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Naviocom Georgia VOL UME 7 , IS S UE 1

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INSIDE THIS ISSUE: CHANGE OF COMMAND CEREMONY

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CHIEF PETTY OFFICER PINNING CEREMONY

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C NO AND M C PON VIS IT C OM M AND

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NIOC GEORGIA DIRECT S UPPORT ELEMENTPROVID ES C RIT IC AL EX PERT IS E

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CIVILIAN OF THE QUARTER 3RD QUARTER 2012

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REAR ADMIRAL MARCH AWARD

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US S COLE CMDCM S PEAKS AT NIOC GEORGIA 20 12 NAVY BALL

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COMMAND PHOTOGRAPHS

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HERIT AGE ART IC LE — MID SHIPM EN OF T HE CONFEDERACY

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N AVAL H I ST ORY — RE VOLT OF T HE AD M I RALS

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NIOC GA S H ORE S AILOR OF T H E YEAR— 2012

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NIOC GA S EA S AILOR O F T H E YEAR— 2012

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NIOC GA S EA AND S HOR E JUNIOR S AILOR OF THE YEAR—2012

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REENLIS TMENTS

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RETIREMENTS

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COMMAND AWARDS

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NAVIGATOR

NAVY INFO RM AT IO N OP E RAT IO NS CO MM AND GEO RGIA

Commanding Officer: CAPT James E. Brokaw Executive Officer: CDR Todd A. Gagnon Command Master Chief: CMDCM Larry D. Howard

Staff CREDITS

537 Brainard Ave., Bldg. 28423 Fort Gordon, GA 30905

NAVIGATOR STAFF

Public Affairs Officer: ENS Brannon Chapman Public Affairs Chief: SCPO John Cowart Editor-in-Chief / Content Designer: ENS Chapman/SCPO Cowart

CO NT RIBUT O RS: Captain James E. Brokaw

PO2 Joshua D. Arminio

CDR Todd A. Gagnon

PO2 Matthew A. Cain

LT Joseph Holstead

SN Robert A. Hartland

CMDCM Larry D. Howard CPO George D. Culbreth PO1 Brian K. Fromal The editorial content of this magazine is prepared, edited and provided by the Public Affairs Office of NAVIOCOM, Fort Gordon , GA, in accordance with SECNAVINST 5720.44C. This quarterly magazine is an authorized publication for members of the military service and their families. Its contents do not necessarily reflect the views of the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense or the U.S. Navy and do not i mply endorsement thereof. The Navigator actively solicits contributions from members of the command. The editors, however, reserve the right to edit/omit material to conform to editorial guidelines.


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NIOC GEORGIA CHANGE OF COMMAND CEREMONY By: PO1 Brian K. Fromal

FORT GORDON, Ga. (NNS) – Navy Information Operations Command (NIOC) Georgia held a change of command ceremony at Fort Gordon, Ga., Aug. 17. Vice Adm. Michael S. Rogers, commander, U.S. Fleet Cyber Command/commander, U.S. 10 th Fleet, presided over the ceremony in which Capt. Jim Brokaw relieved Capt. John C. Post in front of family, friends, and shipmates and praised the outgoing Skipper’s command. “NIOC Georgia has been fortunate to have such a leader,” said Rogers. “He always thinks about mission and he always thinks about people. Almost a decade ago, when Capt. Post was executive officer of [then] Naval Security Group Activity Fort Gordon, there were only 200 Sailors aboard. Today, there are over 1300. That is a testament to both the crew and Capt. Post’s hard work and the importance of the job being done at Fort Gordon.” Capt. Steve Parode, commanding officer of Navy Cyber Warfare Development Group and longtime friend of Post, was a guest speaker at the ceremony. Parode recalled past experiences and memories of Post and also praised the Skipper’s personal integrity. “Recently someone asked me how I would measure integrity, how I would measure dedication, how I would measure performance in a demanding job and I had to think about that,” said Parode. “This morning it struck me as easy. Captain John Post is how I would do it.” NIOC GA Change of Command Ceremony; NIOC GA Flag Detail Fromal/120817-N-ZL-677-104/Released. During Post’s tour aboard NIOC Georgia, Sailors have completed 112 individual augmentee tours supporting both Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom, over 500 individual augmentee tours supporting fleet operations, more than 5,000 missions, have flown approximately 45,000 cumulative hours, and been deployed aboard more than 80 ships.

“NIOC Georgia Sailors, officers, and civilians lead the field technically and tactically,” said Post. “It is a center for fulfilling national and fleet information operations requirements.” Following Post’s final speech as commanding officer, Capt. Brokaw relieved Capt. Post and the NIOC Georgia command master chief and executive officer dressed Brokaw’s uniform with the golden trident signifying Navy command ashore authority. Amid general applause, the new commanding officer addressed the audience. “Your enthusiasm inspires me and I look forward to continuing to build upon the successes of the command and crew,” said Brokaw. “There is no doubt that I am inheriting an outstanding command from a great leader.” The Navy’s change of command ceremony is a time-honored tradition in which the crew gives honor and respect to an out-going commanding officer and welcomes aboard a new commanding officer. Directly following the change of command, a retirement ceremony was held to honor Capt. Post’s 27 years of service.

NIOC GA Change of Command Ceremony; NIOC GA Flag Detail Shady/120817N-DR247-059/Released.

NIOC Georgia is a subordinate command of U.S. Fleet Cyber Command and comprises Task Force 1050 of the U.S. TENTH Fleet. Based at Fort Gordon, Georgia, its mission is to provide Information Warfare and Cryptologic expertise and personnel to Fleet Air, Surface, Submarine and Special Warfare Combatants and to provide reachback and extended staff support to U.S. Central Command and U.S. European Command Joint Forces Maritime Component Commanders. NIOC Georgia supports the Global War on Terrorism, operating in a challenging Naval, multi-service, and multi-national environment.

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FY2013 CHIEF PETTY OFFICER PINNING CEREMONY By: PO1 Brian K. Fromal

FORT GORDON, Ga. (NNS) – Navy Information Operations Command (NIOC) Georgia celebrated the pinning of 21 new chief petty officers at a ceremony held at Fort Gordon, GA. Sept. 14, 2012. The ceremony for the FY 13 chief petty officers marks the end of a sixweek long induction period that started July 31, 2012. The road to chief petty officer has been long for some and this ceremony marked a significant milestone in their careers. “Your family and chain of command invest a lot in you,” said newly pinned Chief Legalman Amanda Rhodes-Johnson. “You have this weight on your shoulders, but it’s a good weight. You learn to not just meet standards, but to perform above and beyond those standards.” Command Master Chief Larry Howard, command master chief, NIOC Georgia, spoke about commitment and the need for dedicated Sailors to step up and become leaders. “It’s not easy, “said Howard. “They’ve demonstrated they’re the best of the best over the past six weeks. You must realize that you don’t know it all and these new chiefs have acknowledged that and have attained the highest point. It doesn’t get any higher than this.”

Fort Gordon, GA (Sep 14, 2012) - Chief Petty Officer pinning ceremony 120914-N-ZL677006.

Rhodes-Johnson also noted how the induction and pinning are much more than just ceremonies. “It’s about becoming a part of the heritage and passing that on to your replacement,” said Rhodes-Johnson. “You realize and almost have this epiphany that there is a part of you that can meet the challenge.”

Capt. James E. Brokaw, commanding officer, NIOC Georgia, is a former Chief Cryptologic Technician (Interpretive) and received his chief pins in 1982. Brokaw congratulated the new chiefs and charged them with continuing to meet the new challenges and responsibilities that come with their appointment. “One of your main responsibilities is to ensure that our most junior Sailors that are serving in the Navy now will serve in a Navy that is better than the Navy you joined,” said Brokaw. The chief petty officer pinning ceremony is a U.S. Navy tradition dating back to when the chief petty officer pay grade was created in 1893. It signifies taking on increased leadership and unique responsibility. During the ceremony, family and friends pin the gold-fouled chief anchors on the Sailor’s collar. Next, the Sailor’s sponsoring chief places the chief combination cover on their head and mark the transition from first class petty officer to chief. Finally, the new chief is piped aboard and salutes the commanding officer, formally taking on their new mission as a chief petty officer in the U.S. Navy. NIOC Georgia is a subordinate command of U.S. Fleet Cyber Command and comprises Task Force 1050 of U.S. 10th Fleet. Based at Fort Gordon, Ga., it’s mission is to provide information warfare and cryptologic expertise and personnel to fleet air, surface, submarine and special warfare combatants and to provide reach back and extended staff support to U.S. Central Command and U.S. European Command Joint Forces Maritime Component Commanders. NIOC Georgia supports the Global War on Terrorism, operating in a challenging Naval, multi-service, and multi-national environment. Fort Gordon, GA (Sep 14, 2012) - Chief Petty Officer Koch’s pinning by her family members during the CPO pinning ceremony on Sep 14, 2012. 120914-N-ZY969-188.

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NAVIGATOR

CNO AND MCPON VISIT NIOC GEORGIA By: NIOC GA Public Affairs

FORT GORDON, Ga. (NNS) -- Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan W. Greenert and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) Michael D. Stevens visited Navy Information Operations Command (NIOC) Georgia on Friday, Nov. 30, to discuss the Navy's role in military information operations and the way ahead for the near and extended future. Prior to his remarks, Greenert re-enlisted Petty Officer First Class Terry L. Sanders and pinned twelve newly qualified Enlisted Information Dominance Warfare Specialists and Officers. While addressing the crew, Greenert stressed the steadily increasing demand for the Navy's contribution to military information operations. He particularly emphasized the point outlined in his Oct. 31 position paper citing the need to "accelerate the fielding of systems to make the electromagnetic spectrum and cyberspace a primary warfighting domain." Noting that the mission of NIOC Georgia was essential to that achievement, Greenert expressed his high regard for the skills and abilities of NIOC Georgia Sailors: "As CNO, I've had the chance to meet many Sailors, and I've found that people in your line of work, cyber warriors, are the most confident I've come across.” “These information professionals provide and execute the non-kinetic piece of our war fighting capabilities, neutralizing threats and determining vulnerabilities using the EM spectrum. It's an important area and one I will be tracking more closely in my second year as your CNO.” “I encourage you to keep doing what you're doing so that the Navy can continue to operate forward and be ready." CNO Adm. Jonathan W. Greenert and MCPON MCPON Stevens, selected for the position in September, followed up the CNO’s remarks Michael D. Stevens. 121130-N-TD563-071. by saying that he was honored to have a chance to serve as Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy and also urged NIOC Georgia to continue to focus on and strive to improve its core mission and resources. Following the all-hands call, he remained behind to personally congratulate and pin an additional thirteen Sailors who had earned their Information Dominance Warfare Specialist qualification. Greenert and Stevens concluded the visit by touring the newly constructed multi-service facility that is home to NIOC Georgia and other services. Both had the chance to meet and talk with Sailors on the job, observing day-to-day operations at the command. Appreciative of the visit, Air Operations Officer Lt. Ryan Haag said afterward, “It’s an honor to have them come here, answer our questions, and pin our Sailors. I think it was great for everyone to meet the CNO and MCPON and see that they are real people with real personalities who genuinely care about Sailors.”

CNO Adm. Jonathan W. Greenert and MCPON Michael D. Stevens. 121130-N-TD563-104.

NIOC Georgia is a subordinate command of U.S. Fleet Cyber Command and comprises Task Force 1050 of the U.S. 10th Fleet. Based at Fort Gordon, its mission is to provide Information Warfare and Cryptologic expertise and personnel to Fleet Air, Surface, Submarine and Special Warfare Combatants and to provide reachback and extended staff support to U.S. Central Command and U.S. European Command Joint Forces Maritime Component Commanders. NIOC Georgia supports the Global War on Terrorism, operating in a challenging Naval, multi-service, and multi-national environment.

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NIOC GEORGIA DIRECT SUPPORT ELEMENT PROVIDES CRITICAL EXPERTISE By: CTTSN Robert A. Hartland

Sailors assigned to the Navy Information Operations Command (NIOC) Georgia direct support element serve a Navy faced with emerging global threats and are always readily available to lend their technical cryptologic expertise. Specially trained personnel within this direct support element deploy in teams to support tactical commanders abroad. These Sailors provide a highly specialized and technical understanding of foreign threats and are able to integrate their extensive knowledge into forward operations and planning. As information operations specialists, direct support operators predominantly serve aboard Navy ships, submarines, and in support of aircraft squadrons. When deployed, these teams primarily provide indications and warning to support warfare commanders' decisions and increase battle space awareness. The direct support element at NIOC Georgia is a nimble force that supports some of the most hostile areas in the world. The surface shop, led by Lt. Charles M. Brawner and Senior Chief Cryptologic Technician (Collections) Nakia T. Davis, provide cryptologic expertise to surface platforms and reach-back stations annually in support of 2nd, 5th, 6th, and 7th fleet operations. These Sailors provide operational technical skills that insure the Fleet is 100% mission ready. By providing an unrestricted perspective of the foreign threat, Sailors aid in the advancement of effective operations. Through the use of global maritime domain awareness and personnel augmentation, direct support has become a double-edged sword. As a nation, our policies demand the capability to operate on or below the world's waterways. In addition, our flexible military force requires highly specialized intelligence personnel to augment the seaborne assets within the Navy's fleet. Both of these capabilities are sustained in part by utilizing specially trained personnel such as those found within direct support elements located at Navy Information Operations Command Georgia. Cmdr. James H. Henderson-Coffey, NIOC Georgia operations officer said, "Our Sailors in themselves are weapons systems, and are the very best in their field, true information warriors." As emerging global threats continue to change, so has our Navy. With the increased flexibility and expertise of direct support elements, our Navy has adopted an on-call structure that constantly adapts to the needs of our nation. NIOC Georgia is a subordinate command of U.S. Fleet Cyber Command and comprises Task Force 1050 of the U.S. 10th Fleet. Based at Fort Gordon, its mission is to provide Information Warfare and Cryptologic expertise and personnel to Fleet Air, Surface, Submarine and Special Warfare Combatants and to provide reach-back and extended staff support to U.S. Central Command and U.S. European Command Joint Forces Maritime Component Commanders. NIOC Georgia supports the Global War on Terrorism, operating in a challenging Naval, multi-service, and multi-national environment.

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CIVILIAN OF THE QUARTER FOR THIRD QUARTER 2012 By: PO2 Joshua D. Arminio

Jacqueline Boyce was selected as this NAVIOCOM Georgia's civilian of the quarter for the third quarter 2012. Ms. Boyce serves as Defense Travel Administrator for the command and has been on board for two and half years working with Sailors going TAD and making sure all financial issues regarding their travel are squared away. In June of 2012, Ms. Boyce facilitated the processing of 104 TAD trips for Sailors and typically processes more than 100 TADs per month. Ms. Boyce also leads training, conducts briefs and writes weekly DTS (Defense Travel System) reports. In an interview with the public affairs team, she said that the most rewarding part of her job is working with people and also that “[Sailors] may not always like the answers, but I do my best to figure out how to help them.” She would also like to personally thank the FCAC for their support and their hard work to help Sailors and ensure zero financial discrepancies for TADs.

Ms. Jacqueline Boyce—130128-N-HA720003/Released.

NIOC GEORGIA WINS RADM MARCH AWARD FOR LANGUAGE By: LT Joseph Holstead

Commander, U.S Fleet Cyber Command/U.S. 10th Fleet announced today Navy Information Operations Command (NIOC) Georgia as the 2012 winner of the Command Language Program of the Year, also known as the Rear Adm. G.P. March Award. NIOC Georgia's Cryptologic Technician (Interpretive) 1st Class Michael H. Gray was announced as the Language Professional of the Year winner. The awards program recognizes the best language professionals in the Fleet Cyber Command domain and the winners will be nominated to compete at the Navy-wide level. "This is another example of great Sailors doing great work while deployed around the globe and here at NIOC Georgia - committed both to mission and to personal and professional excellence," said Capt. James Brokaw, NIOC Georgia Commanding Officer, and Commander, Task Force 1050. "This selection is an honor for us and will motivate us to achieve even greater results in the coming year," said Brokaw. NIOC Hawaii received honorable mention for the Command program and Cryptologic Technician (Interpretive) 1st Class Kate E. Greifzu, NIOC Maryland, received honorable mention for Language Professional of the Year. "This program recognizes the best language professionals in our domain and all command nominees should be rightfully proud of their accomplishments," said Vice Adm. Michael S. Rogers, Commander, U.S Fleet Cyber Command/U.S. 10th Fleet. NIOC Georgia is a subordinate command of U.S. Fleet Cyber Command and comprises Task Force 1050 of the U.S. 10th Fleet. Based at Fort Gordon, its mission is to provide information warfare and expert cryptologic personnel to fleet air, surface, submarine and special warfare combatants and to provide feedback and extended staff support to U.S. Central Command and U.S. European Command Joint Forces Maritime Component Commanders. NIOC Georgia supports the Global War on Terrorism, operating in a challenging Naval, multi-service, and multi-national environment.

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NAVIGATOR

CMDCM PARLIER SPEAKS AT 2012 NAVY BALL By: PO2 Joshua D. Arminio

USS Cole Command Master Chief Delivers Keynote at NIOC Georgia 2012 Navy Day Ball This year's Navy Day Ball celebrations held by Navy Information Operations Command Georgia commemorated the 237th birthday of the United States Navy. Along with the traditions and toasts that go with every year's celebrations came a powerful and moving speech by keynote speaker, Command Master Chief (Retired) James G. Parlier. CMC Parlier served aboard the USS Cole (DDG-67) when it was attacked by terrorists at the port of Aden, Yemen on October 12, 2000. Before his speech that night, I had the pleasure and honor to personally interview CMC Parlier about his experiences. When I asked him about his duties aboard USS Cole, he said "this was my first CMC billet, I had been senior enlisted advisor before to hospitals and clinics, but this was much different. You're communication as a CMC on a small ship is magnified 100 times [that of] a really large command. Everybody really knows you." On his style of leadership, CMC Parlier says "the way I operate is [to] hit the problem head on and be honest and straightforward about everything. As the CMC, you speak for the crew. It's very important that you [inform] the Captain and the XO [of] the needs of the Sailors." CMC Parlier also believes a primary duty of a CMC is acting as the "glue to the Chief’s Mess" and that in the event of a disagreement within the Mess, it is the responsibility of the CMC to ensure a consensus is reached. On his first reaction when the ship was attacked, he recalls "Like everybody else, I thought that there had been an explosion at the fueling station, but we realized the impact seemed to come from the port side while we were taking on fuel from the pier to our starboard side, so our initial assumption wasn't right and whatever happened didn't fit that scenario. Eventually reports started coming back to us that we had a blast on the port side...and you could smell the Semtex and the C4. We knew it wasn't us." CMC Parlier went on to speak about the mentality of being on a warship at sea. "Our mentality out there as Sailors on a warship was that we were invincible. We were Americans. Who was going to mess with us? We were proven wrong and ever since then, everybody in the Navy has to operate differently." I then asked him how this attack changed the mentality of Sailors. "It changed the way we fight the ship,” he said . "From damage control to the way we operate medically on a ship. It affects our force protection policies, the way we pull into port now. We've got small boats in the water constantly watching our ships. Those are big-picture lessons learned from the Cole." He then stressed the importance of intelligence and how vital it is in the protection our ships. Wrapping up my interview, I asked the CMC Parlier if he had any leadership advice to give young Sailors. Though reluctant to give up his secrets, he obliged. "You train the Sailor first. In other words, you train your warfare area whether it be surface, subsurface, Seabee… and then you train your rate. Lastly you train your skills within that rate. Sailor, rate, technical skills. If you train in that order, you will find yourself successful.“

USS COLE CMDCM Parlier speaks at 2012 Navy Ball— 121019-N-HA720-171

USS COLE CMDCM Parlier speaks at 2012 Navy Ball— 121019-N-HA720-171

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By: PO2 Joshua D. Arminio

CMC Parlier finished by telling me that he found the USS COLE Sailors who were in the process of earning their ESWS (Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist) pin and signed their PQS. "They don't need to go through a board, they saved the ship!", he exclaimed. "They earned their pin." During his speech, the CMC recounted his story and the story of the USS Cole in detail. He spoke of the heroism of its crew, the crew's cohesion, and lives that will be forever changed by the tragedy. He also said that Al-Qaeda never succeeded in their mission to sink the Cole as it is still operational to this day. Following the CMC's speech, master of ceremonies CTRC Farnsworth welcomed the youngest and oldest Sailors to cut the cake according to tradition. As it happened, the oldest Sailor at the command was Commanding Officer Captain Brokaw, born sometime in the past, cut the cake with the youngest Sailor, SN Aspen Bentley, born sometime later. Chief Farnsworth then granted liberty to all those in attendance as Sailors exchanged neckerchiefs for neck ties and uniform shoes for high heels. This year's Navy Day Ball celebrations combined all the traditions so valued by the United States Navy - the time to take a well deserved break as well as the time to hear lessons of the past and words of wisdom passed down to new and old Sailors alike.

The youngest and oldest Sailors at 2012 NIOC GA Navy Ball—121019-N-HA720-240.

2012 NIOC GA Navy Ball Flag Ceremonyl—121019-N-HA720-153.

2012 NIOC GA Navy Ball Flag Ceremony—121019-N-HA720-136.

2012 NIOC GA Navy Ball—121019-N-HA720-270.

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NAVIOCOM GEORGIA PHOTOGRAPHS

SN Laisney—ESWS Warrior! 120924-N-CH661-030

CO in Dunking Booth 120803-N-TD563-37

Summer Bash 2012 120802-NDR247-062

NIOC GA Car wash 120825-NTD563-023

Summer Bash Soccer 120803-N-TD563-26

NIOC GA new Chief’s 120914-N-ZL677-032

NIOC GA Sports Week—120730-N-ZZ999-208

Chief Armer and son– NIOC GA 120914-N-ZL677-060

PO3 Brewer’s frocking. 120812-N-ZZ999-010.

SN Pritchett—EAWS warrior! 121012-N-NB538-064

Children’s Christmas Party-121204-N-HA720-224 NIOC GA Car Wash 120825-N-TD563-006

Children’s Christmas Party-121204-N-HA720-008

Command Christmas Party-121204-N-HA720-008

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NAVIOCOM GEORGIA PHOTOGRAPHS

CPO365 Luncheon-130128-N-TD563-122.

PO3 Johnson—ESWS Warrior! 120924-N-CH661-036.

Bluejacket of Year—PO2 Chaney N-GC629-086.

CPO365 Luncheon-130128-N-TD563-122. NIOC GA MWR/NDB Car wash 1208250N-TD563-028.

CDR Gagnon and MCPO Morgan at Midland Valley High School Navy Junior Reserve Officers Training Corp Unit Pass-In-Review. 130123-N-TD563.

Rifle Qualifications-120612-N-ZZ999-001.

PO2 Chaney—EIDWS warrior! 121212-N-NB538-172.

Promotion Ceremony—NIOC GA 120809-N-ZZ999-001.

Sport Week Flag Football –120803-N-TD563-101.

CPO Howlett Combat Tourney Champion! 120714-N-TD563-53.

Tribute of the Fallen team 121108-N-TD563-076.

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HERITAGE ARTICLE—THE MIDSHIPMEN OF THE C ONFEDERATES By: PO2 Matthew Cain

In the darkest hour of American history, the Civil War, our country was divided and the Navy was split in two. At the outset of the war, the newfound and short-lived country of the Confederate States of America faced a substantial obstacle: the training and education of naval officers. The midshipmen recruited and employed faced unique challenges and dangers that their counterparts in Annapolis were spared until their education had been completed. Though history may label them rebels, these Sailors and their descendants fought bravely for their homeland. The education of naval officers and common Sailors was traditionally a very hands-on and practical approach. A Sailor was recruited, attached to a ship, and taught through drill and time spent at sea. The Royal Navy of England recognized the limitations of this system and established a school in 1729 to teach young gentlemen to be naval officers with the practical subjects of astronomy, navigation, gunnery, and seamanship as well as the perceived less practical (but no less important) subjects such as history and literatu re. The United States, having established West Point in 1802, did not immediately recognize the value in what the English had done a century before and did not establish the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis until 1845. Annapolis was chosen because of its quiet location as opposed to the “temptations and distractions” of Philadelphia. In 1861 when 11 U.S. states seceded from the Union, over 300 or 24% of U.S. Naval officers either resigned their commissions or were dismissed from service. The South, a culture steeped in tradition, thought highly of naval service and sent many of their young men to sea, aiding the old philosophy “the best place for a young man is at sea.” The Southern enlisted Sailors whose home states seceded did not have the option of leaving service, and so were either forced to remain in the Union Navy to fight their friends and family or desert. The now released naval officers applied their trade to the Confederate States Navy (CSN). The Confederate Secretary of the Navy, Stephen R. Mallory, was appointed by the Confederate Congress and tasked with forming an education system for young naval officers. Mallory set to work and ordered the CSS Patrick Henry, then flagship of the James River Squadron, be taken out of service and converted into a school ship. The Patrick Henry began life as a transport side paddlewheel steam powered ship between Richmond and New York City and sailed under the name Yorktown. She was sold to the Confederate States Navy along with the steamer for $280,000. Though designated a school ship, the Patrick Henry remained in active service and was an integral part of the James River Squadron charged with protecting Richmond, Virginia. The floating school accepted men between the ages of 14 and 18 and had a 4-year curriculum. Generally the first year was spent on the Patrick Henry, the second and third years spent attached to various ships in full-time active service, and the fourth and final year spent again on the Patrick Henry. The midshipmen were required to pass annual exams to progress to the next class and held the rank of acting midshipman until graduating. While a midshipman was stationed with an active warship, he was to perform all the duties assigned him as fitted a junior officer as well as one other: to study and learn his trade. The Confederate Navy sent annual examinations to those ships to which midshipmen were assigned. Failure to pass the exam required the student to repeat a year at the academy.

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HERITAGE ARTICLE—THE MIDSHIPMEN OF THE CONFEDERATES By: CTI2 Matthew Cain

Due to the demands of the war, the acting midshipmen were often called upon to perform duties above and beyond what would be considered normal for students, called to active duty regardless of their level of military training. On June 2, 1864, CSN midshipmen were part of the 15 officers and 117 men in 7 boats who snuck up to and captured the USS Water Witch. Two acting midshipmen were injured in the 10 minute long fight. She was then designated the CSS Water Witch and sailed as part of the Savannah River Squadron until her destruction during the taking of Savannah in 1865. Naval Academy Midshipmen Class of 1861 — Naval Historical Center

In the later years of the war, the midshipmen were again called to active duty. Richmond was in danger of being invaded and the Confederate government called for an evacuation. The Confederate Navy had previously attempted to find a new and safer location for its academy but to no avail. Having remained behind in Richmond, the midshipmen were charged with guarding the gold and silver bullion of the Confederate States on a train heading for Danville, Virginia. That bullion from the Confederate and Virginia treasuries was valued at the time to be worth near $770,000. The midshipmen’s duty didn’t end there. Before boarding the train to Danville, a lieutenant and 10 students were ordered burn the Patrick Henry to prevent it from falling into the hands of the Union. After the midshipmen burned their ship and went to Danville, they were then ordered to be armed as infantrymen and fight alongside the Confederate Army. Secretary Mallory made comment that a more apt “fish out of water” metaphor never existed. Sailors adrift on dry land had a difficult time adapting to their new surroundings. On May 26, 1865 the last Confederate troops surrendered and the country was wounded but whole once more. The former midshipmen were barred from receiving commissions as officers in the recomposed U.S. Navy, but went on to do quite well in politics, the arts, and enterprise in the exciting period of the industrial revolution. Both sides fought well in this horrific war, and the midshipmen aboard the Patrick Henry truly exhibited the core values of honor, courage and commitment, regardless of the color of their uniform.

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NAVAL HISTORY—REVOLT OF THE ADMIRALS By: CTIC(SG) George Culbreth

Revolt of the Admirals Can you imagine the United States without its Navy? As preposterous as that sounds, it came very close to reality immediately after the Second World War in which the US Navy had played a decisive role. “There's no reason for having a Navy and Marine Corps. General Bradley tells me that amphibious operations are a thing of the past. We'll never have any more amphibious operations. That does away with the Marine Corps. And the Air Force can do anything the Navy can do nowadays, so that does away with the Navy.” —Secretary of Defense Louis A. Johnson, December 1949 With the war having ended with the decisive use of the atomic bomb, military doctrine was totally in flux. Many power brokers of the day thought that strategic nuclear bombing was going to be the strategy of any future wars. The newly independent Air Force was insistent that they were the obvious choice to fulfill this mission. It wanted the greatly reduced post-war defense spending to support its major projects such as the long range B-36 Peacemaker strategic bomber and Strategic Air Command (SAC). The Navy’s plan, which was supported by the first Secretary of Defense, James Forrestal, was to build the USS UNITED STATES, a “supercarrier” and four sister ships. Building on the success of the carrier strike forces in the Pacific campaigns of WWII, these flush top carriers were designed to carry 100,000 pound heavy bombers that could carry the multi-ton atomic weapons of the day. Naval Academy Midshipmen Class of 1861 — Naval Historical Center

The keel of the USS UNITED STATES was laid on 18 April 1949 at Newport News Drydock and Shipbuilding. Due to budget arguments with President Truman, Secretary of Defense Forrestal was asked to resign and was replaced by Louis Johnson, who supported the Air Force plan. Mr. Johnson, in his first month as Secretary of Defense and without consulting Congress, cancelled the construction of the USS UNITED STATES and all the subsequent ships on 23 April 1949. He then tried to have the Marine Corps air assets transferred to the Air Force, but dropped the idea after a heated opposition from Congress. The Navy, seeing these moves as an attempt to diminish their role in the new military structure, protested vehemently in a public disagreement called the “Revolt of the Admirals”. The Secretary of the Navy John L. Sullivan resigned in protest and many high-ranking admirals were open in their criticism of the new policy and several of them were censured or forced to resign due to this open defiance seen by some as gross insubordination. Even the Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral Louis E. Denfield was one of the casualties, being detached from duty on November 1, 1949. Secretary of Defense Johnson took President Truman’s plans for postwar downsizing to the extreme, drastically cutting conventional forces budgets while continuing to fund the big-budget Air Force projects like Strategic Air Command. The Navy-Marine position was vindicated in 1950 when the Korean War began. The strategic nuclear option was not an option in the political war that unfolded. Front line Army troops were using worn out weaponry and inferior tanks which fell victim to the well equipped Communist forces that the Soviet Union kept supplied with small-arms, tanks, ordnance and artillery. The USAF’s much vaunted B-36 proved too old and slow to fly against the new Mig-15s that patrolled the skies over Korea. Truman was publically embarrassed when the naval blockade of North Korea he ordered was unable to be implemented due to a shortage of sea-worthy Navy ships. The Navy retained their position as a viable strategic force as atomic weapons went to sea on the USS FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT in 1950. New plans were drawn up for a “supercarrier” which led to the construction of the USS FORRESTAL in 1955, the first to be built with an angled flight deck.. The “Revolt”, in the end, had succeeded in bringing public attention to the scuttling of the Navy and in doing so, prevented it. USS FORRESTAL (CVA-59) — Naval Historical Center

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VOL UME 7 , ISSUE 1

NIOC GA SHORE SAILOR OF THE YEAR — 2012 By: PO1 Brian K. Fromal

Petty Officer Benjamin Midkiff was born in Williamsburg, Va. in 1977. He graduated from Lake Taylor High School in Norfolk, Va. in 1995 where he lived until enlisting in the Navy in 2005. After completing the Basic Arabic Course at DLI/FLC, Midkiff reported to Navy Information Operations Command Georgia as a cryptologic direct support operator. When Midkiff entered the Navy, he knew that it was a career choice for him. He also wanted “the full Navy experience”. He deployed on an individual augmentation billet to Iraq and received his Enlisted Expeditionary Warfare Specialist qualification. Later, he deployed on board the USS Florida (SSGN-728)(Gold), where he was designated Qualified in Submarines, and the USS San Juan (SSN-751). This is also where Midkiff was promoted to Petty Officer 2 nd Class. Following his initial tour of duty, Midkiff transferred to NIOC Georgia's Joint Operations Department for his second tour. He was promoted to Petty Officer First Class and served as a National Mission Team Lead and Division Leading Petty Officer. Midkiff qualified as an Enlisted Information Dominance Warfare Specialist and was selected as Military Performer of the Quarter for Fourth Quarter CY2010, Senior Shore Sailor of the Quarter for Fourth Quarter FY2012, and Senior Shore Sailor of the Year FY2012. He now finds himself competing at the 10th Fleet level, U.S. 10th Fleet Shore Sailor of the Year. When asked about advice for junior Sailors, Midkiff said, “You gotta care. We do the right job, the right people get prosecuted and the right people live. Seriousness and professionalism have to transfer over into everyday life.” Petty Officer Midkiff's awards include Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal, Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal, Good Conduct Medal (Two Awards), Sea Service Deployment Ribbon (Two Awards), as well as various unit and campaign awards. Petty Officer Midkiff is married to Nicole Midkiff, a former Navy Hebrew Linguist. They currently live in Grovetown, Ga.

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NAVIGATOR

NIOC GA SEA SAILOR OF THE YEAR — 2012 By: PO1 Brian K. Fromal

Petty Officer Nazma Rahman was born on November 12, 1980 in Queens, N.Y. She graduated from Bayside High School in 1998 and enlisted in the United States Navy in July of that year. “I joined the Navy in 1998 with the goals to travel the world while serving my country, support my family, earn a college degree and acquire skills that would transition into the civilian sector,” says Rahman. So far all her initial goals are coming true. After successful completion of recruit training at Great Lakes, Ill., Rahman went on to attend FC “A” school (also at Great Lakes) and later “C” school, becoming a qualified close-in-weapons technician. Starting in March of 2000, she began what would be the first of two sea tours out of Pearl Harbor, H.I. First she was stationed aboard the USS Frederick (LST-1184), earning her Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist qualification, and second aboard the USS Port Royal (CG-73). For her third duty station, Petty Officer Rahman reported as Staff to Transient Personnel Unit (TPU) out of San Diego, Calif. where she became the Command Career Counselor for over 80 staff and 7,000 transient Sailors in retirement, separation and PCS status. It was at this command where she was recognized as 2006 Sailor of the Year for her efforts. She also pursued off duty education in the Arabic language at San Diego City College, which greatly influenced her decision to submit a conversion package to Cryptologic Technician (Interpretive). She strongly advises junior Sailors to pursue their degrees and says, “Review your SMART transcript and you may find that you are only credits away from holding a degree.” In July 2008, she attended the Defense Language Institute’s Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) Basic Course and graduated with honors and an AA degree in MSA in December 2009. She then completed Naval Aircrew Candidate School in Pensacola, FL in January 2010, following on to complete EP-3E Platform Familiarization at NAS Whidbey Island, WA and Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape training at North Island, Calif. before reporting to her first command as a CTI at Navy Information Operations Command (NIOC) Georgia in April of 2010 where she currently serves as the NIOC GA Air Operations Divisional Leading Petty Officer. As an element of the Direct Support team, she successfully qualified as an airborne Special Operator while performing duties aboard EP-3E mission aircraft. She has accrued over 600 flight hours, and qualified Naval Aircrew Warfare Specialist in September 2011 while deployed to Djibouti; Africa for CNO sponsored aircraft missions. Petty Officer Rahman earned her Enlisted Information Dominance Warfare Specialist designation in August 2012. Rahman gives this advice to junior Sailors, “There are two types of people in the US Navy. Those who are CHALLENGED by the Navy and those who CHALLENGE the Navy. Be the latter. Always strive to be the best and bring out the best in those around you. You never know who you will inspire or motivate!” Her awards include the Air Medal (one strike, submitted but not yet awarded), the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal (two stars), Battle Efficiency “E” awards (one award), Good Conduct Medal (three stars), and various other personal awards. Petty Officer Rahman is married to Petty Officer First Class Ghathe Alkhalaf and they currently reside in Augusta, Ga. 16


VOL UME 7 , ISSUE 1

NIOC GA SHORE JUNIOR SAILOR OF THE YEAR — 2012 By: PO1 Brian K. Fromal

Petty Officer First Class Johnson grew up in Reidsville, Ga. He graduated from Tattnall County High School in May 2001 and one week later entered into the U.S. Navy attending basic training in Great Lakes, Ill. Petty Officer Johnson attended Information Systems Technician A-School in Great Lakes, Ill. and reported to his first duty assignment at NCTAMS PAC DET in Hawaii from 2001-2004. Johnson attended Transmission Systems Technician C-school in January 2005 and reported onboard USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) in April of that year. He served onboard the USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) from Dec 2005 until decommissioning in 2007. From there, Johnson served onboard the USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) where he finished out his sea duty tenure and reported to Naval Recruiting District Jacksonville from 2008 until 2010. Petty Officer Johnson attended Journeyman Networking Core “C” School en route to Navy Information Operations Command (NIOC) Georgia. In December 2012, he was advanced to Petty Officer First Class and selected as NIOC Georgia Shore Junior Sailor of the Year. He has successfully served at NIOC GA for 3 years where he has filled numerous Divisional, Departmental and Command leadership positions. He will be reporting to NMCB-14 (Jacksonville, FL) in April 2013. Petty Officer Johnson's personal awards include a Joint Service Commendation Medal, Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal ,an Army Achievement Medal, and Good Conduct Medal (3 awards). He has also achieved qualification in the following: Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist, Enlisted Aviation Warfare Specialist, Enlisted Information Dominance Warfare Specialist.

NIOC GA SEA JUNIOR SAILOR OF THE YEAR — 2012 Petty Officer Second Class Ashtan Park was recognized as NIOC Georgia Sea Junior Sailor of the Year, but has since departed the service in pursuit of other goals. Fair winds and following seas shipmate!

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NAVIGATOR

Congratulations to the following Sailors for their choice to STAY NAVY! PO1 Anthony, William PO1 Baker, Stephon PO2 Barrett, Dennis PO1 Butler, Kelly PO1 Colon, Victor PO2 Cox, Ezell PO2 Devore, Joshua SCPO Dwyer, Danica PO1 Griffith, Michael PO1 Hilliard, Jeremy CPO Howlett, Nicholas PO2 Jenkins, Antwone

PO Mintz’ Reenlistment—120821-N-HR551-021

PO2 McClure, Tammy PO1 Ostby, Nathaniel PO2 Pace, Anthony PO3 Reber, Dennis PO2 Saenz, Jacqueline PO1 Sanders, Terry PO1 Smith, Joshua PO1 Walker, Aslan PO1 Wallis, Jeffrey PO2 Setzer reenlistment by his father—120627-N-ZZ999-003.

PO1 Walker’s Reenlistment—130130-N-ZL677-047.

PO2 Fallon’s Reenlistment—130106-N-ZZ999-002.

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VOL UME 7 , ISSUE 1

Congratulations and a heartfelt “Thank You” go to the following Sailors for their faithful service to their country and the United States Navy!!

FAIR WINDS AND FOLLOWING SEAS! PO1 Coleman, Trevor CPO Conrad, Andy SCPO Davis, Scott CPO Fowler, Andy CPO Fowler-Tutt, Suzie PO1 Gary, Anthony PO1 Gulley, Shawnon PO1 Houston, Marcus PO1 Ingram, Richard PO1 Mixon, Robert

LCDR Sroda’s retirement ceremony r—121019-N-ZZ999-001.

CAPT Post, John CPO Roy, David LCDR Sroda, Joseph

PO1 Gulley’s retirement ceremony—130201-N-ZL677-124.

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NAVIGATOR

COMMAND AWARDS Air Strike Medal Awardees PO2 Haggerty, Michael

Letters of Appreciation Awardees CPO Wyatt, Richard

PO1 Walter, Anthony

PO2 Aubry, Amanda

SA Goodgine, Madelina

PO2 Bullock, James

PO3 Marshall, Johnathan

PO2 Cain, Matthew

PO1 Misiak, Leota

PO1 Carter, Scott

SA Robledo, Christopher

PO3 Clark, Kendra

PO2 Sauls, Chrystal

PO3 Cobb, Jessica

PO2 Sullivan, John

PO3 Cope, Jonathan

PO2 Webb, Kristin

Joint Commendation Medal Awardees PO2 Blauvelt, Daniel PO2 Campbell, Matthew

Joint Achievement Medal Awardees PO1 Anderson, Vanessa

PO2 Yeager, David

PO2 Buehler, Benjamin

PO2 Fibelkorn, Jessica

Navy & Marine Corps Commendation Medal Awardees LTJG Baugess, Kenneth

PO3 Cross, Butch

CWO3 Lester, Michael

PO3 Gifford, Mason SSOQ/JSOQ/BJOYQ—4th Quarter SSOY/JSOY/BJOY

CPO Collins, Dave

BJOQ (Shore) PO3 Strahorn, Marcus

BJOY (Shore) PO3 Holloway, Brittany

Navy & Marine Corps Achievement Medal Awardees

BJOQ (Sea) PO3 Valentin, Danielle

BJOY (Sea) PO3 Valentin, Danielle

JSOQ (Shore) PO2 Mosher, Brandon

JSOY (Shore) PO2 Johnson, Jessie

JSOQ (Sea) PO2 Clark, Richard

JSOY (Sea) PO2 Park, Ashtan

SSOQ (Shore) PO1 Midkiff, Benjamin

SSOY (Shore) PO1 Midkiff, Benjamin

SSOQ (Sea) PO1 Houston, Selena

SSOY (Sea) PO1 Rahman, Nazma

PO1 Blevins, William

PO2 Jenkins, Christopher

PO2 Buehler, Benjamin

SCPO Maleu, Nathan

PO1 Carter, Thomas

PO1 Mancha, James

PO3 Furrer, Sawyer

PO1 Mold, Benjamin

PO2 Gaulden, Celina

PO2 Sebastian, Mark

LT Glebus, Tebin

PO1 Slaten, Kenneth

PO2 Hall, Christopher

PO1 Solis, Samuel

PO1 Harris, Matthew

PO1 Spence, Jared

PO1 Hemming, William

PO2 Storey, Alexis

PO1 Hutson, Ashley

PO1 Van Waldick, Heather

PO1 James, Alexander

LCDR Zumbrunn, Lisa 20


VOL UME 7 , ISSUE 1

COMMAND AWARDS EIDWS PIN

IDWO PIN

PO2 Adams, Sarah

ENS Barsis, David

PO2 Beltran, Michael

LTJG Offord, Boswyck

PO1 Biro, Kevin

ENS Chapman, Brannon

PO1 Blevins, William

ENS Crawford, Brian

PO3 Garza, Iliana

LTJG Edwards, Derrick

PO1 Hauser, Mathieu

LT Giles, Elliott

PO1 Hilliard, Jeremy

LT Glebus, Tebin

PO2 Hillis, Mary

LTJG Maenza, Jason

PO3 Holloway, Brittany

ENS Reinke, Lauren

CPO Koch, Kristina

LTJG Ryan, Jessica

PO1 Lewis, Zachary

LTJG Waller, Tyrone

PO3 Martin, Bryan

LT Wylkynsone, Tye

PO1 McKeithan, Justin PO2 Mendez, Juniper PO2 Mitchell, Athena PO1 Mueller, Bradley PO1 Phillips, Roderic CPO Qadadah, Salah PO2 Sebert, Timothy PO2 Stubbs, Sarah CPO Wyatt, Richard

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NAVIOCOM GEORGIA Commanding Officer NIOC Georgia 537 Brainard Avenue, BLDG 28423 Fort Gordon, GA 30905-5810

Go Navy! Command Mission Navy Information Operations Command, Georgia, provides Information Warfare/ Cryptologic expertise and personnel to Fleet Air, Surface, Submarine and Special Warfare Combatants. Provides reachback/extended staff support to C/JFMCC CENT/EUR requirements.

NIOC GA Navigator  

Volume 7, Issue 1. Winter 2013

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