Page 1

CONVENTION CENTRE G.I.F.T. CITY


An Architectural Design Thesis Project Report On

Convention Centre, GIFT City. BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE (BArch)

By

NIRAV BHAVAN RATHOD


ACKNOWLEDGEMENT I too would like to take this opportunity to judge myself in comparison to the years that have gone by and implement the knowledge gained from the teachers, seniors, friends and family as this knowledge would in turn help me in channelizing my career the way I would want it to be and see what would it be that could contribute to the practical world from whatever I have learnt. A final year architectural project is a step by step process and even a never ending one as no matter whatever we do one’s own self would always feel that there would be scope for even more and even better. The extent of involvement in clearly reflected from the extent one goes in handling all the possible challenges one would meet during the actual execution of the project and thus it brings out flair as aspiring architects as we end up trying to strike a balance between the real and virtual world.

I understand that the solution cannot be achieved in one go as with every stage. The work needs to be reviewed in order to check it for every possible discrepancies which needs to be addressed then and there by surrounding it with appropriate details and solutions. In a thesis project as work involved, it is virtually impossible to acknowledge the contribution of those who have helped towards the completion and presentation of the enclosed work. However, I take this occasion to document my sincere thanks to a selected few without whose guidance, inspiration, assistance and support this work would not have seen the light of the day. My special thanks to Ar. Chinmay Laiwala and Ar. Jigar Asarawala, my guides whose valuable advise, suggestions and support were of utmost help to put my ideas proposal. I extend my special thanks to Ar. Chirag Rathod, Pune, for moral support to my ideas whenever required. He is very helpful and always willing to share his valuable knowledge. This project is outcome of my five years study and experience. I sincerely express my gratitude to all faculty members and staff of GCPIA who has taught real meaning of architecture. Juries held have given a new direction and different viewpoints to the project. Last but not the least I would like to thank my dear friends and my family for their moral support, encouragement and active involvement in completing the work on time. Thanks to all...


CONTENTS 1 | INTRODUCTION

01

5 | DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

1.1 | Synopsis

5.1 | Site zoning

1.2 | Literature review

5.2 | Form evolution

44

5.3 | Internal space division

2 | CASE STUDIES

07

2.1 | David L. Lawrence convention centre, Petersburg, USA

6 | ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN PROPOSAL

2.2 | Centre Georges Pompidou , Paris, France

6.2 | Floor plans 6.3 | Sections

2.4 | Southern Gujarat Chamber of Commerce and Industry, Surat Gujarat

6.4 | Elevations

6.5 | Rendered views

2.5 | Comparative analysis

6.6 | Final model photographs

29

3.1 |Exhibition spaces

7.2 | Screen detail

3.4 | Helipad standards 3.5 | Food production standards

8 | BIBLIOGRAPHY

3.6 | Building movement 3.7 | Program

4.2 | Location 4.3 | Project context 4.4 | Climate analysis

67

7.1 | Structural detail

3.3 | Conference halls

4.1 | Introduction

6.7 | Process model photographs

7 | DETAILS

3.2 | Auditorium

4 | PROJECT ANALYSIS

49

6.1 | Site layout

2.3 | Mahatma Mandir Convention Centre, Gandhinagar, Gujarat

3 | TECHNICAL DATA COLLECTION

5.4 | Footfall analysis

38

70


1 | INTRODUCTION WHAT IS A CONVENTION ?

WHAT IS A GIFT CITY ?

A convention is a gathering of individuals who meet at an arranged place and time in order to discuss or engage in some common interest. Conventions are often planned and coordinated by professional meeting and convention planners, generally by staff of the convention’s hosting company.

Gujarat International Finance Tec-City (GIFT) (3.58 sq km)

MICE- meetings incentives Conventions and Exhibitions - is widely used term in Asia as a description of the industry.

WHAT IS A GIFT ? It is the Growth of India’s Financial Services / IT Sector The last decade has seen unprecedented growth in India’s financial services sector. It employs over 3 million people, constitutes about 5% of the GDP and has an estimated market capitalization of over US$ 200 billion. As India experiences continued economic growth, the financial sector could generate about 10-11 million jobs and a GDP contribution of US$ 350 to 400 billion by 2020. With a sustained growth and rapid development in technology and infrastructure, an increasing share of financial services would get centralized. McKinsey & Company’s market assessment report estimates potential of about 6 million centralized jobs across multiple service roles.

GIFT City is emerging as the new financial capital for India among the world’s financial capitals. Spread over more than 3.5 kilometres of area, GIFT City has immense scope for development. The planning and design of every element of the city is in consideration of the microclimatology to be maintained in particular locations. The city is built to adhere strongly to green-building principles and every structure aims to achieve the highest standards of efficiency in terms of energy, waste management, quality of space and material efficiency.

WHAT IS THE NEED OF CONVENTION CENTRE ? GIFT city feels the need for such infrastructure, that could provide a facilities to organize exhibitions, trade shows, buyer - seller meet, seminar etc. Making facilities such as exhibition halls and convention centre to the Gujarat International Finance Tec-City would help in further economic growth. This will be the fertilizer to grow more opportunities, business trade and over all development of the country.

01


1.1 | Synopsis AIM To design a building which could function as a convention centre and meet the requirements of the city. It was also made an aim to overcome the limitations of the public buildings and make it interact with the surrounding at different levels.

SCOPE OF RESEARCH ▪

To study different approach made by architects of a public building of similar scale.

OBJECTIVE

Understand the role and scale of services in public building.

To develop a platform for global business opportunities contributing the motive of GIFT city and help growth of global trades. Also to conduct culture events and create a place for gathering which nourish the social interaction of local with the foreign public. Be a part of new image of India and make a bold statement of smart India.

Understanding the sustainability techniques suitable for public building.

To study the standards of space design for the program.

To study the space division ideology adopted for convention centre.

To study and follow the local development rules and regulations.

To study other researches on climate responsive building techniques.

The objectives drafted are: ▪

To create flexible spaces for variety of events

To house activities for people on daily basis

Maintain a balance in daily activity and event spaces

Accommodate neighbouring activities in one

Engage people in active and passive ways

Merge with urban fabric and not stand out like an alien

LIMITATION The design limits in addressing the site zoning with a layout of activities in campus. Detail designing of proposed building only.

02


1.2 | LITERATURE REVIEW URBAN DESIGN COMPENDIUM | Llewelyn – Davies

IMPORTANCE OF URBAN DESIGN Urban design draws together the many strands of place-making environmental responsibility, social equity and economic viability, for example - into the creation of places of beauty and distinct identity. Urban design is derived from but transcends related matters such as planning and transportation policy, architectural design, development economics, landscape and engineering. It draws these and other strands together. In summary, urban design is about creating a vision for an area and then deploying the skills and resources to realise that vision.

03


APPRECIATING THE CONTEXT Context is the character and setting of the area within which a projected scheme will sit. It is its natural as well as human history; the forms of the settlements, buildings and spaces; its ecology and archaeology; its location, and the routes that pass through it. Context also includes people, the individuals living in or near an area and how communities are organised so that citizens become real participants in the projected development. A thorough appreciation of the overall site context is the starting point for designing a distinct place. Context is crucial. It is about understanding the position of development, and how to position a development. This involves a range of considerations and participants, directly or indirectly. High quality places will only emerge if the approach is cohesive and inclusive.

04


05


06


2 | CASE STUDIES 2.1 | David L. Lawrence convention centre, Petersburg, USA 2.2 | Centre Georges Pompidou , Paris, France 2.3 | Mahatma Mandir Convention Centre, Gandhinagar, Gujarat

2.4 | Southern Gujarat Chamber of Commerce and Industry, Surat Gujarat 2.5 | Comparative analysis

07


2.1 | DAVID L. LAWRENCE CONVENTION CENTRE, PETERSBURG, USA

08


| David L. Lawrence convention centre

09


| David L. Lawrence convention centre

10


| David L. Lawrence convention centre

11


| David L. Lawrence convention centre

12


2.2 | CENTRE GEORGES POMPIDOU , PARIS, FRANCE

13


| Centre Georges Pompidou

14


| Centre Georges Pompidou

15


| Centre Georges Pompidou

16


2.3 | MAHATMA MANDIR CONVENTION CENTRE, GANDHINAGAR GUJARAT

17


| Mahatma Mandir Convention Centre

18


| Mahatma Mandir Convention Centre

19


| Mahatma Mandir Convention Centre

20


| Mahatma Mandir Convention Centre

21


| Mahatma Mandir Convention Centre

22


| Mahatma Mandir Convention Centre

23


2.4 | SOUTHERN GUJARAT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY, SURAT

24


| Southern Gujarat Chamber of Commerce and Industry

25


| Southern Gujarat Chamber of Commerce and Industry

26


| Southern Gujarat Chamber of Commerce and Industry

27


2.5 | COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS

28


3 | TECHNICAL DATA COLLECTION 3.1 |Exhibition spaces 3.2 | Auditorium 3.3 | Conference halls 3.4 | Helipad standards

3.5 | Food production standards 3.6 | Building movement 3.7 | Program

29


3 .1 | EXHIBITION SPACES The layout of public areas in a museum, 28.7, may be based on a simple concept of free circulation around a single open-plan exhibition space, 28.7a, or on more complex concepts related to generic interpretive structures. It is important to consider the nature of the narratives appropriate to the museum’s objects of interest. The storyline of an exhibition may be translated into: ▪

A linear arrangement of spaces with beginning, middle and end, 28.7b

A loop where the essentially linear storyline leads naturally back to the beginning, 28.7c

An arrangement of core and satellites where each theme or detailed treatment of a subject leads back to a central introductory or orientational area, 28.7a

A more complex scheme combining linear, loop and core satellite arrangement of spaces which is specifically structured to account for more or less stable relationships between collections and interpretive themes, 28.7d or

A labyrinthine arrangement where the relationships between areas can be varied from exhibition to exhibition by managing the public circulation, 28.7e.

28.7 Genetic plans for exhibit and open-access storage areas: a Open plan; b Core þ satellites; c Linear procession; d Loop; e Complex; f Labyrinth.

30


3 .2 | AUDITORIUM INTRODUCTION The three-dimensional volume of an auditorium is conditioned by the need for all members of the audience to be able to see the whole of the platform or stage; and to hear the actor, singer, musician or speaker, 33.1. Seating density, floor rake and seating layout are partly determined by this, partly to give the audience an appropriate level of comfort and essentially to ensure a means of escape in an emergency, such as a fire, within the time required by safety considerations and by legislation. DESIGN OF THE AUDITORIUM SEAT The aim is to provide an appropriate standard of comfort. The range of human body dimensions is wide; while in most auditoria a single size of seat is provided, 33.2 and Table I. Tolerance levels vary: young people can tolerate simple seating found less comfortable by older people. Those attending concerts of classical music seem to expect more comfort than those watching drama. Seats are generally designed for the average person expected to use it; this varies according to age and nationality. Minor variation is achieved by the upholstery and adjustment of the back and seat pan material when the seat is occupied: otherwise the seat selection is a common size within the whole, or part of, the auditorium layout. The best able to be achieved is in the order of 90% of the audience within an acceptable range of comfort.

Auditorium seating: definitions of terms and dimensional information (to be read in conjunction with Table I): a Plan. b Section

AUDIENCE REQUIREMENTS As stated above, every member of the audience should be able to see and hear clearly whatever is happening on every part of the stage or platform. This is an ideal rarely (if ever) totally attainable in practice. However, a clear view for everyone of the main part of the stage or platform is normally achievable in modern auditoria. Where an existing building is undergoing renovation, further compromises may well be necessary for some seats. The greater the encirclement of the audience of platform or stage, more people can be accommodated within the aural and visual limitations up to 180 encirclement. 31


SIGHTLINES FOR A SEATED AUDIENCE

32


3.3 | CONFERENCE HALLS

RELATIONSHIP DIAGRAM FOR CONFERENCE HALL

Functional requirements ▪ The audience needs to see and hear the speaker, chairman and panel of speakers in the various positions on the platform ▪ They need a clear view of screens, chalkboard and other visual displays: each has its own physical requirement ▪ Acoustic clarity of sound listening to speaker and to reproduced sound ▪ Adequate presentation and viewing of any demonstrations. ▪ Awareness of the whole audience by every member ▪ The audience able to hear all speakers and chairman ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES ▪ Offices: functions may include policy, house management, accounts, personnel, marketing, press and publicity, development and community programmes, clerical work; ▪ Associated spaces may include boardroom, storage, strong room, office services and equipment, entrance and reception, toilets. ▪ Box office: room for postal and telephone bookings, storage of sales records and accounts; access to changing, relaxation and toilet facilities. ▪ Men’s and women’s staff rest rooms: lockers, lounge chairs, refreshments and toilets. ▪ Maintenance workshop, office and store: for the maintenance of the building fabric, equipment, emergency services, external works. ▪ Cleaners’ stores: central storage of materials and equipment; up boards with sink, cleaning materials and equipment throughout building. ▪ Security control room: surveillance monitors, fire-detection systems, alarms, service monitors, paging systems, locking devices. ▪ Refuse: external provision for dust-bins, well ventilated and easily cleaned. ▪ Catering facilities: the scale of the operation may justify the inclusion of catering facilities for all staff.

Conference hall formats for lectures requiring projection facilities: a Rectangular with or without rear balcony. b 60 fan with or without rear balcony

Conference hall formats for debating: a Fan with 180 arc (US Senate). b Audience in two facing banks (House of Commons)

33


3.4 | HELIPAD STANDARDS SECTION 4 - AERODROME STANDARDS & AIR TRAFFIC SERVICES TOUCH DOWN AND LIFT OFF AREA (TLOF) The minimum dimensions of the TLOF shall be 2 B X 2 B, where B equals the wheel base or the side base of the helicopter whichever is more, of the helicopter used (Ref Annexure – I). A TLOF shall be capable of supporting the weight of the helicopter intended to be used.

APPROACH AND TAKE OFF CLIMB SURFACE An approach and take-off climb surface in an inclined plane sloping upwards (8%) from the end of the safety area and centred on a line passing through the centre of the FATO, should be available for a distance of at least 245 meters. THE APPROACH AND TAKE-OFF CLIMB SURFACE SHOULD COMPRISE ▪

an inner edge horizontal and equal in length to the minimum specified width of the FATO plus the safety area, perpendicular to the centre line of the take-off climb surface and located at the outer edge of the safety area;

two side edges originating at the ends of the inner edge and diverging uniformly at a specified rate of 10% from the vertical plane containing the centre line of the FATO.

FINAL APPROACH AND TAKE-OFF AREA (FATO) TLOF shall be encompassed by a FATO. The minimum dimensions of the FATO shall be 1.5 A x 1.5 A, where A equals the maximum overall length of the helicopter used (Ref Annexure – I). This area shall be without obstructions. The surface shall be suitable for forced landings and free from loose objects, which may endanger the safe performance of the flight. MARKING A helicopter identification marking shall be provided within the TLOF area and shall consist of letter “H” white in colour. The legs of the 'H' should be 3 metres in length and 0.4 metres wide. The crossbar should be of the same width and separate the legs so that the overall width of the 'H' is 1.8 metres. The marking used shall be of such a nature and fixed in a way that it does not constitute a risk to the flight or to any third party. WIND DIRECTION INDICATOR A wind direction indicator may be a wind sleeve, flag or continuous smoke source. It should be so situated so as to be visible from a helicopter in flight, in a hover or on the movement area and should indicate the wind conditions over the FATO in such a way as to be free from the effects of airflow disturbances caused by nearby objects or rotor downwash. SAFETY AREA The take-off and landing area should be surrounded by a safety area, the width of which should not be less than 10 m. Within the safety area no obstacle must be higher than 1 m. The surface shall be suitable for any forced landings, if required.

34


3.5 | FOOD SERVICE FACILITIES

DINING AREA

KITCHEN Relative to size of dining area depending on: â–Ş Conventional kitchen: 0.3 to 0.5:1 menu choice and seat turnover. â–Ş Finishing kitchen: 0.1 to 0.3:1 storage and dishwashing. STORAGE AREAS Storage depends on throughput and frequency of deliveries. Cold stores are grouped together and preferably entered through chilled holding areas to save energy. Floor slabs may need to be recessed to allow level wheeled entry to the store. Vegetable stores have direct access to their preparation area. Purpose-designed moveable racks are used in food stores. Racks and shelves should allow about 50mm between and above packages for easy access. The top shelf should not be higher than 1800mm and the lowest should be at least 200mm above floor. Shelves for heavy and frequently used items are best between 700 and 1500mm high. Space may be required for containers awaiting return to suppliers

35


3.6 | BUILDING MOVEMENT ESCALATORS AND PASSENGER CONVEYORS Dimensions, speed and finishes vary but a 30 incline is available from all makers, 5.14. For preliminary purposes or an approximate comparison with lifts’ performance (Tables II and III) allow a handling capacity of 1600 people in 30 min per 600mm of step width. In many buildings, of course, a lift or lifts will also be needed for the infirm, wheelchairs, prams and/or goods traffic. If space permits a conveyor, 5.15 may be installed. This is able to take prams and suitably designed trolleys, and so is appropriate for supermarkets and air terminals, etc.

A one-speed mechanised passenger conveyor system, may be flat, or up to 12 for prams, shopping trolleys, etc., or up to 15 for special installations. Other systems available permit ‘valley’ and ‘hill’ longitudinal profiles; also surface laying of conveyor on drive motor on existing floors. Capacity of system shown is 7200 persons per hour. Systems are available up to 8000 pph. Speed range is 0.45–0.6 m/s. Tread widths, 1000–1400mm 36


3.7 | PROGRAM SOUTH BLOCK Convention Block Main Hall Stage Foyer/Reception open event area [lawn] Lounge Green room Toilet Bltock Kitchen Electric Room BMS Room Lights&Audio control room Back Reception Sccks Bar Auditorium Block

TOTAL Capacity 1500-2000 people

6461 Area [sq.mt.] 2200 3:2 ratio 216 814 72 126 276 338 48 56 28 45 300 4303

Capacity

Capacity Stage size Foyer/Reception Green room Toilet Block Electric Room BMS Room Lights&Audio control room Store Back Reception Snacks Bar

1200 people

Other Facilities Conference Rooms Seminar Halls Car parking

Capacity 250 people

Area [sq.mt.] 0.8 sq mt/person 720 3:2 ratio 216 407 186 146 24 27 27 90 36 200 1143 Area [sq.mt.] 500 4 15 500 1015

NORTH BLOCK Exhibition Block Exhibition Hall Toilet Block Cloak Room Medical Room HGV Parking Lounge Car parking HGV Parking Administration Block Conference Room Account Dpt. Admin Operation & maintenance Cleaning & Security Rception Toilet Block Pantry

TOTAL Capacity

18314.2 Area [sq.mt.] 8000 480 60 51 780 400 500 780 11051

3 bed

Capacity 20 people

Area [sq.mt.] 70 36 36 36 36 96 12 5 327

37


4 | PROJECT ANALYSIS 4.1 | Introduction 4.2 | Location 4.3 | Project context 4.4 | Climate analysis

38


4 .1 | INTRODUCTION WHAT IS A CONVENTION ?

WHO ARE THE USERS ?

A convention is a gathering of individuals who meet at an arranged place and time in order to discuss or engage in some common interest. Conventions are often planned and coordinated by professional meeting and convention planners, generally by staff of the convention’s hosting company. MICE- meetings incentives Conventions and Exhibitions - is widely used term in Asia as a description of the industry.

The delegates: ▪ These are the group of people who form the major part of the convention centre. ▪ People from both national and international backgrounds are a part of this user group.

WHAT TYPES OF CONVENTIONS ARE CONDUCTED ? Trade Conventions : It typically lays focus on an particular industry or industry segment and feature keynote speakers, vendor displays, and other information and activities of the interest to the event organizers and the attendee. Professional Conventions: They focus on issues of the concern to the profession and advancements in the profession. Such conventions are generally organized by societies dedicated to promotion of the topic of interest. Fan conventions: they usually feature displays, shows, and sales based on pop culture and guest celebrities. Seminars: They are meetings organised to inform a group of people about a specific topic, or teach a specific skill. Expert speakers and teacher are usually invited to speak on various topics. Social events: A large gathering organised to celebrate major life events are religious ceremonies. Common social events include: anniversaries, weddings and birthdays. Trade shows/Exhibitions: They are an opportunity for to exhibit some of their latest products, as well as yet to be released prototypes to journalists as well as in the industry.

The exhibitors: ▪ They are the reason for the delegates to attend various conventions and exhibitions. ▪ People from all over the country gather to promote their respective event. ▪ The exhibitors may also be local craftsmen who are allowed to setup temporary shops. The staff: ▪ These people form the backbone of the convention centre. ▪ They take care of the delegates as well as the exhibitors who are new to the place and guest at the convention centre. ▪ The building must cater to their needs along with catering to the direct user of the building.

39


4 .1 | LOCATION

GIFT is located in South-East region of Gandhinagar, Gujarat, India. NH 48 is the industrial corridor from stretching from New Delhi to Chennai connecting New Delhi, Jaipur, Ajmer, Udaipur, Ahmedabad, Vadodara, Navsari, Vapi, Thane, Pune, Kolhapur, Belgaum, Hubballi, Davangere, Bangalore, Vellore & Chennai 40


4 .3 | PROJECT CONTEXT WHAT IS A GIFT ?

Power Infra Highlights

It is the Growth of India’s Financial Services / IT Sector

The last decade has seen unprecedented growth in India’s financial services sector. It employs over 3 million people, constitutes about 5% of the GDP and has an estimated market capitalization of over US$ 200 billion. As India experiences continued economic growth, the financial sector could generate about 10-11 million jobs and a GDP contribution of US$ 350 to 400 billion by 2020. With a sustained growth and rapid development in technology and infrastructure, an increasing share of financial services would get centralized. McKinsey & Company’s market assessment report estimates potential of about 6 million centralized jobs across multiple service roles. WHAT IS A GIFT CITY ? Gujarat International Finance Tec-City (GIFT) (3.58 sq km) A Global Financial Hub GIFT City is emerging as the new financial capital of the world’s financial capitals. Spread over more than 3.5 kilometres of area, GIFT City has immense scope for development. The planning and design of every element of the city is in consideration of the micro-climatology to be maintained in particular locations. The city is built to adhere strongly to greenbuilding principles and every structure aims to achieve the highest standards of efficiency in terms of energy, waste management, quality of space and material efficiency. ▪ ▪ ▪

KEY FEATURES Water Sources: ▪ Narmada Main canal ▪ Recycling and Reuse of Wastewater ▪ Rainwater Harvesting ▪ 24 x 7 Water Supply ▪ Concept of Zero Discharge City ▪ Proposed landscaped promenade at the river bank along GIFT City

▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪

GIFT Power Company Ltd., 100% subsidiaries of GIFTCL is Power distribution license. Projected Power demand of GIFT is 610 MVA. 220/33KV Receiving Stations with Dual source of Power. Initially 66/33KV receiving station with Dual source of Power. 33 kV dual feed cable distribution in Utility Tunnel to all the packages. Centralised Backup power feed through same network. State-of-the-art automation setup for Substation, Distribution, Lighting and distribution network with real time monitoring and control.

Samruddhi Sarovar & Waterfront Development ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪

1 km length & 7 m depth Width varying from 82 m to 160 m Designed for 15 days drinking water storage Water Body of 0.75 Mm3 capacity to enhance aesthetics and for water sports activity

Solid Waste Management ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪

Automated Waste Collection System (AWS) through chute system Minimum Human Intervention Minimize space requirement Minimize impact on health Waste sucked through pipes at a speed of 90 km/hr Waste Treatment through Plasma Technology

District Cooling System ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪

Total cooling load capacity – 1,80,000 TR State-of-the-art technology with series counter flow chillers and Thermal storage tank Chilled water distribution through underground utility tunnel Effective metering and control through SCADA

41


Utility Tunnel in GIFT City The Utility Tunnel will accommodate all the utilities including Power Cables, Raw Water supply pipe line to Water Treatment Plant (WTP) as well as treated water supply pipe line from WTP to various developments, chilled water supply from District Cooling Pipe (DCP) to various developments and return pipe line to DCP, ICT cables, Automated Waste Collection pipe line, Fire hydrant water pipe line, etc.

REQUIREMENTS ▪

Convention hall capacity 1800-2000 people

Auditorium capacity 1000-1200 people

Campus capacity 5000 people

Exhibition area

Seminar halls

42


4 .4 | CLIMATE ANALYSIS

TEMPERATURE GRAPH

WIND SPEED

GEOGRAPHY Contour: Gradual slope of 10 Mt is recorded across the city. Contour lines are of 2m difference. ▪ Geomorphology: The district as whole has a flat planar topography. ▪ Soils : The soils in the district are generally sandy loam type with grey to brown colour. As per the studies carried out during UNDP project. In the western part of the district the soils are alkali type and saline. They are typically deep, grey, calcareous sandy loam of very low permeability. ▪ Climatological Data : Source - GROUND WATER BROCHURE GANDHINAGAR DISTRICT GUJARAT. Government of India Central Ground Water Board West Central Region Ahmedabad. ▪

RAINY DAYS

SUNNY DAYS

CLIMATE SUMMARY

SCIOGRAPHY

43


5 | DESIGN DEVELOPMENT 5.1 | Site zoning 5.2 | Form evolution 5.3 | Internal space division 5.4 | Footfall analysis

44


5 .1 | SITE ZONING

Site boundary measurements

Identification of pedestal entry points and marking walking distance of 2-3 mins (200mt)

Identification of building position of building depending on approach points

Studying of sciography and identifying vehicular entry points

Developing pockets between access lines

Placing the 2 building blocks along the central axis for maximum shadow along the length of building

And making a axis line dividing north and south

45


5 .2 | EVOLUTION OF FORM

Segregation of program on floor plates at multiple levels in the 2 building blocks along the central axis

Deforming the volume, giving less direct facade to west & longer faced on river front side

Raising the building on a podium to separate it from the people on river front controlling access to building.

Breaking the podium to maintain the central access

Adding a connection between 2 buildings.

Adding a weather protection skin to the building mass.

Identifying vertical circulation with concern of easy escape route.

46


5 .3 | INTERNAL SPACE DIVISION SOUTH BLOCK

NORTH BLOCK

47


5 .4 | FOOTFALL DESIGN Daily footfall

Event foot fall

48


6 | ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN PRAPOSAL 6.1 | Site layout 6.2 | Floor plans 6.3 | Sections 6.4 | Elevations

6.5 | Rendered views 6.6 | Final model photographs 6.7 | Process model photographs

49


6.1 | SITE LAYOUT LEGEND C 1 - DIAMOND METRO STATION C 2 - ENTRY FROM EAST RIVER FRONT C 3 - OPEN AMPHITHEATRE C 4 - PUBLIC PARK C 5 - MULTI LEVEL PARKING C 6 - HOTEL C 7 - EXHIBITION & CONVENTION CENTER C 8 - RIVER FRONT C 9 - JETTY POINT

50


6.2 | FLOOR PLANS

GROUND FLOOR PLAN 1- Drop point 2- Vehicular entry 3- Security check 4- Parking 5- Enquiry desk 6- Luggage room 7- Entrance foyer 8- Waiting/Circulation area 9- Cafeteria 10- Control room 11- Technical room 12- Medical room 13- HVAC room 14- Electric room 15- Reception 16- Green room 17- Service room 18- Auditorium 19- Jetty office 20- Ticket office 21- Loading bay

51


FIRST FLOOR PLAN 7- Entrance foyer 8- Waiting/Circulation area 13- HVAC room 14- Electric room 15- Reception 17- Service room 18- Auditorium 22- Store room 23- Admin 24- Lounge 25- Audio & Light control room 26- Bridge

27- Exhibition hall 28- Service room

52


SECOND FLOOR PLAN 8- Waiting/Circulation area 13- HVAC room 14- Electric room 15- Reception 16- Green room 17- Service room 24- Lounge 25- Audio & Light control room 26- Bridge 27- Exhibition hall 28- Service room 29- Conference room

30- Convention hall

53


THIRD FLOOR PLAN 8- Waiting/Circulation area 13- HVAC room 14- Electric room 15- Reception 17- Service room 24- Lounge 25- Audio & Light control room 26- Bridge 27- Exhibition hall 28- Service room 29- Conference room 30- Convention hall

31- Seminar hall

54


6.3 | SECTIONS

55


6.4 | ELEVATIONS

NORTH BLOCK

SOUTH BLOCK 56


6.5 | RENDERED VIEWS

View of North Block north screen showing daily updates of weather and time on screen

57


View of Avenue from River front end of Avenue

58


View of entry corner of North Block for Exhibition halls (for visitors coming from Diamond Metro Station & from Public Plaza from other side of River Front)

59


View from inside of Avenue with entry to Auditorium 60


View of west faced of Both Blocks (narrow ends of building) with hoarding seen from metro passing coming from Ahmedabad to Diamond metro station, GIFT City.

61


View of south faced with dedicated approach from hotel for VIPs. South side of screen displaying greeting statements which can be seen from arriving metro also. 62


6.6 | MODEL PHOTOGHAPHS

Ground floor

First floor

Second floor

Third floor

Terrace [roof]

With kin [Screen]

63


64


6.7 | PROCESS MODEL PHOTOGHAPHS SITE MODEL

STAGE 1

Ground floor

Second floor floor

Podium floor

First floor

65


STAGE 2

Ground floor

Second floor

First floor

Terrace floor

First 2

66


7 | DETAIL 7.1 | Structural detail 7.2 | Screen detail

67


7 .1 | STRUCTURAL DETAIL COLUMN BEAM DETAIL Structure is designed with a keen interest to achieving spanning floors with no intermediate vertical support. The structure is divided in a grid of 10mx10m with inverted truss that ties the columns together. To have a slender structure system composite columns are introduced for ease beam-column joinery. The column is then given a concrete cover to secure the inner metal column and better joinery with the walls. Inverted truss is strategically used to carry the services which decreases loss of volume. False ceiling conceals the service inside for cleaner space inside but also allows one to maintain the services when needed.

Concrete cover MS box section Flooring Concrete deck Metal deck

SERVICE SHAFT WORKING Large surface area exposed to outside heat Hot air rise to top

Ultimately create pressure difference for air ventilation

Solar panel Buffer for heat reduction

MS I section

False ceiling

Inverted truss

AHU Mechanical floor

Cable tray AC duct

Coolant supply duct

68


7 .2 | SCREEN DETAIL

SOLAR PANEL

WALL SECTION

Set in cross grid to avoided shadow of one another and fixed at 21o (peak hours - 12pm to 4pm)

Programmed motor Cross bracings support frame

Bright side of petal

Changing angle to control light

Dark side of petal

Screen working to display message (e.g. ‘WELCOME TO GIFT’ can be read by the people entering the city from metro)

Ripple effect on screen created by wind.

69


8 | BIBLIOGRAPHY

Urban Design Compendium. English Partnerships/Housing

Metric Handbook Planning and Designing Data, Third edition

Creating Successful Masterplans, CABE, 2004

The Value of Urban Design. CABE, 2001

Time Saver Standards for Urban Design. Watson, Platus and

70

Profile for Nirav Rathod

Convention Centre, Gift City  

Advertisement