdRHA & CSRHA Classes Offered • NRHA Entry Level Classes Offered • Youth & Non-Pro Trophy Buckles Awarded

• 1st Ever Team Affiliate Challenge Event • NRHA Classes offered • $5,000 Added Prize Money

FOR MORE INFORMATION: CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE

www.idrha.com or contact Matt Wagoner (208) 680-8077 • srbc2003@yahoo.com Jay Brower (307) 260-5276 • jayb@sublettewyo.com Joan Broadbent (307) 587-9626 • wyoreiners@tetwest.net

Space is Limited. Reserve Your Lodging now in Pinedale WY. IdRHA has some Lodging Reserved @ the Hampton Inn in Pinedale Be sure to as for the Reining Horse How Rate.

Sublette Co. Fairgrounds 10937 HWY 189, Big Piney WY 83113 www.sublettecountyfair.com or Facebook In conjunction with the Cowboy States Reining Horse Association (CSRHA)

Published by News Media Corporation | SUMMER 2012

September 12-16, 2012 SUBLETTE COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS, BIG PINEY, WY

Cattle will be settled at 7:30 a.m. daily for all show days starting on Thursday, September 13th. Cutting will begin at 8:00 a.m. Draw - Wed Sept 12th

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS Wednesday, September 12th 1:00 p.m. Fresh Practice in the working pen Thursday, September 13th 8:00 a.m. Futurity 1st Go Derby Open 1st Go Classic Open 1st Go Friday, September 14th 8:00 a.m. Futurity Open 2nd Go Derby Open 2nd Go Classic Open 2nd Go Saturday, September 15th 8:00 a.m. Futurity Open Finals Derby Open Finals Classic Open Finals NCHA Open $500 Added NCHA Non-Pro $500 Added NCHA 50 AM $500 Added Youth

Futurity Non-Pro 1st Go Derby Non-Pro 1st Go Classic Non-Pro 1st Go Sunday, September 16th 8:00 a.m. Futurity Non-Pro 2nd Go Derby Non-Pro 2nd Go Classic Non-Pro 2nd Go NCHA Open $500 Added NCHA Non-Pro $500 Added NCHA 50 AM $500 Added Youth Derby Non-Pro Finals Classic Non-Pro Finals Futurity Non-Pro Finals *WCHA holds the right to amend this schedule at any time when necessary. *WCHA holds the right to amend this schedule at any time when necessary.

$29,8 0 added 0

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

PROFFIT RANCH HORSE SALE: PRESERVING THE ORIGINAL ‘COW HORSE’ NOT EVERYONE HAS FORSAKEN HORSES FOR FOUR-WHEELERS, ATVS By Deborah Demander STAFF WRITER

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ucked away in the Bear River Valley of southwestern Wyoming, a small ranch works hard, not only to run sheep and cattle, but to preserve the cowboy way. The Proffit Ranch offers a wide variety of horses, bred for stamina, mobility and attitude, according to Kim Proffit. She said the ranch puts out an annual catalog to showcase the horses to be featured at the annual Labor Day Horse Sale at the ranch. Aside from the Proffit Ranch’s horses, the sale also features horses from other breeders.

Proffit said in a recent interview that the sale got started as a rancher thing. Groups of ranchers got together every year to see what everyone else had available, and what they would part with. Over the years, the Labor Day sale has grown and changed, as some ranches have gotten out of raising horses. For the Proffits, though, horses are an important part of life. “They are a big part of everything we do,” Proffit said. “Even as technology advances and more ranchers move toward using four-wheelers and ATVs, we persist in using horses. It is a big part of our life and our tradition.” Proffit adds that the horses raised on the family ranch are special. They

come from strong bloodlines and are smart, quick, athletic and tough, characteristics that make them attractive for working a ranch and for riding. “These horses are fun to ride and fun to work with,” she said adding that the ranch offers lessons during the summer. “It’s been neat to grow up around horses, and we do weekly lessons to help other people learn how fun it is to be a part of a horse’s movement.” Proffit added that lessons advance depending on each individual rider, Courtesy

PROFFIT continued on page 24

Kim Proffit says the Proffit Ranch offers a wide variety of horses, bred for stamina, mobility and attitude.

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SUMMER 2012 | Published by News Media Corporation


70th Annual

Come enjoy the 70th Anniversary of the Fiesta Days Rodeo in our brand new, fabulous Arena. This year’s rodeo will mix the deep tradition of talent and entertainment that has been built through the last 70 years with the experience of enjoying the Rodeo in a modern, state of the art facility that will allow more spectators, better seating and viewing opportunities. This Family Event, presented by Mountain View Hospital, has four action-packed nights of top professional rodeo action. Come see the bucking horses, the ferocious 1-ton bulls, the brave cowboys and cowgirls. Cowboys compete in these classic rodeo events: Bareback Bronc Riding Steer Wrestling Team Roping Tie Down Roping Bull Riding Saddle Bronc Riding Women’s Barrel Racing

Tickets:

July 20 & 21 Child - $6.00 Adult - $11.50 Grandstand - $13.50

July 23 & 24 Child - $13.50 Adult - $13.50 Grandstand - $16.50

Fairgrounds: 475 S Main (Exit #257), Spanish Fork, Utah Fiesta Days Rodeo begins at 8:00p.m. Pre-show activities being at 7:00p.m.

You will also enjoy these crowd favorites: Mutton Bustin’ (The Mutton Bustin’ will take place during all rodeo performances. One winner will be chosen each night.) Buckle Presentation Dodge Trucks Pre-Show Entertainment (beginning at 7:30p.m.) Specialty Act Rodeo Royalty Also Featuring: Stock Contractor Sankey Rodeo Company PRCA Rodeo Announcer Randy Schmutz Specialty Act - Tomas Garcilazo Barrel Man - J.J. Harrison Bullfighter - Joe Butler Bullfighter - Richie Harris

Published by News Media Corporation | SUMMER 2012

presented by

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

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PROFFIT

continued from page 22

and as they adapt their balance, the lessons can progress. The annual horse sale features registered quarter horses from the Proffit, Arrow, Elbow, and Bazoo Hollow ranches. The sale typically offers colts, yearlings, 2-year-olds and older horses, too. While these horses are bred to be exceptional work animals, they also perform well in the arena, with extraordinary minds and athletic prowess.

Aside from running cattle and sheep, the Proffit family shares the western experience with families looking for a getaway. The Diamond X Guest Ranch offers exciting opportunities for families to enjoy ranching, horse riding and many more activities. For more information about the quarter horse sale, or the Diamond X Guest Ranch, call (307) 679-5463.

Courtesy

The Diamond X Guest Ranch offers the chance to experience exciting western ranching.

2 0 1 2 P l a t t e C o u n t y

Summer Schedule Platte County Progress Show . . . . May 26-27 4-H Presentation Contest . . . . . . . . . . June 5 PACT & 4-H Fashion Revue . . . . . . July 23-24 Demolition Derby . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 28 Platte County Fair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 30-Aug. 4 • Livestock Shows & Sale • Ranch Bronc Riding (ticket event) * Pig Wrestling for charity (ticket event) • Ranch Rodeo Benefit (ticket event) • Parade Senior Pro Rodeo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aug. 20-23 High School Rodeo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sep. 2-3

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Celebrating 101 Years!

• • • •

Gifts Clothes Feed Farm Supplies

Stop in to outfit both your horse and yourself! www.wheatlandcountrystore.com

301 16TH ST. • WHEATLAND, WY

322-3922

SUMMER 2012 | Published by News Media Corporation


Published by News Media Corporation | SUMMER 2012

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

DRESSAGE: A FANCY WORD FOR TRAINING RANDLE SAYS SPORT BENEFITS BOTH HORSE AND RIDER By Mary Angell CONTRIBUTING WRITER

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ay “dressage,” and most horse people envision a rider decked out in a top hat, tailcoat, breeches and black riding boots executing precise movements on a glossy, high-class horse. While it’s true that is exactly what one sees in the Grand Prix at the Olympic games, dressage is not the elitist discipline some may suppose it is, according to a Cheyenne, Wyo., dressage instructor. It’s for anyone who wants to train his horse to move more athletically. “It sounds like such an obscure thing, but it can be for all people, all manners of horses,” said Deeda Randle, who teaches dressage to about 20 students in Cheyenne and Colorado. “You can enjoy it on all different levels. You don’t have to set out to be an international rider; you can set out just to make your own little guy (horse) better.” “Dressage is just a fancy name for training,” she added. “It’s a primary aid system developed through the military. It’s been stylized to make it into a sport, but the whole essence is to make the horse good on the parade grounds and be useful and last a long time in the military.” The basic level of dressage consists of teaching the horse to pick its back up, let its legs swing freely and carry the rider’s weight most efficiently, Randle explained. As the training progresses and the horse gets stronger, the horse learns to get its back legs more underneath it and its front end up more. “And that’s what we call collection,” she said with a smile. The competitive equestrian sport of dressage is defined by the International Equestrian Fed-

Here the horse is trotting.

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eration as “the expression of horse training.” Dressage competitions range from beginner levels to international competitions. The very basic level of competition requires the rider to make the horse simply walk, trot and canter and form circles and figure eights. The judging is based on the horse’s smoothness, rhythm and willingness to follow his rider’s commands. The three Olympic equestrian sports are show jumping, dressage and eventing, a kind of equine triathlon comprised of dressage, cross-country and show jumping. Eventing, which is based on dressage, is Randle’s sport, and she is a licensed judge and technical delegate. Though the sport is more popular on the East and West coasts, Randle isn’t the only dressage instructor in the area. Sue Gentle, for example, who has competed on the international level, also teaches dressage in Cheyenne. The Cheyenne Dressage and Eventing Club and the Windy Wyoming Equestrian Association in Laramie keep their members informed of upcoming clinics, trials and shows in the area. There are numerous dressage shows in Colorado and several in Wyoming, including one at the Wyoming State Territorial Prison each May and at the Laramie County Community College arena in Cheyenne Aug. 4-5. As a judge, Randle looks at whether the horse can progress from movement to movement and make it look easy; whether the horse and rider are in harmony and maintain balance and rhythm; and the smoothness of the horse’s gaits. Because these are the goals of many horse owners, dressage or eventing may be pursued as a sport in itself or applied to other disciplines: English or Western equitation or reining, for example. “You think about it as an entry level of sport: to get a horse to lift his back and go free in his paces. . . . hmmm. Sounds like a pleasure horse,” Randle said. Dressage is beneficial for both horse and rider – and especially good for building a partnership of the two, she said. It teaches the rider to be consistent in the way he cues his horse, which helps the horse learn faster. “The rider has to be thoughtful,” she said. “You develop a communication system of aids, and the more you do it, the more reflexive the aids become.” This is what makes dressage a “lifelong

Photos by Gary Gwin

Deeda Randle puts Aldebaran’s Rad Magic through his paces. The horse owned by Dr. Shauna McKusker. sport,” according to Randle, whose passion for it is also based on its ability to make the most of a horse’s potential. “I like the process of training a young horse and having him, over time, develop physically and mentally so he is the most athletic he can be,” she said.

Finally, dressage can also help protect the horse from leg, foot and back problems, Randle said. “A lot of those things you can avoid by teaching the horse how to carry a rider,” she said. “God made horses just to walk around and eat grass. He didn’t make them to tote folks.”

SUMMER 2012 | Published by News Media Corporation


Published by News Media Corporation | SUMMER 2012

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

A HEALTHY HOOF IS A HEALTHY HORSE AN OBSERVANT, CARING HORSE OWNER CAN ENSURE PROPER CARE

Photos by Matthew Manguso

While it may look painful, trimming a horse’s hooves is the perfect way to prevent hoof diseases like cracks, thrush and laminitis. By Matthew Manguso STAFF WRITER

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wning a horse is a huge responsibility. Whether a horse owner views an equine as a tool, pet or companion, proper hoof care is essential to ensuring the horse has a healthy, long life. With long winters, wet springs and a varied terrain, horse owners in Wyoming must be especially careful when it comes to properly caring for a horse’s hoof. According to Tina Gehlhausen, doctor of veterinary medicine at the Pinedale (Wyo.) Animal Clinic, the hoof is the heart of the horse. “Horses carry 80 percent of their body weight on their front two feet. That is a huge amount of weight, and, if you want a func-

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tional horse, they have to have good, maintained feet,” Gehlhausen said. From cracks to laminitis, there are a myriad of ailments that can afflict a horse’s hoof, and Gehlhausen repeatedly emphasized the onus is on the owner. Commonly referred to as founder, laminitis is an inflammation of the digital cushion that sits beneath the rear end of the sole and separates the frog from the bulb. Laminitis is extremely painful for a horse, and, without treatment, the finger-like connection that holds the coffin bone and hoof wall together can break down and cause permanent damage. In extreme cases, the coffin bone can literally sink down to the ground and force a horse owner to euthanize his or her equine. “A horse can founder from 1,000 different causes, but grain and grass founder are the

two most common ways,” Gehlhausen said. Grain and grass founder occur when horses happen upon a cache of grains or are left to pasture on lush, nutrient rich grasses like alfalfa or lawn grass. Unaware that the grain or grass will lead to hoof problems, horses will gorge until they are stopped. Overweight horses are extremely susceptible to laminitis, and their food intake should be strictly monitored. Another potentially life-threatening hoof condition is a crack. Hoof cracks come in all shapes and sizes, and while some, like surface cracks, can heal on their own, others, like deep, working cracks, can lead to infection and sometimes death. Vitamin supplements, especially those high in biotin, will aid in promoting healthy hooves. Then there is thrush. With Wyoming’s wet and soggy springs, thrush should be a major concern for all horse owners. Occurring primarily around the frog, thrush is a bacterial infection that thrives in wet and muddy conditions, Gehlhausen explained. It is a black, tarry substance that, if allowed to enter the soft, inner tissue of a hoof via cracks, can cause lameness and the hoof to bleed. Though thrush is easily treated, it is a constant threat to a hoof and, sometimes, it may take as long as a year for the frog to properly heal and regrow. “There are so many case-dependant things that can cause hoof damage, but the responsibility is on the owner. One of the ways is just being observant to your horse,” Gehlhausen said. Gehlhausen began her veterinarian career in Indiana. Compared to Wyoming, Indiana has much milder winters, and less diverse terrain, allowing owners to ride and work their horses year round. Properly maintained hooves are vital, especially where horses are left to pasture in the winter and then used heavily for ranching duties in the spring and summer and with outfitters in the fall and where a horse can be ridden through river valleys in the morning and then over rocky terrain that afternoon. In addition to observing a horse, and a properly monitored diet, having regular appointments with a skilled farrier is of the utmost importance. “Trimming problem horses every four to six weeks, and regular horses every

Regular trimming of a horse’s hooves are vital to the overall health of a horse. six to eight weeks with a good, professional farrier is extremely important,” Gehlhausen added. Trimming a horse’s hoof is similar to trimming your own fingernails, but the process is much more critical for a horse due to the amount of weight the hoof bears. “A horse’s hoof grows constantly,” JB Bond, a Daniel farrier, said. “On average, the hoof grows 3/8 of an inch every five or six weeks. Because of that, they need trimming periodically, and, if you’re riding them on rough ground, you have to put shoes on them.” Without monthly trimmings, a horse’s hoof can grow irregularly, cause cracks and lead to lameness. “[The hoof] is what bears the horse’s weight, and it’s not something that needs to be addressed on a daily basis, but certainly every five or six weeks,” Bond added. “When you own a horse, it’s entirely up to you to take care of it, and hoof care is just one of the elements you are required to take care of. It’s super important.” If even one hoof becomes diseased, a horse will generally compensate by adding weight to others. This compensation will lead to more ailments until, eventually, all the hooves become affected, Gehlhausen said. Being an observant, caring horse owner is the best way to ensure proper hoof care.

SUMMER 2012 | Published by News Media Corporation


EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

‘THE ONLY FRIEND I HAD’ YOU NEED IS SOMEONE WHO WILL LISTEN By Shaun Evertson STAFF WRITER

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was home on leave for the first time after deploying overseas and “seeing the world.” I’d just returned from eight months in the Mediterranean Sea and Indian Ocean – the Med and I.O. in naval vernacular – embarked with Carrier Airwing Eight in USS Nimitz, where I’d served as a Search and Rescue Paramedic and Rescue Swimmer. It was springtime on the EJE Ranch in Kimball, Neb., and the grass was lush and green and looked especially good to my eyes. Cows and calves dotted the prairie, the air was warm and the breeze filled with the smell of rich earth and growing things, hawks soared overhead in the evening sky, a good home-cooked meal filled my belly. I was home and everything looked good, looked the

way I remembered it, looked the way I saw it in my mind’s eye during the long months of deployment. The only thing that was different was – me. Eight months on a warship will change any man, particularly a young man writing the first chapter of his adult life. But eight months of flying search and rescue during a deployment where seven aircraft went to the bottom and 11 good shipmates were lost ... Well, that experience changed me in ways I wouldn’t begin to fully understand for many years. I ambled toward the barn in the darkening evening, trying to wrap my mind around the enormity of the

FRIEND

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experience. I wasn’t having much luck. Just the night before I’d met some high school friends at a local watering hole and tried to explain my Navy job and the recent cruise. I didn’t know it at the time, but there’s a gap between “them that has and them that ain’t,� and it’s a gap that can’t be bridged. There’s no right or wrong to the gap; it’s just a fact of life. “Them that ain’t� can’t begin to understand. That’s just the way it is. As I rounded the corner of the barn, the fading twilight was nearly gone and the yard light already burning. At the corner of the corral stood an old friend, a trusty black quarter horse gelding named Poke. He’d been cut at 8 and was still convinced he was a stud. He was a handful but game as they come, and he’d always been a superb horse. Good cow sense, easy gait, sure-footed, miles of heart. And ready, in the fading light, to mooch a bit of sweet mix. As Poke chewed away and as I curried his mane and tail, I thought about a line from Audie Murphy’s World War II autobiography, “To Hell and Back.� Somewhere toward the end of the book, a pair of soldiers talk of home and horses. “Sometimes a horse was the only friend I had,� said one. With that thought in mind I began to spill my guts to ol’ Poke. I told him about the kid with the terrible steam burns, about the Prowler that ran out of gas over Sicily one night and the way the pilot died and about the botched barricade landing that killed seven men in one terrible,

drawn-out instant. Then I told him about the worst one, the first one. The S-3 crash on my birthday. How I’d wanted so much to save that young man’s life, how I realized after leaping into the sea that his injuries had been instantly fatal, how I’d spent a long, cold hour with him in the open ocean, waiting for the live ones to be rescued first, bobbing side by side with a dead hero in the mild swell, his torso harness gripped gently in my hand. All through the telling, Poke just stood there quietly, chewing sweet mix and listening. He didn’t understand a word I said, of course. I’m sure he sensed my emotion, but I’m sure he didn’t know what it meant or what to do about it. He was in it for the sweet mix and the curry comb, and he put up with the jaw flapping because it might mean more treats and attention. And maybe, just maybe, because he respected me much as I respected him. At any rate, I’d found someone to talk to, someone to help me begin to make sense of the harsh realities of life. By the time I finished telling those tragedies, I felt as wrung out as a sponge but infinitely better. I know now that hurts locked away in manly silence only fester; it’s always best to “let the bad out.� Poke was never the only friend I had, but, on that spring evening 30 years ago, he was the only one I could talk to, the only one who would listen and the one who helped me start climbing out of an awfully dark hole.

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

UW STUDENTS TEACH EQUINE CLASSES ABROAD STOPS INCLUDE UNITED KINGDOM, SWEDEN AND DENMARK By Adam Louis STAFF WRITER

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our University of Wyoming students and one instructor are taking advantage of the opportunity of a lifetime. The five UW representatives recently left for the remainder of the summer to teach horsemanship to riders in Europe. The university’s new equine program in the Department of Animal Science received a grant from the American Quarter Horse Association to teach overseas. “This is an amazing opportunity,” said UW extension equine specialist Amy McLean. “All four students have worked with horses a good bit, especially in teaching environments. They are all very well accomplished.” The students are teaching in the United Kingdom, Scandanavian

University of Wyoming student Kateylynn Ewing, of Sidney, Neb., taught overseas through UW’s new equine program in the Department of Animal Science.

Courtesy

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countries and portions of western Europe. Classes range from basic western riding lessons to showmanship and roping. They will conduct clinics in Karlstad, Sweden, Horse Creek Farm in the United Kingdom, Drumcoura Equestrian Centre in Ireland, and Tuse Creek Ranch in Regstrup, Denmark. “A lot of planning and coordination goes into spending a month in Europe,” McLean said. “Each host wanted something different, based on the level of the rider.” McLean said the four students selected for the trip were Kateylynn Ewing, of Sidney, Neb., Corinna Slingerland of Lander, Wyo., Lindsey Hankins, of Fort Collins, Colo., and

CLASSES continued on page 48

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

OUT OF THE SNOW AND INTO THE FIRE HORSES STILL HAVE PLACE IN ANY BOVINE OPERATION By Megan Rawlins STAFF WRITER

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ith calving season upon us, the fields and pastures across Wyoming are dotted with small, nursing baby cows unaware of their fate. In the month of May, branding season began, and the acrid smell of smoke and the bleating of the calves spread across the ranchland from one weekend to the next. Ranchers are a special community and a community in the true sense of the word. Families travel from ranch to ranch, helping each other move, sort and brand the newest in the herd with the understanding that without that mutual aid, not a single one of them would survive in

Photos/ Megan Rawlins

FIRE continued on page 34

Corey Jensen, with rope and rein in hand, wraps the tail end of the rope around the horn to pull the calf to the branders.

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FIRE continued from page 33

Photos/ Megan Rawlins

Clay Kainer (right) and Neal Stelting work as team to wrestle a calf. One of the joys of this time of year is the strong sense of community it brings among ranching families and friends.

Kristi Kainer, catching her charge, pulls it in. With two ropers and more than 100 calves, it is a long day for both horse and rider. the business. The other half of that crucial team is comprised of the dozen horses carrying riders, working the cattle and getting uncomfortably close to a red-hot branding iron. With the advent of all-terrain vehicles, it may have seemed the age of the cowpony had come to a close, but, until a four-wheeler can sense a cow’s movement and head it off instinctively, there will be a place for the equine in any

bovine operation. Watching the riders deftly sort calves and cows or the ropers pick a single target among many black heads, pulling an anxious calf to its fate, is visual conďŹ rmation of the horse’s value in this venture. When branding is over and scabs have healed up, the horses will return to move herds to grazing allotments, pushing the cows through deserts, up mountains and across rivers, catching the wayward straggler along the way.

Cotton Bousman gives aid to some of the riders to move the process along. He means one less body wielding an iron, but one more nimble horse manipulating the cows.

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SUMMER 2012 | Published by News Media Corporation


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Brian Welling 307.789.7021 Published by News Media Corporation | SUMMER 2012

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

HOMES SOUGHT FOR WILD HORSES YOUNG AND HEALTHY HORSES GO UP FOR SALE TO KEEP NUMBERS MANAGEABLE By Amber Ningen STAFF WRITER

A

s the calm blue roan mare slowly made her way into the arena, bidders could be heard whispering about the gentle-looking horse. While the horses up for adoption before her hadn’t seemed to gather that much attention, people immediately started bidding on this mare. After a bid war that livened up the crowd before the mare was sold to her new, excited owner. As all horse enthusiasts know, there are times when you see a horse and just know the horse was meant for you. This blue roan mare was sold at a wild horse adoption outside of Wheatland in late June, hosted by the Bureau of Land Management and the Mantle Wild Horse Adoption and Training Center.

Steve Mantle shows bidders a 2-year-old brown gelding during a wild horse adoption at the Mantle Ranch outside Wheatland, Wyo., on June 23.

Photo/Amber Ningen

The BLM holds wild horse adoptions at various times during the year. Public Affairs Specialist Cindy Wertz said Wyoming has over 5,000 wild horses living on the range. Most of these horses are located in southwest Wyoming. The BLM monitors the horses to make sure there isn’t an overabundance of them. “When there gets to be too many, we go in and gather them,” Wertz said. Before going up for adoption, the BLM vaccinates the horses and verifies that they’re healthy. “If they are too old for adoption, they’re sent to a long-term facility,” Wertz said. “If they are young and healthy, we put them up for adoption.”

HOMES continued on page 37

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Wertz noted that people seem to prefer adopting wild horses that are gentle and halter trained. The BLM will hold wild horse adoptions at the following locations this summer: ■ Cheyenne Frontier Days, Cheyenne, Wyo. – July 20-28 ■ Wyoming State Fair, Douglas Wyo. – Aug. 13-18 ■ Wyoming Honor Farm Fall Adoption, Riverton, Wyo. – August 24-25 Adoption requirements listed by the BLM include the following: ■ Adopters must be 18 years or older ■ Have no prior violations of adoption regulations or convictions of inhumane treatment to animals ■ Will have no more than 4 untitled animals in the same location unless an additional screening form and employment statement are completed ■ Adopters must be present to select their animal For more information on wild horse adoptions, visit the BLM website at w w w. b l m . g ov / w y / s t / e n / p rog ra m s / Wild_Horses.html.

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A 2-year-old blue roan mare makes her way around the arena during a wild horse adoption at the Mantle Ranch.

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

WITH THE ABSENCE OF FEAR, YOU HAVE THE POWER OF TRUST TRAINER CAN REMOVE ALL STRESS FROM HORSE’S MIND By Shauna Lea Freitas CONTRIBUTING WRITER

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t doesn’t take long in the presence of Randy Gunn, horse trainer and Cowboy Mounted Shooting Association World Champion, before a person will start asking questions. In watching a CMSA competition, you might notice Randy sometimes shoots with a rifle. With both hands on the weapon and his horse at a full gallop, my first question was, “So how do you keep your horse exactly where you want him without the use of reins?” Randy’s reply of “well that’s easy” had me going. Then we talked a little bit about all the crazy things that he has gone through with his personal horses and one thing really stood out. Randy’s horses don’t panic when most horses would. That had me asking more questions. How do you train a horse not to do what comes naturally? They instinctively know that on the food chain they are likened to a steak and potato meal. Randy’s answer tied into my first question. “It’s in the training.” Most good horses still have one hang up. They are horses. Whether they are cool-headed or hot-headed, when it gets down to something really scary, horses typically let fear rule them. They can’t help it. It’s how they were born. How can a person convince them that trusting is better than going with instinct? Randy’s proof for his methods would be “in the pudding,” as some would say. With award belt buckles, accolades and many people who are thrilled with the horses he has trained, he has proven his techniques work. I asked Randy about his philosophy for training horses, and it was surprisingly simple. Beyond safety for him and the horses he works with, there is one goal in mind. They have to learn that stress is gone when they follow the master. Horses don’t like stress, so, when they find this out, it’s a relief for them to be able to put their trust in someone other than themselves. Day one of training starts in the round pen. With nothing on the horse and the trainer in the center, the first lesson commences. Using a rope or something to make noise, the horse starts to circle. If it slow down, you make more noise.

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Courtesy

Action is fast in a Cowboy Mounted Shooting Association event. The horse is working, he would like to get rid of the noise and he wants to get away. But with nowhere to go, he continue to circle. After 15 minutes or so, the trainer ceases all noise and says “whoa.” If the horse stops and looks at the trainer, the lesson is half over. If it doesn’t, it goes back to circling. The trainer doesn’t need to chase the horse, just keep up with noise and movement to keep him going. When the horse does stop at the “whoa” and turn to the trainer, then you move on to step two of lesson one. At this point, the horse is tired and a bit winded; he wants to stop. If he lets the trainer come up to him and pet him without shying away, lesson one is almost finished. At the end of the first day, the horse should follow the trainer around. When he is following the trainer, he doesn’t need to run from a noise; he doesn’t need to be afraid. There is stress when he is running around the arena, trying to get away from noises. There is no stress when he is following the trainer, even if there are other things happening. Following the trainer is safe. Using this as a foundation, Randy has

It’s not easy to hit a target from the back of a moving horse. been able to train horses to excellence, fix bad habits and enjoy a high level of trust with all his animals. If we can communicate se-

curity to our horses and gain more of their trust, fear would no longer be the master of our hoofed friends.

SUMMER 2012 | Published by News Media Corporation


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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

JUST A BIT OF HORSING AROUND LARGE BELGIAN HORSES ENJOY THEIR TIME ON THE PITCH By Shauna Lea Freitas STAFF WRITER

D

o horses need to play games? Do they get burnt out on their respective professions and need their minds and bodies stimulated? Long time Wyoming residents Valerie and Steve Siegel believe their horses are much healthier emotionally and physically with diversity in their lives. Currently, almost all of their horses do more than just one thing. If they pull in harness, they are ridden as well; if they compete in dressage, they also trail ride. But, beyond that, Valerie and Steve get their horses involved in playing soccer as a means to relax – yes, soccer. Like you, I was wondering how this all got started. Valerie explained when they were part of Mounted Patrol, they did lots of exercises with the horses to get them used to unusual things happening around them and the idea to press into something instead of run away from it. The horses were taught to push the ball, to side pass slowly during crowd control situations and to be unafraid of most anything they may encounter. Valerie and Steve purchased two horse soccer balls, a 6-foot ball and a 3-foot ball. They are inflated, very light and bounce readily. The idea was to control the ball and get it in between the cones to make a goal. With horse personalities what they are, some horses start to show a true competitive spirit during playtime. It was during one of these play times when the 6-foot ball met with a serious accident. Two determined draft horses closed in on the ball from opposite sides and gained control simultaneously. The eagerness of the two horses overwhelmed the ball to the point it expired quite abruptly. In this story, there are no details to be had about any horses getting wild over the ball’s termination, only sadness at the loss of a great toy. In the arena, the three-foot ball is brought out for play and training but, besides that, lives a peaceful life. The resident horses like to mess with that ball at every opportunity, though. Valerie and Steve tell me that, when the horses are in the arena by themselves for a night, they tend to have a party with the ball. When it’s time for morning chores, they sometimes find the ball to not only have been moved, but be

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Courtesy

Soccer might be catching on with horses. completely out of the arena. It’s not uncommon to see the horses play with the ball without humans directing them, but never to that exuberant level. Curious to see how playing soccer directly affects the horses, Valerie gave me the chance to get in on the fun. Out came a lovely blue roan Belgian mare by the name of Dixie. With arched neck, and bulging muscles, I was to be privileged enough to ride this sanguine mare in a game of soccer. At first on our own, I warmed her up a bit. She is well trained in the English style of riding and readily obeys commands, though she is a laid back horse as horses go. As we rounded a corner and bore down on the ball, her ears pricked and her pace showed a bit more excitement, though she was still listening to my commands. We kicked the ball, chased the ball and occasionally got it stuck in a corner. We managed to get it through the cones a few times, and both of us had an excellent time.

At this point, Valerie brought out her larger Belgian. Petey is of classic color for the breed; he is over 17 hands and has the high stepping action that causes people to pause when he travels by. Petey is known to get competitive with soccer, and we commenced a game between the two of us. Neither horse ever became flighty or difficult as you see sometimes with horses that game professionally, but both had pricked ears, flared nostrils and excitement in their gaits. Petey would sometimes even guide the ball with his nose while he kicked it. I was amazed at how the horses eagerly came alive over a 3-foot soccer ball and two orange cones. Even though both of these horses are draft animals, all breeds can get just as much out of both learning and playing with the ball. It appears that horses have a strong need to let their manes down and sometimes horse around just like their human counterparts. Seeing these horses eager to participate in a bit of

Go ahead and take a shot on goal.

sport for their own enjoyment has given a new understanding of the needs of our beloved equine friends.

SUMMER 2012 | Published by News Media Corporation


Published by News Media Corporation | SUMMER 2012

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

TA GUEST RANCH: THE PERFECT GETAWAY JOHNSON COUNTY CATTLE WAR REMNANT STILL STANDS HERE By Amber Ningen STAFF WRITER

I

f you’re looking for a getaway that offers gorgeous views, historical beauty, good conversation and plenty of horseback riding, the TA Guest Ranch may be what you’re looking for. Located 13 miles south of Buffalo, Wyo., the TA Guest Ranch is on the National Historic Registry as a Historic District and is the site of the Johnson County Cattle War. The 8,000-acre ranch is family owned and operated by Earl and Barbara Madsen and Kirsten Madsen Giles. The ranch has been in existence for 130 years, starting back in 1882 as a cattle ranch. In 1892, ranch manager Charlie Ford was sympathetic to the Wyoming Stock Growers Association and harbored their “invading” force during the Johnson County Cattle War. Giles explained that the original barn involved in the conflict still stands, as well as the

bullet holes in the bar and throughout buildings on the property. “After the Johnson County Cattle War, the occupants found themselves on the wrong side of the conflict and traded ranches with a Percheron breeder who supplied working draft horses to the Big Horn Basin,” she said. “The ranch was sold to two other cattle ranchers and then to the Madsen family in 1991.” One familiar face at the ranch is clinician Bob King. Giles explained that King is a friend and contemporary of Dan “Buck” Brannaman, who is a horse trainer and a leading practitioner within the field of natural horsemanship. This is a philosophy of working with horses based on the idea of working with the horse’s nature, using an understanding of how horses think and communicate to train the horse to Courtesy

GETAWAY continued on page 46

The original barn involved in the Johnson County Cattle War still stands at the TA Guest Ranch.

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GETAWAY continued from page 44

accept humans and work confidently and responsively with them. One of Brannaman’s stated goals is to make the animal feel safe and secure around humans so that the horse and rider can achieve a true union. Brannaman was one of the primary individuals who inspired the character of “Tom Booker” in the Nicholas Evans novel “The Horse Whisperer” and was the lead equine consultant for the film of the same name. A documentary about Brannaman called “Buck,” directed by Cindy Meehl won the U.S. Documentary Competition Audience Award at the 2011 Sundance Film Festival. “King has been riding with Buck since 1990 and often sponsors Brannaman clinics,” Giles said. “We mention the movies ‘The Horse Whisperer’ and ‘Buck’ when we speak of Bob, because many people have seen those movies and they form a good reference for the style of training that connects the horse and the rider.” Giles said that King is an extremely positive and patient person who works with any level of rider. “I have never seen him lose his temper or his patience. He wants to know your goals as a rider and take you to the next level,” she said. “We own a ‘Dude’ string of horses, and I have seen him work some very jaded horses into pliable and willing companions that look forward to meeting their next rider.” Giles said this program has been extremely successful. It has been interesting, she said, because their ranch has some very experienced horsemen that want to learn how to work cows, but they also have a large European clientele that have never been on a horse. “We have not seen one disappointed client – each person works at their level. We are a very small and intimate setting, which allows us this freedom,” she said. One example Giles recalled involved two experienced riders from France last year. One man traveled with his young family and could only stay a couple of days. “He was able to learn to work cattle in the two days he had with us and accomplished a lifelong dream of riding on the open plains like a cowboy,” she said. The other rider had the same experience but had quite a bit more time. He stayed about 10 days and learned more extensive skills, Giles explained, with both his horse and working cattle. “During that time Bob was able to convince his wife to ride. She wasn’t as confident with her horsemanship skills, but Bob made a big difference for her and helped this husband/wife team share a passion,” she said. The TA Guest Ranch staff also worked with

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Courtesy

The TA Guest Ranch is open to anyone and offers a relaxing getaway. a man who loved to ride but was a little frightened of the horse, because it is so big and potentially dangerous. “Every time he got on he loved his time, but was a little on edge. Bob worked with him in the round pen and got his horse to latch on, and it completely changed his riding experience,” she said. “It was a very beautiful and emotional experience to see both rider and horse let their guard down and enjoy each other without reserve. That’s our measure of success, and we are privileged to be a part of that learning.” The TA Guest Ranch is open to anyone. It is one of the few guest ranches that does not require a mandatory stay. You may stay one day, three days, two weeks, etc. Located four hours from Cheyenne, three hours from Rapid City, S.D., and Billings, Mont., the TA Guest Ranch is quite accessible. The ranch buildings have been historically renovated and feature period antiques. “Our goal is to provide a relaxing getaway. Nice rooms, good food, good conversation and lots and lots of riding,” Giles said. For more information on the TA Guest Ranch, visit http://www.taranch.com.

The TA Guest Ranch offers many activities to its clients. Each person works at their own level in the small, intimate setting.

SUMMER 2012 | Published by News Media Corporation


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TUNE-UP continued from page 32

Lacey Teigen, of Laramie, Wyo. “These four young ladies will all have the opportunity to share their experiences training, riding, showing and judging with AQHA international affiliates,” McLean said. “The idea behind the horsemanship camps is for the students to help strengthen horsemanship skills and to promote the appreciation of the American Quarter Horse, among international members.” Teigen transferred to UW from Laramie County Community College. She grew up riding horses and was involved in 4-H and the Future Farmers of America. She found her love for teaching horsemanship to kids while involved with 4-H in Laramie, and attended Laramie County Community College for two years, studying equine management. She met McLean through UW’s horse judging team, which was recently named the reserve world champions. “I like teaching kids how to ride horses, because it can really hurt you if you do it the wrong way,” Teigen said. “Hopefully, they will love

[horses] as much as I do. Growing up with horses opened up so many opportunities around the U.S. for me. I’m really excited to go to Europe.” Hankins works in the reproduction barn at the McQuay Stables. Prior to college, Hankins showed horses with her local 4-H club, and gave horsemanship lessons. She was part of UW’s equestrian team last year before working as president of the Collegiate Horsemen’s Association. “This is going to be an awesome experience for all of us,” Hankins said. Slingerland traveled with Teigan to Kenya in December as members of the reserve world champion horse judging team to learn about the equine field in developing countries. A Central Wyoming College alumnus, Slingerland is certified to teach riding lessons in Riverton as a small-business venture. Ewing is also an LCCC alumnus and completed her two-year equine science program. She’s continuing her horse-training skills working for Mears Morgans in Laramie, Wyo. The group left for Europe June 28.

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

NEED HELP? LET THE HORSE AID IN THE SOLUTION POWELL CLINIC SPECIALIZES IN EQUINE-ASSISTED PSYCHOTHERAPY By Dave Bonner STAFF WRITER

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oil it down, and the theory of the Three Amigos Clinic is, “horses can lead the way to human solutions.” “We see animals as teachers,” says Dr. Ajakai Hassler, frankly. That’s the premise of her professional practice in Powell, Wyo., in which horses are often, well, teachers. “Horses reflect who we are,” she said. “They are a mirror of what we feel. If humans are upset, horses can sense it.” The clinic’s slogan emphasizes the point: “Ask the animals and they will teach you.” The reference, drawn from the Bible verse Job 12:7, also reflects the spiritual aspect of the Three Amigos. Hassler’s clinic opened in 2005 just outside Powell, is a practice in equineassisted psychotherapy. She holds a doctoral degree from Virginia Tech and has been in licensed practice for more than 40 years. She also does family and marriage therapy, and individual therapy. The name Three Amigos refers to the original three horses utilized in her practice. Today, only one of the original three remain, but she can now call on eight animals as needed. They include two Arabians, one Paint, one Paint-cross, an Appaloosa, two Quarter Horses and a mule. The clinic, at 1071 Lane 11 1/2, Powell, features an office setting with an attached indoor, heated arena. For the last eight years, Three Amigos Clinic has been credentialed by EAGALA – the Equine-Assisted Growth and Learning Association. Not all sessions involve horses, however. In her regional practice, she sees clients face to face, or she works online

or in telephone consultation. The online and telephone sessions are not therapy, but rather consultations to help clients reach a goal. When horses are introduced into therapy, she and her husband, Chuck, work together. Chuck, a self-declared cowboy, manages the horses during sessions, while Dr. Hassler manages the people. She grew up around horses and says she has “always been close to animals.” What grows from equine-assisted therapy, Dr. Hassler said, are teamwork, selfesteem, cooperation and confidence. She offered an illustration of “horse sense” from a session with a group of at-risk children brought to Three Amigos Clinic over several days. On entering the arena, “This group of kids was fighting, talking over each other and out of control,” she related. “All of a sudden, the fan turned on in the arena. One of the horses turned it on. You would have thought there was no way the horse could have turned it on. The switch was not a button; it was a knob. [The horse] had to hit it just right.” Following the uproar in the arena, silence descended. “What it did immediately everyone calmed down,” Hassler recalled. “We had no cooperation from anybody at first. Then we had it. We had kids who wouldn’t even sit next to horses. At the end of three days, they were all over all the horses, even the one they called ‘Mr. Don’t Touch Me.’” Or Dr. Hassler can cite the instance of the little girl who came in for a session, but couldn’t stop crying. “She cried for most of an hour, and I decided to let it go,” Hassler remembered. “At the end, she asked to see the horses.

Courtesy

Dr. Ajakai Hassler uses horses in her Three Amigos Clinic practice in Powell, Wyo., to see into people and help them solve problems. Still sobbing, she went into the arena. The mule came clear across the way and got right in her face and hee-hawed real loud. Her mood changed immediately.” The approach Three Amigos Clinic

wishes to convey is straight-forward. “What we [and the horses] teach is respect – feeling warm and invited, and growth,” she concluded. “And, of course, fun. It’s always a little crazy out here.”

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

TRAVEL PREPARATIONS DON’T FORGET YOUR BRAND INSPECTION By Vicki Hood STAFF WRITER

I

t’s a routine stop. You’ve packed your gear and the horse trailer, and you’re on your way to a parade – any one of a number held across the state of Wyoming, from the annual Cheyenne Frontier Days to the night rodeo in Buffalo Bill country at Cody. But now, Wyoming’s ďŹ nest want to visit with you for just a bit – perhaps they think you’re just a bit too eager to get to that ďŹ nal destination. So it’s time to ďŹ nd all that important paperwork – driver’s license, registration, proof of insurance, it’s all there – at least you think it is, until you’re asked for that one little paper; that one document that you’d been meaning to get, that ďŹ nal piece that tells the world those horses in that trailer belong to you and you alone. That document is a Wyoming brand inspection. Anytime you transport your horses beyond a county line in Wyoming, that brand inspection certiďŹ cate guarantees that you are the legal

owner of that animal, and that your ownership is recognized by the state of Wyoming. Without it, says Wheatland-based Wyoming brand inspector Zane Morris, that ownership can be called into question. “If you don’t have that brand inspection, you don’t legally own that animal in the eyes of Wyoming livestock laws,� Morris said. A brand inspection is much the same as a car title, and every bit as important with regard to proof of ownership. According to Wyoming statutes, every equine purchase in the state must have a brand inspection at the time of sale - a fact of which many horse owners are not aware. The seller must sign his or her current brand inspection when the horse changes hands. Without it, your horse can actually be detained and held while the paperwork is processed. So you say, “but my horse doesn’t even have

TRAVEL continued on page 53

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TRAVEL continued from page 52 a brand.” Despite the reference in the name of the form, when it comes to horses, having a branded horse is irrelevant. Every horse, regardless of branding, must have a brand inspection form to be considered legally owned by the person who claims to be the owner. Although many people who own horses believe the brand inspection is only a form they need to transport in and out the state or across county lines, that simply is not the case. There are two forms available to owners in Wyoming. The first, Form A, is a temporary document that allows transportation on a onetime basis. Wyoming also issues the permanent Form L that, once issued, is valid for the lifetime of the animal, or until that animal is sold or traded. Unless you are going in or out of the state of Wyoming, Form L is generally the most convenient to residents because, once complete and issued, it satisfies the requirement permanently. Brand inspectors are available across the state, and their names and phone numbers are available on the state’s brand inspection website at: http://wlsb.state.wy.us/brands.htm. There is also extensive information regarding the Wyoming brand inspection process for horses and all other animals on the website. If you will need a brand inspection, be mindful of the time of year, as fall is a very busy time

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and scheduling a brand inspection will likely require advance notice. Most brand inspectors will work with a horse owner to make arrangements with regard to time and place for an inspection. To be legal, a brand inspection must be done during daylight hours. A brand inspector collects the fees on behalf of the state, and is paid for their services through their system. They attend classes offered by the state, and must pass a stringent practical test before they are allowed to hire on. Brand inspections have long been required for horse ownership, but the very face of that ownership has changed much over the past 30 years. With Wyoming’s rich history of raising cattle and sheep, most horse owners were already aware of the brand inspection requirements. But with the pronounced increase in recreational use of horses, many people do not have the background that would provide that insight. Brand inspections are also required for moving horses in and out of state, and that process has additional requirements based on your needs. But if you’re a horse owner residing in the Cowboy State, be sure you’re in compliance with the brand inspection laws before it matters. Hefty fines and, more importantly, delays in your schedule can be costly and inconvenient.

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McCULLOCH PEAKS MUSTANG

Photos/ Gib Mathers

Wild mustangs, such as this young horse, roam the Bureau of Land Management’s 110,000-acre horse management area. For more information about these mustangs, see page 56.

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Excellent Wyoming Opportunities!

BULL CREEK RANCH LOCATED ON THE SOUTHFORK 1726 Southfork Road

WAGNER RANCH – TROUT FISHING WITH DRAMATIC MOUNTAIN VIEWS 132 Arland Road

BAR TL RANCH, MEETEETSE WYOMING RANCH FOR SALE 5544 Highway 120

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One of a kind production ranch! This property is clean and all improvements are first class. 1000 +/ac. deeded plus large State grazing lease, 1-1/4 mi. of Bull Creek, superb deer and elk hunting. Lots of wildlife and recreational opportunities. Three homes, hay storage buildings, equipment storage building and Show Barn. 2011 produced 2200 tons of Timothy Grass Hay. $7,750,000

Lying along the upper reach of Meeteetse Creek with a backdrop of 11,000 ft. Carter Mountain, the Wagner Ranch is comprised of approximately 1,475 ac. deeded, approx. 3,600 ac. State of WY grazing lease. Exceptional deer, elk and antelope hunting. Offering privacy, beauty, easy access to Cody – this ranch has a great owner’s residence, three smaller homes for guests or employees (all totally remodeled) and two large reservoirs for trophy trout fishing. $4,100,000

Located approximately 5 miles north of Meeteetse on Highway 120, the ranch headquarters are now being offered for sale. This consists of approximately 425 acres, almost all of which is either irrigated or sub-irrigated meadow. The ranch has extensive water rights, including territorial rights on the Greybull River. The ranch enjoys approximately 2 miles of frontage on the Greybull River. The majority of the land on the other side is State of Wyoming land. $3,200,000

The property consists of approximately 204 acres of irrigated meadows and river bottom land with mature trees and vegetation. Abundant spring water is present and a spring fed fishery would be easily developed. The Greybull River borders the property on the east side for 1 +/- mile. The 3,850 sq. ft. home, built in 2004 features custom cabinetry and solid oak doors and trim, 4 or 5 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths and a very tasteful trophy room/office with wet bar. $1,950,000

RANCH ON IRON CREEK 25 Cow Country Lane

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Custom log home, creek, trees, 35 acres of hay and pasture AND borders federal land with large reservoir! Home has open beam ceiling, decks, 4 bedrooms, 3 full baths and double garage. Plus finished walkout basement. 80' x 100' steel clear span arena and much more. End of road location between Cody and Powell $595,000

Excellent access and visibility make this income producing building one of Cody, Wyoming's finest. Amazing stone exterior, multiple addresses, with good rental history. Corner location across the street from the famous Irma Hotel. 4 separate commercial rental units. This is a two story building with endless possibilities. $575,000

99 +/- ac. with 68 +/- ac. of irrigated pasture, fenced into a total of 8 separate pastures for easy rotational grazing all with stock water access. Extensive improvements include a 3,779 +/- sq. ft. main house with 4 bedrooms and 2 baths, a 1960 +/- sq. ft. manufactured home, a 2,100 sq. ft. frame built office and clinic, a 3.800 sq. ft. steel Quonset for equipment storage, original homestead house, and a 1,000 +/- sq. ft. storage shed. This ranch provides all the essential components for a fantastic livestock operation. $790,000

Fantastic piece of property w/1-1/2 miles of the Big Horn River. 360 acres includes mature cottonwoods, meadows, farm ground and 266 acres of irrigation water. Located at the foothills of the Big Horn Mountains. Income of $10,000 per year comes from a government conservation reserve program and an annual farm lease. Recreational opportunities are limitless and includes fishing, rafting, hunting, and photography. There are some fantastic building sites among the trees with views of the Big Horns. $550,000

COUNTRY CLUB LIVING - HOME ON TRI LEVEL HOME NEAR SCHOOL WITH VIEWS, VIEWS, VIEWS! 40 ACRES IN 5 ACRES w/ GREAT VIEW OF BIG THE GOLF COURSEt508 Skyline Drive LOTS OF ENTERTAINMENT OPTIONS WAPITI VALLEYtHammon McCall Trail CREEK & JIM MOUNTAINt0 Dome Drive 3307 Sandback Avenue, Cody, W Y Located on the prestigious Olive Glenn Golf Course, 40 acre parcel located on a dead end road in Wapiti Majestic Views from this 5+ acre tract sited on near the 15th tee box, it consists of 3 bedrooms, a half bath, a three quarter bath and a full bath. Upgrades include new flooring, a remodeled kitchen with hickory cabinets, new appliances and remodeled bathrooms. There are two fireplaces, a two car garage, fenced yard, a detached storage building. $355,000

Comfortable tri-level built in 2005 and in excellent condition, this home has 2,296 sq. ft. +/- including 4 bedrooms and 2 full baths. A privacy fence and patio with an open gazebo for dining and a fire pit for the cool evenings. This home has a theatre room and a 24 hour monitored security system. Located across the street from the new Sunset School. $259,900

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Valley. Superb views range from the Shoshone River bench overlooking the Northfork, Big Creek, and Jim all the way up to the 12,000' peaks. Good private Mountain. Easy access, midway between Cody and road access, great privacy, excellent building sites Yellowstone $59,500 in a heavily used wildlife area. Close to fishing access on the River. Borders public land with access to U.S.F.S. land. Only 30 minutes to Yellowstone Park. $170,000

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

PREATOR PUBLISHES NEW BOOK OF MCCULLOCH FACTS AND FOLKLORE ‘WE’RE NOT GOING TO LOSE OUR WILD HORSES’ By Gib Mathers STAFF WRITER

M

cCulloch Peaks pundit Phyllis Preator sets the record straight in her second book, “Facts and Legends: Behind the McCulloch Peaks Mustangs.” The book is loaded with photos, history and folklore. The book was written, partly at least, because folks are always asking her questions about the horses. “I figure that anybody that comes out to photograph these horses should have some facts about them,” Preator said. She spends plenty of time in the McCulloch Peaks in northern Wyoming, but said she also completed her fair share of research for the book. Peter McCulloch was one of the first cattlemen to arrive in 1879, she wrote in the book. Although the local spelling is McCullough Peaks, the hills were named after McCulloch. Petroglyphs indicate horses arrived in the area in the late 1600s. By 1730, the Crow, the predominant Indian tribe in the area, were trading for horses. “My people got their horses out of the lake on Polecat Bench,” Preator quoted Crow Chief Plenty Coups. The bench is just north of Powell, Wyo., and the lake is a mirage that shimmers under favorable atmospheric conditions.

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

Photos/ Gib Mathers athers

On a cold January day, author Phyllis Preator was checking out her stock after checking king the McCulloch Peaks mustangs that her book, “Facts and Legends: Behind the McCulloch Peaks Mustangs” is based on.

“…At the right angle on the right day, horses can be seen coming out of the lake,” Preator writes. The Bureau of Land Management oversees the 110,000-acre horse management Area. For this area, the appropriate number of mustangs is 70 to 140, according to the BLM. The herd is well managed, Preator said. These days, stallions must compete for mares. That is good. More competition equals greater diversity,

Preator said. “It stirs the bucket all the time,”” she said. There are horses of Spanish descent and horses that resemble Morgans in the Peaks, Preator noted. The McCulloch mustangs’ future seems secure. “We’re not going to lose our wild horses,” Preator said. “They’ll be here forever.”

SUMMER 2012 | Published by News Media Corporation


Published by News Media Corporation | SUMMER 2012

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

EVENTS CENTER READIES FOR NHSFR ‘IT’S ABSOLUTELY ONE OF THE BIGGEST EVENTS WE’VE HOSTED’ By Travis Pearson STAFF WRITER

I

n the next few days, somewhere around 11,000 people, many hauling large horse trailers behind their trucks, will flood into southwestern Wyoming, namely Rock Springs, for the National High School Finals Rodeo. Roughly 1,500 contestants from 43 states, along with Canada and Australia, will compete in bronc and bull riding, team and calf roping, and plenty of other events at the Sweetwater County Events Complex from July 15-21. Once the spotlights turn on, the cowboys and cowgirls performing in the arena will become the main attraction. Meanwhile, the work that went into putting on such an event will be largely forgotten, highlighted only if something goes wrong. That’s likely fine with the staff at the events complex; after all, the high school students

are the main event. But the amount of work that goes into putting on an event of this magnitude is a remarkable achievement. Luckily, the Sweetwater County Events Complex 13-member staff is up to the task and, if all goes according to plan, the NHSFR should go off without a hitch. While the event center is used to putting on events – marketing director Chad Banks is quick to point out the staff is in the “events business” – the NHSFR is right at the top of the list in terms of size. “It’s absolutely one of the biggest events we’ve hosted. It’s probably one of the biggest events in Sweetwater County and in this part of Wyoming,” Banks said. The road to holding the NHSFR began March 2011 after the Illinois location originally contracted to host the event was unable Courtesy

NHSFR continued on page 60

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NHSFR continued from page 58 to fulfill its obligation. In a “last-minute effort,” Rock Springs threw its name into the hat and was awarded the event – through 2015. In terms of an event like the NHSFR, starting from last March is “honestly much less time than most places have to prepare for it.” When Banks talks about the planning such an event has required, this is no surprise, as the event center has spent more than $4 million in physical upgrades alone. “So much has gone into it,” he said. “We’ve had to do a lot of infrastructure improvements to our facility. I mentioned to you that we had 1,250 campsites. Last year this time we had around 214, so we’ve added more than 1,000, and they’re still under construction right now.” The campsite development will allow about 6,000 to 8,000 people to live onsite during the event. Banks and other event center staffers have also blocked out 1,000 hotel rooms in Sweetwater County. That’s just the beginning for improvements. The arena was split so two performance areas could be be run simultaneously. Two new jackpot arenas were added, along with various power upgrades, including heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. And seating for 5,000 had to be ready. About 1,500 portable stalls had to be brought

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in to house the animals and go along with the 250 the events center already had. “We have added a huge number of pens for not just the horses, but…also the livestock like calves, roping cattle, the roughstock and all of those sorts of things. We have to be ready for all of that,” Banks said. The pens will be more than necessary, considering the animals who will be working alongside the participants in Rock Springs will be to the tune 130 head of bulls, 260 bucking horses, 240 calves, 240 steers, 125 goats, an additional 300 steers for the cutting, 100 head of steers and calves for the practice pen, and 100 head of steers for the cutting pen. The event center will have 450 golf carts available for rent by contestants, and another 100 will be reserved for event staff. Of course, the tangible stuff is only one piece of the preparation puzzle for Banks and company. “During that time also, we’ve been working with the stock contractors to make sure they have everything they need, working with the NHSRA office, taking hotel reservations, campground reservations, developing a marketing plan, an emergency operations plan,” Banks said, slowly trailing off as a number of other tasks are applicable.

Courtesy

Drainage and irrigation systems are installed in the midway area of the Sweetwater Events Complex. Surprisingly enough, the county-owned facility is not expected to turn a heavy profit, if any. “No, it’s certainly not expected to be a revenue-generation event for us. Part of our mission at the events complex is to help the economic well-being of our community,” Banks said. The NHSFR, for those unfamiliar, is a big deal. The event brings contestants, their fami-

lies and countless fans. In Gillette, last year’s rodeo created $9.455 million in economic impact for the greater Gillette area. Those associated with all parties – and to be sure, it’s been a group effort between the

CENTER continued on page 62

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CENTER continued from page 60 Sweetwater County Events Complex, the National High School Finals Rodeo Association and numerous Rock Springs organizations – anticipate a similar community impact in southwestern Wyoming. “It’s not just Rock Springs,” Banks said, adding one-third of hotel bookings have gone to Green River as of mid-June. “One of the goals that we have and that we’ve had all along is, when we’re hosting the event and were awarded the bid to host the event, we want to make sure the contestants and their families and the board members and anybody associated with the rodeo…that they’re spending time in the communities of Rock Springs and Green River, and taking advantage of the recreational offerings that we have.” This reach could potentially spread to Pinedale, Jackson, Yellowstone National Park and beyond. This is what it’s all about for event center staff and the communities involved. It’s more than a moneymaker for Rock Springs; it’s a way to show off southwestern Wyoming to people from around the country and other parts of the world. So, despite all the work and the size of the rodeo, and the fact that Rock Springs’ annual

Fans pack the indoor arena of the Sweetwater Events Complex during the 2011 Mountain States Circuit Finals PRCA Rodeo held last October. big event is only days after the conclusion of the NHSFR, Banks talks about the preparation and leg work with almost another “day at the office” type of attitude. “We’re comfortable,” he said, noting how detail-oriented and precise the staff is. The goal is huge. Making sure all contestants and visitors leave with positive impressions of the area, the event and the center, hopefully all going off simultaneously without a hitch, is an impossible-sounding task. “It is a lot more than what we’re typically

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James Higginbotham, National High School Rodeo Association executive director, addresses a crowd gathered at the Sweetwater Events Complex. He was announcing the selection of the Sweetwater Events Complex as the host site for the 2012-2015 National High School Finals Rodeo. used to. We’re just pushing everything up,” he said. “We don’t want to deal with any fires when the high school rodeo comes up. We want to have all of those things done, so we don’t suddenly have a, ‘Oh, we forgot about this’ or ‘Oh, what about that?’ We’re trying to ask all of those questions now so we can make sure all of those things are done now,

and our Is are dotted and Ts crossed before anyone gets here.” But the staff at the Sweetwater County Events Complex has displayed a determination about and attention to the little things that have earned them accolades for more than a year. With this in mind, it’s safe to assume the event is in the right hands for the next few years.

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

UTAH’S EQUINE EDGE UTILIZES CUTTING EDGE AI TECHNIQUES DR. BARTLETT GRADES EMBRYOS BEFORE THE IMPLANTATION STEP By Anjoli Mosier STAFF WRITER

D

r. Tonya Bartlett of Equine Edge in Farr West, Utah, exemplifies modern advances in specialty breeding and foaling, but of an unusual nature. Most of the breed work that takes place at Equine Edge is through artificial insemination. Semen samples are initially collected and the mares are bred. This is done to protect the mare and stallion from injury. When mares are in heat, they can kick a stud and easily cause injury. Similarly, a stud when mounting can injure the mare. It is for the safety of these invaluable animals that artificial insemination is the most effective course of reproduction, according to Bartlett. So studs are trained to mount a dummy so semen samples can be collected. The size of a mare’s follicles are checked about every other day to determine when they are ready for insemination. When the follicles get to about 40 millimeters, the mare is ready to ovulate. Bartlett watches closely for that ovulation to happen, because there is only a 48-hour window during which the mare can be impregnated. With a horse that’s going to be doing an embryo transfer, it is best to know within 12 hours of when she ovulates. Those mares will be checked more frequently, as the exact time of ovulation is crucial for the process to be effective. Fort Collins, Colo.-based Royal Vista is home to over 300 reset mares. Those mares are the recipients of many embryo transfers. When it is evident an embryo transfer can be done, Bartlett will call Royal Vista and let them know that the mare in question has been implanted and to expect an embryo in eight days. Eight days from ovulation, the mare will be flushed with roughly six liters of fluids of a

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Photo/ Anjoli Mosier

A mare is mere days away from giving birth or foaling. special solution that will protect the embryo until it can be implanted into a surrogate. A balloon catheter is used to ensure that all the fluid they put into the mare is drawn out through the same catheter inserted in the cervix. The catheter is attached to a tray with a filter in it, letting the water and fluid though but holding the embryo. The embryo is too small to see via ultrasound at that point, but it can been seen through a microscope. Embryos can be found anywhere between six and eight days post-implantation. If the egg was fertilized on the day of ovulation, an eight-day embryo

is likely. After ovulation, it could take a few days for the sperm to actually find the egg, which might result in a six-day embryo. Bartlett grades the embryo to see if it appears to have good cells inside, and if the outside has a good color. “Once we do the grading, we decide to send the top two grades on to implantation in another mare,” she said. “With that we just ship those the same was we ship semen, which is in a cooled container. We have container with ice packs which cool to a certain temperature. We ship these to Colorado the same way we would semen. There will be a mare waiting there

who has ovulated at the same time we took the specimen from here. That mare is checked in full a week later, and they can make sure she is in foal. They then wait 25 to 30 days, when they can check for a heartbeat. Once a heartbeat is found, implantation is considered successful.” Equine Edge representatives will then pick up the mare and keep her at their facility until she has foaled. Once the foal is weaned, they will send her back to Fort Collins.

TECHNIQUES continued on page 66

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TECHNIQUES continued from page 64 Not to long ago, Equine Edge handled a breeding where the owner was in Montana, but the mare in Utah. The stud the mare was bred to was in Texas – the semen had been frozen and shipped. The resulting embryo was shipped to Colorado, and the foaled mare was picked up and taken back to Montana. Although semen can freeze and still be used, the embryos aren’t freezing as well right now. Semen freezes well in tubes the size of coffee stir straws. Thawing takes about 20 seconds. For some studs, it can take up to eight straws of his samples to make enough semen to impregnate a mare. The American Quarter Horse Association is allowing four embryos per year on a mare, so you could actually register up to five horses in a year from a single mare, because four could be embryo transfer foals, and one could be a foal that the mare actually carried herself. Thoroughbreds, however, are only allowed live cover breeding, so no artificial insemination or embryo transfer can be registered.

Photos/ Anjoli Mosier

This one was very friendly and curious about the kids. It would come up and smell them, one would giggle, and it would jump away. Then it would get curious again and come back.

Dr. Bartlett helps keep the horses and kids calm, so the kids could pet them.

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | COLUMN

WITH BITS, QUALITY COMES WITH A COST MASS-MADE PIECES OFTEN HAVE DISTORTIONS AND POOR WELDS By Gavin Ehringer CONTRIBUTOR

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he old saying “you get what you pay for” certainly holds true when you buy a bit. What distinguishes an off-the-shelf bit, that sells for $30 or $40, and a hand-made custom bit costing 10 times as much? The answers not only affect the look of the equipment, but everything that goes into them: The quality of materials, the craftsmanship, the fit and, most importantly, the performance. Compare bit-making to the craft of winemaking. There are vintners who produce thousands of gallons of wine in huge stainless steel vats, combining varieties into a generic product sold in a box. Then there are winemakers who look at every detail, every variable: The soil, the location, the climate and the best varieties to take advantage of them all. Each vin-

fail. In a high-production workplace, it’s tage is carefully crafted, and each bottle hard to develop high quality-control stanlovingly handled to result in a wine that dards, but you can make a product that is is vastly superior and, to the discerning very low-cost. Needless to buyer, worth the price paid. say, these mass-produced Today, most off-the-shelf products seldom perform to bits are made overseas. Cost high standards. is the main criteria in their A high end, handcrafted manufacture, so they use bit, on the other hand, adcheap varieties of steel. Parts heres to higher quality are cast or stamped, which standards. At our shop, for results in low-precision fit. instance, we use steel that To compensate, heavy welds is hand-chosen in the steelare used. These are then filed and polished to make yard to meet our specificathe bits look “finished.” But tions. Some of our steel is the same material used in look closely and you will Gavin Ehringer certified aircraft parts. see the lack of precision. When we make a bit, the Shanks that aren’t aligned, parts are machined to exact ports that are off-center, dimensions prior to assembly. This results hinges that bind on one side and are loose in a precision fit: hinges work precisely on the other are common faults. The bits and are matched on either side, and welds may lack balance, or they may simply be are uniform and strong. crafted in such a way that they break and

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E EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE URE

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

KINDNESS RANCH: A SANCTUARY SANC FOR RESEARCH ANIMALS

BRED TO RUN, RACE ACE AND BARREL 7 LAZY K RANCH QUARTER HORSES BOASTS OASTS SOME OF THE NATION’S FINEST

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ar out, on the edge of Sublette County, even out past the edge of the small town of Boulder, is a ranch that, come early next spring, will welcome four registered racing quarter or paint horses into the world. The small breeding outfit of 7 Lazy K Quarter Horses is, despite its size, home to children of some of the nation’s top moneymakers in the field of racing and barrel racing. The stud in residence is Dashing Move Fame, whose sire, Dash Ta Fame, was a barrel champion that produced millions of dollars in race earnings. Two of this spring’s foals will be Dashing’s, and owner, operator, breeder, trainer and all-around head honcho Heather Wells said she is already looking forward to meeting the young ones and gauging their potential. This has been Wells’ first year breeding Dashing, although she and her partner Bill Kelly have been breeding racing and barrel horses for eight years. Dashing’s previous offspring were too young to race the 2011 season, so no one will know how his progeny will perform until the 2012 season starts May 1. But Dashing’s bloodline is solid. His father, grandfather and great-grandfather, as well as his grandmother and great-grandmother, all have speed indexes over 100. A speed index of more than 80 earns a horse recognition for merit. Wells and Kelly are among the more than 100 performance breeders in Sublette and Sweetwater counties, and Wells said they are much smaller than many of the other breeders. “We do it for the fun of it,” she said. “We may make some supplemental income, and the horses we sell typically cover our expenses.” But it’s clear by the smile in her eyes it’s the love of it that keeps her going. It’s a lot of work monitoring mares to determine when they’re in heat, conducting the breeding and then monitoring mares to see if they’re in foal, not to mention raising foals from birth to when they are released into pasture. Kelly

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By Amber Ningen STAFF WRITER

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efore coming to the Kindness Ranch, RayAnne, a tall thoroughbred, was not adoptable. The mare had been used in research and had behavior problems and no manners. Today, she is able to run free through a pasture with other horses in rural southeast Wyoming. The once ill-mannered RayAnne now has good manners, thanks to the new culture that surrounds her. RayAnne’s story is just one of the Kindness Ranch’s success stories. Located near Hartville, the Kindness Ranch American Sanctuary For Research Animals is a 1,000-acre ranch that takes in all kinds of animals formerly used in research. Dr. David Groobman founded the sanctuary, which opened in the summer of 2007. Groobman dedicated 10 years of planning to the sanctuary. Ranch manager David Sleeper said Kindness Ranch staff members are not animal activists. “Our job is to provide the research laboratories a wonderful alternative to euthanasia,” he said. In order to do that, the Kindness Ranch fosters a working relationship with the researchers. While at the Kindness Ranch, animals

Courtesy photo

Dashing Move Fame is the stud for Heather Wells’ 7 Lazy K Quarter Horses outside of Boulder. works out of town much of the time, and many of these tasks are left to Wells. Mares are monitored with an ultrasound machine Wells has at the ranch. Images can tell her when mares are beginning their fertility cycle, to give Wells as much time as possible to administer the artifi cial insemination to impregnate them. The ultrasound can also tell when fertilization has occurred, even before there’s a heartbeat. The day-in, day-out work comes once the foals are born. “It’s a lot for one person to halterbreak, trim the hooves and pick up the feet of all the foals every day,” she said, explaining part of the routine to get the newborns accustomed to being around people. But when the foals aren’t being handled, they’re running around the paddocks, bucking and carrying on like the ability to walk was their own personal discovery, which, in a way, it was.

After 11 months and two weeks growing slowly in a mare, foals are born and able to walk within hours. It’s not the most graceful walk, as their legs unfold from nearly a year curled beneath them. But they figure out what it means to be a horse. Soon enough though, they’re walking and running – then racing. If Wells can’t fi nd buyers for her foals, she’ll keep them and race them when they’re a year old, with the hopes of selling them as finished racehorses. Unlike thoroughbreds, who race between 3/4 and 1 1/2 miles, quarter horses typically run between 300 and 400 yards, around one quarter of a mile – hence the name. Wells takes her horses to Idaho to race, ve tracks. The e, where there are fi five Rock ck Springs track recently opened, and shee said she’s looking forward to doing some me racing closer to home. But Idaho isn’t ’t that bad, she said, when compared

to traveling to Oklahoma to race her paint horses. Quarter and paint horses belong to different associations, so their races are separate, although the races themselves are similar. When their racing career is over, Wells’ horses transition into running barrels, and this is where Dashing’s bloodline emerges to take center stage. Wells said in the barrelracing world, Dash Ta Fame is a household name, and often all the promotion needed to get Dashing’s name recognized. And with that should come demand for breeding opportunities. That’s all the more so, since Wells is keeping the stud fee at $650, when most performance stud fees exceed $1,000. That may change, though, when Dashing’s potential, as realized through his offspring, is recognized. If his foals do well next season, Wells and Kelly may not be doing this all just for fun anymore.

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– which include horses, dogs, cats, sheep and pigs – are rehabilitated in a homelike environment. Though Sleeper says he doesn’t consider himself a horse whisperer, he has a philosophy that has allowed him to form relationships with once untrusting animals. The more afraid an animal is, the more powerful and “permanent” is the response to his techniques. Although the philosophy is given in much better detail when Sleeper relays it to visitors at the Kindness Ranch, the bottom line is that animals mimic our behavior. If a human shows respect by using certain listening and intuiting techniques, coupled with an unwillingness to enter in to the animal’s “zone of intimacy” unless invited, the fearful animal becomes attracted like a magnet to this energetic safety exhibited by the human. The human basically focuses on evolving themselves to their higher form with no agenda and the animal amazingly is attracted and mimics that behavior. The fearful animal ends up being the instigator and choreographer of the deep bonding on an energetic level that emerges. Techniques then follow which encourage non-impulsive thinking behavior with the resulting boost in self esteem. Sleeper said that he can’t tell who is the

Members of the Kindness Ranch are welcome to stay in “yurts” while visiting. For more information on visiting the ranch, visit www.kindnessranch.org.

| FEATURE

Photos by Amber Ningen

Horses at the Kindness Ranch roam a pasture on a sunny October morning. The Kindness Ranch is made up of 1,000 acres. lead mare at the Kindness Ranch. “They all have manners, squabbles are rare and the pecking order seems to be non-existant,” he said. The former lead mare now has the most manners and perhaps the others are following her lead. In RayAnne’s case, the thoroughbred had been getting treats and sweet feed before coming to the Kindness Ranch and she was ill mannered towards people and equines. Sleeper’s idea is that having a relationship with an animal’s stomach leads to impulsive and addictive behavior with poor manners. Whereas relating the heart and mind encourages thinking and evolving and good manners. Sleeper said the 15 horses at the Kind-

ness Ranch now have their own culture that is based on manners and thinking. When a new horse arrives like RayAnne, instead of pecking order battle, the whole herd helps her to leave her impulsiveness behind and become a thinker with manners. “This sounds so strange and impossible until one sees it in action. It is a very rewarding for us folks to see animals that were subject to the trials of research end up living harmoniously with high selfesteem in a Wyoming paradise,” he said. The Kindness Ranch welcomes visitors. It offers well-appointed cabins for its members to stay in while visiting. For more information on the Kindness Ranch, visit kindnessranch.org.

Ranch Manager David Sleeper demonstrates his First Lite technique on Stormy.

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FALL 2011 | Published by News Media Corporation

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FRONTIER DAYS FINALIST FOR ARENA VET NAMED PRCA AWARD DR. NORM SWAN SON KNOWS A THING OR TWO ABOU T BIG-TIME RODE

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STAFF REPORT

serving of this award, which makes he Profession the job of the al Rodeo Cowselection committee boys Associatio very difficult,” n is proud to said Doug Corey, announce the DVM, Pro Rodeo Hall of Famer sen out of a stellar five finalists choand chairman of the fi PRCA Animal for the 2011 “PRCA eld of nominees Welfare Committee Veterinarian of “It is an honor the Year Award,” to be associated with presented by Purina. such The field includes group of veterinarya distinguish ed profession son of Cheyenne, Dr. Norm Swanals that advocate for the welfare nated by Cheyennewho was nomirodeo livestock.” of Frontier Days Rodeo officials. The original field of 16 nominees The 2011 recipient was narrowed to will these be five announced in late distinguished veterinaria October and will ns: honored at the be ■ Dr. Joseph PRCA Contract Coli, Reno, Nev.; Personnel Banquet nominated by Wednesday, Nov. the Reno Rodeo in Las Vegas, 30, and Bob Feist and Wrangler National during the 53rd ■ Dr. Garth Lamb, Finals Rodeo SatLas Vegas, urday, Dec. 3, Nev.; nominated by 2011, at the Thomas Shawn Davis Mack Center in & ■ Dr. Norm Swanson, Las Vegas. Cheyenne; The award was nominated by created in 2010 Cheyenne Frontier recognize dedication to Days Rodeo to the health and welfare of ■ Dr. Jake Wells, rodeo livestock San Antonio, veterinaria ns across by Tex.; nominated the country. The by the San Antonio award is made Stock Show & possible by a partnerRodeo ship with Purina ■ Dr. Wes Mills to sponsor Wittman, Sonora, the award. Calif.; nominated by the Mother “Every nominee Lode Roundup is absolutely deRodeo and Tuolumne County Sheriff’s Posse

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has been part of

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Courtesy photo

‘The Daddy of ‘em

by Cheyenne Frontier

All’ for 42 years.

Days Rodeo

| FALL 2011

WILD

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

continued from page 46

EQUINE ENTHUSIA ST

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WILD HORSES: A SYMBOL OF THE AMERICAN WEST THE LARGEST NUMBER OF WYOMING’S WILD HORSES ARE IN THE SOUTHWEST By Virginia Giorgis STAFF WRITER

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yoming boasts the second largest wild horse herd in the nation, second only to Nevada. Wild horses are symbols of the West – they are untamed spirits and have free range on a wide-open landscape. Today’s wild horses are descendants of horses brought to the United States by the Spanish, as well as horses subsequently turned out by ranchers or led away by the wild horse herds. As of February, there were 5,333 wild horses in Wyoming, according to June Wendlandt, Wyoming’s BLM wild horse and burro program lead. Currently, the number of wild horses is around 2,000 head over the projected management level, which is set at between 2,490 and 3,725 horses.

The wild horses are regulated under the Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act of 1971. The act sets guidelines for maintaining the wild horses and their forage. “We have healthy horses in Wyoming, and we want to keep it that way,” Wendlandt said. Wild horses differ from domestic horses, as they have naturally bred for survival in the wild countryside. They are more compact and have thicker, sturdier legs to carry them over the open ranges. Wendlandt said a large part of management requirements for wild horses is determined by the vegetation and forage on BLM land. She explained the BLM is a multiple-use agency, so the land they manage is divided into multiple purposes, such as wildlife, wild horses, livestock and recreation. BLM analyzes the “amount and type of forage and divides it into pieces of the pie.”

Courtesy of BLM

BLM Wyoming Herd Management Areas (HMAs) for 2011.

Wild horses are found in Wyoming on the western half of the state from as far north as the Cody area to the state’s southern border. Wendlandt said wild horses in Wyoming are managed in 16 management areas, with the largest number of wild horses in the southwest. Wild horses can be seen from I-80 as motorists drive across the western portion of the state. There are Courtesy photos of BLM also a number of wild horses in the Some of the scenes of the horses living in the wild make for worthRed Desert area. while touring.

FINDING WILD HORSES

Courtesy of BLM

Pilot Butte Wild Horse Scenic Tour.

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

The two easiest places to view wild horses are in the Pryor Mountains outside Lovell and in southwest Wyoming, near Rock Springs. A loop tour has even been developed near Rock Springs, known as

the Pilot Butte Wild Horse Scenic Loop Tour. The area is easily accessible and is on the top of Pilot Butte, which lies on the east side of Rock Springs. The 24-mile self-guided tour can begin

WILD continued on page 47 FALL 2011 | Published by News Media Corporation

in either Green River or Rock Springs. Travelers should plan on about 1 1/2 hours to complete the tour, most of which is on gravel roads. “It is a good tour to take,” Wendlandt said, “and most likely the wild horses will be there.” Another sizable herd is in the Adobe Town area, south of I-80 near Rock Springs. The Pryor Mountain Wild Mustang Center features a museum. Visitors can learn about the horses there, as well as the current location of the herd before driving out to locate it. Another benefit is often the sighting of other wildlife in the area. Wild horse management tools include a count of the herds, maintaining the forage, roundups and adoptions, and managing the reproduction of the herds, Wendlandt said. Other management tools for the wild horses include “gathering and removing excess horses, treating the mares with PZP – a form of birth control which prevents the mares from breeding for two years – and adjusting the ratio of the released horses so more males are released than females. That helps maintain a slower growth rate of the herd so the time between round ups can be lengthened, Wendlandt said. Another option that has been considered has been spaying mares and neutering studs. This option has been sidelined until it can be determined what its impact would be on geldings being released back into the herds.

ADOPTING WILD HORSES

Roundups are conducted periodically if the wild horse numbers are deemed too large. The gathered horses are then put up for adoption. To adopt, applications must be submitted by interested parties that contain many specific, including what type of trailer will be used to pick up a horse, and what type of pen will be employed. Requirements include maintaining a fence six feet or higher, a 20by-20 foot enclosure constructed of substantial pipe or wood and connected to a shelter of at least 12by-12 feet. Such specifications are required because most of the ad-

Published by News Media Corporation | FALL 2011

opted horses are “untouched,” or have had little training, though some of the adopted horses may be halter or saddle broken. In Wyoming, the process runs through the spring and summer, though in other states the adoption process is handled year-round. The corrals in southwest Wyoming were closed Sept. 30. There were 128 horses adopted in Wyoming this year, Wendlandt said. The aim is to have 2,000 to 3,000 wild horses adopted nationwide; these numbers were not met this year. Wendlandt blamed the lower adoption rate on the weak economy. “It is hard for people to think about feeding a horse,” Wendlandt suggested, “when they are thinking about feeding their family.” Wild horses have been adopted by a wide variety of individuals. Some are retirees who want to trail ride, others are younger p e o p l e who need a good working horse for their ranch. Others just wa n t to pleasure ride. W i l d horses, Wendlandt said, are “very versatile and

can do almost anything.” She added a wild horse was “the best horse I ever had. She would wait for me to get home from school. I could catch her with no halter, no lead line, and ride her to the house” after Wendlantdt got off the bus from school.

MUSTANG DAYS

A prime wild horse-related event in Wyoming is Mustang Days. The event is held in conjunction with the Mustang Heritage Foundation, a non-profit group. The event was most recently held at the Wyoming State Fair Aug. 16-20, and included competitors as young as 5 years old showing their wild horses. Competitions consisted of mustang owners competing in things like halter, trail courses, western pleasure and freestyle, which can include a theatrical bent. Cheyenne resident Kathi Wilson’s performance with her wild horse was “so cool,” Wendlandt said. Wilson “laid her horse down on the ground. It was done to music, and then she got on and road bareback.” Another important part of Mustang Days is the competition between wild horse trainers. Members of the Honor Farm at Riverton work with some of the wild horses before they are adopted. Also, three members of the Mantle Wild Horse Training Facility competed against one another. The horses have been trained anywhere from 20 days to a year. Jeff Martin of the Honor Farm earned the belt buckle for being the best trainer. The adoption rate was 20 out of 20 – 18 horses and two burros – at the Mustang Days. Wendlandt credited this to the fun and excitement of the event, which made others want to participate next year.

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

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C & K Equipment, Inc Authorized Bobcat Dealer 1851 Commercial Avenue Sheridan, WY 307-674-6405 FACILITIES Goshen County Fairgrounds Western Hospitality At It’s Finest Indoor Arena Handicap Accessible Stadium Seating Large Parking Lots Concessions Lockable Office Space Vendor Space Enclosed Horse Stalls RV Hook Ups 307-532-2525 slofink@goshencounty.org

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CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE FARM EQUIPMENT REPAIR SERVICE Floyd’s Truck Center 60 Plus Years in business Truck & Trailer Alignment, Repair, Parts and Service RV Service, Repair, and Towing Full Service Body Shop Sidney, NE, (308) 254-5956 Scottsbluff, NE, (800) 658-4052 Cheyenne, WY, (866)600-3911 Sandberg Implement Inc. Serving Western Nebraska, Eastern Wyoming and Northern Colorado for over 50 years. Offering the quality products, service and support for all your farm, ranch, commercial or residential equipment needs. 160085 Highway 71 Gering, Ne 69341 (308) 436-2179 HorizonWest Inc. Full-line Case IH and New Holland dealership Our Service departments are staffed with factory trained technicians. Scottsbluff, NE, (888) 322-7344 Sidney, NE, (888) 227-3440 Torrington, WY, (888) 922-7344 Reliable Equipment Rentals Over 25 years experience in the construction industry. High quality construction

equipment for rent. We also offer pole barn kits for sale as well as metal siding and rooďŹ ng 1851 Oak Street Wheatland WY 82201 Tel: 307-322-5900 www.reliabletrussandequipmentrental.com

FARM SUPPLY Norco Construction ServicesExperienced framing contractors needed in Sterling, Pueblo, and Grand Junction areas. Call Chuck at 970-539-5250 Heart Mtn. Construction Grain Bins, Barns, Shops, Commercial, Studio and Storage... We do it all! Independent Authorized CHIEF Agri/Industrial Dealer. Call Rod at Heart Mountain Construction for a quote today. 307-202-1035 Wheatland County Store Farm, Ranch & Clothing 301 16th Street Wheatland, WY 82201 Tel: 307-322-3922 www.wheatlandcountrystore.com Frontier Fencing Commercial & Agricultural Pipe, Cable, Security, Chain Link Barbed Wire Barbless Concrete and Fence Removal

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Dave Schanaman Kimball, NE 308-230-0827

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FEED AND SEED ADM Nutrition We Have the Feed You Need Don Bruner Sales Torrington, WY 308-631-3607 ~ Don 307-575-1082 ~ Ashley 23 Feed & Pet Supplies All your feed needs in Sublette County 215 Country Club Lane Unit #1 Pinedale, WY 82941 307-367-4166

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CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE HORSES FOR SALE

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Park County Fair Where Traditions Remain and new Memories Begin. The Park County Fair - July 24-28, 2012 in Powell, Wyoming. Free stage acts, carnival rides for the kids, nightly entertainment in the Grandstands include Pig Wrestling, Monster Trucks, Park County’s Got Talent, Western Underground, Live in Concert and the always popular demolition derby. Tickets available online at www. parkcountyfair.com Yarn Express We specialize in eco-friendly & specialty yarns. 100 N. 2nd Street Douglas, Wyoming 307-358-3660 McCulloch Peaks Wild Horses Want to find the answers to the most asked questions about the McCulloch Peaks Wild Horses? Contact the Author to get your copy of ‘Facts and Legends behind the McCulloch

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CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE Allen Agency Real Estate Call to find out about latest listings! PO Box 612 Pinedale, WY 82941 307-367-2123

codywyoing.com GET THE WORD OUT! Join the EQUINE ENTHUSIAST EVENT CALENDAR! Submit a short description of your club, business or organization’s event for our calendar. Be sure to include relevant dates, times, locations and contact information. Email your event to: Megan at: mrawlins@ EquineEnthusiast.com

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City Shoe & Saddle Shop “YOUR ONE STOP WORK AND WESTERN SHOP” Boot Repair, Western Wear Horse Tack Jewelry, Buckles & Knives Boots & Shoes 104 N 2nd Street Douglas WY 82633

Rodeo Drive Tack Shop: 803 West 21st Street Cheyenne, WY 82001 tack, saddles,(western & English), grooming supplies, accessories, locally made craft items, jewelry, purses & infant clothing A Touch of the West: 215 W. 17th Street Cheyenne, Wyoming 307-638-8750 Boot and Shoe Repair, saddles, tack, western hats & boots Come on in and say Hi! Balding Bits and Spurs Hand Crafted Bits and Spurs Made in America www.tombalding.com 307-672-8459 Cheyenne’s Newest Tack Shop Featuring English and Western Tack, clothing, boots and

New & Used Saddles & Tack

12490 County Rd 1 Longmont, CO 303-772-7821

info@saddleupcolorado.net

Saddleupcolorado.net

Offer Expires 12/31/2011 3/30/12

Made in America www.tombalding.com 307-672-8459

Wild Man Riggins Custom Built Chaps Larry Sandvick Kaycee, Wyoming Shop 307-738-2608 Cell 307-696-2882 The Tack Room; Servicing Wyoming & Northern Colorado 1311 South 3rd Street, Laramie, WY 82070 Call us for all of your tack needs. 307-223-3005.

Kings Saddlery Ropes & Museum King Ropes 184 N. Main Sheridan, WY 82801 1-800-446-8919 1-307-672-2702 Fax 1-307-672-5235 GET RESULTS! Advertise in the EQUINE ENTHUSIAST CLASSIFIEDS! Line ad classifieds for only $15! Display ad classifieds with color photos for only $25! Call 307-532-2184 and ask for Jeanie at jwright@EquineEnthusiast.com to get more information or to place your ad TODAY!

Balding Bits and Spurs Hand Crafted Bits and Spurs

Full Line Of: r5BDLr8PSLXFBS r$PXCPZ#PPUT r$MPUIJOH If Not Corraled in Ten Days Return to r+FXFMSZ Probst Western and www.probstwesternstore.com

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Family Diner

Daily Specials Children’s Menu

more 803 W. 22st Street Cheyenne, 307-426-4075

**Storewide Sale** All New & Used Saddles, Saddle Up Tack & Accessories on SALE!!!

Gift Shop & Catering

Large parking area for horse trailers, grass areas to “walk” your horses.

307-756-3493

86 16th Street Wheatland, WY 307-322-9302

Jim & Nancy Young (307) 358-2734 104 N. 2nd Street Douglas, WY 82633

CITY SHOE & SADDLE SHOP

ADVERTISE IN THE CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE!

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EQUIPMENT • TACK • HORSES FOR SALE/LEASE TRAILERS/ TRACTORS/ TRUCKS RENTAL PROPERTIES • BOARDING FACILITIES

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Moorcroft, WY Published by News Media Corporation | SUMMER 2012

307 756-3493

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE Moss Saddles, Boots & Tack Most Major Brands of Tack Plus a Whole Lot More 4648 W Yellowstone Hwy Casper, WY 307-472-1872 Probst Western Full line of: Tack, workwear, cowboy boots, clothing and jewelry. Visit Probst Western and Outdoor Clothing Co in Greybull, Wyoming. Visit us online at www.probstwesternstore.com Frannie Tack Quality Tack at a Great Price. Full Service Repair Shop. Custom saddles and gear. More than 100 saddles in stock! The Frannie Tack Shop - 58 Lane 2 1/2 in Frannie, Wy 307-8662344 or 800-552-8836

STEEL BUILDINGS Morton Buildings, Inc. High-quality, post-frame or “timber-frame” structures. 190810 Highway 26 Scottsbluff, NE 69361 (308) 635-2414

TRUCKING SERVICES SR Express/ Trucking Hauling Hay and Cattle Garrett Smith Lusk, Wy 307-334-2337 cell 307-340-1751 GET THE WORD OUT! Join the EQUINE ENTHUSIAST EVENT CALENDAR! Email your equine-related event to Megan at: mrawlins@EquineEnthusiast.com

Harnish Veterinary Services “Quality Veterinary Services For Large & Small Animals” Laser Surgery Boarding 172 W Frontage Rd Wheatland WY 82201 Tel: 307-322-3751

4700 S. Valley Road Casper, WY 82604 307-237-8387

PO Box 708 Pinedale, WY 82941 307-367-4752

Goshen Veterinary Clinic Inc. 4548 US Hwy 26/85 Torrington, WY 307-532-4195

Casper Animal Medical Center Veterinary Services

Animal Clinic of Pinedale Specializing in Equine and Small Animals

GET RESULTS! Advertise in the EQUINE ENTHUSIAST CLASSIFIEDS! Line ad classifieds for only $15! Display ad classifieds with color photos

UTILITIES/SERVICES Vista Beam High Speed Internet Provider Nebraska and Wyoming 888-251-0920 For all your Farm and Ranch needs call the professionals at Burns Insurance Agency. 307-634-5757

All Breeds, All Disciplines!

Equine Enthusiast is also available online at www.EquineEnthusiast. com and on Facebook: Facebook.com/ equineenthusiastmagazine

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For all your Farm and Ranch needs call the professionals at Burns Insurance Agency. 307634-5757

VETERINARY SERVICES Henry Construction 4136 Antelope Meadows Drive Burns, WY 82053 Specializing in Post Frame Buildings, Garages, storage, shop, barn & redwood decks

TRAILER SALES Laramie Ford 3609 Grand Ave Laramie, WY 82070 307-745-7315 We offer Featherlite Trailers Ask us about our special truck & trailer combo pricing

Pioneer Animal Clinic 1905 East 20th St. Scottsbluff, NE 308-635-3188 Laramie Peak Veterinary Associates Steve Lucas, D.V.M. John Koger,D.V.M. Brenda Unrein, D.V.M. Large & Small Animal Practice Hills Prescription Diets & Pet Food Grooming & Boarding Available 28 West Frontage Road Wheatland, WY 82201 Tel: 307-322-3640

Quality veterinary services available for large & small animals Harnish Veterinary Services 172 West Frontage Road Wheatland, WY 82201 Office 307-322-3751 Cekk 307-241-0011

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

307-532-2184 SUMMER 2012 | Published by News Media Corporation


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EVENT CALENDAR JULY ■ 4-H rodeo/timed events Mondays at the Cam-Plex, Gillette. Contact Jessica Gladson at (307) 682-7281 for more information. ■ TBRA barrel races Tuesdays at the Teton County Fairgrounds, Jackson. Contact (307) 733-2577 for more information. ■ 351 Productions roping Thursdays at the Sublette County Fairgrounds, Big Piney. Contact Landa Guio at (307) 260-3007 for more information. ■ Campbell County Cowgirls and Cowboys Thursdays at the Cam-Plex, Gillette. Contact Paula O’Connell at (307) 687-0566 for more information. ■ Team roping Tuesdays at the Sweetwater Events Complex, Rock Springs. Contact (307) 382-6698 for more information.

■ World Series Team Roping July 6-8 at the Teton County Fairgrounds, Jackson. Contact (307) 733-2577 for more information.

■ Melody Ranch Show Down polo tournament July 27 to 29 at the Melody Ranch, Jackson. Contact Craig Rambsy at (307) 690-3986 for more information.

■ IRHA Llyod Brower Memorial Slide July 12-14 at the Sublette County Fairgrounds, Big Piney. NRHA - IdRHA - CSRHA - Event. All IdRHA and CSRHA classes offered with more than $5,000 in added prize money. Youth and non-professional trophy buckles awarded. Contact Matt Wagoner at (208) 680-8077 for more information.

■ SBRC Barrel Racing Jackpots July 29 at the Sublette County Fairgrounds, Big Piney. Contact (307) 360-7647 for more information.

■ Blue Sky Challenge polo tournament July 13 to 15 at the Melody Ranch, Jackson. Contact Craig Rambsy at (307) 690-3986 for more information, ■ Little Levi Rodeo July 14 at the Cam-Plex, Gillette. Contact Quentin Reynolds at (307) 682-0912 for more information. ■ National High School Rodeo Finals July 15-21 at the Sweetwater Events Complex, Rock Springs. Check www.nhsra.com for more information.

■ Rodeos Saturdays and Wednesdays at the Teton County Fairgrounds, Jackson. Contact (307) 733-2577 for more information.

■ Teton County Fair July 16 to Aug. 2 at the Teton County Fairgrounds, Jackson. Contact (307) 733-2577 for more information.

■ Supermodel Ropes Thursdays at the Teton County Fairgrounds, Jackson. Contact (307) 733-2577 for more information.

■ SBRC Barrel Racing Jackpots July 18 at the Sublette County Fairgrounds, Big Piney. Contact (307) 360-7647 for more information.

■ Pre-fair 4-H horse show July 1 at the Teton County Fairgrounds, Jackson. Contact (307) 733-2577 for more information.

■ Memphis Roulette polo tournament July 20 to 22 at the Melody Ranch, Jackson. Contact Craig Rambsy at (307) 690-3986 for more information,

■ Little Buckaroo Rodeo July 3 at the Sublette County Fairgrounds. Check www.sublettewyo.com/ calendar for more information.

■ Red Desert Roundup Rodeo July 26-28 at the Sweetwater Events Complex, Rock Springs. Contact (307) 389-1643 for information.

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

■ Campbell County Fair July 30 to Aug. 5 at the Cam-Plex, Gillette. Contact the fair office at (307) 687-0200 for more information.

AUGUST ■ SBRC Barrel Racing Jackpot Wednesdays at the Sublette County Fairgrounds, Big Piney. Walk, trot barrels, youth and open; walk, trot 3-D poles. Contact (307) 360-7647 for more information. ■ Team roping Tuesdays at the Sweetwater Events Complex, Rock Springs. Contact (307) 382-6698 for more information. ■ Campbell County Cowgirls and Cowboys Thursdays at the Cam-Plex, Gillette. Contact Paula O’Connell at (307) 687-0566 for more information. ■ Rodeos Saturdays, Mondays and Wednesdays at the Teton County Fairgrounds, Jackson. Contact (307) 733-2577 for more information. ■ Supermodel Ropes Thursdays at the Teton County Fairgrounds, Jackson. Contact (307) 733-2577 for more information. ■ Stomping the Divots polo tournament Aug. 3 to 5 at the Melody Ranch, Jackson.

Contact Craig Rambsy at (307) 690-3986 for more information. ■ 351 Productions roping and team roping Aug. 9 at the Sublette County Fairgrounds, Big Piney. Contact Landa Guio at (307) 260-3007 for more information. ■ Crown Royal Cup polo tournament Aug. 10 to 12 at the Melody Ranch, Jackson. Contact Craig Rambsy at (307) 690-3986 for more information. ■ Horse Racing Aug. 17 to 31 at the Sweetwater Events Center, Rock Springs. Contact Wyoming Horse Racing at (307) 708-2331 for more information. ■ Big Easy Match polo tournament Aug. 17 to 19 at the Melody Ranch, Jackson. Contact Craig Rambsy at (307) 690-3986 for more information. ■ NBHA District 4 Barrel Race Aug. 19 at the Sweetwater Events Center, Rock Springs. Contact NBHA District 4 at (307) 749-0779 for more information. ■ 351 Productions roping and team roping Aug. 23 at the Sublette County Fairgrounds, Big Piney. Contact Landa Guio at (307) 260-3007 for more information. ■ Powder Basin Equestrian Assoc. Horse Trials Aug. 24 to 26 at the Cam-Plex, Gillette. Contact Don Gerlach at (307) 682-9429 for more information. ■ Shooting Iron Ranch Challenge polo tournament Aug. 24 to 26 at the Melody Ranch, Jackson. Contact Craig Rambsy at (307) 690-3986 for more information. ■ Top Guns Team Roping Aug. 25 to 26 at the Cam-Plex, Gillette. Contact Larry Steele at (307) 290-0743 for more information.

SUMMER 2012 | Published by News Media Corporation


EVENT CALENDAR ■ Ed Wright Barrel Racing Clinic Aug, 31 to Sept. 2 at the Sublette County Fairgrounds, Big Piney. Contact Shelly at (307) 360-7002 for more information.

■ Supermodel Roping Sept. 21 at the Teton County Fairgrounds, Jackson. Contact (307) 733-2577 for more information. ■ Supermodel Roping Sept. 21 at the Teton County Fairgrounds, Jackson. Contact (307) 733-2577 for more information.

SEPTEMBER ■ Rodeo Sept. 1 to 2 at the Teton County Fairgrounds, Jackson. Contact (307) 733-2577 for more information. ■ Horse Racing Sept. 1 to 2 at the Sweetwater Events Center, Rock Springs. Contact Wyoming Horse Racing at (307) 708-2331 for more information. ■ RCM youth and adult barrel racing clinic Sept. 1 to 2 at the Cam-Plex, Gillette. Contact Carey Mackey at (307) 680-4105 for more information. ■ Rodeo Sept. 5 at the Teton County Fairgrounds, Jackson. Contact (307) 733-2577 for more information. ■ 351 Productions roping and team roping Sept. 6 at the Sublette County Fairgrounds, Big Piney. Contact Landa Guio at (307) 260-3007 for more information. ■ ACTRA fall roping Sept. 6 to 9 at the Cam-Plex, Gillette. Contact Vicki Benedict at (307) 751-3966 for more information. ■ NBHA District 4 Barrel Race Sept. 8 to 9 at the Sweetwater Events Center, Rock Springs. Contact NBHA District 4 at (307) 749-0779 for more information. ■ Fizz-Bomb Barrel Racing Sept. 13 to 16 at the Cam-Plex, Gillette Contact Carey Mackey at (307) 680-4105 for more information.

■ NBHA State Championships Sept. 28 to 30 at the Sweetwater Events Center, Rock Springs. Contact NBHA District 4 at (307) 749-0779 for more information.

Affordable pricing for

Equine & Rodeo Events Full Working Rodeo Arena • Heated Facility Sublette County Fairgrounds 10937 Hwy 189 PO Box 544 Big Piney, WY 83113

OCTOBER ■ Ride ‘Em High 4-H Mondays at the Sweetwater Events Center, Rock Springs. Contact Ride ‘Em High 4-H at (307) 389-7840 for more information.

Check out our

page

Grounds Manager Jay Brower Secretary - Brianne Brower 307-749-3546 email: jayb@sublettewyo.com

■ 4-H horse development Oct. 11 at the Sweetwater Events Center, Rock Springs. Contact 4-H Horse Development at (307) 362-3339 for more information. ■ Northwest Barrel Racing Association finals Oct. 12 to 14 at the Cam-Plex, Gillette. Contact Robyn Miller at (605) 209-0503 for more information. ■ WRCHA snaffle bit futurity Oct. 19 to 21 at the Cam-Plex, Gillette. Contact Cheri Carter at (307) 689-2859 for more information. ■ Elk’s team roping Oct. 27 to 28 at the Cam-Plex, Gillette. Contact Ed Cox at (307) 680-0025 for more information.

Published by News Media Corporation | SUMMER 2012

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

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ADVERTISERS

I N D E X 23 Feed & Pet Suppy ...................page 36 A Touch of the West .....................page 73 Allen Agency Real Estate ............page 36 Americas Best Value Inn ..............page 54 Animal Clinic of Pinedale ............page 45 Balding Bits & Spurs ...................page 27 Baymont Inn & Suites..................page 29 Benedict’s Market ........................page 47 Big Sky Ford ................................page 3 Bloedorn Lumber .........................page 61 Borderline Fencing.......................page 51 Bridger Valley Electric .................page 54 Burns Insurance Agency ..............page 45 C&K Equipment Sales Inc. ..........page 53 Casper Animal Clinic ...................page 33 Cheyenne Coffee ..........................page 73 City Shoe and Saddle ...................page 73 Cleary Buildings ..........................page 57 Coffee Cup Fuel Stop...................page 72 Covolo’s Auto-Farm Service........page 22 Cowboy Dodge ............................page 25 Desert View Pro Rodeo ................page 7 Diamond X Ranch........................page 16 Don Bruner/ Animal Nutrition .....page 66 Eastern Wyoming College ...........page 44 Equine Enthusiast #1....................page 68 Equine Enthusiast #2....................page 69 Evanston Cowboy Days ...............page 35 Flat Broke Perf Horses .................page 58 Floyd’sTruckCenter .....................page 39 Frannie Tack .................................page 45 Frontier Fencing ...........................page 71 Goshen County Fairgrounds ........page 79 Goshen Veterinary Clinic .............page 53 Greiner Motors .............................page 2 Harnish Veterinary Services .........page 74 Heart Mountain Construction ......page 45 Henderson Meat Processing .........page 52 Henry Construction ......................page 30 Holiday Inn Express.....................page 72 HorizonWest Inc. .........................page 9 Horseshoe 7 Ranch ......................page 71 Kings Saddlery .............................page 13 Laramie Ford ................................page 49 Laramie Peak Veterinary Associates ........ ...............................................page 77 Laurie Boner ................................page 37 Lidda Christian/Ranch Rodeo ......page 66 Linton’s Big R ..............................page 8 McCulloch Peaks Mustang ..........page 32 Memorial Hospital of Converse County .. ...............................................page 80

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

MJB Animal Clinic ......................page 67 Morton Buildings .........................page 44 Moss Saddles Boots & Tack ........page 32 Mountain West Builders...............page 63 Newman Realty ............................page 72 Nightingale Equestrian Center .....page 13 Park County Fair ..........................page 19 Pioneer Animal Clinic ..................page 30 Plains Tire ....................................page 43 Platte County Fair ........................page 24 Precious Portraits .........................page 72 Probst Western Store ....................page 73 Quality Realty ..............................page 62 Real Estate Page ...........................page 75 Reganis Auto Center ....................page 53 Reliable Equipment ......................page 71 Rodeo Drive Tack Shop ...............page 54 Running Horse Realty ..................page 72 Sandberg Implement ....................page 17 Sawyer, Warren & Buchanan .......page 70 Scottsbluff County Fair ................page 17 Senior Pro Rodeo .........................page 72 Sommer’s & Voerding Realty ......page 55 Spanish Fork Fiesta Days.............page 23 SportsWorld .................................page 11 SR Express/ Trucking ..................page 67 Sublette County Fair ....................page 59 Sublette County Fairgrounds .......page 77 Sublette County Fairgrounds .......page 21 Sweetwater Events Center ...........page 52 Table of Contents #1 ....................page 4 Table of Contents #2 ....................page 5 The Tack Room ............................page 58 Three Amigos Clinic ....................page 52 Todd’s Concrete ...........................page 62 Vimbo’s Dusty Boots Restaurant .page 73 VistaBeam ....................................page 48 Western Saddle and Tack Shop ....page 73 Western Skys Diner......................page 73 Wheatland Country Store .............page 24 White Horse Feed ........................page 71 Widfeldt Training .........................page 71 Wild Man Riggins ........................page 33 Windmill Realty ...........................page 72 Wolf’s Pinedale Dodge ................page 15 Woming West Realty....................page 72 Wyoming Equipment ...................page 31 Wyoming Quarter Horses ............page 14 Wyoming State Fair .....................page 40 Wyoming Trout Unlimited ...........page 65 Wyoming Wool Warehouse ..........page 14 Yarn Expressa...............................page 72

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | COLUMN

UNDERSTANDING COLIC AND HOW TO PREVENT IT ROUTINE EXERCISE ASSISTS HORSE’S HEALTH By Gail Mahnke MS, DVM CONTRIBUTOR

C

olic, by definition, is abdominal pain. In a horse, abdominal pain may be caused by a variety of conditions and circumstances. Horses with colic may look at or kick at their abdomen, or they may roll on the ground and grunt or moan. Colic is one of the most common equine medical conditions seen in veterinary practice, and is always considered to be an emergency, as all cases of colic are potentially fatal. Colic is the most common cause of death in horses. Colic can originate from any of the abdominal organs, including the liver, kidneys and reproductive organs. However, most cases are caused by disturbances in the gastrointestinal tract, where digestion takes place. Horses, by nature of their copious quantities of bowel and method of digestion, are predisposed to colic. Fortunately, there are some fairly simple steps that can be taken to greatly reduce the risks of colic. Maintaining proper feeding schedules and methods is paramount to keeping our horses’ digestive systems in prime condition. A high-quality diet comprised mostly of roughage should be fed. Concentrated feeds containing grains and high energy supplements should comprise no more than 1/3 of the horse’s total energy requirements, and should be divided into no less than two feedings per day. Hay — roughage – is best fed free choice to maintain continual activity in the digestive tract. If types of feed must be changed, it is important to do this gradually over a period of a few weeks, mixing the old feed with the new feed. Abrupt changes in feed, especially going from a higher roughage grass hay to a higher energy alfalfa hay or grain base feed can cause severe digestive upsets.

It is important to keep feed off the ground, especially if it is sandy. Horses will pick up small amounts of debris as they eat and sand can build up over time and be a significant factor in colic. If your horses are kept in a sandy area, it is important to have them on a regularlyscheduled supplement to help remove the sand from their digestive tracts. There are a number or products that contain psyllium which will help to remove the sand. “Equiaid” and “Sand Clear” are examples of these products that are readily available at your veterinarian or local feed store. Routine exercise, preferably on a regular schedule, will assist in the overall health of your horse, and has been shown to reduce the frequency of colic. However, be careful of unusually high workloads. Always build exercise and training levels slowly to avoid stress and dehydration. Always provide clean, fresh water. Make sure during winter months horses have access to unfrozen water; do not expect them to break ice to get a drink. Feed impactions are a major cause of colic in horses that do not drink enough water, especially when fed dry hay. Talk with your veterinarian to establish a regular parasite prevention program that is appropriate for your area and environment. Internal parasites play a big role in digestive dysfunction. Keeping them at low or nonexistent numbers helps keep your horse in prime condition. Horses kept with multiple pasture mates, or in a place where many horses are coming and going, may need more frequent deworming. Remember to call your veterinarian at the first signs of colic. A delay in treatment can mean a big difference in the final outcome for a horse that had colic. Please feel free to contact Dr. Mahnke at drm@caspervets.com with any questions. Dr. Mahnke is a veterinarian and owner of Casper Animal Medical Center: caspervets.com or (307) 237-8387.

SUMMER 2012 | Published by News Media Corporation


THURSDAY, AUGUST 2 GOSHEN COUNTY DAY ENJOY THE SOUND OF HEARTLAND PRODUCTIONS

THURSDAY, JULY 26 9:00 am Supreme Cow Program

SATURDAY, JULY 28 Enter @ 8:00 am***Rope @ 9:00 am GOSHEN COUNTY TEAM ROPING 7:00 PM MMA FIGHTS (RC)

SUNDAY, JULY 29 2:00 pm 4-H Dog Agility (P) 6:00 pm WIENER DOG RACES (P)

MONDAY, JULY 30 8:00 am – noon 4-H Exhibit Interview Judging (4-H Bldg) 8:00 am – noon Ag Hall Exhibit Check-In (Ag Hall) (NON PERISHABLE ITEMS ONLY) 1:00 pm Fabric and Fashion Judging (RC) 5:00 pm Youth Programmed Ride & Trail Class (P)

TUESDAY, JULY 31 7:00 am Horse Exhibit Check-In (Horse Barns) 7:30 -8:00 am Carcass Lamb Weigh-In (Swine Barn) 8:00 – 8:30 am Carcass Beef Weigh-In (Swine Barn) 8:00 am Horse Showmanship, Halter & Performance (P) 4:00 pm Breeding Meat Goat, Breeding Sheep Showmanship, Breeding Sheep & Breeding Swine Shows (Grass)

6:00 pm YOUTH RODEO SERIES & FINALS (P)

NO ANIMALS ALLOWED IN BARNS BEFORE 6:00 AM WEDNESDAY (EXCLUDING HORSES & BREEDING) WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 1 3:00 – 9:00 pm 4-H Building Open 7:00 – 11:00 am Open Class Entries (Ag Hall) Floriculture & Horticulture 7:30 – 8:00 am Carcass Swine Weigh-In (Swine Barn) 8:00 – 10:00 am Market Swine Weigh-In (Swine Barn) 9:00 am 4-H/FFA Rodeo Events followed by 4-H/FFA Barrels & Poles (P) 10:00 – noon Market Lamb Weigh-In (Swine Barn) NOON-4:00 pm AG HALL CLOSED FOR JUDGING 1:00 – 2:00 pm Market Goat Weigh-In (Swine Barn) 2:00 pm 1st/2nd Yr Lamb Project Conferences (RC) 2:00 – 4:00 pm Market Beef Weigh-In (Swine Barn) Heifers followed by Steers 4:00 pm BAKE SALE (AG HALL) 4:30 pm Market Heifer Preg Check (Swine Barn) 5:00 – 8:00 pm Ag Hall Open for vendor set up 5:00 pm Arrival deadline for all other livestock 5:30 pm Mandatory Livestock Exhibitor Meeting (Grass) 6:00 pm Goat Costume & Agility Contest (Goat Arena) 6:30 pm 4-H/FFA Team Sort (P) 7:00 pm TEAM SORT Calcutta followed by Sort (P) 7:00 pm Release of all Horses 7:00 pm 4-H Style Review (RC) 7:00 pm Pre milk-out for Dairy Goat Milking Competition 4:00 – Midnight BEER GARDEN 8-11 pm Featuring HEARTLAND PRODUCTIONS

Noon – 9:00 pm 4-H Building & Ag Hall Open 7:00 am Chamber of Commerce Ranch Breakfast (RC) 7:00 am FIRST milk-out for Dairy Goat Milking Competition 10:00 am GOSHEN COUNTY FAIR PARADE 10:00 am Carcass Contest (Kelly Pack) 10:00 am Supreme Cow Interviews (RC) Noon 4-H Cloverbud Show (Frontier Shelter) 12:30 pm 4-H Pocket Pet Show (Frontier Shelter) 12:45 pm 4-H/FFA Static Exhibit Auction (FS) 1:00 pm 4TH ANNUAL RANCH RODEO * $8 1:00 pm 4-H Dog Show -Obedience, Showmanship, Conformation, Rally (RC) followed by Dog Costume Contest

1:30 pm Supreme Cow Contest (Grass) 2:00 pm Goshen County Bred/Fed Beef Show (Grass) 5:00 pm Swine Show- Market & Showmanship (Grass) 7:00 pm SECOND milk-out for Dairy Goat Milking Competition 7:00 pm FAMILY NIGHT * $5 Pinnacle Bank Mutton Bustin’ * BARREL RACE Noon – Midnight BEER GARDEN 9- Midnight Featuring THE DRIVIN’ DYNAMICS

FRIDAY, AUGUST 3 9:00 am – 9:00 pm 4-H Building & Ag Hall Open 8:00 am Sheep Show-Showmanship, Market, 1st/2nd Yr Lamb Project (Grass) 8:30 am Rabbit/Poultry Show- Rabbits followed by Poultry Classes & Costume Contest (Rabbit Barn) 11:00 am Goshen County CattleWomen Little Pokes Pet Review (Frontier Shelter) 2:00 pm Goshen County Bred/Fed Lamb Show (Grass) 3:00 pm Market Goat Show-Showmanship, Market, Goshen County Bred/Fed Market Goat Show (Goat Arena) 5:00 pm Goshen County Sheep Producers BBQ 5:00 pm Sheep Lead Contest (Grass) 5:30 pm Dairy Cattle Show (Grass) 6:00 pm 4-H Cat Show (RC) 6:00 pm Market Beef Show (Grass) 8:00 pm BULL RIDING * $8 9:00 pm WY State Fair Exhibitors Meeting (FS) 4:00 – Midnight BEER GARDEN 9- Midnight Featuring ERIC DODGE COUNTRY

SATURDAY, AUGUST 4 9:00 am – 9:00 pm 4-H Building & Ag Hall Open 8:00 am Dairy Goat Show-Showmanship, Dairy Goats (Goat Arena) 9:00 am Breeding Beef Show & Showmanship (Grass) 10:00 am RANCH HORSE COMPETITION 3:00 pm JR LIVESTOCK SALE (FS) Followed by Livestock Sale Buyer Dinner (RC) 6:30 pm 4-H/FFA Round Robin Showmanship Contest, Presentation of Herdsmanship & Special Awards (Grass) 8:00 pm KATIE ARMIGER IN CONCERT (P) OPENING- Eric Dodge Band 4:00 – Midnight BEER GARDEN 9- Midnight Featuring PRAIRIE DEVIL IRON

SUNDAY, AUGUST 5 6:00-10:00 am ALL EXHIBITS RELEASED 10:00 am SONRISE CHIRCH SERVICES (RC)

ALL PROMOTIONS PAID FOR IN PART BY GOSHEN COUNTY TOURISM PROMOTION JOINT POWERS BOARD

Published by News Media Corporation | SUMMER 2012

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Wyo-Braska Summer 2012