NIU Foundation Impact Report (July 1, 2021 - June 30, 2022)

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IMPACT REPORT

JULY 1, 2021 – JUNE 30, 2022

While

p. 2 IMPACT REPORT 2021-2022 Unparalleled partnership. Unwavering support. Unbounded
potential.
the Huskie Nation
CONTENTS Introduction/Contents 2 Letter from NIU Foundation Leadership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 About the NIU Foundation . . . . . . . . . 4 Alumni at a Glance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Notable Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-7 Endowment Performance and Financial Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-9 Fiscal Year Highlights . . . . . . . . . . . 10-17 Stories of Impact . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-24 Distinguished Donor Societies . . . . . 25 NIUF Board of Directors . . . . . . . . . . 26 NIUAA Board of Directors . . . . . . . . . 26 Mission II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
When
Huskies
unite, there is nothing we cannot do.
is certainly thousands strong, we are also infinitely diligent, exponentially empathetic and continuously collaborative when it comes to finding creative ways to support our alma mater, its students and each other. And in the last year, our pack has proven to be more powerful than ever.

LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT AND THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Dear Alumni and Friends, It’s been 12 months since you have received your last impact report, and we are so excited to be able to report a record-breaking year of transformation here at NIU.

Within the 365 days of Fiscal Year 2022, our alumni have reconnected and forged new bonds after months of absence and distance. In this time, our volunteers have united, bringing their passion for equity, advocacy and student support, for the benefit of the University. In the last year, our generous and selfless donors gifted the NIU Foundation more than $23.3 million in an outpouring of care and support never before seen by our organization. This was part of the 51% increase in total philanthropy seen across the University last year.

To say we are proud of what you have accomplished is an understatement, and yet, we are not surprised. Nothing happens at the NIU Foundation without you! We have always understood the importance of our mission and the vision of those who make magic happen every year—our alumni and friends who are the heart and soul of our organizations.

Eleanor Roosevelt once said, “Life’s not about expecting, hoping and wishing. It’s about doing, being and becoming.”

FY22 told an incredible story for the NIU Foundation and all we can accomplish, along with key partners, for the good of the community and the world.

Now, we must forge ahead together!

Go, Huskies!

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Reggie Bustinza NIU Alumni Engagement CATHERINE SQUIRES EXECUTIVE REGGIE BUSTINZA

TOP 3 FY22 GOALS

Increase total philanthropic activity.

Increase engagement and participation of NIU alumni, friends, faculty and staff at all levels.

Enhance the NIU Foundation’s strategic priorities with a focus on brand recognition, donor experience, leadership development and building a culture of philanthropy among the NIU community.

NIU

FOUNDATION MADE INCREDIBLE STRIDES IN FY22

In FY22, the NIU Foundation had one top priority taking precedence over all else—to impact Huskie students and alumni positively, bringing more resources and cutting-edge opportunities to campus, and continuing to nurture the University that nurtures so many!

“It was an incredible year, and we would never have reached more than $23.3M in funding without the contributions of amazing individuals and teams, and, of course, our incredible support system of dedicated donors,” said NIU Foundation President and CEO Catherine Squires. “Our combined efforts brought in gifts from our amazing donors that made FY22 a record fundraising year, and the future looks bright, indeed. All in all, our shared accomplishments and continued momentum illustrate that we are indeed doing all the right things to ensure that donors’ generous investments in NIU have their intended impact.”

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ALUMNI AT A GLANCE

TOTAL NUMBER OF LIVING ALUMNI: 262,777

LIVING ALUMNI BY COLLEGES:

College of Business: 56,029

College of Education: 55,794

College of Engineering and Engineering Technology: 12,423

College of Health and Human Sciences: 32,938

College of Law: 4,331

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences: 85,975

College of Visual and Performing Arts: 15,180

Other: 107

TOTAL NUMBER OF ALUMNI IN ILLINOIS 164,843

TOP FIVE COUNTIES:

Cook County: 45,370

DuPage County: 27,550

Kane County: 18,669

Lake County: 13,069

McHenry County: 11,158

NUMBER OF LIVING ALUMNI WITH THREE DEGREES: 2,051

NUMBER OF LIVING ALUMNI WITH FOUR OR MORE DEGREES: 141

DEGREES EARNED BY LIVING ALUMNI:

Bachelor’s Degree: 198,608

Master’s Degree: 70,388

Doctorate Degree: 9,535

Law Degree: 4,331

TOP 10 UNDERGRADUATE MAJORS

Educator Licensure: 37,064

Marketing: 12,288

Accountancy: 11,396

Communications: 9,989

Nursing: 8,313

Finance: 8,152

Psychology: 7,215

Biological Sciences: 6,663

English: 6,525

Computer Science: 6,449

ALUMNI BY AGE:

22-29: 18,776

30-39: 43,742

40-49: 42,964

50-59: 47,138

60-69: 44,656

70-79: 43,092

80-89: 11,272

90+: 2,971

Unknown: 488

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MADE POSSIBLE BY REMARKABLE DONORS Funds & Organizations Corporate & Business Individuals TOTAL $1,877,484 $2,495,839 $18,922,177 $23,295,500
BY SOURCE:
Donors in FY22
Giving in FY22
NOTABLE NUMBERS
CONTRIBUTIONS
Total
11,143 Number of Scholarships: 2,049 Scholarship Dollars Awarded: $2.76M Total
$23.3M $2.1M

FISCAL YEAR 2022 Impact of Philanthropy

(July 2021 - June 2022)

Throughout FY22, NIU Donors demonstrated an unwavering commitment to improving the lives of our students and empowering their full potential.

The generosity of our donors is helping transform the world and has proven again that, together, we are Thousands Strong.

PHILANTHROPY AT NIU TRANSFORMS LIVES, FAMILIES AND COMMUNITIES.

MORE THAN

50% of new freshmen at NIU are first-generation.

More than 90% of NIU Foundation scholarship recipients graduate. out of

3 4 NIU students are from an underserved population.

Almost

86% of NIU undergraduates receive financial aid through federal, state, NIU and/or other programs.

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JULY 1, 2021 – JUNE 30, 2022 ENDOWMENT FUND PERFORMANCE

Northern Illinois University and the NIU Alumni Association have designated the NIU Foundation as manager of their endowment assets.

$99.3 BEGINNING OF YEAR

$2.0 GIFTS TO ENDOWMENT (NET)

- $11.6 INVESTMENT RESULTS AND ALLOCATION FOR SPENDING $89.7 END OF YEAR

NEW DOLLARS FOR SCHOLARSHIPS AND PROGRAMS MADE AVAILABLE BY

The goal of setting asset allocation and expenditure strategy for the NIU Foundation Endowment Fund is to maintain the spending power of the fund, in inflation-adjusted (real) dollars, far into the future. The NIU Foundation Finance Committee reviews the asset allocation regularly using ranges approved annually by the NIU Foundation Board of Directors.

11.0%

5.3%

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INVESTMENT INCOME
ENDOWMENT MARKET VALUE (DOLLARS IN MILLIONS)
INVESTMENT RETURN ANNUALIZED TOTAL OVER 1 YEAR 5 YEARS 10 YEARS ACTUAL -7.2% 6.0% 7.2% TARGET WEIGHTED BENCHMARK* -8.6% 6.0% 6.8% LONG-TERM TARGET 7.5% 7.5% 7.5%
3.1M 2022-2023 $3.4M 2021-2022 $2.7M 22.4% 6.1% 13% 10.9% 12% 7.4% 11.9% 11% 5.3% 22.4% Equities Domestic—Large/Mid 6.1% Equities Domestic—Small 13% Equities International 10.9% Emerging Markets
Equities Private
Equities Directional Hedge
Fixed Income
2020-2021 $
12.0%
7.4%
11.9%
Natural Resources
Real
Estate
* Market benchmark results for NIUF’s asset mix.

-

Year ended June 30, 2022

35.6% $2,687,335

ASSETS Cash and Investments $142,951,507 Pledges Receivable, Net $4,374,267 Buildings and Land $21,562,394 Other Assets $365,027 TOTAL ASSETS $169,253,195 LIABILITIES Accounts Payable and Accrued Liabilities $1,634,839 Annuity Payable $516,330 Agency-Endowment and Gift Accounts Administered for NIU $11,580,072 TOTAL LIABILITIES $13,731,241 NET ASSETS June 30, 2021 $155,521,954

audited

31% $2,755,944

7% $618,155

$1,118,869 TOTAL ACTIVITY $12,740,080

Year ended June 30, 2022

56.2% $4,242,700

$14,615,299 CHANGE IN NET ASSETS ($1,875,219) NET ASSETS, JULY 1, 2020 $157,397,173 NET

Total Donor Funds Provided: $ 8,977,270

62% $5,603,171

SUPPORT OF UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENTS/PROGRAMS

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departments/programs
Support of University
depreciation and interest on niu foundation buildings for student use
scholarships
8.2% $620,763
DEPRECIATION AND INTEREST ON NIU FOUNDATION BUILDINGS FOR STUDENT USE SCHOLARSHIPS
FUNDS FROM DONOR GIFTS PROVIDED TO SUPPORT NIU
Contributions $22,705,568 Investment Income
For complete Services Contract Income $743,600 Other Income
financial statements
and IRS Form 990, visit www.niufoundation.org/financials.
ACTIVITY
($11,827,957)
Scholarships and Support of University Departments and Programs $8,977,270 Supporting Services • Fundraising • Management $3,161,242 $2,476,787
EXPENSES
ASSETS,
EXPENSES
-
TOTAL
JUNE 30, 2021 $155,521,954
JULY 1, 2021 – JUNE 30, 2022
SUMMARY OF FINANCIAL DATA

FISCAL YEAR HIGHLIGHTS

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FISCAL YEAR HIGHLIGHTS

HOLIDAY RECEPTION

Alumni and friends of the University came together at a new venue for the Holiday Reception in December 2021. Held at The Old Post Office in Chicago, in the beautiful Telegram Lounge, the party featured heavy hors d’oeuvres and a full, hosted bar, plus bocce ball lanes and pool tables as guests reconnected.

“I have attended many NIU events and Holiday Receptions. The 2021 Holiday Reception at the Old Post Office was one of the very best! Alumni gathered in a beautiful environment and several of us were blown away by the ambiance. This event represents yet another reason for us to be extremely proud NIU alumni! Go, Huskies!” — Francine Pepitone, ’74

THE FOUNDERS FORUM WALL BECOMES A REALITY

CELEBRATING THE IMPACT OF SCHOLARSHIPS

In April, more than 150 attendees filled the Barsema Alumni and Visitors Center for the 2022 Celebration of Scholarships. The recipients in attendance were brilliant, accomplished, and grateful ambassadors for their University.

The event provided scholarship recipients and donors a chance to meet one another and celebrate their unique contributions to NIU and the world around them.

“Scholarships play a pivotal role in achieving our shared vision for NIU. They help put us on the path to becoming a first-choice destination for smart, determined young people who come with grit, imagination and a hunger for learning,” said Catherine Squires, vice president of University Advancement and president and CEO of the NIU Foundation.

Squires addressed the grateful scholarship recipients in the audience, “I ask that you look around the room knowing that you are in the company of your Huskie family,” she said. “Your donors believe in you, they support your dreams, and they are confident in the impact you’ll make on our world. They want you to succeed and have made the decision to invest in you.”

An homage to the tremendous impact that Founders Forum donors have on NIU students, the Founders Forum Wall was unveiled during a celebration in NIU’s historic Altgeld Hall on Nov. 12, 2021.

The wall was made possible by a generous gift from NIU alumni John, ’74, M.S. ’75, and Anne Landgraf, ‘73. The Founders Forum recognizes, thanks and celebrates individuals, corporations, foundations and organizations whose lifetime generosity has made a significant impact on the University.

The Impact of Founders Forum donors can be seen and felt throughout campus: in the dedication of new buildings, in the awarding of student scholarships, in the strengthening of our academic and athletic programs, and in the outstanding faculty who hold the prestigious positions they endow.

“Truly, the impact of your giving has breadth, depth and significance that will resonate throughout NIU for generations,” said Catherine Squires, NIU Foundation president as she addressed the audience.

To John and Anne Landgraf, she added, “We believe that this wall will achieve all that you hoped. A key component behind the wall was to inspire others to join the society. It was John’s vision to grow the number of members in the Founders Forum society by 65 by Dec. 31, 2020, and even in the midst of a global pandemic, we not only reached our goal but surpassed it.”

“Thank you, John and Anne, for your vision, and thank you to everyone in this room for your generosity,” she said.

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HUSKIES UNITED ’22 RAISES $1.1M FOR PROGRAMS, CENTERS AND CAMPUS PARTNERS

Once again, Huskies United to do the impossible! Together, our alumni, faculty, staff and friends of the University brought in $1,104,426 through more than 1,300 gifts during our annual Huskies United day of giving in June. This total exceeded expectations and topped last year’s total giving, when just over $1 million was raised.

As all Huskies know, an NIU education encompasses more than just time in the classroom. It also relies on new experiences, getting involved and working for a better future. Huskies United provided critical support for the campus departments, units and centers that bring the college experience to life and help students of all majors emerge as thoughtful, engaged global citizens. In addition, Huskies United gifts went to fund

scholarships for students from all walks of life.

This year, there was a special emphasis on helping the NIU Foundation grow its Northern Fund, which provides flexible funding and bridges gaps for the University. Two giving challenges were created and met for the Northern Fund during Huskies United. Dan, ’87, and Diane Calkins created a $30,000 Northern Fund challenge, which unlocked when 200 gifts were made during Huskies United. Alumna Amy Fahey, ’84, also created a Northern Fund challenge, which unlocked $50,000 when 400 gifts were made. There was a total of 19 giving challenges created for Huskies United, many from NIU faculty and staff.

In addition to our donors, 109 committed Huskies

United ambassadors played a special role in the day of giving, bringing in over 262 gifts and raising a total of $28,477—a new record from previous Huskies United giving days.

“Huskies United never ceases to amaze me,” said Michael Adzovic, senior director of operations and annual giving.

“I hope our donors understand the poignant impact their investment will have on our students and faculty. Their generosity means so much to so many and will have a ripple effect of goodness in our world.”

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FISCAL YEAR HIGHLIGHTS Dan, ’87, and Diane Calkins created a $30,000 Northern Fund challenge.

FISCAL YEAR HIGHLIGHTS

THOUSANDS STRONG DAY OF GIVING GETS STRONGER!

It’s a fact. Huskies are stronger together.

When we band together, there is nothing we cannot accomplish, and this year’s “Thousands Strong” day of giving event proved that once again!

Northern Illinois University alumni, students, faculty and staff, and friends of the University came together on Nov. 10-11 to celebrate the incredible positive impact NIU has on our communities, across the country and around the world.

It all began with an opening night show that featured NIU President Freeman, and a performance by NIU a cappella group, the Huskie Hunks, via Zoom. Our host, B.F.A. acting candidate Kate Drury, introduced four undergraduate students who were surprised with life-changing tuition scholarships—Alejandra Hernandez, Mekhi McCarthy, Edward Carter III and Fabiola Vargas.

The “Thousands Strong” day of giving began after the opening night show and lasted for 31 hours through 11:59 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 11. While final totals are still being tallied, donors provided more than 2,700 gifts to the NIU Foundation for a total of $1,931,200. The event garnered close to 800 views combined between Zoom and YouTube, surpassing our goal of 500 and unlocking a $10,000 challenge gift from Tom Braje, ’64.

Thirty-three challenge and matching gifts were established to encourage giving, led by a $100,000 challenge gift donated by an anonymous donor, which was unlocked when the University reached 2,000 gifts. All seven academic colleges had giving challenges and matches, and many of them were met!

A hard-working group of 150 Thousands Strong ambassadors helped spread the word about our day of giving, and they helped generate 417 gifts of more than $46,438 in donations through social media, text, phone, email or word-of-mouth. This is a record-setting group, garnering the largest number

of referred gifts and the largest amount fundraised despite having 50 less ambassadors than the group that set the previous record. Plus, more students worked as ambassadors this year, helping us to reach new audiences.

“Thousands Strong is just one more way we can see Huskies in action, doing good in the world,” Adzovic said. “Our community came together and showed its Huskie pride and collective strength. When the Huskie family comes together, there nothing we can’t do. Together, we can move NIU forward.”

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Tom Braje, ’64, donated a $10,000 challenge gift.

FISCAL YEAR HIGHLIGHTS

2021 NIUAA AWARDS HIGHLIGHT HUSKIE STRENGTHS AND INNOVATIONS

The NIU Alumni Association annually recognizes the achievements of outstanding alumni, with award recipients being selected based on outstanding professional and personal successes, as well as involvement in civic, cultural or charitable activities.

This year’s award winners represent the best qualities of an NIU Huskie. They have lived and worked with integrity, made positive differences in their professional fields, and have been on the forefront of change.

“Our winners’ accomplishments make us all proud to be Huskies,”

NIU Foundation Executive Director of Operations and Alumni Relations Reggie Bustinza said. “This year’s recipients are trailblazers, leading their industries and forging new pathways for others to follow, and showing leadership during a difficult and unprecedented last year.”

VELCHAMY SANKARLINGAM M.S. ’90

Distinguished Alumnus Award

CAROLYN KAMBICH ’60

F.R. Geigle Service Award

JULIE YURKO ’90

Alumni Achievement in Public Service Award

MATT PRICE ’09

Alumni Achievement in the Sciences Award

WILLIAM “DRE” BUCHANAN ’99

Alumni Achievement in the Arts Award

RACHEL MCBRIDE ’13, M.S. ’16

Outstanding Young Alumna Award

For IBM innovator Matt Price, accepting the NIUAA’s award is an opportunity to step back and look at the things he has been able to accomplish so far.

“Like most others, it seems, I get lost in the day-to-day grind of trying to solve problems and making things better,” he said. “So, the chance to stop and reflect on how far I’ve come since I graduated from NIU will undoubtedly give

me renewed motivation to tackle the challenges ahead of me.”

Founder of North Shore Montessori Schools, Carolyn Kambich was humbled and honored by her recognition.

“I don’t think of doing anything for the recognition,” she said. “I’ve just gone about living my life, and I’ve been amazed when I look back to see where the ‘yellow brick road’ has taken me.”

Our 2021 alumni award recipients (L-R): Carolyn Kambich, ’60; Velchamy Sankarlingam, M.S. ’90; Rachel McBride, ’13, M.S. ’16; NIU President Lisa Freeman; William “Dre” Buchanan, ’99; Julie Yurko, ’90 and Matthew Price, ’09.
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FISCAL YEAR HIGHLIGHTS TRAVEL PROGRAM RESUMES, CONNECTS HUSKIES WITH PEOPLE AND PLACES

Absence makes the heart grow fonder, and this was definitely the case with the Alumni Association Travel Program during the global pandemic.

FY22 saw the resurrection of the program, with four trips executed in the second half of the year, starting with an Antarctica cruise in December 2021, a trip to Southern Spain and Madrid in March, a river Douro River cruise in Portugal in April, and a Canadian Rockies adventure in May 2022.

“Fewer travel restrictions spurred travelers to respond with pent-up demand for travel,” said Pat Anderson, director of the travel program. “The four trips we had were successful, although not without some difficulties. Because of COVID-19 restrictions and testing for travelers who were entering a country and returning to the U.S., some travelers were required to quarantine in Portugal. All were relieved when those travelers finally returned home safely.”

The future is bright for upcoming Alumni Association Travel Program trips. Where there was previously COVID-19 testing to enter many countries and to return to the U.S., now there are no restrictions in many countries. This has caused a huge interest in reservations for future trips, with our January 2023 Galapagos trip selling out in two days, and travelers are eager to hear where we are going next.

NOTABLE NUMBERS:

• During the four trips that were able to operate in FY22, we had a total of 90 travelers, with 81 being unique travelers.

• Over the four trips that were held in FY22, we had 31 first-time travelers. Looking at all our travelers over this past year (90), the average age was 69 and the total number of trips taken (forever) from these travelers is 618.

• FY23 destinations include Ireland (September 2022), Prague (October 2022), Christmas Markets-Highlighting Vienna (November 2022), Quito and Galapagos Islands (January 2023), Holland Tulips Cruise (April 2023) and Arctic Cruise Adventure (July 2023).

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2021

FISCAL YEAR HIGHLIGHTS

COMMUNICATIONS IS KEY AT THE NIU FOUNDATION

Alumni, donors and friends of the University were able to connect, engage and stay in touch, thanks in part to the NIU Foundation’s communications team. From emails and website feature stories to the Northern Now magazine and e-newsletters, and much more, Huskie communications are where all events, travel and volunteer opportunities began in FY22!

NOTABLE NUMBERS:

• Huskies are real news hounds, and in FY22, our email audiences were engaged! With an extraordinary open rate of 28.43% at the end of the year, email communications saw an increase of nearly 10% more alumni, donors and friends opening our email messages.

ALUMNI EVENTS RETURN BETTER THAN EVER!

NOTABLE NUMBERS:

• Thanks to the 123 alumni, donors and volunteers who shared their stories with our audiences through our regular online feature articles and our Northern Now magazine. This year, we heard about the marvelous careers of award-winning teachers and journalists, community leaders, healthcare innovators, TikTok influencers, and an Olympic hopeful. There was a little something for every Huskie!

• Due to the unique stories our Huskies shared, we were able to increase our followers on LinkedIn by nearly 7,500 in FY22.

With alumni and friends of the University able to get back together in person for events in FY22, Huskies were out and about, attending 101 events between July 1, 2021, and June 31, 2022.

• Alumni and friends enjoyed the charming new location of our annual Holiday Reception. The Old Post Office in Chicago proved the perfect locale for more than 150 Huskies to celebrate the holidays together.

• Huskies from Arizona, Florida, Colorado, Michigan and Georgia attended fun regional alumni events in 2022.

• Mission’s Dog Days of Summer brought our favorite fourlegged mascot on a five-city road trip in Wisconsin, Iowa and Illinois, as his official bobblehead was launched for purchase, and he was inducted into the Bobblehead Hall of Fame in Milwaukee.

June 25-29

• In May 2022, more than 200 alumni, faculty, staff and friends of the University attended the 11th NIUAA golf outing at Cantigny Golf Club in Wheaton, Illinois. Weather was perfect as Huskies painted the course with Cardinal and Black!

MADISON (June 26) MILWAUKEE (June 25) DeKalb GALENA (June 27) BLOOMINGTON (June 29) PEORIA (June 28)
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FISCAL YEAR HIGHLIGHTS

VOLUNTEERS SUPPORT FELLOW HUSKIES

Huskie volunteers had an incredible year, with a 17.4% increase in total unique volunteers from FY21 to FY22. Nearly 1,400 participated in 2,212 volunteer opportunities, which not only strengthened the relationships between those alumni and the University, but also provided resources to those campus partners who engaged them. Our biggest wins brought alumni, donors and students together in ways that truly made a difference here at the University!

NOTABLE NUMBERS:

• Through the Huskie Postcard Project, alumni wrote personal messages of encouragement on NIU-themed postcards for current students. Volunteers then created a care package with a pin and snacks for each of the 1,400 cards—which added up to a 100% increase in cards from FY21! With the assistance of campus partners, these postcards were distributed to students at finals in May.

• More than 330 unique volunteers came together to help NIU advocate for its legislative agenda. This is a 48% growth from FY21! The advocacy program continues to grow, with alumni making more than 180 contacts with legislators, and the state increasing funding towards higher education by 5%.

• Alumni volunteers also helped NIU connect with over 18,500 prospective students through activities like letter-writing campaigns, recruitment fairs and panels. This is close to 10% more outreach than in FY21.

• Through the “Advancement, Communication and Engagement Series” (ACES), we were able to show 105 total faculty and staff members the benefits of collaborating with the engagement and philanthropic units within the Foundation.

• This year, NIU Foundation volunteers supported philanthropy at the University more than ever. Ambassadors for virtual fundraising opportunities grew by 15% from FY21, which is 10% more than the goal set for FY22. Close to 300 volunteers supported three separate virtual fundraising opportunities and raised over $80,000 for NIU.

“I really valued this experience as a NIU Foundation student-worker because it allowed me to witness the amount of support provided to current students by NIU alumni. I had the opportunity of working with an alumnus to hand the care packages to students. I got to witness the bonds and connections formed between him and many NIU students. I also got to witness the smile he put on their faces as he handed them those packages and told them short stories about his time at NIU. For me, this was a very memorable experience. As human beings, we don’t always know that people outside our circle have our backs and are rooting for you, but being a part of this project made me realize that.”

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STORIES OF IMPACT

NIUAA STUDENT SCHOLARSHIPS BRING HOPE, RELIEF TO DESERVING STUDENTS

As with each year, the NIUAA Board of Directors’ Scholarship Subcommittee worked very hard to select 10 diligent and impressive undergraduate students who received the 2022-23 Alumni Merit Scholarship of $2,500 each. Each winner’s grade point average was well over the minimum 3.5 needed to apply.

• Haley Brudi, College of Health and Human Sciences, Stockton, Illinois.

• Hannah Clark, College of Education, Roanoke, Illinois.

• Grace DeSmedt, College of Education, Aurora, Illinois.

• Judith Facio, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Elgin, Illinois.

• Sadey Havel, College of Visual and Performing Arts, Appleton, Wisconsin.

• Grace Sharp, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Rockford, Illinois.

• Vilaya Sirivong, College of Business, DeKalb, Illinois.

• Tyler Stewart, College of Engineering and Engineering Technology, Amboy, Illinois.

• Andrew Stover, College of Visual and Performing Arts, Maple Park, Illinois.

• Karli Waldrep, College of Education, Health Education, Mahomet, Illinois.

2022 NIU FOUNDATION IMPACT SCHOLARS

The purpose of the Northern Illinois University Foundation Impact Scholarship Award is to provide financial assistance and support to student(s) who demonstrate the values and spirit of NIU as illustrated by their academic excellence; outstanding work ethic; and Huskie Pride. Each of these 15 winners are in financial need with good academic standing of at LEAST a cumulative GPA of 3.0. These students are just a sampling of the thousands of students who receive NIU Foundation scholarships across campus each year.

• LaMya Webster, College of Health and Human Sciences, South Holland, Illinois.

• Karli Waldrep , College of Education, Mahomet, Illinois.

• Dayoung Park , College of Visual and Performing Arts, Osan-Si, South Korea.

• Gwendolyn Papke , College of Health and Human Sciences, Rochelle, Illinois.

• Alicia LaRouech , College of Health and Human Sciences, DeKalb, Illinois.

• Alison Kramer , College of Business, Genoa, Illinois.

• Erin Kirby , College of Visual and Performing Arts, Prospect Heights, Illinois.

• Di’Quan Ishmon , College of Engineering and Engineering Technology, Rochelle, Illinois.

• Tina Figarelli , College of Visual and Performing Arts, Elk Grove Village, Illinois.

• Judith Facio , College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Elgin, Illinois.

• Anjishnu Chakrabarti , College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Buffalo Grove, Illinois.

• Alberto Briones , College of Business, Aurora, Illinois.

• Cristina Bravo , College of Education, Kenosha, Wisconsin.

• Allie Schneider , College of Engineering and Engineering Technology, DeKalb, Illinois.

• Chyna Bennett , College of Health and Human Sciences, Chicago Heights, Illinois.

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STORIES OF IMPACT CROWDFUNDING ADDS UP TO BIG IMPACT

It takes a village to raise a child, but that village will not desert young adults when they enroll in college!

In fact, it’s easier than ever for people to invest in causes close to their hearts, especially through new online crowdfunding campaigns.

A key difference between crowdfunding and the NIU Foundation’s traditional methods of fundraising is that crowdfunding is driven primarily by volunteers reaching out and amplifying a cause to their individual networks, as opposed to communications being institutionally driven. The dollar goal for crowdfunding campaigns tends to be smaller, anywhere from $50 to $5,000.

Due to the rise in awareness of online giving during the global pandemic, The NIU Foundation launched “NIU Impact,” its new crowdfunding program in 2021. As the program grew, it yielded big results in FY22. Crowdfunding campaigns raised $68,837 for specific

initiatives, such as student travel to conferences, research projects, and scholarships, and the duration of a typical campaign is four weeks.

For instance, 41 donors were able to raise $6,913 in November 2021 for the JJR Steelpan Relief Fund, which supports three international students from Trinidad and Tobago who are pursuing their master’s degrees in music with a specialization in steelpan performance at NIU. In April 2022, the NIU Autism Caregiver Group was able to raise its goal amount of $2,500 through 41 generous online donors. These funds will go to help families of those with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), while providing impactful care opportunities to NIU students.

However, the positive impact of crowdfunding extends to those raising the funds. As part of the crowdfunding project, Michael Adzovic, senior director of annual giving at the NIU Foundation, partnered with Alicia Schatteman,

associate professor and director of the Center for Nonprofit and NGO Studies, to lead teams of NNGO 301 students in planning and executing a month-long crowdfunding campaign to support the initiatives of NIU’s Center for Nonprofit and NGO Studies.

Daniele Leonard, a senior completing her degree in general studies with a certificate in nonprofit and NGO studies, looked at the project as a chance to positively impact the center and her build relationships.

“I learned that you don’t have to graduate to make a difference! Change can be accomplished in-person, remotely, through social media and beyond. Fundraising takes a worthy cause and gives it a voice,” she said. “The campaign also affirmed that I can be the change I want to see. I don’t think I would have felt this confident about my future without both the crowdfunding campaign and the course instruction.”

p. 19

STORIES OF IMPACT

AMY FAHEY CHANGES LIVES WITH TWO DISCRETIONARY FUNDS

staff and professors, and NIU can’t run programs without all of that. I decided to give to a place that I trust and think is managing their finances well, and then leave it to them to allocate it where it was most needed,” she said.

When Amy Fahey, ’84, decided to make a gift to the University in FY22, she knew the time was right to make a certain kind of impact. Her Amy Fahey Fund for Northern, as well as her College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (CLAS) Dean’s Strategic Initiatives Fund, allow University leadership to disperse the funds where they are most needed.

“I have been involved in a lot of nonprofit organizations that struggle to cover their basic costs because so many donors have this view that they want every single dollar to go to programming,” Fahey said. “I am on a couple boards right now, and one in particular, where we struggle with that.”

When she decided to gift the University, Fahey knew she would want to create discretionary funds that allowed leadership to allocate the gifts where they are most needed.

“I know the University has to support the infrastructure of the organization. It has buildings and facilities and

Fahey has supported NIU for years after earning her applied data computer science degree from the University in 1984. While in college, she interned with the McDonald’s corporation and moved on to work in a role for Chevron in San Francisco after graduation. From there, Fahey went on to a long career at JPMorgan Chase, and its predecessor organizations, before starting a consulting firm in 2015.

“I truly believe that the education I received in technology helped launch my career and set me on a path that allowed me to be where I am today,” Fahey said. “I was hired by Chevron after graduation because of the renowned program that NIU offered. While I’m not currently in a technology role, everything we do in today’s world has a technology focus to it. The basic problemsolving skills that I learned at NIU have proven useful throughout my entire career. For that, I am truly grateful.”

Fahey decided to specifically give to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences because of the well-rounded education

she received during her time on campus.

“Having been a student of CLAS, I still to the day, believe that a solid liberal arts and sciences degree prepares students for a lot of situations in career and life and everything,” she said.

Fahey is optimistic for her contribution, and she is eager to see the positive effects it may have on the University.

“From a student perspective, I hope that this gift allows kids to benefit from NIU that may not have been able to before,” she said.

Fahey noted that she never forgets about the importance of faculty when giving to the University.

“People forget sometimes that even teachers have to be taught, and these resources that support the whole infrastructure are critical,” she said. “I also hope these gifts allow faculty and staff to continue to develop programs that are helpful to organizations that will hire students after graduation. They need to constantly be staying ahead of what companies are hiring for and constantly doing research, so that kids are well-prepared for what the workforce expects. Most importantly, I hope others continue to support these vital parts of infrastructure, as well.”

p. 20 IMPACT REPORT 2021-2022

STORIES OF IMPACT

PAUL AND JEAN BURTNESS LEAVE LEGACY WITH MULTI-MILLION-DOLLAR GIFT

After devoting his career to literature and the arts, the late Paul Burtness, and his late wife Jean, wrote their own legacy.

Jean and Paul, who was a retired English professor and dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, as well as a devoted patron of the arts, were inspired to write NIU into their estate plans. Paul passed away in November 2019, and in 2022, the University was made aware of the late couple’s wishes to donate a multi-milliondollar gift to benefit diligent students who might need financial assistance.

“Paul and Jean Burtness have chosen to remember NIU in their estate plans and have left gifts that are truly transformational and impactful to our students,” said Associate Director of

Planned Giving Mike Cullen. “Dr. Paul Burtness was Dean for the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences prior to his retirement. Dr. Burtness saw the value in higher education and had the foresight to leave a legacy for scholarships that will benefit students for generations.”

Paul attended Carson Newman College in Jefferson City, Tennessee, for his bachelor’s degree. The G.I. Bill allowed him to attend the University of Chicago, where he earned his M.A. and Ph.D., with a specialization was Chaucer. Paul also authored several anthologies, including a study of Edgar Allen Poe (The Enigma of Poe), a college English handbook (Close Reading of Factual Prose), a collection of articles about The Puzzle of Pearl Harbor and, in collaboration with

Dr. Warren U. Ober, numerous articles concerning World War II.

Jean earned her bachelor’s degree from Northwestern University before becoming an English teacher at Crystal Lake High School. During the early years of her marriage, she was a service representative for Illinois Bell Telephone to help augment family finances so her husband could finish his graduate studies. Jean passed away in December 2007.

Over the years, the Burtnesses supported the faculty scholarship program, always aware of how much these helping hands mean to deserving students. Their final gift is truly transformational.

p. 21 IMPACT REPORT 2021-2022

DE LA VEGA INNOVATION LAB STORIES OF IMPACT

To enter Barsema Hall is to enter a world where anything seems possible.

With its high ceilings, open stairways, and busy common areas, the building is virtually electric with the energy and ideas of those who work and learn there.

It’s a scene Jenee Carlson, ’19, remembers well from her days as a business student.

“It’s so motivating to see everyone working together in the open areas,” she said. “You know people are doing great things because you can see them in action all around you.”

Thanks to the generosity of donors, Barsema Hall is now home to the De La Vega Innovation Lab.

The 3,000-square-foot, stateof-the-art lab is a resource for all NIU stakeholders to use as they identify emerging needs and create new products and services.

Users will have access to 3D printers, rolling white boards and conferencing technologies. Moveable seating and tables allow for a range of configurations to suit a variety of needs.

IDEAS FOR A BETTER WORLD

“By design, the lab will help users hone their creativity and empathetic skills because we know those are really the cornerstone of innovation,” said Christine Mooney, Barsema Professor of Social Entrepreneurship.

She explained the lab’s fun and relaxing atmosphere helps facilitate innovative thinking.

“When we ask people to be creative, we’re asking them to pull on their vulnerability, and in order to be vulnerable, you need to feel safe,” she said. “Safe emotionally and safe that you can make mistakes.”

Carlson, who now works as a recruitment consultant at EngTal, Engineering Talent, New York, sat on the student steering committee headed by Mooney back in 2019.

“I remember a group of us students sitting on the floor in the space that is now the lab just dreaming up ideas of what it could be,” she said. “We had Post-It Notes and pictures and diagrams posted all over the wall.”

Seeing the lab today, Carlson says it far exceeds any of their wildest dreams.

“I’m thrilled that a resource like this exists for students today,” she said.

It is expected the work done in the lab will contribute to solving pressing global problems, including food insecurity, sustainability and climate change.

“This lab provides an opportunity for our entire diverse student body, working with faculty and staff, to do what we do best here in the United States: innovate,” said NIU Trustee Dennis Barsema, ’77.

“As long as we do that, we will retain our leadership in the world as a global business partner for other countries. It will create jobs and a better world for those who come after us,” he said.

TURNING OBSTACLES INTO OPPORTUNITIES

NIU College of Business Dean Balaji Rajagopalan described the lab as a fitting tribute to its naming benefactors, Ralph and Maria de la Vega.

“Ralph and Maria personify the magic that occurs when innovation, creativity and empathetic leadership are combined,” he said.

p. 22 IMPACT REPORT 2021-2022

As young children in 1962, Maria and Ralph each traveled separately—mostly alone— from Cuba to the United States.

Along the way, they each encountered many obstacles, including cultural and language barriers. “Ralph and Maria have mastered the art and discipline of converting adversity into positive, significant opportunity,” said Rajagopalan.

“What has really resonated with me is the de la Vegas’ belief that some people never reach their full potential because they don’t see the opportunities embedded within challenges,” said NIU President Lisa Freeman.

“Through the de la Vegas’ generosity, we now have a space that will support our students not just in seeing opportunities but in seizing them as well,” she said.

FORTUNE FAVORS THE PREPARED

Ralph de la Vega, M.B.A. ’89, is the former vice chairman of AT&T, responsible for all of AT&T’s global business operations, CEO of AT&T Mobility, COO of Cingular Wireless, and president of BellSouth Latin America.

DE LA VEGA INNOVATION LAB RIBBON-CUTTING

He said that the education he received at NIU helped him continue learning his entire life. He added NIU prepared him to compete—and thrive— in an industry that didn’t exist when he was a student.

“In 1985 there were 300,000 cellular phones in the whole

country. They cost $3,500 a piece, and some were so big you had to put them in the trunk of your car,” he said.

“Starting in an industry with 300,000 wireless subscribers, and by the end, being responsible for a company that had 100 million subscribers and was generating $80B in annual revenues, is something that dreams are made of,” he said. “NIU made that happen.”

GIVING COMES FULL CIRCLE

The Innovation Lab is the result of a wide base of donor support in addition to the de la Vega lead gift.

The lab’s Networking Circle was named in honor of Eric Wasowicz, ’80, Chair of the NIU Board of Trustees, and his wife Ann Lawrence for their generous support to help make the lab a reality. In addition, the Tech Hub was named in honor of Jim Wong, ’92, and his wife Kathy Harenza for their generosity.

Mike Cullen, ’87, former NIU Foundation Board Chair, said the lab will raise awareness of the importance of philanthropy at NIU.

“The quality of education that students receive here will help them find success after graduation,” he said. “It will put them in a position to give back and start the whole cycle again.”

President Freeman reminded donors their impact will reverberate far beyond the NIU community.

“Your contributions will not only serve our students today but will extend into

the business world when our students take what they have learned here and apply it in ways we can only begin to imagine,” she said.

AT NIU, ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE

Standing at the top of the stairway leading to the lab, Ralph de la Vega said he hopes it will be a place for great innovation and inspiration.

“When students walk up these steps and see the Innovation Lab, I hope they know that a 10-yearold boy who got to this country by himself, without his family, without speaking a word of English, and without a penny in his pocket, had something to do with it, and there was a school named NIU that helped him do it,” he said.

“I hope they also see that they too can make it, because once you are a Huskie, everything that you want to do is certainly possible.”

For more information about the De La Vega Innovation Lab, contact Kelsey Johnson at kelsey. johnson@niu.edu.

p. 23
Ralph de la Vega delivers the keynote address at the Innovation Lab dedication.

STORIES OF IMPACT

LRS UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT SUCCESS CENTER AND LRS ENDOWED STUDENT SCHOLARSHIP LAUNCHED IN THE NIU COLLEGE OF BUSINESS

A recent gift to the Northern Illinois University College of Business from Lakeshore Recycling Services (LRS) is creating new opportunities for students to excel at NIU and beyond.

“As an alumnus, I can say that I have never been more proud of this institution,” said Alan T. Handley, CEO of LRS (formerly known as Lakeshore Recycling Systems) an industry leader in waste diversion, recycling and portable services. “LRS and NIU have shared a special relationship through the years, a bond with one common denominator: cultivating academic excellence.”

The gift will help further that goal through the creation of the LRS Undergraduate Student Success Center and the LRS Endowed Student Scholarship Fund in the NIU College of Business.

The LRS Undergraduate Student Success Center will be home to the offices of the director for Undergraduate Business Programs and the college’s academic advisors. The center will also be a source of real-world projects to provide students real-world learning and will provide funding so that teams of business students can travel to national and international competitions. The LRS Scholarship Fund, when fully endowed, will provide scholarships for up to five students in the college each year.

“LRS is incredibly proud to serve as an agent of change, working in partnership with the NIU College of Business, with its first-class education, to create an experiential center of excellence aimed at learning, growing and succeeding,” Handley said.

Handley, who earned a degree in accountancy from NIU, has been CEO of LRS since 2012. Under his leadership, what began as an upstart Chicago-based waste and recycling company quickly grew into one of the largest independent waste diversion, recycling and portable services companies in North America. The organization employs more than 2,000 individuals across nine states, operates more than 65 sites and generates more than $550 million in annual revenue.

Handley is grateful for the opportunity to help current-day Huskies find success.

“Funding the LRS Student Success Center and launching our Endowed Scholarship Fund means everything to me personally,” Handley said.

“Returning to DeKalb and this beautiful campus, I am reminded of just how lucky I was in the fall of 1988, when I began my journey here, forming relationships and having experiences that would last a lifetime. There is no greater honor than to be in a position to pay it back, and in turn, make a difference in the lives of future generations of business leaders.”

Balaji Rajagopalan, dean of the NIU College of Business, noted that the gifts are just the latest examples of how LRS has partnered with the college to provide students with learning opportunities that prepare them for the rigors of the business world. Over the past few years, LRS has:

• Engaged with first-year students through the college’s Business in Action course.

• Provided a project for the college’s Experiential Learning Center, allowing a team of students to function as consultants on frontline issues.

• Provided a real-world decision-making scenario for use in an upcoming M.B.A. course.

Supported LRS employees enrolled in the college’s Executive M.B.A. Program.

NIU President Dr. Lisa C. Freeman shared Rajagopalan’s gratitude for the gifts, noting how closely the gifts align with the university’s commitment to experiential learning and helping students overcome financial hurdles.

“The support provided by LRS will benefit NIU students for many years to come. The creation of the Student Success Center, with its emphasis on providing even more opportunities for realworld learning in our College of Business, aligns with NIU’s vision to be an engaged institution that transforms the lives of students and communities alike,” Dr. Freeman said. “Furthermore, the endowed scholarship will help us ensure that the cost of a college education will not prevent talented students from earning a life-changing degree at NIU.”

p. 24 IMPACT REPORT 2021-2022

DISTINGUISHED DONOR SOCIETIES

THE NIU FOUNDATION HAS FOUR RECOGNITION SOCIETIES TO HONOR DONORS FOR THEIR CONTRIBUTIONS:

The Founders Forum recognizes donors who have generously contributed $50,000+ during their lifetime. This includes cash, gifts in kind and pledges but does not include estate intentions until they are realized.

The Leadership Society recognizes donors who have contributed a minimum of $1,000 cumulative during a fiscal year.

“I support the NIU Foundation and NIU students because the University does an excellent job of engaging its alumni in the ‘3 Ts’—time, talent, and treasure. Giving of my time as an NIU Alumni Association Board member, and sharing of my talent and professional expertise with students, makes it easy for me to share of my financial resources. As a leader, I do not give to be seen, but I must be seen giving, for I believe in the motto ‘Each one reach one… by any means necessary!’”

The Cornerstone Society recognizes donors who have included NIU in their estate plans.

The Olive Goyle Society recognizes donors with three or more consecutive fiscal years of giving to NIU. We call them our “Olive Goyle Loyals.”

“I chose to set up the Jan Half Scholarship Fund to encourage Leland CUSD #1 students to enroll at NIU, and I set up the STEAM Fund to support Leland students and teachers in the learning and experiences of science, technology, engineering, arts, and math. Teaching middle school students in Leland from 1975-1979 was where I launched my 40-year career in education, technology and running a California STEAM nonprofit, so I wanted to give back to the Leland students and community in this way. The courses I took and the internship I had for my M.S.Ed. at NIU from 19771980, greatly impacted my career.”

p. 25 IMPACT REPORT 2021-2022

NIU FOUNDATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS

OFFICERS

John (Jack) Tierney ’75, M.S.Ed. ’78 Chair (February 2022 – June 2022)

Chris Cole ’75

Chair (July 2021 – February 2022)

Cynthia Crocker ’80 Vice Chair

David Heide ’85 Treasurer

Catherine Squires, CFRE ’80

President and CEO, NIU Foundation

V.P. University Advancement, NIU Secretary

NIUAA BOARD

OFFICERS

Joseph Sener ’93, M.S. ’10, President

Peter Garrity ’71, M.B.A ’76, Immediate Past-President

Rich Escalante ’74, M.A.P.A. ’78, Vice President

Sankat Patel ’00, Vice President

Michael Hughes ’92, M.A. ’93, Treasurer

Reggie Bustinza, Executive Director and Secretary

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Marlo Barnett M.S.Ed. ’12, Ph.D. ’17, Chair of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

Carlos Fulcher ’90

Chair of Student Engagement and Scholarship Committee

Pat Gregolunas ’77, M.S. ’11, Chair of Volunteer Engagement & Advocacy Committee

Donald Hubbartt ’96, M.B.A. ’01, Chair of Alumni Events and Awards Committee

Vinay Mullick ’00, Chair, Marketing & Communications

DIRECTORS

Sophia Arnold, Student Director

Ray Banks ’86

Stacey Barsema

William Boston ’70

M.B.A. ’71

Brent Brodeski ’88

M.B.A. ’91

Wheeler Coleman ’83

Carol Crenshaw ’78

Rich Escalante ’74

M.A.P.A. ’78

John Thomas Futrell

M.B.A. ’79

Pete Garrity ’71

M.B.A. ’76

Kenneth Greisman ’82

Anthony Kambich ’59

Jeffrey Liesendahl ’87

Cherilyn Murer

J.D. ’78

James Pick, Ph.D., M.S.Ed. ’69

Manny Sanchez ’70

Joe Sener ’93, M.S. ’10

Isabelle Vondra Student Director

DIRECTORS

Kimberly Buchanan ’95, M.A. ’98

Michael Cahill ’12, M.A.S. ’13

Chad Fitz ’01, M.A.S. ’02

Paul Green ’81

Kristin Hamblock ’08, M.B.A. ’15

Marlon Haywood ’10, M.S.Ed. ’12

Marty Johnstone ’09, M.B.A. ’21

Thomas Libert ’74

William McCoy ’92

Kimberly Moore ’01, M.M. ’04

Vinay Mullick ’00

Peggy Norton-Rosko ’87

Mark Pienkos ’72, M.S. Ed. ’74

Sherry Reynolds-Whitaker

M.B.A. ’09, M.S.Ed. ’13, Ed.D ’16

Valerie Salmons ’74, M.P.A. ’77

Joe Sosnowski ’99

John Tsaras ’14

Fred Vinciguerra ’88

p. 26 IMPACT REPORT 2021-2022

MISSION

Some say once a celebrity has his own bobblehead, he has made it to a new tier of fame.

FY22 saw the introduction of Mission II’s minifigure, complete with a bobbling head, which has been selling out on the NIUAA’s website and at events. He was even welcomed into the National Bobblehead Museum’s Bobblehead Hall of Fame during a trip to Milwaukee in the spring.

Mission’s influence continued in other ways, too. Over the course of last year, he went from having 11,0000 followers to 32,600 over his various social media accounts. Mission’s overall event requests rose to 130 appearances, with all positive feedback.

The program launched the Mission’s Pet Pack program and continues to accumulate followers with 12 new pack members in FY22.

“Mission has rapidly gained the love and adoration of the Huskie community, even outweighing that of his predecessor,” said Mission’s trainer and manager, Lisa Boland. “I’ve had many incoming students say that his presence on campus was one of their factors when considering NIU. He has a talent for bringing joy wherever he goes, and

thrilled that he’s one of the most compelling ‘faces’ of NIU.”

p. 27 IMPACT REPORT 2021-2022
I’m
WORKS AS FOUR-LEGGED AMBASSADOR TO HUSKIES NEAR AND FAR
“Working with Mission II has been a true honor, and I feel the experience really embodies what it means to be an NIU Huskie. I have gotten to see all the electricity that alumni, faculty and students have at game days and also feel their true Huskie Pride.”
— Wyatt Smith, ROTC Student and Mascot Program Participant

Altgeld Hall 135 DeKalb, IL 60115

(815) 753-1626

niufoundation@niu.edu | niufoundation.org TEACHER

TOTAL NUMBER OF GRADUATES (UNDERGRADUATE, GRADUATE AND LAW COMBINED)

4,238

2021-22 GRADUATION STATISTICS TOTAL (UNDERGRADUATE, GRADUATE AND LAW COMBINED)

College of Business: 943 (22.3%)

College of Visual and Performing Arts: 237 (5.6%)

College of Law: 104 (2.4%)

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences: 1204 (28.4%)

College of Education: 715 (16.9%)

College of Engineering and Engineering Technology: 327 (7.7%)

College of Health and Human Sciences: 708 (16.7%)

PSYCHOLOGY NURSING COMPUTER SCIENCE MARKETING ACCOUNTANCY HEALTH SCIENCES MECHANICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATIONS MANAGEMENT 230 193 166 132 125 122 119 128 125 121
LICENSURE
TOP 10 UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES
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