Issuu on Google+

Aleksandr Nizhikhovskiy d e s i g n

w o r k

/

2 0 0 6

-

2 0 1 2


T h e ce n t ra l d e s i g n i ss u e s o f a rc h i te c t u re a re h u m a n s a n d t h e i r h i sto r y a n d c u l t u re ; s p a ce ; l i g h t ; h ow t h i n g s a re p u t to g e t h e r ; a n d re s p o n s i b i l i t y to t h e l a n d . G o o d d e s i g n i n vo lve s a n u n d e rsta n d i n g o f t h e s e i ss u e s a n d p u rs u i n g t h e q u e st i o n s t h ey ra i s e u n t i l yo u m a ke a p p ro p r i a te d i s cove r i e s . A rc h i te c t u re i s a p a t h o f d i s cove r y. - G le n n M u rc u t t


C O N T E N T S C

o m p l e x o

d o

A

l e m 達 o

S

c h o o l

C

e n t e r

spring 2012 / harvard graduate school of design 1

DIA : G

o w a n u s

A

r t s

T

o w n h o u s e

fall 2010 - spring 2011 / ccny spitzer school of architecture 11

W

V

e s t

i l l a g e

fall 2008 / ccny spitzer school of architecture 21

D.U.M.B.O. P

A

e r f o r m i n g

C

r t s

spring 2008 / ccny spitzer school of architecture

e n t e r

25

R

F

u b e l l

C

a m i ly

o l l e c t i o n

fall 2012 / harvard graduate school of design 29

S

B

o u t h

r o n x

P

L

u b l i c

i b r a r y

spring 2010 / ccny spitzer school of architecture 39

A

s h b u r t o n

A

v e n u e

H

o u s i n g

C

fall 2009 / ccny spitzer school of architecture

o m p l e x

45

S

e w a r d

P

a r k

E

E

n v i r o n m e n ta l

d u c at i o n

spring 2009 / ccny spitzer school of architecture

C

e n t e r

51

SML C

o m pa n y

O

f f i c e s

september 2006 / montoya-rodriguez architects + planners 57

St. F

r a n c i s

C

o l l e g e

- S

c i e n c e

C

november 2008 / montoya-rodriguez architects + planners

e n t e r

59

St. F

r a n c i s

C

o l l e g e

- C

h i l l e r

may 2011 / montoya-rodriguez architects + planners 61

P

l a n t


Spring 2012 P ro fe ss o rs J o rg e S i lve t t i & Pa u l N a k a z a w a H a r va rd U n i ve rs i t y - G ra d u a te S c h o o l o f D e s i g n

P r o g r a m

CO M P L E XO do A L E M テグ SCHO O L R i o d e J a n e i ro , B ra z i l

The introduction of something as large

allowing for greater flexibility in use as

as a school into the small and dense

well as phased construction. Much of

e.c.d. classroom

2

6 / 50m

fabric of a favela requires not merely

the building massing is defined by nar-

h.o.l. classroom

6 / 50m2

intervention, but more importantly inte-

row bands of classrooms and external,

primary classroom

6 / 60m2

gration. Existing natural and social fea-

shaded walkways. This allows for the

gymnasium classroom

6 / 60m

tures and relationships must be identi-

building to easily bend and follow the

art classroom

2

2 / 80m

fied and then leveraged and integrated

curves of the topography, while provid-

science classroom

2 / 80m2

into the design of the school. The site of

ing maximum light and air penetration.

workshops + labs

5 / 80m2

the school sits at the intersection of the

The larger bulk programs are distrib-

student clubs / exhibition

350m

east-west axis of two public plazas and

uted in such a way that they can link up

lobby / entrance

2

400m

the north-south axis running downhill

to the existing public plazas and share

auditorium

600m2

from the Teleferico station to the soccer

their amenities with the community. The

cafeteria

600m2

field. Within these boundaries are a se-

massing and organization creates a var-

library

400m

ries of rock outcroppings and a downhill

ied and interesting experience for users

2

administration 550m

storm-water channel. All of these ele-

as they move through the project. There

community center

325m2

ments defined and shaped the break-

is a constant connection between build-

health clinic

225m2

down of the site and program massing

ings on the new school campus and their

outdoor patios

2400m

into four distinct zones. The results of

surrounding environment.

service / miscellaneous

1000m

this organization are that each zone is

2

2

2

2 2

of a relatively smaller scale that can be total

ツア 9000m2

more easily integrated into the community and operate semi-autonomously,


2

1

1

teleferico (cablecar) station

2

upper plaza

3

lower plaza

4

soccer field

2

3

4

25 0

10

50

100 25

200 ft 50 m

site plan

1:2000


a

a c

c

11 12

11 11 11 11 10

a

5

a

11 5

7 b

6

7 8

6

b

8 3 6 9

3 c

3

1

c

3

9 9

3 b 2

9

b 3

2

4

9

9

4

4

4

2

2

25 0

50

2

100

10

200 ft

25

level -1 (+60m)

1:1500

level 0 (+65m)

50 m

2

22

16

16 20

12

15

0

25 5

50 10

houses of literacy play patio

2

sports courts

3

houses of literacy classrooms

4

shops / laboratories

5

auditorium

6

public plaza

7

pedestrian street

8

lobby

9

gymnasium classrooms

11 early childhood dev. classrooms

11

12 cafeteria

75 ft 20 m

1

10 early childhood dev. play patio

10 10

1:1500

section a-a

1:500


4

16

a

16

a

15

16

c

15

c 22

16

15 20

17

15

15 19

15

a

23

a

24

18 b 14

b

13 13

13 c

c 13 21 b

b

2

2 4 4

2

2

level 1 (+70m)

13 science / art classrooms 14 multi-purpose space

1:1500

level 2 (+75m)

1:1500

13

21

15 primary classrooms 16 student club rooms

9

6

17 student exhibition space 18 administration 19 teacher’s lounge

3

20 outdoor roof patio

3

1

21 science learning terrace 22 library

2

23 health clinic 24 community center

section b-b

1:500


avoid monolithic, closed-off, compound Avoid monolithic, closed-off, compound design design currentwith schools - which which of doesmany not integrate neighborhood does not integrate with neighborhood

maintain urban and porosity, Maintain urban scalescale and porosity, creating crea mix ating a mixprivate of public, private andareas semiof public, and semi-private

leverage elevation difference to create multiple levels of circulation and access multiple levels of circulation and access

Avoid monolithic, closed-off, compound design which does not integrate with neighborhood

Maintain urban scale and porosity, creating a mix of public, private and semi-private areas

Leverage elevation differences to create multiple levels of circulation and access

75

Leverage elevation differences to create

private areas

75 70

700m²

SW 65 75 60

1300m² NW 700m² 700m² 1300m² 1800m² 700m²

75 70

5500m²

SW

65 60

55

NW

5500m²

NE

1800m² 55

SE

Existing site features, including buildings, topography rock formations, rainwater run-off & street

Total site area, however existing site conditions and features make some of that area unbuildable

existing site feature, including buildings,

Man-made and natural formations divide the site into four regionsSE

total site area - however, existing site con-

Existing features, including buildings, topography steepsite topography, rock formations, rainrockrun-off formations, run-off & street water andrainwater pedestrian path

NE

man-made andand natural Man-made naturalformations formations divide the sitedivide into four regions the site into four regions

Total site area, existing conditions and ditions and however features makesite some of that features make some of that area unbuildable area unbuildable

20

10

15

11

7 6

section c-c

1:500


6

view from soccer field


a building rooftops are protected by planting, patio materials or a trellis.

i

exposed concrete retaining walls radiate cool temperatures from adjacent soil into spaces.

b overhangs provided protection to both occupants and sections of the building (large glazing & rammed earth walls) from direct sunlight and rainfall.

j

skylights and vents at rear courtyard provide sun light and ventilation for cafeteria, student clubs and library.

c

k

wood slat awning doors swing to shade dining patio

l

storm water pond provides treatment and storage capacity for rainfall runoff, as well as evaporative cooling for the surrounding play patio.

freestanding elements of the school allow for effecient cross ventilation.

d earth tubes provide cooled air and additional ventilation. e air intakes and vents are integrated into street furniture and put on display as teaching tools.

m hillside soil is re-graded and stabilized to decrease risk of landslides.

f

solar chimneys improve air ventilation in embedded, single exposure classrooms.

g

tranparent ducts heat air to improve circulation and act as skylights to provide natural light into classrooms.

h concrete slabs & frame with rammed earth infill walls provide thermal mass for daytime heat absorption and nightime release.

n new footpaths crossing the hillside are integrated with horizontal channels to collect and funnel runoff towards main drainage channel.

o the existing drainage channel is expanded for additional capacity and also improved to become a site amenity.

a b

b

c

j n

i

k l

o

m

n m f a b i

a b

e

g

l

i

d

a

a

b

i

c

f

o

b

c

a b

g

e

i

l d

environmental diagrams


8

Library Community Center

Health Clinic

level 2 (+75m)

Primary Education Classrooms

Primary

Student Clubs & Exhibition

Administration

Lobby

Art and Science Classrooms

level 1 (+70m)

Workshops and Labs

Cafeteria E.C.D.

Early Childhood Development

level 0 (+65m)

Gymnasium Classrooms

Gymnasium

Workshops and Labs Auditorium

level -1 (+60m)

H.o.L

Houses of Literacy Classrooms

Workshops and Labs

exploded building diagram


approach from upper plaza


10

approach from lower plaza


Fa l l 2 0 1 0 / S p r i n g 2 0 1 1 P ro fe ss o r J a co b A l s p e c to r C i t y C o l le g e o f N ew Yo r k - S p i t z e r S c h o o l o f A rc h i te c t u re

P r o g r a m

D IA : GOWA N U S A RT S CE N T E R B ro o k y l n , N ew Yo r k

The Gowanus Canal and surrounding

extending towards the canal a series of

neighborhood are most known for their

alleys provide access to artist studios

workshop art studio

2

14 / 500ft

rich, yet difficult industrial past. Today

and duplex live/work units.

live/work art studio

10 / 1500ft2

the area is being transformed by an in-

public is able to engage with the artists

6200ft2

flux of artists and young professionals,

as well as view pieces in production in

16500ft

as well as a government led clean-up of

the below-ground workshops. North of

2

6900ft

the canal. This Arts Center, in partner-

the promenade a long gallery building

lobby/reception 1800Wft2

ship with the DIA Art Foundation, aims

emerges out of the ground, expanding

exhibition gallery

23800ft2

to highlight and preserve the site’s in-

towards the canal and providing large

5200ft

dustrial heritage, while also creating a

and flexible spaces for art installation.

2

760ft

contemporary cultural hub and spur-

Strolling along it, the public is invited to

3000ft2

ring future development. Now partially

glimpse some of the work on display and

6 / 1000ft2

occupied by a cement plant, the mostly

access the public roof terrace. Joining

1700ft

abandoned site once housed a manufac-

these two elements, an elevated “bar-

service/miscellaneous 20000ft

tured gas plant. Though no structures

building” contains community art class-

remain, the foundations of three large

rooms and administrative offices, while

holder tanks form a point of reference

providing a street façade to the project

for the new design. It seeks to trace pat-

and mirroring the elevated train opposite

terns of past inhabitation, while present-

it. These built elements are surrounded

ing a porous and interactive layout that

by a public sculpture park, which incor-

draws people through the site towards

porates the tank foundations as well as

canal.

the canal.

administration analog workshop

2

digital fabrication shop

restaurant museum shop lecture auditorium public art classrm public lounge/exhibit

2

2 2

total

± 120000ft2

South of a central promenade

Here the


12

1

view of site from elevated (f train) subway station

2

gowanus canal (typical condition)

3

adjacent residetial neighborhood

3

2

1

50 100 0 10

25

250 50

500 ft 100 m

site plan

1� : 400’


c

d

b

b 2

e

e

3

FU_COLD FU_HOT FU_WASTE FU_TOTAL FIXT_CODE

FU_COLD FU_HOT FU_WASTE FU_TOTAL FIXT_CODE

FU_COLD FU_HOT FU_WASTE FU_TOTAL FIXT_CODE

1

a

a 6

7

4 8

5

10

c

1

gallery

2

sculpture court

3

lecture hall

4

analog shop

5

digital shop

6 restaurant

d

7

snack shop

8

mechanical services

9 lobby/reception 10

25 0

section a-a

50 10

100 25

1”=50’

200 ft 50 m

level -1

1”=128’

grounds service


14

c

d

b

b

1 e

1

1

3

FU_COLD FU_HOT FU_WASTE FU_TOTAL FIXT_CODE

e

1

FU_COLD FU_HOT FU_WASTE FU_TOTAL FIXT_CODE

FU_COLD FU_HOT FU_WASTE FU_TOTAL FIXT_CODE

9

a

11

a

retail

11

12 loading/delivery 13

workshop studio

14

live/work studio

15

artist lounge

16

student lounge

17

art classroom

18

ramp/amphitheater

19

administration

20

roof terrace

11

13

14

14

14

14

14

13

13

13

13

13

13

13

13

13

13

13

13

15

12 13

14

14

c

25 0

50 10

100 25

14

14

14

d

level 0

200 ft

1”=128’

50 m

25 0

50 10

100 ft 25 m


c

d

16 20

e

e

18

17

20

17

a

a 17 17

14

14

14

20

14

14

20 20

17 17 14

14

14

14

14

level 1 c

c

1”=128’

d

d

1

gallery

2

sculpture court

3

lecture hall

4

analog shop

5

digital shop

6 restaurant 7

snack shop

8

mechanical services

9 lobby/reception e

e

10 11

grounds service retail

12 loading/delivery 19 a

a

level 2 c

d

1”=128’

13

workshop studio

14

live/work studio

15

artist lounge

16

student lounge

17

art classroom

18

ramp/amphitheater

19

administration

20

roof terrace


16

1

- 1” fixed steel grate sun screens - 2”x2” steel tube substructure - low-e double glazed windows - 12” deep steel-reinforced structural window frames - motorized window shades

2

- 4” brick pavers w/ grass/soil infill - 2” of sand bedding - 2” gravel drainage base - 5” rigid insulation (sloped to drain) - waterproof membrane - 12” deep concrete waffle slab

3

- (2) 5/8” impact-resistant gypsum board wall - 2” acoustic insulation - 6” light-gauge framing infill btwn columns - 22” (clear) cavity for MEP services - 6” light-gauge framing infill btwn columns - 2” acoustic insulation - (2) 5/8” gallery-finish gypsum board display wall

4

- small profile convector unit

5

- 22”h continuous aluminum return grille

6

- exposed concrete slab edge

7

- 8”h continuous aluminum supply grille

8

- lawn grass - 10” lightweight engineered soil - filter fabric - 2”drainage mat - 5/8” protection board - 4” rigid insulation (sloped to drain) - waterproof membrane - 6” concrete slab on steel deck

9

- standing-seam copper cladding - moisture barrier - 4” rigid insulation - 5/8” sheathing board - 2” steel deck - steel beam structure - suspended 5/8” gypsum board ceiling

10

- (2) 5/8” gallery-finish gypsum board display wall - 6” light-gauge framing - 7” (clear) air cavity - 12” concrete foundation wall - waterproof membrane - 4” rigid insulation

11

- 8” polished concrete slab - 4” rigid insulation - 2” sand - waterproof membrane - gravel bed

1 0

5 1

10 ft 2

3m

8

9 1

2

4 5 6

3 10

11

7

detail section thru gallery

3/16”=1’-0”


25

section b-b

1”=100’

0

50 10

100 ft 25 m


18 1 0

5

10 ft

1

2

3m

1

3

1

- standing-seam copper cladding - 5/8” sheathing board - 5” rigid insulation - waterproof membrane - 5/8” sheathing board - 3” steel deck - exposed steel beam structure

2

- 4” polished concrete slab on steel deck - steel beam structure - 4” light-gauge framing channels - 5/8” sheathing board - waterproof membrane - 5” rigid insulation - 6-1/2” light-gauge framing channels - 5/8” sheathing board - standing-seam copper cladding

3 4

- 14” continuous aluminum return grille

5

- 1” metal grate ceiling system

6

- 6” glazed wall assembly

7

- interior sun shade - low-e double glazing - 6” / 10” fixed exterior louvers

8

- operable window

9

- built-in convector unit

10

- low-profile base radiator

4

7

5

6

8

9

- suspension rods and brackets 7

2

10

detail section thru classroom/administration

25

section c-c

1”=100’

0

50 10

3/16”=1’-0”

25

100 ft 25 m

section d-d

1”=100’

0

50 10

100 ft 25 m


communal roof terrace fosters interaction with other artistsin-residence and creates possibility for outdoor work space

pitched roofs have potential for rainwater collection, photovoltaic panels or solar water heaters

loft living space above studios allows for flexible living patters as well as additional work space loft/roof terrace

studio level

shop/service level

+14’-0”

0’-0”

live/work studios feature approx. 30’x30’ open work space with minimum 13’ ceiling height

-17’-6”

ground floor work space opens with a 12’x13’ pivoting door onto courtyard space

glazing around lift areas allows for pedestrian views and sun light into shops below

work space studios measure approx. 20’x30’ with a 13’ ceiling and toilet facilities

sliding crane platform allows for movement of materials and work between studios and shops

open plan shop space with light wells to above and approx. 15’6” ceiling height

artist studio cutaway axon

section e-e

1”=50’


20

25 0

50 10

100 ft 25 m


Fa l l 2 0 0 8 P ro fe ss o r E l i s a b e t ta Te r ra g n i C i t y C o l le g e o f N ew Yo r k - S p i t z e r S c h o o l o f A rc h i te c t u re

P r o g r a m photography house

2400ft2

apartment

700ft2

photo studio

1150ft2

archaeology house

3175ft2

shared yard

2200ft2

total

Âą 10000ft2

WE ST V ILLAGE TOWN HOU SE N ew Yo r k , N ew Yo r k

This pair of townhouses accommodates

interior spaces. In contrast to the tall

two unique families. The first is an ar-

wood-covered form of the first house,

chaeologist couple and their two young

the smaller house is stretched horizon-

sons, while the second family consists

tally, constructed of cast-in-place con-

of a photographer father, stay-at-home

crete and defined by its glass enclosed

mother and their wheelchair-bound

cantilevered second level. The archae-

daughter. At-home work spaces are pro-

ologists’ house is designed to represent

vided for both, with a modest home office

a sensation of discovery and exploration.

for the archaeologists and a photography

Spaces are broken up across multiple

gallery and basement studio/darkroom

levels, which unfold and open slowly

for the second family. The photographer

as they are experienced, providing new

family also requires a separate apart-

views onto and relationships with other

ment that can be rented for additional

spaces in the house. The photographer’s

income. These conditions are realized

home is designed with a relatively open

through an L-shaped organization of

and straight-forward plan spread across

the two homes around a shared back-

two modest-sized levels, representing a

yard. The larger of the two, the archae-

concept of observation. The unobstruct-

ologist house, is a wedge-shaped mass,

ed layout and large open spaces afford

wrapped in tightly spaced wooden slats.

views through them and to the outside,

Though mostly solid with minimal glaz-

while also accommodating the mobility

ing on the street side, the opposite south

needs of the handicapped daughter.

facade is open to admit sunlight into the


22

1

father demo square

2

downing street view towards site

3

existing site conditions

4

adjacent west village context

1

2

3

4

50 0

10

100 25

250 50

500 ft 100 m

site plan

1� : 250’


4

11 7 6

1

3

5 15

8

2

4

a

a

a 11

4 2 4 13

5

12

b

b

3

2

b

7

4

1

b

8

b

9

a

0

25 ft

level 0

8

4

6

4

11

10

10 4

14

6

a

1/32”=1’-0”

level 1

a

1/32”=1’-0”

level 2

1/32”=1’-0”

5m

1

entry

2

kitchen

3

dining room

9

guest bedroom

10

children play area

11 terrace

4 bathroom

12

5

living room

13 photography studio

archaeology office

6 study

14 studio apartment

7

master bedroom

15 shared rear yard

8

children bedroom

10

4

6

4

8

8

4

6

5

14

11

12

9

13

1

1

2 5

section a-a

1/16”=1’-0”

0

3

10 ft 2.5 m

section b-b

1/16”=1’-0”

b


24

elevation along downing street


Spring 2008 P ro fe ss o r A t h a n a s i o s H a r i to s C i t y C o l le g e o f N ew Yo r k - S p i t z e r S c h o o l o f A rc h i te c t u re

P r o g r a m

D . U . M . B . O. P E RFORM IN G A RT S C E NT E R B ro o k y l n , N ew Yo r k

Located at the foot of the Brooklyn

City skyline beyond.

Bridge, the building is set within the ex-

layout and deck connections allow the

1750ft2

isting brick shell of an old tobacco ware-

program to be stretched across the site,

lobby 1550ft2

house. In order to keep the site open

keeping most of the structure in low pro-

administration

1500ft2

and porous for the public, each theater is

file, and thus accentuating the forms of

cafe

2650ft

treated as an individual pavilion bursting

the theaters. This approach also allows

proscenium theater

2

3625ft

through and linked by a continuous, fold-

the public to easily pass over, under and

black box theater

2150ft2

ing deck. This layout incorporates a tra-

through the structure, keeping with the

cinema theater

1000ft2

ditional proscenium theater as well as

original intention of urban porosity and

exhibition / gallery

5000ft

an experimental black box theater and

access to the waterfront. Adorning the

rehearsal space

1150ft

a rooftop performance space. Providing

glass facades of the complex, a continu-

a striking oval form against its rectilin-

ous series of tightly spaced wooden slats

ear surroundings is a uniquely designed

work to diffuse sunlight into the interior

cinema. Housed below the constantly

and also break up what would otherwise

folding and growing deck are circulatory

be large expanses of glass. The ground

connections, along with secondary pro-

floor is enveloped in glass without slats,

grams, such as exhibition, administra-

giving the complex the appearance of a

tion and cafĂŠ. The constant movements

large mass floating on air.

reception / ticket

total

2

2 2

Âą 25000ft2

of the deck provide visitors with an everchanging experience of the site, along with different views of the surrounding neighborhood, East River, and New York

The pavilion-like


26

1

existing tobacco warehouse shell

2

surrounding D.U.M.B.O. neighborhood

3

view from in front of site looking across east river

3

1

50 100 0 10

25

250 50

500 ft 100 m

2

site plan

1� : 400’


a

a

a

10 b

b

6

4

b

10

5

9

4

9

5 10

7

10

1

7 10 7

3

2

8

a

b

level 0

1/32”=1’-0”

8

a

b

level 1

1/32”=1’-0”

a

b

level 2

1/32”=1’-0”


28

a

b

12

11

10

9 12

1

lobby

2

reception/tickets

7 6

8

1

2

3 cafe 4 adminstration 5 restroom 10

11

6

proscenium theater

7

exhibition gallery

8

black box theater

9

cinema theater

10

outdoor deck

11

rehearsal space

12

rooftop cinema

section a-a

9 10

7 4

3 10

10 0

25 5

1/32”=1’-0”

50 ft 10 m

a

b

level 3

1/32”=1’-0”

section b-b

1/32”=1’-0”


Fa l l 2 0 1 2 P ro fe ss o r F lo r i a n I d e n b u rg H a r va rd U n i ve rs i t y - G ra d u a te S c h o o l o f D e s i g n

P r o g r a m exhibition space permanent collection temporary exhibition large room project rooms (2)

27000ft

2

12000ft2 8000ft2 3600ft2 2700ft2

art storage

5000ft2

reception/lobby

1000ft2

book store

1000ft2

staff offices

1500ft2

auditorium/flex

1500ft2

cafe

1500ft2

caterer prep/kitchen

1000ft2

art book library

500ft2

total

± 40000ft2

RU B E LL FA M ILY COLLE CT ION Wa s h i n g to n D . C .

An abandoned junior high school located

are preserved for larger and more fixed

in Southwest Washington D.C. provides

program elements, while the interior of

the site for an extension of the Rubell

the site is reworked with the placement

Family Collection – a private contempo-

of numerous smaller pavilions hous-

rary art collection based in Miami. Pres-

ing galleries and classrooms. Inserted

ently seven different school buildings

amongst this combination of existing

occupy the property, of which the three

and new, are three large public “nodes”

southern-most are landmarked.

The

where branching private paths of exhibi-

site is also one of few to have survived

tion spaces intersect with open public

a 1950s-60s urban renewal that demol-

circulation through the site.

ished 99% of the neighborhood. Given

loop travels through the three nodes,

this sort of context, the introduction of

open courtyards between them and the

something as foreign as a Miami-based

three landmarked buildings. Around it,

contemporary art institution can be chal-

multiple levels and sequences of gal-

lenging. The proposed design mediates

leries provide for a dynamic and flex-

between the local community, the “art

ible combination of exhibitions. To the

world” and visitors by creating a building

south, public programming is provided

that invites the public into and through it,

along the main street elevation, while to

allowing it to develop a comfortable and,

the east an under-utilized park is trans-

at first, “casual” relationship both with

formed into a public sculpture court.

the institution and the work on display. Most of the existing perimeter buildings

A public


30

1950s Southwest D.C. urban renewal

1

facade along I Street (landmarked buildings to be preserved)

2

interior courtyard

2

1

50 0

10

100 25

250 50

500 ft 100 m

site plan

1� : 250’


breaking the block

central public hall

public periphery

public path through

ideas of access


32

concept image: window shopping museum


a

15

c

b

12 10

14 16 9

9

15

9 9 6

15

1

6

15

15

randall park

public plaza

11

13

15

6

1

1 15 3

2 7

4 6 5

a

10 0

25

50 10

100 ft 25 m

a

c

b

level 0

1/64”=1’-0”


34

a

9

c

b

9

9 9

14

1 14

14

14

2 3 4 5

randall park

1

14

14

lobby/node

1

14

cafe

book store

public living room

performance space

6 classroom 7 library 8 9 10

staff office 1

artist studio

loading dock

11 receiving/staging 12 storage 13 workshop 14 residential 15 commercial 16

catering kitchen

a

10 0

25

50 10

100 ft 25 m

c

b

level 1

1/64”=1’-0”


1

lobby/node

2

cafe

3

book store

4

public living room

5

performance space

6 classroom 7 library performance space

8

staff office

9

artist studio

10

loading dock

11 receiving/staging 12 storage 13 workshop 14 residential 15 commercial 16

western entry

catering kitchen


36

1

11

5 12

25 0

50

100 ft

10

section a-a

4

25 0

6

50

25

section b-b

1”=50’

section c-c

1”=50’

25 m

3

50 10

12

100 ft

10

4

0

1”=50’

25 m

1

100 ft 25 m

12


approach from randall park

interior courtyard


38


Spring 2010 P ro fe ss o r J o a n K rev l i n C i t y C o l le g e o f N ew Yo r k - S p i t z e r S c h o o l o f A rc h i te c t u re

P r o g r a m

SOU T H B RON X P U B LIC LIB RA R Y B ro n x , N ew Yo r k

Through the separation and definition

massing effectively caps an axis of open

of “louder” public library areas and

(proposed) park space between the site

2

2200ft

“quieter,” more intimate programs and

and Taft High School to the north. The

800ft2

spaces the design aims to address the

main façade is animated by the activity

cafe 300ft2

varied and contradictory roles of the

of people moving through and studying

fiction collection

2300ft

contemporary neighborhood library as

inside. To further enhance this sense of

nonfiction collection

3800ft

both a place of quiet study as well as

activity, most other circulation zones are

reference

1600ft2

a community center.

moved to the periphery and expressed

auditorium gallery

2 2

Accessible from

periodicals 1400ft2

both of the bounding cross streets, the

to the street outside.

special collection

2

1000ft

expansive base of the building holds the

around the stacks acts as a buffer from

150ft2 ea.

mostly public, community and, gener-

the study areas as well as exterior envi-

quiet reading room

400ft2

ally “noisier” functions of the library. As

ronmental factors such as sunlight. The

conference room

500ft2

patrons transition upward into a slender

resulting library is a simple and elegant,

children’s library

3800ft

bar building, they encounter progres-

yet dynamic design, which preserves

2

600ft

sively quieter, more individual and more

the quiet and intimacy of a traditional li-

1500ft2

serious library programs. An open, in-

brary, while providing for public commu-

administration 3500ft2

viting and active building which encour-

nity functions and opening up the activity

building support

ages use by the community and draws

and uses of the building to surrounding

people inside is achieved by the place-

neighborhood.

study rooms

teen library digital resources

total

2

4500ft

2

± 30000ft2

ment of study levels and rooms and the central circulation ramp along the north façade. This strong northern façade and

The circulation


40

1

building site

2

new park/playground

3

view towards Taft High School

4

open space along Grant Avenue

4

3

2

1

50 100 0 10

25

250 50

500 ft 100 m

site plan

1” : 400’


a

6

6

5

6

5

6

3

c

c

1 4 2

b

b

a

10 0

25 5

level -1

50 ft

1/32”=1’-0”

10 m

a

15

5

9

5

13 c

c

12 11

12

20

b

16

14

16

16

16

16

16

16

16

b

17

10 0

25 5

50 ft 10 m

a

level 1

1/32”=1’-0”


42 a

10

7

8

c

b

c

b

9

a

10 0

25 5

level 0

50 ft

1/32”=1’-0”

10 m

a

1

plaza

2

cafe

3 gallery 4

lecture hall

5 restroom 6

book storage/handling

7 lobby 8

5

circulation desk

9 terrace 10

children’s library

11

p.c. work area

12

meeting room

13

tech learning center

14

conference room

15

teen library

16

stepped reading areas

17

private study rooms

18

quiet reading room

19

book stacks

20

circulation ramp

5

c

18

c

19

20 16

b

b

17

10 0

16

25 5

50 ft 10 m

a

level 4

1/32”=1’-0”


44

section thru book stacks (a-a)

stepped reading areas (b-b)

section thru lobby (c-c)


Fa l l 2 0 0 9 P ro fe ss o r J u l i o S a lce d o C i t y C o l le g e o f N ew Yo r k - S p i t z e r S c h o o l o f A rc h i te c t u re

P r o g r a m

A SHB U RTON AV E N U E HOU SING C O M PL E X Yo n ke rs , N ew Yo r k

Located on a narrow and steeply sloped

of the trailway with smaller, more private

site in the city of Yonkers, this residen-

residences and private patios. This sys-

2

22/500ft

tial complex sits within a neighborhood

tem of retaining walls and terraces al-

one bedroom units

38/1000ft2

which is undergoing a period of rebirth

lows for the creation of taller structures,

three bedroom units

28/1600ft2

after decades of decline and blight. The

whose height is masked by the sloped

concierge 180ft

project is realized through a series of

landscape.

storage closet

2

180ft

zones created by a system of retain-

and construction frees up open space

community room

500ft2

ing walls which act as linear east-west

which in turn allows for more access to

management office

150ft2

“spines.” These walls work to activate

light, air and views. The linear nature of

trash room

300ft

and manage the difficult landscape by

the project is broken at one end, where

mechanical/utility

2

750ft

breaking it up into terraced levels. The

the retaining walls join together to wrap

commerical raw space

10000ft2

northernmost commercial spine along

around an “inlet” in the topography be-

1/du

Ashburton Avenue consists of a num-

fore again splitting apart to create the

1/200ft cm

ber of modular storefronts supporting

public park at the corner. The residen-

pedestrian circulation and residence

tial units accumulate to create a larger

entrances above. Next, a semi-public in-

tower/slab building partially concealed

terior spine - consisting of a central lawn

by the landscape. The result is an urban

area, bordered by pedestrian pathways

intervention consisting of spaces and

and residential units - uses the land-

experiences layered both vertically and

scape and topography to accommodate

horizontally across the site.

studio units

2

parking

2

2

total

± 120000ft2

an underground parking garage.

The

final spine responds to the rural nature

This vertical organization


46

1

western corner of site along ashburton avenue

2

existing overgrown hillside site

2

3

old croton trailway along southern edge of site

4

eastern end of site along ashburton avenue

4

1

3

50 100 0 10

25

250 50

500 ft 100 m

site plan

1� : 400’


3

3

5

4

3

6

2

2

3 4

tower level 6

1/32”=1’-0”

4

4

3

5

6

3

6

6

5

5

tower level 4

3

1

6 2

1

commercial

2 terrace 3 5

2

10 0

25 5

50 ft 10 m

public circulation

4

studio unit

5

one bedroom unit

6

three bedroom unit

1/32”=1’-0”


48 ashburton avenue

1

1

6 6 5

5

row house level 0

1/32”=1’-0”

row house level 2

1/32”=1’-0”

3

6

4

5

5

6

6

2

2

3

row house level -1

1/32”=1’-0”

row house level 1

1/32”=1’-0”

3

6

4

6 5

2

5

6

2 old croton trailway

town house level -1

1/32”=1’-0”

town house level 0

1/32”=1’-0”

town house level 1

1/32”=1’-0”


50

elevation along ashburton avenue

elevation along old croton trailway

3

6

ashburton avenue

1 5

1

3

commercial

2 terrace 3

3

5

4

10 0

25 5

2

old croton trailway

50 ft 10 m

section 1/32”=1’-0”

public circulation

4

studio unit

5

one bedroom unit

6

three bedroom unit


Spring 2009 P ro fe ss o r C h r i st i a n Vo l k m a n n C i t y C o l le g e o f N ew Yo r k - S p i t z e r S c h o o l o f A rc h i te c t u re

P r o g r a m

SEWARD PARK ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION CENTER * D e s i g n e d i n p a r t n e rs h i p w i t h M e n g y i Fa n

N ew Yo r k , N ew Yo r k

Located on the Lower East Side of Man-

mental center first through the lower

hattan the project aims to inform the

level subterranean lobby and exhibition

2

500ft

neighborhood on a variety of environ-

galleries, up into the light-filled and vo-

exhibition 1000ft2

mental issues and solutions, while also

luminous event space and then through

information desk

300ft2

acting as a general purpose community

and across that space to other areas of

book shop

500ft

center. Given the opportunity to locate

the project. Reaching a publicly acces-

books and storage

2

1000ft

the building anywhere within the park,

sible green roof, visitors are then taken

multi-purpose space

4000ft2

a location was chosen along a central

down a set of exterior stairs to the park.

cafe/shop 500ft2

axis running through the park into the

The multipurpose event space also acts

science classroom

2 / 400ft

historic Seward Park Library. The site

as a transition between the library and

2

administration 500ft

occupies a transitional zone from the

park by framing them in its glazed east-

mechanical

500ft2

natural and playful environment of the

ern and western facades. A set of large

park to the hard urban landscape of the

folding doors across the western facade

library building and asphalt plaza in front

can be opened in warmer weather, blur-

of it. The design mediates these two op-

ring the boundaries between interior and

posing settings by creating a visual and

exterior and extending the park right into

physical connection between them. A

the building.

entry/lobby

total

2

2

Âą 12000ft

2

centrally located multipurpose event space defines the building’s massing all other areas are accessed by moving around, through or across this central space. Visitors experience the environ-


52

1

existing carnegie library building

2

view of site from library plaza

3

view of site from park

4

Seward Park entrance

3

1

2

4

50 0

10

100 25

250 50

500 ft 100 m

site plan

1� : 250’


8

2

1

6 7

5 4 3 5

3 6

1

lobby

2

reception/tickets

3 closet 4

staff lounge

5 restroom 6

exhibition gallery

7

mechanical room

8

storage space

10 0

25

50 ft

5

level -1

1/32”=1’-0”

level 1

1/32”=1’-0”

10 m

9 cafe 10

multi-purpose space

11 bookstore 12 classroom 13

open walkway

14 administration 15

office terrace

16

public roof garden

13

5 12

10 0

12

25 5

5

50 ft 10 m


54

e 9

10

d

5

5

a 11 5

3

5

10 0

25

level 0

50 ft

5

1/32”=1’-0”

10 m

d

b c

5

d a 14

16

15

16

10 0

25 5

50 ft 10 m

level 2

1/32”=1’-0”

a. channel glass facade b. heat storage system c. light shelves / louvers d. air vents for natural cross ventilation e. green roof


solar heat gain (passive system) the west facade is heated up during the winter through the use of extensive glazing to allow for maximum gain in the multipurpose space.

cross ventilation (summer) a. cool air is allowed to pass through the space for cross ventilation while direct solar penetration is regulated by adjustable louvers, reducing heating load at peak hours.

western facade (summer) a. thermal mass heat gain is avoided through the use of water channels for planting and natural ventilation at night

b. air vent allows for hot air from the multipurpose room to escape (stack effect ventilation)

b. daytime heat gain is minimized through the use of exterior solar shades

classrooms (summer) a. direct solar penetration is mitigated during peak hours with the use of fixed louvers that redirect light and heat away from the classrooms. Direct gain is also prevented by recessing the classrooms.

classrooms (winter) a. solar penetration is maximized through light reflected by the fixed louvers.

cross ventilation (passive system) air is funneled through the building via the stack effect - warm air is released via air vents in the administrative offices.

thermal storage (active system) south-facing channel glass facade utilized to collect daytime heat via a vacuum system and stored in a thermal resevoir for later use.

b. air vents placed in the volume allow air to travel through and filter into the multipurpose space. c. corridor air vent allows the space to be naturally ventilated while maintaining climate-controlled classrooms.

b. daytime heat is retained in south-facing channel glass facade and stored to warm the building at night.


56


September 2006 D e s i g n e r : J o h n G a rc i a M o n toya - R o d r i g u e z A rc h i te c t s + P l a n n e rs

SM L COM PA N Y OF F ICE S N ew Yo r k , N ew Yo r k

Selected to design the headquarters of the SML clothing company, MontoyaRodriguez Architects first undertook a survey of the existing 1800s loft building. Through numerous meetings with the clients a layout was created with perimeter offices and conference room around internally

located

workstations

and

pods. My own involvement in the project included responsibility for conducting a survey of the existing office along with the preparation of demolition drawings. Working alongside the project architect I assisted in the development of multiple schemes for the new office layout, along with the creation of construction bid documents – specifically, the design of wall sections and glass office partitions.

partition types and details

glass partition details


58

demolition plan

1/8”=1’-0” 5

0

0.5

1

10 ft 2

new work plan

1/8”=1’-0” 5

0

0.5

3m

1

10 ft 2

3m


N ove m b e r 2 0 0 8 Designer: Jerry Santillanez M o n toya - R o d r i g u e z A rc h i te c t s + P l a n n e rs

ST. F RA N CIS COLLE GE - SCIE NC E C E NT E R B ro o k ly n , N ew Yo r k

This multi-phased project represents a near-complete overhaul of the college’s science laboratory facilities, including new data services and center, a new mechanical system and roof plant, and a reorganization of the upper 5+ floors of an existing 1950s building. Originally proposed as one large project, it was later restructured, requiring careful phasing and coordination. I was involved with the project from its inception until the completion of the early phases. Working directly with the project architect, I was given responsibility to develop classroom, laboratory and office layouts, along with preparing ceiling plans and details and designing and coordinating lab casework. This project represents a multi-year commitment during which I was able to participate in nearly all phases of design and construction.

science lab casework details


60

5 0

1

10 2

5 0

ceiling details

1

20 ft 5m

10 2

sixth floor demolition plan

1/16”=1’-0”

sixth floor new work plan

1/16”=1’-0”

20 ft 5m


May 2011 Designer: Jerry Santillanez M o n toya - R o d r i g u e z A rc h i te c t s + P l a n n e rs

This project required the demolition of an existing steel superstructure housing three cooling towers and a structural evaluation of the building’s beams and columns to determine whether they could support a proposed new chiller plant. The project was further complicated by the restricted work area on the roof top and by an accelerated design schedule. The final design resulted in a phased demolition of existing roof structure and the extension/reinforcement of structural steel up from below the roof level. I directly assisted and worked with the project architect and was involved in all phases of the design. My work integral to the assembly of the entire architectural drawing set, but most significantly I contributed to the wall sections, parapet and roof details, many of which were developed on my own with the guidance of the project architect.

ST. F RA N CIS COLLE GE - CHIL L E R PL A NT B ro o k ly n , N ew Yo r k


62

5 0

1

0

1

10

15 ft

2

5

5m

10 2

15 ft 5m

roof demo plan

3/32”=1’-0”

chiller plant new work plan

3/32”=1’-0”


aleksandr nizhikhovskiy / niz.alex@gmail.com / 917.518.5864


Aleksandr Nizhikhovskiy Design Work 2006 - 2013