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Selected Works Nick Purvis


Nick Purvis 609 Merganser Trail Clinton, MS 39056 c. 601.473.6752 e. jnp108@msstate.edu


School of Culinary Arts

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Starkville Farmers Market

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Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum Pavilion

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Point Cadet Casino + Marina

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Crosby Arboretum: Gum Pond Exhibit

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Howlin’ Wolf Blues Museum + City Arts Council

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School of Culinary Arts

Legend 1. Restaurant 2. Kitchen 3. Bake Shop 4. Pastry Kitchen 5. Teaching Kitchen 6. Student Lounge 7. Atrium 8. Demonstration Lab 9. Restroom

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School of Culinary Arts Program: Sq. Foot: Location:

Restaurant, Bake shop, Teaching Space +/- 27,000 Downtown Memphis, TN


One must consider the history of Memphis in order to create a building that stands out yet fits into the context. The design of the school recognizes and acknowledges the strong historic influences while maintaining a modern feel. The facades facing the historic buildings to the south and west mirror the robust brick facades. A transition occurs on the north and east side, in which a change in materials from brick to steel symbolizes a change from historic to modern. The double skin steel curtain wall on the north facade works to frame views out into Memphis. The change in facades makes the building blend into the context during the day, but stand out at night. The glass and steel on the north facade allow for a transparency, which reveals the movement and circulation, which is pushed to the outer perimeter, of the people within the building.

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Opposite Page: Extrusion Concept Sketch (top left), Solar Chimney Concept Sketch (middle left), Interior Lobby Sketch (bottom left)

North Elevation

Spring 2012 | Design 3 - B

This Page: Process Model (top left), Street Corner Sketch (top middle)


School of Culinary Arts

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Education

Curtain Wall Section

Administration

Dining

Circulation


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Opposite Page: Northwest Corner Sidewalk Rendering (top), Space Diagrams (bottom This Page: Northwest Corner Night Rendering (top), Brick Panel Detail Drawings (left), Interior Kitchen with Brick Panel System Rendering (right)

Spring 2012 | Design 3 - B

A prefabricated brick paneling system clads the south side of the building, serving as a light filter and heat sink. The automated panels allow the user to determine how much light is desired in the space through an automated control system.


Starkville Farmer’s Market

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Starkville Farmer’s Market Program: Sq. Foot: Location:

Temporary Retail Space, Public Park +/- 6000 Starkville, MS


Opposite Page: Process Model (top left), Axonometric Site Block Sketch (middle left), Steel Footing Detail Sketch (bottom left), Site Plan (top left), South Elevation (bottom right) This Page: Southeast Corner Picture (top), East Elevation (middle), Transverse Section (bottom)

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Spring 2010 | Design 1 - B

This is a schematic design project for the Starkville Community Farmers Market in downtown Starkville. Old and abandoned, the lot was chosen by the city to be the site of a future farmers market. The first Saturday of every month, local vendors gather to advertise and sell their goods. This proposal seeks to landscape the site in order to create a lawn for larger vendors to set up. The other half of the site is covered with a steel and wood structure, which provides shelter for smaller vendors to conduct business.


Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum Pavilion

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The endeavor pragmatically acknowledges three challenges within the community of Starkville and the task of bringing knowledge of green building technology to our region. The initial challenge was to revitalize the exterior of the Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum and bring interest and activity to the humble building along Fellowship Street. This challenge prompted the idea of an interactive outdoor museum that could display the potentials of affordable sustainable technologies applicable to our climatic region. This idea provoked the second challenge: How can the project’s influence extend beyond the immediate site into the community. The third challenge related to the project realization: undertaking the construction of any structure, requires a broad spectrum of knowledge involving a conglomerate of disciplines within the building industry.

Transverse Section

Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum Pavilion Program: Sq. Foot: Location:

Outdoor Assembly Space, Green Roof 600 Starkville, MS


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Fellowship Street

Site Plan The multiplicity of design parameters presented an overlap and potential synthetic moment in which professional boundaries among architecture, landscape architecture, landscape contracting, building construction science and art might be blurred. The concept of recycling under-utilized elements of the city was realized as Stromboli’s former fueling station structure was disassembled and appropriated to create a public pavilion neighboring the museum. This two-prong concept was the first step in transforming an area of blight along University Drive while also creating a public center within the same community. This example of sustainable design, while not immediately apparent to the community, is a well established means of recycling that is low cost and low impact with regard to energy conservation. To encourage the community directly, the site was retrofitted with sustainable design features, including a rain garden, water harvesting system, and a green roof; all of which were designed to express themselves in conjunction with their partnered graphic depiction, explaining the environmental benefits. This creates a symbiotic interaction between information and example. While the site serves as a teaching tool, it also creates a public center for events both planned and spontaneous. Research suggests that a public center is often created by location and unfastened space. Creating this center provides for a variety of individuals to coalesce hopefully strengthening the sense of community, as well as personal understanding of green building technology. Opposite Page: North Elevation (bottom left) This Page: Stair Safety Enclosure (top left), Northwest View (middle left), Northeast Aerial Site View (bottom left)

Summer 2012 | ARC 4990 Design/Build Group Project

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Point Cadet Casino + Marina

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Located at Point Cadet Marina in Biloxi, MS, this proposal introduces a precedent for future casinos to follow. From the beginning, the intent was literally and figuratively to open up the casino; combining the global (tourists) and local (fishermen) cultures of Biloxi. The program includes not only the casino, but an included marina, restaurant, hotel, amphitheather, and park. The project acts as an extension of the landscape and adjacent park. The wave form of the building works to draw people from the park up the gentle slope of the green roof, while the underside houses the casino, restaurant, some of the hotel, and creates a grotto for the marina. The entire ground level of the complex has an open plan, to allow for a variety of public uses. The second level houses the casino and restaurant, and the upper levels provide hotel rooms with views over the Gulf of Mexico.

Site Plan

Point Cadet Casino + Marina Program: Sq. Foot: Location:

Casino, Marina, Restaurant, Hotel, Amphitheater, Public Park 100,000 Biloxi, MS


Main Gaming Level:

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1. Gaming Area 2. Restaurant 3. Shopping 4. Marina 5. Amphitheater 6. Boardwalk 7. Public Plaza 8. Park 9. Existing Parking Garage

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Opposite Page: Southeast View Axonometric (middle left), Northeast View Axonometric (bottom left) This Page: Site Model - South Marina (bottom)

Fall 2012 | Design 4 - A

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Point Cadet Casino + Marina

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Fall 2012 | Design 4 - A

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Crosby Arboretum Gum Pond Exhibit

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In order to approach the form of our design our team strove to understand the nature of the gum pond, and the gum trees within in, the context provided by the wonderful architecture of Fay Jones, and the overarching philosophy of the Crosby Arboretum - that nature is in constant process and under continual change and flux, and that what human kind can do to facilitate this is appropriate and important for further growth of the landscape and human understanding. Our design took into consideration the way in which Fay Jones analyzed the structure of the pine trees surrounding his site, the formal pattern and layout according to the naturally occurring golden ratio, and the idea that the structure can respect and should not dominate the site. Our design proposal applies these attitudes and principles specifically to the gum pond, from which, a new language emerged and formed a synthesis of the natural environment and the built environment. By utilizing the principles given by Fay Jones and the Crosby Arboretum we hope to generate a new destination within the gum pond exhibit and a new anchor point for the north end of the arboretum. We hope to provide a point that marks the end of what is existing now, and be respectful of context we were given.

View Axis Through Portals

View from Main Landing Entry View from Savannah Exhibit

Crosby Arboretum Gum Pond Exhibit This Page: Gum Pond Exhibit Site Plan (middle) Opposite Page: Pavilion + Bridge Plan (top), Pavilion + Bridge Section (bottom)

Program: Sq. Foot: Location:

Outdoor Gathering Space, Stream Bridges, Wiers, 800 Crosby Arboretum - Picayune, MS


Pavilion + Bridge Plan Spring 2013 | ARC 4990 Building Bridges

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Crosby Arboretum Gum Pond Exhibit

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Initial visits to the site displayed a landscape brimming with diverse vegetation and animal life. We also were immediately confronted with a structural language that was intricate and meticulously ordered. Our proposal for a new canopy takes Jones’ approach, applying the same design strategies except to a new set of variables. The structure of the gum trees, with tall vertical trunks and long horizontal branches which dissolve outward, directly influenced the tectonic language of the structure. Along the path leading up to the main gathering space under the canopy, the structure is seen as glimpses through the trees, slowly revealing itself as visitors walk around the path. The roof structure is feathered out to blend with what is around it in a way that is natural and simply beautiful, and the materiality of the building and its openness to the elements allows for little pieces of the landscape to sneak in and take up residence. Nature is free to overtake the structure with little vines crawling along the floor and columns or the sporadic branches of the nearby Ti' Ti' plant becoming intertwined with the rectilinear structure. This synthesis of nature and architecture gives a new frame of reference, brilliantly combining the two and allowing visitors to experience the landscape from a new perspective, framed by the new pavilion.

This Page: Pavilion and Primary Bridge Rendering Looking south (top), 1” = 1’ - 0” Scale Model Pictures (bottom) Opposite Page: Small Stream Bridge Section (top left), Cast Concrete Model Pictures (top right), Wier Section (bottom)


Spring 2013 | ARC 4990 Building Bridges

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SITE PLAN

MILL STREET

Howlin’ Wolf Blues Museum + City Arts Council

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The idea of revitalizing the city of West Point is well intentioned, but at a closer look, is highly unlikely. Building one entity and expecting it to spark a large scale change throughout the city; economically, socially, politically, etc., is a long shot. By creating a building suited toward a utopian image of a city, rather than addressing the immediate needs of West Point, the new blues museum would over extend itself physically and programmatically, to a point where it could not sustain itself. This being said, the blues museum should fit the socio-economic context of West Point by providing for the present needs of the city, with the capability of expansion, should West Point begin to grow, whether it be as a direct result of the museum or other contributing factors. The design of the museum is the result of numerous studies relating to adaptive reuse and parasitic architecture.

Howlin’ Wolf Blues Museum + City Arts Council Program: Sq. Foot: Location:

Museum, Restaurant, Gallery, Art Studio, Educational Space +/- 13,000 West Point, MS


2nd Level Plan 1. Museum Exhibit Space 2. Art Gallery / Flex Space 3. Studio 4. Restroom

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1. Atrium 2. Gift Shop 3. Art Gallery 4. Auditorium 5. Restroom 6. Conference Room 7. Office 8. Storage 9. Restaurant 10. Kitchen

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Opposite Page: Northeast View Rendering (top left), View Looking North on Mill Street (middle left)

Spring 2013 | Design 4 - B

1st Level Plan


Howlin’ Wolf Blues Museum + City Arts Council

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Longitudinal Section

Broad Street Elevation


Transverse Section

Commerce Street Elevation

The question of how to make the most of the opportunities or problems presented by the existing McClure Furniture building and how to begin design work. The McClure Furniture building is rich with history but has fallen into a dilapidated state. The idea arose to renovate and restore parts of the existing building and leave the smallest economic impact on the building as possible during the first phase of the project. The timber columns and floor joist have been left in tact, aside from two atrium spaces which remove parts of the the second floor and roof plane, creating double story thresholds for guests and tourists to gather and enjoy the local artwork. This move to demolish parts of the second story speaks to the urban fabric of the outside public realm of the street and sidewalk. The atrium works to provides a much smoother transition from the public outdoors, to the semi-public indoors, and eventually the quiet spaces of the art galleries and museum exhibits. Walls are pushed and pulled to reveal the original structure and the exhibits on the second level wrap the timber columns, putting the history of the building on display along with the collection of blues artifacts. The awkward layout of the existing structural members divides the building into three “ribbons� which are used to determine the placement of the program spaces which, coincidentally, creates a strong visual axis, slicing through the buildings shell and visually connecting the museum to the city park across the street.

This Page: 2nd Floor Exhibit Hall (top left), Arts Council Addition - Gallery Space (top right)

Spring 2013 | Design 4 - B

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Howlin’ Wolf Blues Museum + City Arts Council

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In the second phase of the project, this axis is pulled through the new addition on Broad Street, which creates a new entrance and offers an alternate pedestrian route to broad street, although the main entrance is now housed in the threshold between the historic McClure Building and the Art Gallery addition. The facade along broad street engages the pedestrian with a new steel structure which supports the original masonry wall of the McClure Building, while also doubling as a green wall. The green wall provides a canopy for pedestrians as well as solar protection for the southern facades in the summer with full vegetation, and allowing for solar heat gain in the winter when the vegetation loses it’s canopy. The new pedestrian traffic along broad street and the art gallery axis will provide more awareness and also work to bring more profit to the museum. This mall-like quality of the newly created pedestrian walk-through is flanked with a restaurant, cafe, gift shop, and casual art gallery.

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Opposite Page: 1st Floor Atrium + Art Gallery Space

Spring 2013 | Design 4 - B

This Page: Southeast Night Rendering (bottom left), Wall Section Detail (right)


Education

Experience

Awards + Honors

Skills

BArch - Mississippi State University Starkville, MS 2009 - 2014 GPA: 3.36/4.00 Clinton High School Clinton, MS 2009 GPA: 4.00/4.00 Freelance Graphic Designer - A2Z Printing Jackson, MS Jan 2013 - April 2013 Intern Architect - Realty Ready Services Clinton, MS Summer 2010 + 2011 Construction Foreman - Realty Ready Services Clinton, MS Summer 2010 4th Year Capstone Studio Design Excellence/Stion Competition Winner Howling Wolf Blues Museum + Arts Council | Spring 2013 MS ASLA - Design Merit Award Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum Pavilion | Spring 2013 MS ASLA - Service Project of the Year Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum Pavilion | Spring 2013 Shackouls Honors College Mississippi State University | 2009 - 2012 Digital

Adobe Illustrator Adobe InDesign Adobe Photoshop AutoCAD Microsoft Creative Suites Revit Rhino + Grasshopper Sketchup

Practice

Free Hand Sketching Hand Rendering Model Building Laser Cutting Residential Construction Wood Working


Nick Purvis 609 Merganser Trail Clinton, MS 39056 c. 601.473.6752 e. jnp108@msstate.edu

Nick Purvis | Selected Works  

A collection of undergraduate architecture work at Mississippi State University

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