Page 1

Covering C ­ annon Falls, Faribault,­ Farmington, ­Lakeville, ­Northfield, ­Owatonna & S ­ urrounding Areas

May 2014 FREE

MILLER, CARSON & KURTZWEIL EXHIBIT Faribault STEEL MAGNOLIAS Opens May 9 - Faribault LATINO PLAY ­FESTIVAL Opens May 9 - Northfield GIRLS NITE OUT May 9 - Northfield VECCHIONE/­ERDAHL DUO w/MARIA JETTE May 18 - Lakeville ULTIMATE TRIBUTE TO JOHNNY CASH May 23 - Zumbrota JIVIN’ IVAN & THE KINGS OF SWING May 24 - Faribault

Now taking reservations for 507-444-0303

Mother’s Day!

timberlodgeowatonna.com I-35 to Exit 45 • Owatonna (near Cabela’s)

To keep up on what’s happening


Happy 75th Birthday DQ Bob! om ith w

Give only the best for the best lady in your life.

900 N Hwy 3 Northfield, MN 507-645-8912 nfld DQ Manderfeld www.dairyqueenofnorthfield.com

Serving Northfield Since 1963

ril

Pre-order cakes or pickup in lobby

FE

AT

Don’t forget Mother’s Day

Ap

Delight M

U Ap 17 RI ril - S M a N 3 m ay 0 G: M M 15 M i l a ay r tic 29 Rob k K h, C - R ert reitz lea ey r no Bell er, M wa ld , Tw a ter r Ph H ilip in C k Kr ot e se itie itz Clu k, b s Sid Ho er B t a ew C n al lub d kC af e Tri o

DQ Bob

304 Water Street

Family. Friends. Community. Mark Quinnell, Agent 107 W Third Street Northfield, MN 55057 Bus: 507-645-4545 mark@markquinnell.com

We’re all in this together. State Farm® has a long tradition of being there. That's one reason why I'm proud to support Northfield. Get to a better State . ®

Tandem 2 for 1 bagel with Tuesdays! cream cheese after 2pm 1211007

State Farm, Bloomington, IL

info@entertainmentguidemn.com

317 DIVISION STREET SOUTH DOWNTOWN NORTHFIELD (507) 786-9977

© The Entertainment Guide


Contents

Exhibits�������������������������������������������������������2-3 Theater�������������������������������������������������������4-5 4th Annual Latino Play Festival�������������6 2014 Sidewalk Poetry������������������������������10 Northfield Fireworks Ball������������������������10 Special Ad Section: Girls Nite Out��� 7-9

your source for happenings since 2005

Vol. 9, Issue 5

May 2014

Happenings�����������������������������������������������11-35

17 Bridge Square Northfield, MN 55057

Music Makers:

Get exposed in our annual music issue in June.

Historic Happenings: Early Bicycling Craze�������������������� 37-41 Non-Rules of the Gravel Road�����42-43 Northfield: Bike Town, USA?��������������� 44

507/663-7937

info@entertainmentguide.com

June 2013 FREE

Clubs, Classes & More���������������������������� 45

Publisher: Rob Schanilec By All Means Graphics

Falls, Faribault, Farmington, Covering Cannon & Surrounding Areas Northfield, Owatonna

Lakeville, n Lou & Peter Berryma TASTE OF June 7 - Zumbrota NORTHFIELD 16 - Faribault La Boheme - June Falls 14 S - June 23 - Cannon SaSha mercede 5TH ANNUA oF muSic L JUNEBUG JuneBug FeStivaL Northfield June 26-29 June

Dining����������������������������������������������������46-47 Business Classifieds����������������������������������������� 48

Contributors: Susan Hvistendahl Nathan Nelson Bruce Anderson Jennifer Lompart Northfield.org Northfield Music Collective Online: on Facebook: entertainmentguidemn and at entertainmentguidemn.com.

On the Cover: This Pink Peony by Northfield watercolor artist Kathy Miller is from her exhibit, Perspectives, which is part of a multi-artist presentation through June 7 at the Paradise Center for the Arts in Faribault.

entertainmentguidemn

27-30

Advertisers’ Index������������������������������������ 46

Advertising: Teresa Tillson, Sales Manager Teresat@byallmeansgraphics.com

To keep up on what’s happening

Thursday, June

POSITIVELY DIVISION STREE T

Jessica Paxton

Ameriprise Financial 507-663-0083 • 1090

Services, Inc. Member

South Hwy, 3, Northfield,

Advisor. Associate Financial Patty Robertson, Kerry Running, Tate Running and Don Robertson, Financial Advisors.

FINRA

MN 55057

Don’t miss the deadline this year (May 15). Send content now. info@entertainmentguidemn.com Send your stuff: a bio, a picture, a website/ facebook page... It’s FREE – Do it TODAY!

Summer Classes for ALL ages!

LIVE MUSIC 10pm May 2 Shalo Lee May 9 Hicktown Mafia May 16 Tripwire May 23 Chris Brooks May 30 Dirty Word Sat Nights

Check out our New DJ “Crazewell” and dance the night away! FREE Pizza 8-12 $1 taps 9-11

Weekly Specials Graduation? Birthday? Retirement?

We have the facility at

NO CHARGE

NO mess to clean up PLENTY of parking Picnic Tables Volleyball Courts Pool Tables & Darts Large variety of food choices catered by Encore Catering Call Therese for details

507-332-8371 ext 205

TUESDAYS $5 Pizza/FREE pool & darts WEDNESDAYS $3 Burger/Reduced pool & darts THURSDAYS $3 Twin Tacos & Quesadillas Ladies’ Night 2 for 1 beer & bar pour 9-11 FRIDAYS 1/2 price Wings & all Appetizers!

1525 Division St. W., Faribault • theclubfbo.com • 507-331-1511

May 2014

Register for summer classes! Options include: • Ballet Pointe • Modern

• Tap • Jazz • Musical Theatre

For ages 1 to 101!

Watch for information about our recital in June, including our production of “Peter and the Wolf”!

www.NorthfieldDance.com

640 Water St S | Northfield, MN 55057 507-645-4068

Check us out online at www.entertainmentguidemn.com

1


Flaten Art Museum

Arts & Heritage Center of Montgomery

206 1st St. N., Montgomery • artsandheritagecenter.org 507/364-5933 or 507/364-8110 • Th-F 2-5pm, Sa 9am-12pm Batiks by Susan Hayes – Opens May 1.

Ames Center

12600 Nicollet Ave, Burnsville • ames-center.com 952/895-4685 • M-F 9am-5pm, Sa 10am-2pm, Su 12-4pm Burnsville Historical Society – May 8-June 15

Crossings at Carnegie

320 East Ave., Zumbrota • 507/732-7616 crossingsatcarnegie.com • M/T/W/F 10am-5pm, Th 10am8pm, Sa 10am-4pm 13th Annual Poet-Artist Collaboration – through May 15 – A juried group show featuring 26 poems and the art they inspired. Reception and Poetry Reading: May 10, 6:30pm. Ann Tristani, Laura Weimert: Paintings – May 16-June 30 – Opening Reception: May 23, 6-8pm.

Eclectic Goat – 413 Division St. S. • 507/645-0301 • M-Sa

10am-5:30pm, Th until 7pm, Su Noon-4pm – Hip Handmade Goods!

Dittmann Center, St. Olaf • stolaf.edu/collections/flaten 507/786-3556 • M/T/W/F 10am-5pm, Th 10am-8pm, Sa/Su 2-5pm Senior Show 2 – through May 6 Lasting Legacy 2014 – May 1-25 – An annual exhibit series featuring objects from Flaten Art Museum’s collection chosen by senior Art History majors. All Senior Show – May 12-25 – Opening Reception: May 25, 10:30am-12:30pm.

Northfield Arts Guild

304 Division St. • 507/645-8877 • northfieldartsguild.org M-F 10am-5pm, visit website for weekend hours Surface Tension: Seven Emerging Artists – through May 10 – An exhibit by St. Olaf and Carleton art apprentices featuring an array of mediums including photography, drawing, printmaking, painting and ceramics. The artists are Anna Carlson, Eliza Dennis, Gina Gaetz, Brooke Granowski, Addie Rosenwinkel, Kara Sajeske and Noah Sanders. Northfield High School Honors Show – May 14-31 – A mixed media exhibit featuring work from the Northfield High School honors program. Each of the artists focused on an area of personal interest. The mediums include clay, charcoal, spray paint, watercolor, acrylic and mixed media. Opening Reception: May 16, 7-9pm.

Northfield Arts Guild at Allina Clinic

1440 Jefferson Rd. • M-T 7am-8pm, F 7am-7pm, Sa 9am-3pm Prints and Book Plates from Northfield book artists.

Sweet and Savory Pastries, Soup, and Sandwiches made entirely from scratch. Open Friday & Saturday 612-227-2681 Downtown Dundas 236 Railway St. N.

2 info@entertainmentguidemn.com

© The Entertainment Guide


Northfield Historical Society

408 Division St. • 507/645-9268 • northfieldhistory.org M-Sa 10am-5:30pm, Su 1-5:30pm Basketball display through early June of artifacts from the first era of women’s basketball.

Northfield Senior Center Gallery

1651 Jefferson Pkwy. • 507/664-3700 northfieldseniorcenter.org M-F 7am-8pm, Sa 7am-5pm, Sun 10am-5pm Bridgewater 4th Grade Students’ Art – through May 18 Adele Beals, paintings and Paul Dimick, sculpture – May 19-June 22

Owatonna Arts Center

435 Garden View Ln., Owatonna • 507/451-0533 oacarts.org • 1-5pm, closed Mondays Christina Spencer: “Creatively Nesting” – May 4-25 – Spencer received a grant from the Southeastern Minnesota Arts Council to develop this show. Christina says, “Expecting mothers have the natural instinct to ‘prepare their nest.’ Our simple house suddenly changes into a place to live, to call home, to raise a family and to shower with love...This small new life, from the moment of conception, became my everything and my inspiration.” Christina has a BFA in art education K-12 from the University of Duluth. She was the Education Developer of the Youth Programs at OAC. Opening Reception: May 4, 1-4pm.

exhibitors are doing and the many new artists that are a part of Steele County. The imagery is as diverse as the number of artists showing.

Paradise Center for the Arts

321 Central Ave., Faribault • 507/332-7372 Tu/W/F/Sa 12-5pm, Th 12-8pm, Su/M closed Exhibit dates through June 7 Carlander Family Gallery: Kathy Miller – Perspectives Lois Vranesh Boardroom Gallery: Deb Lee Carson – The Horse – Spirit and Light Corey Lyn Creger Memorial Gallery: Kaelen Kurtzweil

Paradise Center Healing Arts G ­ allery at District One Hospital

200 State Ave., Faribault Featured artists: Diane Hagen, George Sierakowski, Georgi Tsenov, Loretta Verbout and Sandra Dinse. There will also be several pieces from a variety of artists on loan from Barb Bruns’ Gallery in Morristown, MN.

Studio Elements

16 Bridge Square • 507/786-9393 • studioelements.net Th 10am-5pm, F/Sa 10am-5pm, Su 12-4pm. Fine art, unique gifts and fun junk.

Call for Artists

62nd Annual Steele County Art Exhibition – May 4-25 – For 62 years artists in Steele County have exhibited their latest creations. This show makes us aware of the number of artists and the high quality of their work. It is an opportunity to see what new expressions longtime

Northfield’s Riverwalk Market Fair and Montgomery’s ­Montgomery Meander have both put out calls for artists. See their ads on pages 6 and 18 respectively.

Spring is (finally) here!

ARE YOU THINKING OF SELLING?

We will give you a complimentary Market Analysis.

ARE YOU THINKING OF BUYING?

We can help you find your new home.

Therese Andersen Kathryn Jamison 507-271-4599 507-581-2828

Carol Hong 612-210-3790

Larry Defries 507-321-1431

Millie Berg 507-581-0481

Debbie Zellner 612-280-9105

Michael Jordan 612-280-6969

Dianne Kyte 651-247-0667

Arlen Malecha 507-581-0303

Connie Malecha 612-363-9176

Lynda Streefland 612-229-4411

Jeanette Nelson 507-321-1645

Jan Stevens 507-244-0500

Ed Kuhlman 507-649-1983

Lynn Johnson 507-390-6109

Steve Mikula 952-212-9388

419 Division Street S., Northfield, MN • 507-663-1234 • ColdwellBanker.com May 2014

Check us out online at www.entertainmentguidemn.com

3


Theater

Peter Pan or The Boy Who Would Not Grow Up

Mom! A New Musical

May 2-5, May 8-11; M/Th-Sa 7:30pm, Su 2pm Ames Center, Burnsville Mom! celebrates the twists and turns, delights and dilemmas, rewards and regrets of parenting – from trying to reason with a toddler in a tantrum to panicking at the prospect of a parent-teacher conference. From staving off unwanted child-rearing advice to struggling to accept the choices of grown children. From trying to rekindle marital passion to trying to shield kids from the heartbreak of divorce – this musical celebrates the humor and the terror of parenting. Monday night’s performances will feature a talk-back after the show. Tickets: $20 adults, $17 seniors and groups of eight or more and available at ticketmaster.com or 800/982-2787. Time Stands Still

May 1-3; F/Sa 7:30pm, Su 2pm Little Theatre of Owatonna Time Stands Still focuses on Sarah and James, a photojournalist and a foreign correspondent, trying to find happiness in a world that seems to have gone crazy. Theirs is a partnership based on telling the toughest stories and, together, making a difference. But when their own story takes a sudden turn, the adventurous couple confronts the prospect of a more conventional life. Tickets available at littletheaterofowatonna.org or 507/451-0764.

May 8-9, 7pm; May 10, 2pm Arcadia Charter School, Northfield An adaptation of the J.M. Barrie story by Trevor Nunn and John Caird, who adapted Les Miserables for the stage. This is the beloved story of Peter, Wendy, Michael, John, Capt. Hook, Smee, the lost boys, pirates and the Indians and, of course, Tinker Bell, in their adventures in Never Land. However, for the first time, the play is here restored to Barrie’s original intentions. In a whimsical, ambiguous and ironical manner he speaks here as clearly to adults as he does to children. This piece is performed in a playful, storytelling fashion from beginning to end, including Barrie’s heartbreaking and heartwarming conclusion to Peter and Wendy’s story. Tickets: $6 adults, $4 students, call 507/663-8806. Cocktails with Mimi

May 8-10, 7:30pm Northfield High School Auditorium This show by Mary Chase is a fun, frothy comedy about Mimi Ralston, a wealthy and much-married divorcée. She is giving a party in honor of the reputedly formidable parents of her daughter’s fiancé. Hoping to break off the engagement, she engages a stunt “waiter” to insult her guests and spill soup on the stuffedshirt Calthorpes. But her daughter, Edie, fearing that her mother would never be able to stomach her future in-laws, has hired two actors to impersonate them, which works fine until the real Calthorpes arrive on scene. Mistaken identities proliferate until all is in a state of hilarious confusion. Tickets: $6 adults, $4 students and can be gotten at the Activities Office or at the door. Love Potion #10: The Musical

May 9, 7:30pm Lakeville Area Arts Center This comedy production is filled with intrigue, romance and the great songs of the golden age of rock and roll, featuring popular radio disc jockey Michael Patrick “Records” Ryan from WDGY and The Whitesidewalls. You’ll hear all the great music and the love story that takes place at a small-town high school in 1964. Tickets: $22 advance, $25 at the door and available at lakevilleareaartscenter.com or by calling 952/985-4640.

The Merlin Players Present

May 9, 10, 15, 16, 17 - 7:30PM Sunday, May 11 - 2:00PM - Mother’s Day! Directed by Julianna Skluzacek A special gift from Donahue’s Greenhouse to the first 25 moms on Mother’s Day! Open at 1PM.

Featuring Susan Dunhaupt, Abigail Green, Linda Karnauskas, Dallas Musselman, Sydney Place, Kristin Elder Sellentine

Hitting a pothole can cause serious damage … let us check your steering and suspension. Some rebates available.

Paradise Center for the Arts, 321 Central Ave., Faribault

Call 507-332-7372 for tickets. Box Ofc Hrs: T, W, F, Sat.- 12P-5P; Thurs. - 12P-8P Laughter through tears is my favorite emotion - Truvy Sponsored by Charter Communications and Bill Hankerson of Morgan Stanley/Smith Barney

Complete Auto Care for Foreign and Domestic Vehicles

,

“ Steel Magnolias is presented by special arrangement with Dramatists Play Service, Inc.

4 info@entertainmentguidemn.com

701 Division Street • Northfield 507-645-7242 • www.wittbros.com

© The Entertainment Guide


25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee

May 9-10, 7:30pm; May 10, 2pm Urness Recital Hall, St. Olaf Northfield Lyric Theater production. Fourth Annual Latino Play Festival

May 9-10, 16-17, 7pm Northfield Arts Guild Theater The 4th Annual Latino Play Festival has a different flavor this year. It tells the story of a diverse group of students who stop and imagine the possibilities. They come together in an acting class at Northfield High School and discover their potential through storytelling. The real-life stories create counsel and uncover the truth hiding beneath stereotypes, misunderstandings, and misconceptions on all sides. Students find out that Latinos, whites, Africans, and kids with autism are dealing with unimaginable challenges but that they all have the capacity to survive and discover a voice they didn’t know they had. Tickets: $15 suggested donation. Proceeds go to Latino Performing Arts Class. For questions, call the Northfield High School at 507/663-0630 Beauty & the Beast

May 9-10, 7pm, May 10-11, 2pm Ames Center, Burnsville Tickets: $16-$32 and available at ticketmaster.com or 800/982-2787. Steel Magnolias

May 9-11, 15-17; Th-Sa 7:30pm, Su 2pm Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault A funny, poignant story of women who are as delicate as magnolias but tough as steel. For tickets, call 507/332-7372 Tuesday-Saturday, noon-5pm, Thursdays until 8. Hands in Action: MSAD & National Theater of the Deaf

May 22, 7pm Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault During the week of May 19-23, middle school students from the Minnesota State Academy of the Deaf will create and rehearse an original, theatrical production with NTD performers. You are invited to see the final performance. Free and open to the public.

See Our Signs: National Theater of the Deaf

May 23, 7pm Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault See tangram shapes become words, signs and stories as NTD performers combine exciting American Sign Language with the spoken word creating a performance that will be seen, filled with stories, fables and interactive improvisation. Free and open to the public. Z Puppets Rosenschnoz, A La Carte: In a Fool’s Kitchen

May 30, 7-8pm Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault Get ready for a comic battle between a funny French clown chef and a wily lobster as the award-winning puppeteers of Z Puppets Rosenschnoz take you on a playfully interactive comedy journey, featuring clowning, puppetry, music and a few unruly vegetables. Tickets: $7 youth members 18 and under, $12 adult members, $10 youth nonmembers, $15 adult nonmembers. For tickets, call 507/3327372 Tuesday-Saturday, noon-5pm, Thursdays until 8. Twelfth Night

May 30-June 1, June 5-9, 12-14; M/Th-Sa, 7:30pm, Su 2pm Ames Center, Burnsville The Chameleon Theatre Circle is teaming up with Green T Productions to meld Shakespeare’s irresistible romantic comedy with the visual and movement styles of the Japanese Kabuki tradition. In the kingdom of Illyria love is turning everyone’s lives upside down, from the regal Duke and haughty Countess to their most lowly servants. A shipwreck, disguises, intercepted messages and questionable fashion choices all play a part in the chaos that drives one of the most beloved comedies of all time. Tickets: $20 adults, $17 seniors and groups of eight or more and available at ticketmaster.com or 800/982-2787.

Paid Advertisement

May 2014

Check us out online at www.entertainmentguidemn.com

5


The 4th Annual Latino Play Festival (including seven white people and one African) By Jennifer Lompart As the teacher of the year-long performing arts class at the high school, I was looking at different directions the class could take as we were wrapping up the 3rd Annual Latino Play Festival last year. Racial conflict is not a problem at Northfield High School, but there does exist an underlying sentiment that things could be better. Interested in finding out why there is a quiet divide between whites and Latinos in Northfield, I decided to open it up to all sophomores, juniors and seniors and intentionally create a space in which students recognized what divides them, listened to the unique stories of each other’s struggles and triumphs, examined their similarities and, ultimately, embraced one another despite their differences. By the time the application process was complete and the class started in the fall, there were six Latinos, one African (from Nigeria), and seven white students (one with autism). For the first few months, some of the students were eager and excited. A few were polite. Others were civil. But some were angry, wondering what they’d gotten themselves into. At first, they didn’t talk about the obvious attributes that separated them. As time went on, they began to open up through class discussions and they started asking each other questions. As the class evolved, students grew to trust each other. It was agreed that any question could be posed without the risk of being judged racist or ignorant. Some kids asked Latinos, “Do you know someone who is undocumented? Is it hard for immigrants to find good jobs? Why did you come here? Is it hard to get papers? Was it difficult to learn English? Why do so many Latinos live in Viking Terrace?” Some kids asked whites, “Do all white families sit down at the same table, hold hands, and pray before each meal? Do you ever have to worry about money? What kinds of problems do you have? Does everyone in Mayflower live in a perfect square house with three floors? Will you just automatically go to college?” And other students asked Daniel, “Why don’t Muslims eat pork? How often do you pray? If you have black skin, can you get a tan?” And still other students asked George, “What is it like having autism? Do you ever feel lonely? Is it hard to make friends?” The 4th Annual Latino Play Festival has a different flavor this year. It tells the story of a diverse group of students who stop and imagine the possibilities. They come together in an acting class at Northfield High School and discover their potential through storytelling. The real-life stories create counsel and uncover the truth hiding beneath stereotypes, misunderstandings, and misconceptions on all sides. Students find out that Latinos, whites, Africans, and kids with autism are dealing with unimaginable challenges but that they all have the capacity to survive and discover a voice they didn’t know they had. Please join us at the Northfield Arts Guild Theater on May 9, 10, 16 and 17 at 7pm.

6 info@entertainmentguidemn.com

Back Row: Jordan Severson, Stephanie Garcia, Adilene Valeriano, Helen Forsythe, Erick Hernandez, Daniel Lawal, Andy Kell, Morgan Anderson, and Sara Silkensen; Middle Row: Tyler King, Sarah Miller, and George Johnson; Front Row: Brenda Camacho and Yamileth Duque Not pictured: Jennifer Lompart, Producer and English as a Second Language teacher at Northfield High School; and Linda Henderson, Director.

Saturdays, June 7-October 25 9:00am to 1:00pm Rain or Shine Bridge Square, Northfield

Dreaming of more income selling your art, fine craft, farm produce or artisan food?

BE A VENDOR RIVERWALK MARKET FAIR Space limited. Apply today. Starts June 7 Booth Fees: Only $10-$20 per Saturday. 20 Saturdays available. You pick!

APPLY TODAY

visit www.RiverwalkMarketFair.org or contact Nancy Stroessner manager@RiverwalkMarketFair.org © The Entertainment Guide


GIRLS NITE OUT

8th Annual

Girls Nite Out at

Tagg 2 Gift & Home

Downtown Northfield

15% off storewide complimentary treats in-store drawings

FREE MnAlyY G ift o

w/$20 or more purchase when you bring in this ad.

Unique • Affordable • Boutique Clothing • Rings • Jewelry • Body Jewelry Thousands of Designs in Tungsten, Stainless Steel, and Sterling Silver

GIR LS NITE OUT

Downtown Northfield

Friday, May 9, 2014 Shopping 4-9pm

Stop in participating stores for specials, giveaways and drawings throughout the night. D sp inin Ga ecia g lor ls e!

joy En ive ! L sic Mu

Drink, Dine & Dance

DOWNTOWN! Food and drink specials, live music and a variety of special entertainment.

Basil’s – Pizza Specials Carbone’s – 1/2 Price Wine Chapati – Open to Midnight Beer, Wine, Desserts Flamenco Guitar by Randall Ferguson Contented Cow – Shock Top Happy Hour Beer Tasting 4-6 Bill McGrath, Stone Soup Froggy Bottoms – Pink Lady Martinis & BOGOS • Dave Hudson Hideaway – 1/2 Price Bottles of Wine Rueb ‘n’ Stein – Wine and GNO Drink Specials Tandem Bagels – Open for Dinner The Tavern Lounge – Wine Specials Andy Tackett

220 Division Street • Downtown Northfield

May 2014

Check us out online at www.entertainmentguidemn.com

7


GIR LS NITE OUT

Downtown Northfield

Friday, May 9, 2014

GIR LS NITE OUT

Store Specials Drawings Gift with Purchase 401 Division Street Northfield, MN 55057 www.rarepair.com

GIRLS NITE OUT Special Sale and Treats

13 bridge square, northfield 507-786-9990 nestmidwest.com Monday closed • Tuesday by appointment Wed-Sat: 10:30-5:30 | Sun: 12-4

If you are confident ~ You are beautiful

Join us for in-store specials! 302 Division St. S. – Northfield, MN 507-645-2539

8 info@entertainmentguidemn.com

© The Entertainment Guide


Fashion Fair 320 Division St S • Northfield, MN 507-664-9152 • measuringcupofnorthfield.com

411 Division St. Northfield 645 • 6967

Discounts, Drawings, Samples, Treats, and More!

20-50% off heels and dresses during Girls Nite Out

GIR LS NITE OUT

405 Division St S • Northfield, MN •507-663-7720

Girls Nite Out

Caramel Apple Martinis Cosmopolitans House Chocolate Martinis F Wine

SPECIALS

503 Division St. • Northfield • 645-6691

Ruebnstein.com

1

$

OF 4-10pm

for all GNOers

Girls Nite Out

Discounts, Drawings, Samples, Treats, and More!

Sales Third Thursday-Sunday each month. DON’T MISS IT!

Girls Nite Out

with special GNO guest

FRI, May 9

Sipping and shopping 4-9pm Win a one-of-a-kind reclaimed wood & metal piece!

Monthly Sale

THU, May 15, 3-7pm

unWINEd night. Sip and shop to kick-off the Weekend Sale Event.

FRI-SUN, May 16-18, 10am-6pm An Occasional Store Unique Home Accents A few days each month

SpareRoomUnderground.com

Like us on Facebook for sales news 310 Division St. Lower Level/Riverside Entrance Look for the pink boa and head down the alley!

May 2014

Check us out online at www.entertainmentguidemn.com

9


2014 Sidewalk Poetry ­Contest winners announced The Arts and Culture Commission of Northfield, in partnership with the Friends and Foundation of the Library, announced winners of Northfield’s fourth annual Sidewalk Poetry Contest. Chosen from among 89 poems submitted for judging, ten were selected for imprinting in city sidewalks. The winners are: Chris Ellison, Orick Peterson, Dana Engstrom, Kaethe Schwein, Christine Kallman, Bella Smith, Anna Moltchanova, Lori Stoltz and Rhea Mehrkens (2). Five judges, drawn from across the community, were: Diane LeBlanc, published poet and Director of Writing, St. Olaf College; Doug Green, published poet and teacher of writing at Augsburg College; Patsy Dew, local artist and recently named Northfield Living Treasure; Scott Tempel, Northfield City Planner; and Lynne Young, recently retired Director of the Northfield Library. The winning poems will be on display at the Northfield Public Library, posted on the Friends and Foundation of the Library and City websites, and shared with local media. Beginning in May, poems will be installed in City sidewalks. A Sidewalk Poetry celebration will take place in August in downtown Northfield.

Northfield Fireworks Ball tickets on sale now Let’s keep the lights fantastic! How often does a social event benefit an entire community? For your children, your grandchildren and the child in you, the Fireworks Ball keeps Northfield’s 4th of July fireworks tradition alive with a black tie gala at Carleton’s Weitz Center for Creativity on June 28. Featuring many of the same organizers from the Governors’ Ball (2005) and the Beaux Arts Ball (2009), the Fireworks Ball brings an evening of SAT. JUNE 28, 2014 fine food, outstanding music and amazing art together within the modern elegance of the Weitz Center. Expect a crowd; both the Governors Ball and the Beaux Arts Ball attracted more than 500 of your neighbors and friends. A COMMUNITY CELEBRATION

TO ENDOW THE FUNDING OF THE A N N U A L 4 TH O F J U L Y F I R E W O R K S

DANCING • BIG BAND • LIVE & SILENT AUCTION

7 : 0 0 PM A T T H E W E I T Z C E N T E R , 3 2 0 E A S T T H I R D S T R E E T

MUSIC BY THE BEND IN THE RIVER BIG BAND • BLACK TIE OPTIONAL

Sponsors: BY ALL MEANS GRAPHICS, THE ARCHER HOUSE, ECO TRANS, KYMN & THE NORTHFIELD NEWS F U L L D E T A I L S & T I C K E T I N F O R M A T I O N : f i r e w o r k s 5 5 0 5 7. o r g

But, of course, this is about more than just a party.

April showers bring baby showers and bridal showers. Call now to book us for your spring events, birthday parties, graduation parties and more

It’s about continuing the tradition Danny Freeman – Mr. Northfield – started years ago, raising funds for Northfield’s Fourth of July fireworks. Proceeds from this event will seed an endowment to carry Danny’s dreams forward and fund Northfield’s fireworks for years to come. The evening will include two silent auctions, including a galleryhoused fine arts auction, a live auction, catering by Bon Appetit and the big band sounds of the 19-piece Bend in the River Big Band. Bring in the summer with a night to remember. Tickets are $65 BUT are available for only $50 through May 31. Demand will be high, so don’t wait too long. Go to fireworks55057.org, KYMN Radio, Northfield News or By All Means Graphics today.

BRIDGE SQUARE BARBERS 113 years of continuous service!

The only barber shop in Northfield

Buzz

Adam

1st Mon of Month 8:00am-4:00pm • Tue 8:00am-5:30pm Wed 8:00am-7:00pm (Free Snacks & Soft Drinks 5:30-7:00pm) Thu-Fri 8:00am-5:30pm • Sat 8:00am-12:00pm

15 Bridge Square • 507-645-4193

Appointments available, walk-ins welcome.

10 info@entertainmentguidemn.com

© The Entertainment Guide


The last days of April…

HAPPE N I NG S

TUESDAY, APRIL 29

MONDAYS: Bingo • 7pm

SATURDAYS: Movie Matinee • 2:30pm

TUESDAYS: Poetry & a Pint • 7-8:30pm

DJ Link • 9pm-1am

Carbone’s, Northfield Contented Cow, Northfield Free Pool & Darts

The Club, Faribault WEDNESDAYS: Mooove It! • 10pm

Contented Cow, Northfield DJ dance party with Terry VanDeWalker. THURSDAYS: DJ and Karaoke • 9pm-1am

Froggy Bottoms, Northfield By Speedo ­Entertainment. FRIDAYS: Bar Bingo • 7pm

Contented Cow, Northfield Rueb ‘N’ Stein, Northfield Club Music/Dancing • 10pm

The Club, Faribault

Free Jukebox Sat Night Froggy Bottoms, Northfield SUNDAYS: Conversation at the Cow 5:30-7:30pm

Contented Cow, Northfield Quiz Night • 8pm

Contented Cow, Northfield Four-person teams compete for prizes.

L&M Bar & Grill, Dundas

Acoustic Jam Session • 7:30-10pm

The Contented Cow, Northfield Every Tuesday night show up with your unplugged instrument of choice and jam – or just show up and listen. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30 Gypsy Jazz Jam Series: Mark Kreitzer • 7-9pm

Northfield Eagles Club No experience necessary – join in the jam with Mark Kreitzer of the Mark Kreitzer Band – or just come to listen. Traditional Irish Music Session • 7-9pm

Corner Room, Rueb ‘n’ Stein, Northfield A gathering of musicians and listeners in a relaxed, informal setting. Along with the music enjoy conversation, camaraderie and perhaps even a few Irish dance steps. Chance Meetings • 7:30-10pm

The Contented Cow, Northfield John Hiscox, Neil Rowley, Gail Moll and Rob Lampe play a mixed genre of music which is not half-bad and a lot of fun. THURSDAY, MAY 1

DJ Link • 9-11pm

Ladies Night Out • 4-8pm

Rueb ‘N’ Stein, Northfield

Downtown Faribault Spring fashion, spring decor and spring savings with 18 Faribault stores and restaurants. In-store specials, giveaways and refreshments.

Karaoke • 9pm-1am

Boston’s, Faribault

ed seats Reserv nline! o now

2

venue

0965 Holyoke A Love Potion #10, The Musical with The Whitesidewalls Friday, May 9, 2014, 7:30pm A comedy filled with intrigue, romance and great songs of the golden age of rock and roll featuring WDGY disc jockey Michael Patrick “Records” Ryan and The Whitesidewalls. Great music and a love story that takes place at a small-town high school in 1964. Tickets: $22 advance / $25 at the door

Coffee Concert No. 4: Vecchione/Erdahl Duo with Maria Jette

Sunday, May 18, 2014, 2pm Maria Jette (soprano) returns with vibrant vocals along with Carrie Vecchione (oboe) and Rolf Erdahl (bass). Featuring music from Baroque to Grieg to Jazz. Tickets: $15 adults / $12 seniors & students

Register for a variety of summer art and theater camps on the LAAC website Tickets: www.LakevilleAreaArtsCenter.com or 952-985-4640 May 2014

Check us out online at www.entertainmentguidemn.com

11


HAPPENINGS Thursday, May 1, continued

Percussion Ensemble • 8:15pm

Urness Recital Hall, St. Olaf, Northfield

Cannon Falls First Thursday Fun Fest • 5-8pm

Mill Street, Cannon Falls Entertainment, food vendors, artist booths, games for kids and more. Cannon River Winery will be offering three complimentary wine samples for those who stop in. Theater: Time Stands Still • 7:30pm

Little Theatre of Owatonna See theater page.

Companydance Spring Concert • 7:30pm

Kelsey Theater, St. Olaf, Northfield A spring celebration of dance created by faculty, students and guest artists. Tickets: $8 general public, free for faculty/staff/St. Olaf students and available at 507/786-8987. Also May 2-3. Nick Hensley • 8pm

The Tavern Lounge, Northfield Singer/songwriter Nick Hensley is the mastermind behind the musical collaborative, Love Songs For Angry Men, also the title of his first solo release, after fronting the critically acclaimed rock ensemble, The District. Hensley has shared the stage with bands like The Hold Steady, Widespread Panic, The Gear Daddies, Trampled By Turtles, The Samples and Big Head Todd and The Monsters. Hensley’s music has received 4-star ratings from Paste magazine, City Pages and Alt Country. com.

FRIDAY, MAY 2 Anna Marie Mitchell • 6-7pm

The Contented Cow, Northfield “Personal and heartfelt, this young singer/ songwriter writes and sings with a passion and wisdom far beyond her years. Her debut album, Little Bird, bears testament to her unique vocals, smooth compositions and fresh, thoughtful lyrics.” Listed as “One to Watch” by the Nashville Songwriters Association International for her song, Broken Glass. Catch her here and some day you can say you saw her when. Companydance Spring Concert • 7:30pm

Kelsey Theater, St. Olaf, Northfield A spring celebration of dance created by faculty, students and guest artists. Tickets: $8 general public, free for faculty/staff/St. Olaf students and available at 507/786-8987. Also May 1 and 3. Theater: Time Stands Still • 7:30pm

Little Theatre of Owatonna See theater page.

Theater: Mom! A New Musical • 7:30pm

Ames Center, Burnsville See theater page.

Bring

in downtown Dennison, MN

Mom Johnny’s for Mother’s Day to

MOTHER’S DAY SPECIALS

Shrimp Fettucine Alfredo AND Chicken Alfredo Lasagna Free wine for Mom with any entree 507-645-6666

12 info@entertainmentguidemn.com

Open 7 days a week • M-Th 4pm-Close • F-S-S Noon-Close

© The Entertainment Guide


usage over

an inch

Congratulations to our Heroes of Education Contest winners! use this version for an usage u nder an y inch

for any use this version r an inch usage unde

2 for any

ver an in

usage u

version

ND

CE

use this

for any use this version r an inch usage unde for any

r Josie Helgeson, St. Dominic, grade 3 nde

for any use this version an inch usage over

PLA

FIRST

ch

1

SE CO

usage o

version

PLACE

use this

an inch

Alexis Finstuen, St. Dominic, grade 3

THIRD

use this version for any usage over an inch

CE

Alexander Salinas, Greenvale Park, grade K

PLA

TH

3

PLACE

IRD

3

Julian Vazquez, Greenvale Park, grade K

Trust your home to the Professionals who care.

use this version for any usage under an inch

速 Proud to be your Realtor

Office (507) 663-1100 www.ProfessionalPrideRealty.com 205 3rd Street West, Suite B Northfield, MN 55057

May 2014

Check us out online at www.entertainmentguidemn.com

13


Timothy Howe • 9pm-12am

HAPPENINGS Friday, May 2, continued

Froggy Bottoms, Northfield Silky vocals, melodic lines and acoustic guitar. Howe’s been compared to Jason Mraz, Gavin Degraw, Bruno Mars, John Mayer and Howie Day.

Lonesome Dan Kase • 8pm

The Tavern Lounge, Northfield For the last 15 years, Lonesome Dan has been playing his unique brand of countryblues on stages throughout the U.S. His performances showcase his unique fingerpicking style and warm vocals as well as his knowledge in the history of the blues. More at lonesomedan.com.

Smokescreen • 9:30pm-close

Babe’s Music Bar, Lakeville A rock variety band that has been entertaining audiences around the Upper Midwest for more than 20 years. They headline many fairs, festivals and city celebrations. Their gigs include premier sound, a light show with Dwight Holmbo (lead vocals, guitar, synthesizer, harmonica, fiddle), Chris Kerber (vocals, guitar), CJ Stahlberg (vocals, bass) and Tim Boeck (drums).

Jesse & Eastman • 8-10:30pm

The Contented Cow, Northfield Concert: Jazz I • 8:15pm

Lion’s Pause, St. Olaf, Northfield Guest conductor Phil Hey.

Shalo Lee • 10pm

Gell • 8:30pm-close

Reggie’s Brewhouse, Owatonna A variety of fun alternative music, driving hard rock with a splash of country. City Pages ranked them the “Best Rock Band – Reader’s Choice” in 2002; Nominated for “Best Cover Band” in the 2003 Minnesota Music Awards. Will Bauermeister • 9pm

Rudy’s Redeye Grill, Lakeville Fish make great pets!

Aquatic Pets “A Unique Pet Shop” Tropical Fish Aquariums & Supplies For All Pets

The Club, Faribault Headed up by this talented and electric singer/songwriter, Lee’s high-energy country rock band has engaged and captivated audiences throughout the region. SATURDAY, MAY 3 Get Your Spring On! Faribault Business Expo • 9am-3pm

Second Street and Central Avenue, Faribault Outdoor displays of spring merchandise (lawn, garden, boat, camping, etc.).

Northfield Garden Club Plant & Bake Sale

e sun and shad annuals and perennials

Saturday, May 17th • 8am to Noon debalicious ked Bridge Square - Northfield treats

414 Division St. S. • Northfield, MN

507-663-1096

Steve & Liz Messner, Owners

Celebrate Mom’s Day!

Exp. 5/31/14

11% Off your total purchase.

Your Family Friendly Sports Bar & Grill

$5

Burger Basket Lives On

503 Division St. • Northfield • 645-6691

Ruebnstein.com 14 info@entertainmentguidemn.com

© The Entertainment Guide


Planning to Build?

Save money with the one-time close on construction-permanent financing at CRB! Construction Phase

Long-Term Fixed Rate

2.95 4.125% 4.2035% %

Interest Rate

Interest Rate

APR*

Construc

l tion Loan Specia

Building a home is hard enough. That is why we make the financing process easy to understand. Call Peggy Hoffman at 507-645-4441 for details on our construction loan special that can save you money on a construction-permanent loan. Call today to take advantage of this great deal! *Annual percentage rate (APR) of 4.2035% is a combined APR for construction and permanent financing. Effective as of 4-8-14 and subject to daily changes in CRB/FHLMC market pricing. Based on principal loan of $300,000 with initial advance of $150,000; 80% loan-to-value and an interest rate of 2.95% for 9 months and 4.125% fixed rate for 30 years with a minimum payment of interest only monthly during construction followed by a principal and interest payment of $1,453.95 for 360 months. Payment does not include taxes and insurance premiums - actual payment obligation may be greater. Estimated closing costs of $6,476. Offer based on credit approval. Additional terms and rates are available. Property insurance required. Consult a tax advisor regarding deductibility of interest.

Northfield Main Office 1605 Heritage Dr. Northfield Downtown 618 Division Street S.

507-645-4441

www.community-resourcebank.com May 2014

Also located in Cannon Falls and Roseville

Check us out online at www.entertainmentguidemn.com

Member FDIC

15


Theater: Time Stands Still • 2pm

HAPPENINGS Saturday, May 3, continued Bagels & Birds • 9:30-10:30am

River Bend Nature Center, Faribault Join a naturalist in the comfort of the building to observe bird (and other) visitors to the backyard habitat feeding area. Enjoy coffee and bagels in a relaxed atmosphere while watching the antics of wildlife.

Little Theatre of Owatonna See theater page.

St. Olaf Band • 3:30pm

Boe Chapel, St. Olaf, Northfield Conducted by Timothy Mahr. Women in Music: Someone Will ­ Remember Us • 4pm

Grand Re-Opening • 11am-6pm

Cocoa Bean Toys & Sweets, Northfield Your neighborhood sweet shop is getting a whole new look, featuring fine Minnesota-made chocolates, nostalgic candies and classic toys for today’s kids. Be among the first to check out this one-stop shop for the child in your life – and in your heart. Look for Melissa and Doug, Schleich, Ravensburger, Manhattan Toys and more. Kickoff to May Bike Month • 11am-5pm

Cannon River Winery, Cannon Falls May is National Bike Month, and the winery is hosting a kickoff event. All Cannon Valley Trail pass holders will receive $1 off a glass of wine throughout the day. There will be complimentary healthy snacks and pitchers of water available, plus live music from Joel Kachel (1-4pm) and treVeld (5-8pm). Kachel is an original singer/ songwriter and child of the new acoustic pop rock wave with an engaging stage presence and lively music. This high-energy acoustic guitar player will be sure to have you off your seat and wanting more. treVeld is a group of string musicians who produce a rare quality of acoustic music that blends gypsy, swing, old time, Celtic, bluegrass, blues, chamber and Nordic roots and appeal to all ages.

.

BEST BURGER DEAL IN TOWN

Pelon

The Arts & Heritage Center of Montgomery Lauren Pelon sings and plays 25 ancient and modern instruments in celebration of music by and for women. Free will donation.

Fifth Annual Big Hats & Big Hearts Auction for the Arts and Kentucky Derby Party • 4-7pm

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault An afternoon of food, fashion, friends and fun to help raise funds for future arts and education programming at the Paradise. Take part in silent and live auctions and watch the greatest two minutes in sports. Enjoy all the festivities of the Kentucky Derby. Tickets: $17 members, $22 nonmembers. Call 507/332-7372 Tuesday-Saturday, noon-5pm, Thursdays until 8. Tuition Daddies • 5-7pm

The Contented Cow, Northfield Spring Brewfest • 7-10pm

Owatonna Arts Center Numerous vendors including Schell’s, Third Street and the Cheese Cave will present their best brews and bites to delight your tastebuds. $15 members, $20 nonmembers. Tickets at OAC, Kottke’s or the door.

Congrats to the class of 2014 We can design and print your personalized graduation banner

Choose from 7 quarter-pound flame broiled hamburgers. Includes large fries and soft drink.

$6.17 plus tax

We recycle CLEAN packing peanuts, air bags and bubble wrap.

You can’t get more local 116 3rd Street West • 645-7886

16 info@entertainmentguidemn.com

© The Entertainment Guide


Rock ‘N’ Roll Revival • 7pm

Northfield Senior Center Put on your bobby socks to dance to music of the ’50s and ’60s at this 2014 Northfield Senior Center Fund Drive Kick Off. Craig Wasner on keyboards, Lori Williams on saxophone and Nick Weaver on fiddle. Tickets $10 and available at northfieldseniorcenter.org, at the Senior Center front desk or at the door.

A co ac ad

Companydance Spring Concert 7:30pm

Kelsey Theater, St. Olaf, Northfield A spring celebration of dance created by faculty, students and guest artists. Tickets: $8 general public, free for faculty/staff/ St. Olaf students and available at 507/7868987. Also May 1-2.

•A h

Peter Mayer • 7:30pm

Crossings at Carnegie, Zumbrota With breathtaking guitar work and intelligent lyrics to match, Mayer delivers richly layered songs about interconnectedness and the human journey. Tickets: $20 advance/$22 day of show and available at crossingsatcarnegie.com or 507/732-7616.

A senior housing cooperative for active independent adults providing:

• All the tax advantages of traditional home ownership

Join us FoR the event CenteR

GRand openinG May 31!

• Secured A senior housing cooperative for equity active, independent adults.

CeNTer

AT CANNoN river WiNery

growth

Vineyard Tours & Picnics start in June

• Summer HourS • Monday - Thursday 11-7 Friday - Saturday 11-9 Sunday 11-6* * Yes, you may purchase wine on Sunday

cannonriverwinery.com

May 2014

•F

Affordable • Tax Advantaged • Secure • Maintenance Free

EVENT

507-263-7400

•S

• Affordable home ownership

Enjoy Free Live Music Every Saturday & Sunday

The

•A a t o

• Freedom OPEN HOUSE

Kildahl Park Pointe

from – 888 Ca Saturday, May 17 • 11am-2pm maintenance Refreshments & Tours of Occupied Units 507-650-7100 – www.kildahlpa

Kildahl Park Pointe

– 888 Cannon Valley Dr. 507-650-7100 – www.kildahlparkpointe.com

Check us out online at www.entertainmentguidemn.com

17


HAPPENINGS Saturday, May 3, continued Theater: Mom! A New Musical • 7:30pm

Ames Center, Burnsville See theater page. Sasha Mercedes • 8pm

The Tavern Lounge, Northfield A feisty folk-rocker that draws you in with her compelling and powerful vocal stylings. Lyrical, genre-bending, thought-provoking, inspiring, catchy, easy to relate to and easy to listen to. Her new album, Lucky, is wowing audiences and critics alike and has been featured on KYMN Radio’s All-Wheel Drive. Find her at sashamercedes.com. STAGECOACH • 9pm

Red Fox Tavern, Lakeville SUNDAY, MAY 4 D’Sievers • 1-4pm

Cannon River Winery, Cannon Falls A group of musicians from Rochester and surrounding Southeast Minnesota communities. The core sextet consists of Steve Sawyer (bass), Eric Straubmuller (piano), Lee Krueger (drums), John Sievers (trombone), Curt Shellum (trumpet) and Dick Rohrbaugh (saxophone). Together they play a variety of music with a focus on improvisation. Exhibit Opening Reception: Christina Spencer: “Creatively Nesting” • 1-4pm

Owatonna Arts Center See exhibits page.

WANTED

Register today! 8th Annual NRC

Golf Classic

CRAFTSMEN • ARTISTS • MUSICIANS • GARDENERS FARMERS • HOME-BASED BUSINESSES for The NEW

Montgomery Meander

Four Third Thursdays • 4-8pm June 19, July 17, Aug. 21, Sept. 13 contact Maureen, 507-364-8039 montgomerymeander@yahoo.com sponsored by:

The Arts & Heritage Center of Montgomery

Booths along 1st Street, Montgomery BYO tables and tents Commit to one event or all four Reserve your space today

Monday, June 2, 2014

Call 507-645-9511 or visit northfieldretirement.org for details.

18 info@entertainmentguidemn.com

© The Entertainment Guide


Faculty Recital: Timothy Bradley, Horn • 2pm

Urness Recital Hall, St. Olaf, Northfield Theater: Mom! A New Musical • 2pm

Ames Center, Burnsville See theater page.

Concert: Jazz II and III • 4:30pm

Lion’s Pause, St. Olaf, Northfield Guest conductor Phil Hey.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 7 Traditional Irish Music Session • 7-9pm

Corner Room, Rueb ‘n’ Stein, Northfield A gathering of musicians and listeners in a relaxed, informal setting. Along with the music enjoy conversation, camaraderie and perhaps even a few Irish dance steps. Chance Meetings • 7:30-10pm

St. Olaf Choir • 7:30pm

Boe Chapel, St. Olaf, Northfield Conducted by guest conductor, Mark Stover. MONDAY, MAY 5

The Contented Cow, Northfield John Hiscox, Neil Rowley, Gail Moll and Rob Lampe play a mixed genre of music which is not half-bad and a lot of fun. THURSDAY, MAY 8 Ronny Cox • 7pm

Theater: Mom! A New Musical • 7:30pm

Ames Center, Burnsville See theater page.

Northern Roots Session • 7:30-9pm

The Contented Cow, Northfield An informal weekly gathering of musicians to play acoustic music with roots in the north, particularly the Nordic countries. Participants and listeners of all ages and levels of experience are welcome. TUESDAY, MAY 6 Acoustic Jam Session • 7:30-10pm

The Contented Cow, Northfield Every Tuesday night show up with your unplugged instrument of choice and jam – or just show up and listen.

Crossings at Carnegie, Zumbrota He was the corporate snake in RoboCop and Total Recall, but Ronny Cox has also made a name for himself as a performer of an eclectic mix of acoustic music, and he’ll bring folk, western and jazz/blues to life. Cox will play guitar and sing. Joining him Photo by Dick Lowry will be Radoslav Lorkovic on accordion, keyboards and vocals and T Bruce Bowers on fiddle and mandolin. Tickets: $20 advance/$23 day of show and available at crossingsatcarnegie.com or 507/732-7616. Theater: Peter Pan or The Boy Who Would Not Grow Up 7pm

Arcadia Charter School, Northfield See theater page.

HAVE A CAKE DECORATED FOR YOUR MOM OR YOUR GRADUATE!

We Carry GLUTEN FREE Products

$1.00 OFF

any frozen dough item. GRADUATION CAKE DECORATIONS

School color sprinkles, mortarboard decorations, cupcake flags and more.

GRADUATION PREPARATION

Food for a crowd: cookies, pastries, breadsticks, quiche and more.

Limit 1 item per coupon. Not valid with any sale items. Not valid with any other offers. One coupon per customer. Expires 6-30-14

CASE DISCOUNTS AVAILABLE 507-645-2253 • www.gootersdoughtogo.com 200 Schilling Dr • Northfield/Dundas, MN Hours: Sun-Wed 10am-7pm, Thu-Sat 10am-8pm

May 2014

Check us out online at www.entertainmentguidemn.com

19


HAPPENINGS Thursday, May 8, continued Theater: Mom! A New Musical • 7:30pm

Ames Center, Burnsville See theater page.

Theater: Cocktails with Mimi • 7:30pm

Northfield High School Auditorium See theater page.

First Year Project/Open Stage • 4pm

Wagner/Bundgaard Studio One, Dittmann Center, St. Olaf, Northfield First Year Project dancers perform pieces that have been created by and with faculty during the year. Genres include modern, improvisation, ballet and international. Open Stage presents dance worksin-progress and newly completed pieces. Bill McGrath • 5-7pm

The Contented Cow, Northfield

Mark Mraz • 8pm

The Tavern Lounge, Northfield Everybody’s favorite piano man tickles the ivories and performs favorite sing-along songs, golden oldies and classic covers from the pop music archives.

Sitar and Tabla • 7pm

Wesley Church & the Fabulous Vanguards • 8-11pm

Northfield Arts Guild Theater See theater page.

Concert Hall, Carleton, Northfield Sitar by Shujaat Khan, Tabla by Samir Chatterjee. Theater: Fourth Annual Latino Play Festival • 7pm

The Contented Cow, Northfield Country music.

Shujaat Khan

Theater: Peter Pan or The Boy Who Would Not Grow Up • 7pm

FRIDAY, MAY 9 Girls Nite Out • 4-9pm, and into the night

Downtown Northfield Gather your girlfriends for a fun night of shopping, giveaways, hors d’oeuvres and refreshments at downtown shops, boutiques, restaurants and pubs. See advertised GNO specials on pages 7-9.

Arcadia Charter School, Northfield See theater page.

Theater: Beauty & the Beast • 7pm

Ames Center, Burnsville See theater page.

Theater: Love Potion #10: The Musical • 7:30pm

Lakeville Area Arts Center See theater page.

WALK FOR THE ANIMALS Saturday, May 10, 8:30am-12:00pm

FOR DAILY SPECIALS

Riverbend Nature Center • Faribault, MN

Refreshments! T-shirts! Treat Bags for Dogs! Prizes for top fundraising walkers! Walk with a pet or without! More information and pledge sheets will be on our website prairiesedgehs.org For more info or to have a pledge form mailed to you, call

507-334-7117

Prairie’s Edge

Humane Society Prairiesedgehs.org 507-334-7117

20 info@entertainmentguidemn.com

LIVE MUSIC FRIDAYS 9pm-12am May 2

Tim Howe

May 9

Dave Hudson

May 16

Chad Edwards

May 23 Trent Shaw May 30 Room for Gray RESERVE THE BACK ROOM FOR YOUR MEETING OR PARTY

11 CRAFT BEERS ROTATING SELECTION

Hoppy Hour

BOGOS 3-Midnight

&All Day Sundays

TRY OUR NEW MENU!

FROGGY'S LUNCH PUNCH CARD

After 9 punches, your 10th lunch is FREE! Mon Closed • Tue-Wed 11am-10pm, Thu- Sat 11-1am, Sun 11-9pm Kitchen until 10pm • 307 S Water St, Northfield • 507-301-3611

© The Entertainment Guide


Thu, May 29th 5 - 10 pm Bridge Square FAB FOOD TASTINGS from LOCAL RESTAURANTS BEER & WINE GARDENS BANK RAID REENACTMENT LIVE LOCAL MUSIC & TALENT SHOW

FUN FOR ALL AGES! May 2014

Check us out online at www.entertainmentguidemn.com

21


HAPPENINGS Friday, May 9, continued Theater: The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee 7:30pm

Urness Recital Hall, St. Olaf, Northfield See theater page.

Theater: Cocktails with Mimi • 7:30pm

Northfield High School Auditorium See theater page.

Theater: Mom! A New Musical • 7:30pm

Ames Center, Burnsville See theater page.

Stone Soup • 8-11pm

The Contented Cow, Northfield A hearty broth of rock and blues from a time when it hit you in the chest and lifted you straight up. Breathe the air, stir the pot, share the wine and start feeling fine. Lost Highway • 9pm

Carbone’s, Lakeville One of the Upper Midwest’s top country bands, Lost Highway’s commitment to country music and electrifying crowds is evident every time they hit the state. Dave Hudson • 9pm-12am

Theater: Steel Magnolias • 7:30pm

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault See theater page. Lorie Line “An Intimate Evening” • 7:30pm

Crossings at Carnegie, Zumbrota Famed Minnesota musical talent Lorie Line returns to Zumbrota as part of her 2014 Intimate Evening Series. This spring she’s bringing her young, hip and cool “Fab Five” with her to share music celebrating her quarter-century as a touring musician. Tickets: $39 and available at crossingsatcarnegie.com or 507/732-7616. Andy Tackett • 8pm

The Tavern Lounge, Northfield Playing popular cover songs from many genres, Tackett is sure to hit your nostalgia button. Expect everything from the Little River Band, England Dan and John Ford Coley to Johnny Cash and Glen Campbell.

Froggy Bottoms, Northfield After cutting his teeth with various college bands and acoustic duos, Dave Hudson made his way through the Minneapolis music scene by writing and singing his own blend of melodic acoustic-rock music. His style has been compared to the likes of the Gin Blossoms, U2 and the Counting Crows. His self-styled mix of cover songs ranging from the ’80s, ’90s and today, blended with his own recorded and nationallyreleased music, is what has kept crowds coming back for more. Younger Brother • 9:30pm-close

Babe’s Music Bar, Lakeville Gabe Elmhorst (lead vocal, rhythm, harmonica, tambourine – influences: AC/DC to Theory of a Deadman), Mike Carlson (guitar – influences: Madonna to Dream Theater), Steve Hurinenko and Jason Wilkerson (bass, piano – influences: Cash to Zeppelin).

Give Your Home A Fresh Look For Spring 4 GREAT OFFERS, USE 1 OR USE THEM ALL

1 20% OFF 2 er Your Entire Ord

FREE

Cordless Lift on Graber and Kathy Ireland Brands

3 FREE LINING With Draperies

Order

4 FREE INSTALLATION On Your Entire Order

WE BRING THE SHOWROOM TO YOU

952-895-0618 www.cdabbyme.com

All offers end 5/31/14 - CALL TODAY! Offers may not be combined with any past offers or sales, call for complete details.

22 info@entertainmentguidemn.com

Our company is well below Big Box Store pricing and internet pricing. Includes FREE Installation and the same unbeatable Lifetime Warranty.

© The Entertainment Guide


Hicktown Mafia • 10pm

The Club, Faribault A five-piece, Southern Minnesota-based country and rock party band playing hits from the ’70s to the ’90s, from Johnny Cash to AC/DC. Hicktown Mafia is Rob Donner (lead vocals, lead and rhythm guitar), Jason Rasmussen (bass guitar), Jody Sommervold (lead guitar), Scott Russell (drums, percussion, vocals) and Mike Solma (drums, percussion). Additional members sometimes include Greg Murphy and Mark Janning (keyboards and vocals).

Theater: Beauty & the Beast • 2pm and 7pm

Ames Center, Burnsville See theater page.

Theater: Peter Pan or The Boy Who Would Not Grow Up • 2pm

Arcadia Charter School, Northfield See theater page.

Theater: The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee • 2 and 7:30pm

Urness Recital Hall, St. Olaf, Northfield See theater page.

Ashes for April • 5-8pm

Cannon River Winery, Cannon Falls Four guys, six acoustic instruments and retro pop songs. Includes Lincoln Ashbury (acoustic guitar, mandolin, vocals), Chubby Ashton (upright bass, vocals), Rocco C’Ash (drums, percussion) and Mickey Mash (acoustic guitar, banjo, vocals). Reception & Poetry Reading: 13th ­Annual Poet-Artist Collaboration 6:30pm

Crossings at Carnegie, Zumbrota See exhibits page.

SATURDAY, MAY 10 Rice County Historical Society Flea Market • 8am-2pm

Rice County Historical Society, Faribault Walk for the Animals • 8:30am-12pm

Riverbend Nature Center, Faribault Prizes for the top fundraiser walkers, refreshments, T-shirts, treat bags for the dogs. For info, a brochure and/or a pledge form, go to prairiesedgehs.org or call 507/334-7117. Martial Arts Festival • 10am-12pm

Northfield Middle School Gymnasium Five main disciplines will be demonstrated: Kyudo, Karate, Tai chi ch’uan, Tae Kwan Do and Gumdo. Visit information booths and enjoy live music. Free. Girls’ Day Away • 10am-5pm

Cannon River Winery, Cannon Falls Bring your friends, sisters, moms, aunts, neighbors and grannies. Local vendors of handcrafted jewelry, clay pots, artisan soaps, clothing and more will have items for sale. There will also be food samples and live music from Robert Meany (1-4pm) and Ashes for April (5-8pm). Meany is an Robert Meany award-winning singer-songwriter and pianist from Bloomington, best known as the singer/ Ashes for April keyboardist for the pop-rock group Terramara. He is also a versatile solo artist performing both original and popular songs in the styles of Elton John, Billy Joel, Ben Folds and Harry Connick Jr. See Ashes for April’s listing at 5-8pm.

May 2014

NOW! E L A S S ON Y 31

TICKETTHROUGH MA able at $50

A C OMMUNITY CE LE BRATIO N TO ENDOW THE FUNDING OF THE A N N U A L 4 TH O F J U L Y F I R E W O R K S DANCING • BIG BAND • LIVE & SILENT AUCTION

avail E 1 on, KYMN Radio, N U J 5 $6 rg, s55057.o and firework rthfield News hics o N rap eans G M ll A y B

6:30pm AT THE WEITZ CENTER, 320 EAST THIRD STREET

SAT. JUNE 28, 2014 MUSIC BY THE BEND IN THE RIVER BIG BAND • BLACK TIE OPTIONAL Sponsors: BY ALL MEANS GRAPHICS, THE ARCHER HOUSE, ECO TRANS, KYMN & THE NORTHFIELD NEWS D E T A I L S & T I C K E T I N F O R M A T I O N : f i r e w o r k s 5 5 0 5 7. o r g

Check us out online at www.entertainmentguidemn.com

23


Theater: Fourth Annual Latino Play Festival • 7pm

HAPPENINGS

Saturday, May 10, continued Cannon Valley Regional Orchestra: Vive La France • 7pm

First UCC Church, Northfield Featuring mezzo soprano soloist Deesa Staats and the Northfield Harp Ensemble. $10 adults, $6 students. Also May 11 in Cannon Falls.

Northfield Arts Guild Theater See theater page.

Theater: Steel Magnolias 7:30pm

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault See theater page. Theater: Cocktails with Mimi • 7:30pm

e

No w ne

Northfield High School Auditorium See theater page.

rthfeld

ot sp

cocoa bean to ys

s t e & swe

GRAND Re-OPENING Cocoa Bean Toys and Sweets Saturday May 3, 2014 Your neighborhood sweet shop is getting a whole new look. Featuring fine Minnesota-made chocolates, nostalgic candies and classic toys for today’s kids, we’re the one-stop shop for the child in your life – and in your heart. Look for Melissa and Doug, Schleich, Ravensburger, Manhattan Toys and more!

24 info@entertainmentguidemn.com

Ames Center, Burnsville See theater page. Why Not • 8pm

The Tavern Lounge, Northfield Why Not features local favorites Ray Coudret and Carey Langer. They cover hits from the ’50s to today and get everyone in the audience tapping their toes. With their tenacious ability to string songs together, they’re often referred to as a “human jukebox.” Why Not brings great vocals and instrumentation – and a whole lot of fun – to every performance. Bonnie & the Clydes • 8-10:30pm

sw

t ee

aw ho l

Coming soon

Theater: Mom! A New Musical 7:30pm

The Contented Cow, Northfield Take a step back and resurrect songs of love, peace and flower power from the late ’60s and early ’70s. The Bonnie is Bonnie Jean Flom. The Clydes are Bill McGrath and Scott McMillan.

Church of Cash • 8:30pm-close

Reggie’s Brewhouse, Owatonna Perhaps the Midwest’s best Johnny Cash tribute band performing a multitude of hits spanning Johnny’s entire career. The Church of Cash is: Jayder (vox/guitar), J. “Shorty” TeBeest (electric guitar/vox), Crista “Lonesome Fiddle” (fiddle/vox), “Pistol Pete” Boulger (drums) and “Diamond Dan” Arlig (double bass). SUNDAY, MAY 11 Tony Williams • 1-4pm

Cannon River Winery, Cannon Falls Williams’ solo performance features a variety of classical, flamenco and jazz originals as well as some Americana/classic cover songs. During the summer of 2011 he was voted the winner of KARE 11’s “The Voice: Minnesota” contest. Theater: Mom! A New Musical • 2pm

Ames Center, Burnsville See theater page.

© The Entertainment Guide


Theater: Beauty & the Beast • 2pm

Cannon Valley Regional Orchestra: Vive La France • 7pm

Ames Center, Burnsville See theater page.

St. Ansgar, Cannon Falls Featuring mezzo soprano soloist Deesa Staats and the Northfield Harp Ensemble. $10 adults, $6 students. Also May 10 in Northfield.

Theater: Steel Magnolias • 2pm

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault See theater page.

MONDAY, MAY 12 Truck and Tractor Night • 6:15-7:30pm

Kim Bloom • 2pm

Owatonna Arts Center Classical guitarist Kim Bloom brings his music to the OAC for Mother’s Day. Bloom has a degree in classical guitar performance from the San Francisco Conservatory of Music and has taught all over the country, including at Owatonna’s Tone Music. Tickets: $5 18 and under, $10 adults and available at OAC, Kottke’s or the door. Carleton Symphony Band • 3pm

Concert Hall, Carleton, Northfield

Northfield Community Resource Center parking lot Everyone is invited to this annual event where big and little people alike can enjoy exploring different vehicles and heavy equipment like fire trucks, police cars, tractors, a race car and more. Rain reschedule date: May 15. Free. Northern Roots Session • 7:30-9pm

The Contented Cow, Northfield An informal weekly gathering of musicians to play acoustic music with roots in the north, particularly the Nordic countries. Participants and listeners of all ages and levels of experience are welcome. TUESDAY, MAY 13

St. Olaf Orchestra • 3:30pm

Boe Chapel, St. Olaf, Northfield With senior soloists. Conducted by Steven Amundson.

Jensen and Bugge • 7-9

The Contented Cow, Northfield This Danish folkmusic duo returns for another night of great Nordic traditional and roots music. Both Mette Kathrine Jensen (accordion) and Kristian Bugge (fiddle) have won coveted Danish Music Award Folk prizes (the Danish Grammy).

1st Communion • Confirmation • Mother’s/ Father’s Day • Graduation • Memorial Day

Celebrate your special occasion with a beautiful Quality Bakery cake

Weddings, Parties, Events, Funerals Experienced and Versatile Large Repertoire In Any Style: Classical, Pop, Jazz, Religious and More

pies • cookies buns • dinner rolls

Since 1949 • 410 Division St • Northfield, MN • 507-645-8392

Check out our new sandwiches, appetizers, wines and AMAZING KALE SALAD!

ace in l p g n i t e e m t s e t Grea ... d l e i f h t r o N n w downto

Portable Equipment Available Reasonable Rates musicmanmiller@charter.net 507-301-3316 • Northfield, MN Voted Best Take-Out two years in a row by the Entertainment Guide readers!

Let’s enjoy some fresh, individually prepared, delicious Peking & Szechuan cuisine at

...for coffee, wine, food and fellowship

Bringing a touch of the Orient to downtown Northfield since 1981

May 2014

Welcome Spring!

107 East 4th St. • Northfield • 645-7101 MandarinGardenNorthfield.com

Check us out online at www.entertainmentguidemn.com

25


Advanced Choreography Showing • 7pm

WEDNESDAY, MAY 14 Break of Reality • 7pm

Ames Center, Burnsville A cello rock band formed at the Eastman School of Music in 2003. Their sound is cinematic, subdued and heavy all at once, and their live audiences are equally diverse; fans of Led Zeppelin, Radiohead and Yo-Yo Ma are finally getting acquainted. Most recently they’ve posted a video covering the theme to the television show Game of Thrones, which has had more than 1 million hits to date. Tickets: $25 adults, $10 students and available at ticketmaster.com or 800/982-2787. Traditional Irish Music Session • 7-9pm

Corner Room, Rueb ‘n’ Stein, Northfield A gathering of musicians and listeners in a relaxed, informal setting. Along with the music enjoy conversation, camaraderie and perhaps even a few Irish dance steps. THURSDAY, MAY 15 unWINEd Night • 3-7pm

Spare Room Underground Shop, Northfield Sip, visit and shop to kick-off the once-a-month weekend sale event.

Wagner/Bundgaard Studio One, Dittmann Center, St. Olaf, Northfield Final showing of choreographic works by the Advanced Choreography class. Gypsy Jazz Jam Series: Robert Bell 7-9pm

Northfield Eagles Club Join featured musician Robert Bell for the third session of this series. Open to all instruments and abilities, come to jam or just to listen. Bell is founder of the Twin Cities Hot Club, a member of the renowned Cafe Accordion Orchestra and has been a featured soloist with the Fort Worth Symphony. Wine Club • 7-9pm

The Grand Event Center, Northfield Find just the right wines in time for the BBQ season – free and open to the public. Theater: Steel Magnolias • 7:30pm

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault See theater page.

Taste of Lakeville • 5-9pm

Lakeville Area Arts Center Enjoy live entertainment, select wine and beer tastings, food samplings from local restaurants and caterers and live and silent auctions. Proceeds benefit the Lakeville Rotary Foundation, which supports community projects and student scholarships. $35 advance, $45 at the door and available at tasteoflakeville.org.

Several prime spots left for the 2014 camping season. We ONLY do seasonal camping!

Shady Acres Resort of LeCenter

Experience the solitude of Minnesota’s beautiful outdoors and great fishing on Clear Lake, just a short drive from Mankato and St. Peter areas.

GREAT FOOD & SERVICE Lake Front Bar & Grill right next door

NEW FACILITIES! • Oversized lots with cement driveways • No cost for visitors most weekends • Refer-a-friend program • 50 & 30 amp service • Lawn maintenance • Pets allowed

CANNON VALLEY REGIONAL ORCHESTRA

Vive La France! Saturday, May 10- Northfield Sunday, May 11- Cannon Falls Season Sponsor: Community Resource Bank

GALLERY Northfield High School Honors Art Class Opening Reception May 16, 7-9 pm Auxiliary Galleries: A+ Art Club

SPRING DANCE CONCERT Saturday, May 17, 3:00 Northfield High School Auditorium 1400 Division Street South

Winjum’s Shady Acres Resort

35032 Clear Lake Ln., Le Center • 507-334-6661

www.winjumsshadyacres.com

26 info@entertainmentguidemn.com

northfieldartsguild.org

northfieldartsguild.org

507.645.8877

507.645.8877

© The Entertainment Guide


Rob Meany • 8pm

The Tavern Lounge, Northfield An award-winning singer-songwriter and pianist from Bloomington. Meany is best known as the singer/keyboardist for the poprock group Terramara. He is also a versatile solo artist performing both original and popular songs in the styles of Elton John, Billy Joel, Ben Folds and Harry Connick Jr. Wesley Church & the Fabulous Vanguards • 8-11pm

The Contented Cow, Northfield Country music. FRIDAY, MAY 16

Theater: Fourth Annual Latino Play Festival • 7pm

Northfield Arts Guild Theater See theater page.

The Tavern Lounge, Northfield Called “the best kept secret” by numerous well-known and respected names in the music industry, Valdez is a singer/songwriter and guitarist who pays tribute to classic rock and blues with his own signature brand of sass. Based in St. Paul (by way of Santa Fe, New Mexico), Valdez is a mainstay on the Twin Cities live music scene. Valdez frequently collaborates with Nick Hensley of the musical collaborative Love Songs for Angry Men. More at kenvaldez.com. East Meets West: Carleton Singers and Chinese Ensemble 8pm

Concert Hall, Carleton, Northfield

Exhibit Opening Reception: Northfield High School Honors Show • 7-9pm

Northfield Arts Guild See theater page.

Chad Edwards • 9pm-12am

Froggy Bottoms, Northfield Solo acoustic artist. Rhino • 9:30pm-close

Theater: Steel Magnolias • 7:30pm Honors show are by Amelia Kimmes Kneser

Ken Valdez • 8pm

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault See theater page.

Babe’s Music Bar, Lakeville A high-energy Twin Cities band playing a wide variety of modern, alternative, ’80s and classic rock with twists of country and other surprises splashed in.

SOUTH METRO

A caring and knowledgeable Realtor Cell: 507-244-0500 Phone: 507-663-1234 ext. 219 janstevens@realtor.com jstevens.cbsouthmetro.com

Realtor & Certified Residential Specialist

Sunday May 11 • 3pm Carleton Symphony Band Friday May 16 • 8pm East meets West: Carleton Singers and Chinese Ensemble

Sunday May 18 • 3pm Jazz Band Friday, May 23 • 8pm Carleton Choir Concert Friday, May 30 • 8pm Carleton Orchestra

All events at Concert Hall

$5.00 TACO SALAD

apps.carleton.edu/curricular/musc/events

May 2014

Saturday Nights

ONEs 29 toformidnight

Jukebox

Friday May 9 • 7pm Shujaat Khan (Sitar) and Samir Chatterjee (Tabla)

FREE

Concert Series and Events

Downtown Dundas 507-645-8987

Twins Game Beer Bucket Special

Townie Tuesday Tacos 2 for $3.99 Taco Salad $5.50 Beer Bucket 5 for $10

Check us out online at www.entertainmentguidemn.com

27


Northfield Arts Guild 2014 Spring Dance Concert • 3pm

HAPPENINGS Friday, May 16, continued

Northfield High School This performance will feature dances from all classes, including Creative Ballet, Ballet, Modern, Tap, Mexican Folklórico and the Dance Theater Company. Tickets: $10 adults, $6 students, children five and under are free – northfieldartsguild.org or 507/645-8877.

Tripwire • 10pm

The Club, Faribault Four multi-talented musicians who play every genre you could imagine with a “Tripwire twist.” SATURDAY, MAY 17 Northfield Garden Club and Bake Sale • 8am-12pm

Bridge Square, Northfield Kick off your spring projects with local plantings – and delicious baked goods from the Northfield Garden Club. Wake-Robin • 12-1pm

Bittersweet, Northfield Wake Robin is John Hanson and Brad Easterson, who play a range of traditional folk music, Celtic to American roots, featuring banjo, guitar and fiddle.

Family Art Event • 3-4:30pm

Owatonna Arts Center Create flower art as a family. $5/family OAC members, $8/family nonmembers. Maddie Hargis • 5-6pm

The Contented Cow, Northfield Erin & Madison • 6-7pm

The Contented Cow, ­Northfield

Fourth Annual Cannon Falls Veterans Memorial Benefit 12-5pm

Cannon River Winery, Cannon Falls There will be a silent auction with proceeds going to the Cannon Falls Veterans Memorial Fund, T-shirts for purchase and memorabilia to observe. One dollar from every glass of wine, tasting or flight sold goes directly back to the Cannon Falls Veterans Memorial Fund. Andrew Walesch • 1-4pm

Cannon River Winery, Cannon Falls Blues and jazz by “the boy with the voice.” A great variety of classics and originals.

Theater: Fourth Annual Latino Play Festival • 7pm

Latino Play Festival

Northfield Arts Guild Theater See theater page.

Theater: Steel Magnolias • 7:30pm

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault See theater page.

ultra premium extra virgin olive oil The highest standard for Extra Virgin Olive Oil in the world

Olive Oils & Balsamic Vinegars starting at $6

Freshest Extra Virgin Olive Oil from around the world Fused and Infused Olive Oils – the perfect flavor aesthetic Authentic Traditional Style Balsamic Vinegar made in Modena, Italy

Northfield Olive Oils & Vinegars

18 Bridge Square | Northfield MN (507) 645-4008 | www.northfieldoliveoilsandvinegars.com

28 info@entertainmentguidemn.com

© The Entertainment Guide


Long Time Gone Bluegrass Band 7:30-11:30pm

Signature Bar and Grill, Faribault Hot licks and that high lonesome sound. No cover. Lehto and Wright • 8pm

The Tavern Lounge, Northfield John Wright and Steve Lehto are a Celtic/American/English folk and progressive rock duo from Minneapolis. The two have released numerous CDs on the New Folk Records label to widespread critical acclaim. More at lehtoandwright.com. “Runnin’ Down a Dream:” A Rockumentary Tribute to Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers • 8pm

Crossings at Carnegie, Zumbrota With hits like American Girl and Learning to Fly, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers were on the forefront of the heartland rock movement in the late 1970s and ’80s. Hear their biggest hits accompanied by film and news clips at a rockumentary tribute by Justin Ploof and the Throwbacks. Tickets: $20 advance/$25 day of show and available at crossingsatcarnegie.com or 507/732-7616.

ing in Specializ ndly ie r Earth-f nd s plant a . products

Optimum Trajectory • 8-10pm

The Contented Cow, Northfield A jazz quintet based in the Twin Cities. Their repertoire spans jazz classics from the ’30s to the ’50s and contemporary jazz and originals. Band members include Ira Adelman (alto and tenor saxophones), Garth Anderson (drums), Jeff Gurney (acoustic and electric bass), Steve Hillson (trumpet and flugelhorn) and Tim McNamara (guitar). More at optimum-trajectory-jazz.com. Headband Jam • 8:30pm-close

Reggie’s Brewhouse, Owatonna SUNDAY, MAY 18

Coffee Concert No. 4: Vecchione/ Erdahl Duo and Maria Jette • 2pm

Lakeville Area Arts Center Maria Jette, soprano, returns with vibrant vocals along with Carrie Vecchione, oboe, and Rolf Erdahl, bass. Featuring music from Baroque to Grieg to jazz. Tickets: $15 adults, $12 seniors and students and available at lakevilleareaartscenter.com or by calling 952/985-4640.

I’m ready to help you find your home in the Cannon Valley.

Cannon Falls

earth • conscious • organics Northfield’s Neighborhood Garden Store Open 7 Days a Week! 600 Division St. • Northfield

507-645-7078

Jim Althoff

Experienced • Professional

119 N 4th • Cannon Falls 507-263-5665 • jima.pru@gmail.com

620 South  Water  Street     Northfield,  MN  55057               507-­‐645-­‐2300  

Voted Best Pizza

By Minneapolis/S

t. Paul Magazine

  2 for 1 Drinks Everyday   50¢ Taco Tuesday from 11-7 & 10-12   Kids Eat Free Every Tuesday   18 Tap Beer Selections With Paid Adult Entree   $7.99 All You Can Eat   50¢ Unlimited Wing Lunch Buffet M-F 11-2 Wednesday   Half Price Apps M-F 3-7   15 HD TVs   We have the NFL Sunday Ticket & NHL Center Ice Watch all the games here!

www.CarbonesNorthfield.com May 2014

Check us out online at www.entertainmentguidemn.com

29


HAPPENINGS

Sunday, May 18, continued

Fresh.

MN Winery Stories Book Launch, Signing and Book Orders • 2-3:30pm

Local. Co-op.

Cannon River Winery, Cannon Falls With authors Dick Osgood and Diane Lynch. Live music from The Average Janes (see below). The Average Janes • 2-5pm

Cannon River Winery, Cannon Falls Music from the ’70s, ’80s and today. A little country without the twang. Jazz Band • 3pm

Concert Hall, Carleton, Northfield

WEDNESDAY, MAY 21 Traditional Irish Music Session 7-9pm

Corner Room, Rueb ‘n’ Stein, Northfield A gathering of musicians and listeners in a relaxed, informal setting. Along with the music enjoy conversation, camaraderie and perhaps even a few Irish dance steps. THURSDAY, MAY 22 Theater: Hands in Action – MSAD & National Theater of the Deaf • 7pm

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault See theater page. Carey Langer • 8pm

The Tavern Lounge, Northfield A solo artist covering six decades and seven styles of music. From The Everly Brothers and Frank Sinatra, to Rick Springfield, Dave Matthews and Jimmy Eat World, plus original music. Wesley Church & the Fabulous Vanguards • 8-11pm

The Contented Cow, Northfield Country music. Northfield Troubadors with SISTER 3pm

Open 7 days per week 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.

Bethel Lutheran Church The senior men’s chorus will perform works from Ireland, Wales and Russia as well as spirituals and patriotic songs along with selected solos and ensembles. Special guest appearance by S­ ISTER, the dynamic and entertaining trio of three sisters with close harmony and rollicking humor with a Scandinavian flavor. Free will offering. MONDAY, MAY 19 Northern Roots Session • 7:30-9pm

The Contented Cow, Northfield An informal weekly gathering of musicians to play acoustic music with roots in the north, particularly the Nordic countries. Participants and listeners of all ages and levels of experience are welcome.

516 Water Street S. justfood.coop 507-650-0106 516 Water Street S · 507-650-0106

justfood.coop

Monday through Saturday 8 a.m.–9 p.m. and Sunday 10 a.m.–7 p.m.

Cooperatively Owned.

TUESDAY, MAY 20 Acoustic Jam Session • 7:30-10pm

The Contented Cow, Northfield Every Tuesday night show up with your unplugged instrument of choice and jam – or just show up and listen.

All are welcome! 30 info@entertainmentguidemn.com

FRIDAY, MAY 23 Carleton Jazz Piano Studio • 5-7pm

The Contented Cow, Northfield

Theater: See Our Signs – National Theater of the Deaf • 7pm

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault See theater page. Reception: Paintings by Ann Tristani and Laura Weimart • 6-8pm

Crossings at Carnegie, Zumbrota See exhibits page. St. Olaf Bands • 7:30-11:30pm

The Contented Cow, Northfield The Ultimate Tribute to Johnny Cash • 8pm

Crossings at Carnegie, Zumbrota Terry Lee Goffee does more than play the music or impersonate Johnny Cash. Like an actor in a play, he becomes his character from the moment he walks on stage until the end of the show, causing audiences and reviewers to rave. He plays the man so well that he was chosen to provide the moves for a Cash character on the Guitar Hero 5 game. He looks like Cash, he sounds like Cash, he moves like Cash. Nobody does Johnny Cash like Goffee. Tickets: $24 advance/$28 day of show and available at crossingsatcarnegie.com or 507/732-7616.

© The Entertainment Guide


RJ Blu • 8pm

The Tavern Lounge, Northfield Armed with a powerful voice, a blood-spattered acoustic guitar and the scarred fingers to match – RJ Blu is a Minnesotan born singer/songwriter with a vast book of music. He has performed across the nation, from the Great Lakes of the North to the swamplands of the South – all the way down to the sand and sun of the great state of Texas for a showcase at SWSX Music Festival in 2013. His “slap-n-pop-finger-rakin’ acoustic guitar is akin to the funky rhythmic stylings of Keller Williams and his passionate, gut-bucket vocals call back to a time when churches didn’t have microphones and singers sang to be heard.” A free mind and an open heart continue to propel his songwriting to new heights as he returns home to Minnesota to embrace family and do some fishin’. More at rjblu.com. Carleton Choir Concert • 8pm

Concert Hall, Carleton, Northfield

Chris Brooks • 10pm

The Club, Faribault Chris Brooks & The Silver City Boys are a premier Minnesotabased country rock band. This dynamic, high-energy six-piece group with great harmonies mixes Texas and “Red Dirt Country” with current radio hits and their spin on the classics to keep the dance floor packed. SATURDAY, MAY 24 Tap the Barrel • 12-5pm

Three Rivers Wine Trail This is the first of a two-day event. Each winery will provide samples from the cask to mark the beginning of another growing season and to remember the fruits of last year’s labor. Pick up a wine trail passport and get it stamped at each winery to get a free glass of wine and a logo wine glass. Free live music at Cannon River Winery by 6th Street Trio (1-4pm) and Relativity (5-8pm). 6th Street Trio plays smooth ’70s piano classics. See 5-8pm listing for info on Relativity. For more info on the wine trail, go to 3riverswinetrail.com. Relativity • 5-8pm

Trent Shaw • 9pm-12am

Froggy Bottoms, Northfield Union Junction Band • 9:30pm-close

Babe’s Music Bar, Lakeville Classic rock, R&B, country, blues and more. A band of many talents, fantastic voices, experienced musicians and great sound.

Cannon River Winery, Cannon Falls Voted one of the best bands in Northfield, Relativity is a duo that combines vocals, guitar, mandolin, harmonica and percussion to create a fun evening of music. They pack a request list of a couple hundred songs – from covers of current music like the Avett Brothers and the Lumineers, to classic and folk rock such as Fleetwood Mac and the Indigo Girls.

presents its final concerts of the season:

Vive la France

Saturday, May 10, 7pm St. John’s Hall 500 3rd St. W. Northfield

Sunday, May 11, 7pm St. Ansgar’s Lutheran Church 7459 Hwy 19 Blvd. Cannon Falls

Both concerts will feature mezzo soprano soloist Deesa Staats in an aria by Berlioz, Massenet and Offenbach Also featured is the Northfield Harp Ensemble playing in Debussy’s Petite Suite and the Cesár Franck D Minor Symphony Tickets at northfieldartsguild.org 507-645-8877 and the door.

Shoes, Clothing & Accessories for Men & Women

This activity is made possible by the voters of Minnesota through a grant from the Minnesota State Arts Board, thanks to a legEvent sponsor: Ferndale Market islative appropriation from Season sponsor: Community Resource Bank the arts and heritage fund.

401 Division Street • Northfield, MN 55057 645-4257 • www.rarepair.com May 2014

Check us out online at www.entertainmentguidemn.com

31


HAPPENINGS Saturday, May 24, continued Dylanfest • 5:30-11pm

The Contented Cow, Northfield Live music from Terry VanDeWalker (5:30-6:30pm), Luke Smith (6:30-7:30pm), Forest and the Rangers (7:30-8:30pm) and Marty Anderson & the Goods (9-11pm). Jivin’ Ivan and the Kings of Swing • 7:30-11:30pm

Signature Bar and Grill, Faribault Classic acoustic swing with hot licks, stellar vocals and dancing. Bernie King & the Guilty ­Pleasures • 8pm

The Tavern Lounge, ­Northfield This group returns in support of their fantastic sophomore release, Pretty Little Gal. A high-energy band that blends blues, rock and bluegrass into a sound that some have called “bluesgrass.” King’s songs tell tales of worn souls traveling through a landscape of sin and redemption. Live, the four-piece, acoustic group delivers its delightful tunes with a signature rhythmic swing. S&S Band • 8:30pm-close

Reggie’s Brewhouse, Owatonna SUNDAY, MAY 25 Exhibit Opening Reception: All Senior Show • 10:30am12:30pm

Flaten Art Museum, St. Olaf, Northfield See exhibits page.

32 info@entertainmentguidemn.com

Tap the Barrel • 12-5pm

Three Rivers Wine Trail This is the second of a two-day event. Each winery will provide samples from the cask to mark the beginning of another growing season and to remember the fruits of last year’s labor. Pick up a wine trail passport and get it stamped at each winery to get a free glass of wine and a logo wine glass. Free live music from Jagged Ease at Cannon River Winery from 1 to 4pm. Regulars on the southern Minnesota music scene, Jagged Ease is an acoustic duo playing originals and covering many genres from easy-going lounge to blues-driven ballads. More at jaggedease.com. For more info on the wine trail, go to 3riverswinetrail.com. MONDAY, MAY 26 Northern Roots Session • 7:30-9pm

The Contented Cow, Northfield An informal weekly gathering of musicians to play acoustic music with roots in the north, particularly the Nordic countries. Participants and listeners of all ages and levels of experience are welcome. TUESDAY, MAY 27 Acoustic Jam Session • 7:30-10pm

The Contented Cow, Northfield Every Tuesday night show up with your unplugged instrument of choice and jam – or just show up and listen. WEDNESDAY, MAY 28 Traditional Irish Music Session 7-9pm

Corner Room, Rueb ‘n’ Stein, Northfield A gathering of musicians and listeners in a relaxed, informal setting. Along with the music enjoy conversation, camaraderie and perhaps even a few Irish dance steps.

© The Entertainment Guide


Chance Meetings • 7:30-10pm

THURSDAY, MAY 29

The Contented Cow, Northfield John Hiscox, Neil Rowley, Gail Moll and Rob Lampe play a mixed genre of music which is not half-bad and a lot of fun.

9th Annual Taste of Northfield • 5-10pm

Bridge Square Food tastings from local restaurants, beer & wine garden, bank raid reenactment, live music and a talent show. Fun for all ages. More info at nddc.org.

Faribault The Experience Awaits You!

419 Central Avenue North 507-333-9999 • flairfurnitureandgiftgallery.com

Quality service since 1946 Ceramic Tile • Carpet • Linoleum • Vinyl • Wood Cork • Natural Stone • Quartz • Granite Countertops

Large Selection • Happy Feet! 128 Central Ave North 507-334-7774 • burkhartzmeyershoes.com

208 Central Ave North • 507-334-9287

Watch “BEST of Minnesota” featuring Faribault on Saturday, June 14, 1pm on WCCO-TV channel 4.

aribau

l

Faribault

o m • w w w.

m • www .

sitf

t.c

vi

VISIT US!

vi

sitf

aribau

.co

AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE & TOURISM

lt sitf

AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

aribau

VISIT US!

t.c

vi

& TOURISM Check us out online at www.entertainmentguidemn.com 

l

o m • w w w.

May 2014

Faribault

sitf

aribau

l

vi

530 Wilson Avenue w w55021 m MN Faribault, w. .co t (507) 334-4381 (800) 658-2354

33


FRIDAY, MAY 30

HAPPENINGS Thursday, May 29, continued Gypsy Jazz Jam Series: Reynold Philipsek • 7-9pm

Northfield Eagles Club Join featured musician Reynold Philipsek for the final session of this series. Open to all instruments and abilities, come to jam or to listen. Reynolds has composed more than 200 songs and appeared on nearly 50 recordings. His music is strongly influenced by Django Reinhardt but also has strong American post-bop roots.

Smokin’ in Steele • 11am on

Steele County Fairgrounds, Owatonna The first of a two-day smokin’ good time festival! Kansas City-sanctioned BBQ competition and live blues benefits the local Special Olympics chapter. The 9:30pm headliner is the Fabulous Lovehandles w/Brian ‘Zoot’ Simonds. Full schedule at smokininsteele.com. May Fly Music Festival • 5pm

The Contented Cow This is the first of a two-day event. Live music from Carey Langer (5-6:30pm), The Erverators (7-8:30pm) and Marty Anderson & the Goods (9-11:30pm).

Mark Mraz • 8pm

The Tavern Lounge, Northfield Everybody’s favorite piano man tickles the ivories and performs favorite sing-along songs, golden oldies and classic covers from the pop music archives.

Theater: Z Puppets Rosenschnoz, A La Carte: In a Fool’s Kitchen • 7-8pm Z Puppets ­Rosenschnoz

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault See theater page.

B u i l d i n g B u s i n e s s • D e ve l o p i n g C o m m u n i t i e s

(507) 645-8975 northfieldconstruction.com

1610 Riverview Lane Northfield, MN 55057 MN Lic. 667670

Fifth Annual Big Hats & Big Hearts Annual Auction for the Arts & Kentucky Derby Party Saturday, May 3rd 4 - 7pm Food. Fashion. Fundraising. The Not-to-be-missed event of the Spring “Hands in Action”. May 22nd 7pm National Theatre of the Deaf and MSAD Students Perform an original play. Free! See Our Signs, May 23rd 7pm

507.332.7372

www.ParadiseCenterfortheArts.org

Proud Supporter of the Arts

See tangram shapes become words, signs and stories as NTD performers combine exciting American Sign Language with the spoken word. Free!

Robert Overby, Agent

507-334-7542 32 4th Street NW ~ Faribault, MN 55021 BobOverby.com

This activity is made possible by the voters of Minnesota through a grant from the Southeastern Minnesota Arts Council thanks to a legislative appropriation from the arts & cultural heritage fund.

34 info@entertainmentguidemn.com

© The Entertainment Guide


Room for Gray • 9pm-12am

Froggy Bottoms, Northfield Fueled with pop-rock energy and claiming influences such as Bon Jovi, Matchbox 20 and Daughtry, Room for Gray continues to expand its fan base through the power of grassroots support.

al 14

2,

Fe

tA ug

e

The Tavern Lounge, Northfield Voted one of the best bands in Northfield, Relativity is a duo that combines vocals, guitar, mandolin, harmonica and percussion to create a fun evening of music. They pack a request list of a couple hundred songs – from covers of current music like the Avett Brothers and the Lumineers, to classic and folk rock such as Fleetwood Mac and the Indigo Girls.

st iv

Relativity • 8pm

ba 12 nd s

Ames Center, Burnsville See theater page.

20

Theater: Twelfth Night • 7:30pm

r

The Tavern Lounge, ­Northfield An acoustic duo known for their lush harmonies and love of ’70s AM radio rock. Presenting original tunes along with favorites from Neil Young, Warren Zevon, Bobbie Gentry, Patti Smith and Bruce Springsteen.

Reggie’s Brewhouse, Owatonna A straight ahead rock band from the St. Cloud/Minneapolis area that is filled with high energy, passion and soul. Strange Daze has played with many national acts and reached No. 9 on College Music Journal’s top 200 adds.

ai ho 12 ser Ba !S n ur s a d

The Frye • 8pm

Strange Daze • 8:30pm-close

ta g

Concert Hall, Carleton, Northfield

The Contented Cow, Northfield This is the second of a two-day event. Live music kicks off with Occasional Jazz (5-6:30pm).

nd

Carleton Orchestra • 8pm

May Fly Music Festival • 5pm

Fu

Ames Center, Burnsville See theater page.

Vi n

Theater: Twelfth Night • 7:30pm

Them Pesky Kids • 9:30pm-close

Babe’s Music Bar, Lakeville

Dirty Word 10pm

The Club, ­Faribault Dirty Word’s playlist is a virtual library of hits that leaves no genre untouched including top 40 pop, soulful funk grooves, rockin’ country and classic rock and pop hits that span five decades. SATURDAY, MAY 31 Smokin’ in Steele • 7am on

Steele County Fairgrounds, Owatonna The second of a two-day smokin’ good time festival! Kansas City-sanctioned BBQ competition and live blues benefits the local Special Olympics chapter. The 9:30pm headliner is the Smokin’ in Steele Band. Full schedule at smokininsteele.com. Free Admission Day • 10am-7pm

Northfield Historical Society In addition to free admission, visitors will get to see some rarely seen historical artifacts relating to St. Olaf College. Event Center Grand Opening • 12-4pm

Cannon River Winery, Cannon Falls Celebrate with a ribbon cutting ceremony by the Cannon Falls Chamber of Commerce, wine samples, light appetizers catered by Rudy’s Redeye Grill and live music from Spindrift.

May 2014

Check us out online at www.entertainmentguidemn.com

35


Northfield Senior Center presents:

May 3

7:00pm Craig Wasner – keyboard Lori Williams – saxophone Nick Weaver – fiddle

Put on the bobby socks for dancing and singing along to old standards from the ’40s and ’50s. It’ll be a rockin’ good time!

$20

ADMISSION: ($15 tax deductible as a donation to the Annual Fund – $5 for delectable deserts)

Christian Lockner

Greg Pierce

Jon M Snodgrass, CFP®

Financial Advisor 1250 S Hwy 3, Northfield, MN 507-645-0270

Financial Advisor 509 Division St P.O. Box 664, Northfield, MN 507-663-8809

Financial Advisor 158 N Water St Ste 4, Northfield, MN 507-663-0325

Tickets at northfieldseniorcenter.org, the Front Desk or 507/664-3700

Northfield Senior Center

Active, Connected, Engaged

1651 Jefferson Pkwy, Northfield

The Arts & Heritage Center of Montgomery presents:

Women In Music:

Dustless. Odorless. Done in one day

Someone Will Remember Us

Lauren Pelon

Saturday, May 3 • 4:00pm Hilltop Hall • Free will donation

Lauren sings and plays 25 ancient and modern instruments in a celebration of music by and for women.

Buff & Coat® restores the luster of household and commercial hardwood floors that have lost their shine from everyday wear and tear. The unique Buff & Coat® process renews the lustrous beauty of hardwood floors without the dust and mess of traditional floor refinishing.

Contact Rod Magsam

507-366-2833 • www.buffandcoat.com 36 info@entertainmentguidemn.com

“Lauren Pelon is a showpiece by virtue of her beautiful, fervent voice and her extraordinary talents on an assortment of unusual, but authentic instruments.”

In The Gallery Starting May 1

Batiks by Susan Hayes

Thu-Fri 2pm-5pm, Sat 9am-noon

This activity is made possible by the voters of Minnesota through a grant from the Minnesota State Arts Board, thanks to a legislative appropriation from the arts and heritage fund.

507-364-5933 507-364-8110

206 1st St N, Montgomery

artsandheritagecenter.org

© The Entertainment Guide


HISTORIC

HAPPENINGS By Susan Hvistendahl

The Early Bicycling Craze “Do you remember your first bike?” This is the question KYMN radio’s Wayne Eddy likes to ask people he is interviewing on his Mon.-Fri. morning show. This year marks Eddy’s 50th year in broadcasting (all but the first four in Northfield) and this Minnesota Broadcasting Hall of Famer knows what questions will evoke immediate responses. Bicycle riding seems to be one of those universal experiences which we can readily share with others, even if the first bike simply marks a passage between our riding tricycles and driving motorized vehicles. I don’t remember my first bicycle, but I do remember my favorite. It was a sleek black three-speed English bicycle with narrow tires, hand brakes and double baskets on the back to carry my tennis racket (in its wooden press) to the South Dakota State courts which “townies” used in the late ’50s and early ’60s for summer recreation. I have many joyful memories of hopping on my bike to visit friends, get to the Brookings swimming pool, fish for crawdads in the creek or ride to the Dairy Queen at the outskirts of town for an ice cream cone.

The high wheel bicycle (left) was first built in the U.S. in 1878 and was especially popular with daredevil young men not afraid to take “headers” onto the ground, such as this young man in 1887. Courtesy of Carleton College Archives; William Wardwell Kinyon of Owatonna showed off his safety bicycle (right) which sparked the bicycle craze for both sexes in the 1890s. Courtesy of the Steele County Historical Society.

myself master of the most remarkable, ingenious, and inspiring motor ever yet devised upon this planet.” She was not alone in her euphoria. In 1892, Wild West sharpshooter Annie Oakley professed to love her bike as much as her horse. While researching other topics, I kept running across ads for many models of men’s and women’s bicycles in newspapers in the last part of the 19th century. With winter’s grip finally released around here, I thought a bicycle-themed story would

I even had a name for my bike: Black Shadow. Back in 1895, a woman named Frances Willard, who was president of the Women’s Christian Temperance Union, had a name for her bicycle, too. She took up bicycling late in her life at the height of the 1890s bicycling craze and called her bike “Gladys,” for its “gladdening effect” on her health. In her book A Wheel Within a Wheel: How I Learned to Ride the Bicycle, this well-known proponent of temperance and women’s suffrage said that since the age of 16 she had been “enwrapped in the long skirts that impeded every footstep” in walking and, heeding a doctor’s advice to “take congenial exercise,” she got a bicycle. It took her three months of practice but at last, she wrote, “I had made

A high wheel bicyclist at “Kamp Rain-O-Shine” on Roberds Lake, 1880. Courtesy of the Rice County Historical Society.

May 2014

Check us out online at www.entertainmentguidemn.com

37


These women rode their bicycles more than ten miles from Morristown to Faribault to have this 1888 photo taken. (Their attire made bicycling more difficult and led to the later popularity of bloomers.) Courtesy of the Rice County Historical Society.

It appears even skeletons were enjoying the bicycle craze in this (unexplained) photo dated 1894. Courtesy of the Carleton College

be a breath of fresh (spring) air for May. The first reference to a bicycle I could find was in the Carletonia of May 1, 1882: “Carleton has a bicycle club of one member. For further information inquire of O. Lockwood.” A modest start. The next year, both Northfield and Faribault had town bicycle clubs and 13 years later the Northfield News of April 4, 1896, wrote, “It is needless for parties living in Northfield to go out of the city to purchase wheels, as nearly every manufacturer has an agent here and prices are by far lower than in the cities.” A list followed of the store locations and names of local riders who endorsed certain models. In 1897, as booming sales produced bicycle prices below $100, more than two million bicycles were sold in the United States, or about one for every 30 persons. By 1898, you could buy a basic model for $30. How had this happened? One word: Safety. That was the name given to the design change, which led to the bicycle craze at the end of the century. In 1885, the Rover model came out with two wheels the same size, a rear chain drive and direct steering. Before that, bicyclists rode ordinary bikes. That is to say, bicycles with the large wheel in front and smaller one in the back called “ordinaries,” “high wheels” or “penny farthings,” which been developed in England. These bicycles were shown off at the 1876 Philadelphia Centennial exposition, the one where Northfield flour won a medal while the James-Younger Gang was attempting to rob the First National Bank. These high wheelers had replaced the French pedal-driven velocipedes, nicknamed “boneshakers” due to the uncomfortable ride from their stiff construction and iron wheels. The bigger the wheel, the faster one could go and, in 1878, the first ordinaries were built in the United States and

Archives.

became popular with daredevil young men, in particular. There was an “unsafety” factor to this design, since the rider was so high up that there were dangers of toppling over the front wheel (“taking a header”) when encountering road hazards. There was little braking ability and “breakneck speed” could indeed break a neck. Yet, these bicycles began to catch on and the League of American Wheelmen was formed in 1880 to promote cycling interests, including better roads. A humorous acknowledgment of the risks of bicycling came in the first Northfield Bicycle Club announcement in the Feb. 22, 1883, Rice County Journal. After listing the officers of the 12-member club (including a bugler), the report noted that “one necessary officer” had not been named “whose services will probably be needed more than that of any other, we mean a surgeon…We would advise the physicians of the city to apply for honorary memberships.” This club used the Central House hall for practice and ordered

The Carleton College Bicycle Club of 1891-1892 shows off its wheels. The club’s “Lieutenant,” William Warren Dean (far left), praised the two girls (center) as pioneers. He had been afraid that the girls would be “expelled for their brazenness and shamelessness” since the “head lady” at the college had denounced female bike riding. Courtesy of the Carleton College Archives.

38 info@entertainmentguidemn.com

© The Entertainment Guide


Meanwhile, minutes of the Faribault Bicycle Club show it was formed in March of 1883, led by William Blodgett (who worked in his family’s lumber business in Faribault). The club resolved that no sidewalks would be used, “except in cases of urgent business and then only when the streets will not permit of their passage.” They also adopted a uniform including shoes, accepted an invitation to visit the Rochester Wheelmen and agreed to levy a 50 cent fine for those missing meetings. Their meeting place was a “stone building opposite the Brunswick” (possibly at 120 Central Ave., the Batchelder’s Block, built in 1868-1869). Bicycle racing had begun with the advent of the high wheel and was featured in Northfield’s Independence Day festivities of 1883. The July 5 Rice County Journal described a grand procession from the city hall to city park, including 31 men on bicycles and the fire department apparatus “tastefully decorated with wreathes, flowers and bunting.” Afterwards, 2500 celebrants gathered at the county fairgrounds (then located in Northfield) to see a bicycle tournament of several heats with two bicyclists from Faribault, 13 from Minneapolis, three from St. Paul and 13 from Northfield. Those from Northfield “made a grand and interesting display,” with only a couple “headers.” That August, several Northfield club members rode on sandy roads to St. Paul, 57 miles in seven hours, claiming it to be the “longest run on record in Minnesota.” At the end of August, the Northfield club sent 21 members (said to be the largest number from outside of the Twin Cities) to cycling competition at the Minnesota State Fair, with $100 prizes at stake for one and two-mile dashes. Shortly thereafter in September, Minneapolis hosted an international “championship of the world” and the Rice County Journal of Sept. 6 reported that Northfield and Faribault “bore off a goodly share of the honors from the late bicycle meet in Minneapolis.” Hart Johnson, “a Northfield boy,” was awarded a gold watch and chain for winning the two mile race for the “championship of Minnesota, thus giving Northfield the glory of being the home of a hero of the sporting world.” Johnson “made better time for a mile than the champion of the world had done in Minneapolis in his three-mile race.” Northfield’s captain Nye G. Young was elected treasurer of the newly formed state league of wheelmen and William Blodgett of Faribault was elected vice president, “making Faribault proud.” As 1883 drew to a close, the Faribault Bicycle Club seemed to be more interested in dancing than bicycling (which perhaps makes sense in the winter). A Committee on Dance arranged for printed programs and invitations at a cost of $20 and rented the hall for $25. A Faribault band beat out a Winona band to furnish music for the $2-per-ticket event which was held on Jan. 30, 1884. The club then agreed to rent the back of the bicycling

May 2014

club room for use as a dancing hall for one year and the second “club ball” was held on April 16. For unknown reasons, the members tendered their resignations at the April 26 meeting and the club was reorganized with new member names on July 7. The minutes which survive end with a quorum not being present on July 26, the second meeting of the new club. There was at least one “issue” with bicyclists: The Rice County Journal of Sept. 27, 1883, “commended” an article from the Wheelman magazine about use of the bicycle on Sundays, the traditional day of rest. As long as the bicycle was “a means of exercise and enjoyment,” it should not be used on the Sabbath, “even for church-going.” The article shot down the idea that one might spend Sundays studying God through nature on a bicycle, saying, “Greater than nature’s book and nature’s law is the Book of books and its law: ‘Remember the Sabbath day and keep it holy.’ Here, knights of the wheel, is an opportunity for self-sacrifice and the cause of principle.” The advent of the “safety” bicycle in 1885 brought wheels to knights and ladies alike. Pneumatic tires patented in 1888 added to riding comfort. Ten years after Carleton had a oneman bicycle club, the Algol yearbook for 1891-1892 named 15 club members, including two females. W.W. Dean is listed as “Lieutenant” and, fortunately, the Carleton College Archives has a memoir of William Warren Dean written in 1938 in which he recounted his bicycling experiences. Dean moved to Northfield as a child and attended Carleton Academy and Carleton Col-

Your hometown print shop

INVITATIONS 500 POSTCARDS STARTING AT $40

JEFF & TER I

Join

new bicycles and uniforms. By April, 16 members were meeting in rooms of the McClaughry block, waiting for the mud to subside so they could ride outdoors. In June, two members “took a run to Cannon Falls on their wheels and claim to be the first exhibitors of the machine in that lively city.” The trip was made in one hour and 40 minutes and was followed by a ride to Dundas that evening. By the end of that month, the members were making extended tours through Rice County.

BOB and DEANNA CEREMONY THEIR WEDDING INVITE YOU TO

N CHURCH BETHEL LUTHER AT 5:00 IN THE EVENING 1321 NORTH AVENUE NORTHFIELD, MN

FRIDAY

AS THEY GE T

OCTOBER 18, 2013

TO FOLLOW DINNER & DANCE CENTER THE GRAND EVENT STREET 316 WASHINGTON NORTHFIELD, MN

MARRIED!

October 12 Valley Grove• 5pm Church • Ner strand, MN Ceremony at

Dinner at the 5pm Reception to Grand Event Center at 6:30pm follow at 7:30 pm

All your print & design needs • Business Cards • Letterhead • Envelopes • Brochures • Posters • Postcards

• Folders • Fliers • Logos • Publications • Proofreading • Copying

No Gifts • RSVP

to teriknight@ yahoo.com by September 30

• Printing • Carbonless Forms • Menus • Labels • Notepads • YOUR Project

From concept to delivery... ...designing ideas for more than 25 years 17 Bridge Square ByAllMeansGraphics.com

Check us out online at www.entertainmentguidemn.com

(507) 663-7937

39


were terribly scared about it, and ashamed too, because we fully expected both of them would be expelled for their brazenness and shamelessness.” Dean praised their “real courage” and said, “There had to be pioneers and they were the first. Soon almost as many girls rode as men.” Then, Dean wrote, “The great anti-bike furor had barely died down when it flared up worse than ever.” What happened? “Some girls had dared to ride down the streets attired in the new ‘bloomers.’”

The C. Zamboni and Sons store at 301 N. Cedar in Owatonna was one of many bicycle shops supplying customers. They also sold guns, fishing poles and (hanging from the ceiling) phonograph horns. Today it is one of the oldest buildings with continuous occupants in Owatonna, built about 1880. Photo ca. 1895 courtesy of the Steele County Historical Society.

lege, graduating in 1896. Dean wrote, “We had long had what was known as high bicycles. I had several myself. We thot they were the last word until the new safety came in…We felt like a bird soaring in the wind. Roads and streets were soon full of your hellions known as ‘scorchers’ who rode all hunched up like an inverted letter ‘U.’ Then came models with a dropped frame for the ladies.” Dean said the bicycle was a boon for ladies because about the only exercise a college girl had was crocheting or playing the piano. The prospect of women on bicycles was not universally welcomed, however. Dean said the “spinsters” were “highly alarmed, horrified and shocked…When anything involved the morals of our sisters and daughters, they believed in lashing out. The head lady at the college Miss X. denounced the new bikes as being shockingly indecent and immoral and announced that no C.C. [Carleton College] girl would be allowed to ride one or only over her dead body.” When Carleton’s Bicycle Club was organized, there were two girls attending college who had bikes. Dean wrote, “I can remember how we begged and pled with those two girls to join the club and come out and have their pictures taken with the young men. They were two shy mouse like, hesitant little girls, about 17.” When the two agreed to be photographed, Dean said, “We

Bloomers were not actually new. The loose trousers gathered at the ankle worn under shortened skirts were named after Amelia Bloomer, who promoted (but did not originate) this style in the 1850s in her newspaper The Lily in Seneca Falls, N.Y. (the site of a woman’s rights convention in 1848). A push for less restrictive clothing was accelerated when women wished to take advantage of this new bicycling activity. Just picture Scarlett O’Hara being cinched into her corset in Gone With the Wind and imagine someone trying to ride a bicycle thus attired. Fashion dictated layers of petticoats under long skirts and dresses. No wonder the “rational dress” movement of England in 1881 called for underwear weighing no more than seven pounds. Dean wrote that seeing girls riding bicycles in bloomers was “the last straw for Miss X. Such girls were denounced as hussies and worse. In spite of all she could do, and she ruled her girls with an iron hand so they scarcely had a right or privilege in the world, bikes and bloomers came in.” (The Northfield News of June 8, 1895, commented that the “bloomer bicycle costume” which “gives free play to the limbs and minimizes the danger from accidents is no longer a pronounced novelty, but is often seen on thoroughfares much frequented by fair cyclists. In fact, bloomers are so common that many variations of the original style are observed.”)

Not all were receptive to the growing independence and quest for equality of women, symbolized by the bicycle. In 1897, male students hung up an effigy in the town square of a female riding a bicycle to protest a proposal that women should be admitted as full members of Cambridge University in England.

40 info@entertainmentguidemn.com

Dean called it “the beginning of the bicycle era, one of the greatest manias the cockeyed old U.S. has ever had. People were getting bicycle crazy.” Dean certainly was. He decided to “show off ” and ride to the Chicago World’s Fair during the summer of 1893 on his “heavy and clumsy” bicycle that “would have been a joke today.” He wrote, “Every day was heart-breaking brutal exertion. It took every iota of physical and mental power, but I fancied I was a great hero…” It took Dean 6 ½ days to travel 500 miles. But he made it and described the fair as the “greatest manmade spectacle the world has every known.” (Although there were bicycles on display, the main attraction was a different kind of wheel: the world’s first Ferris Wheel, seen by

© The Entertainment Guide


the 28 million visitors over six months.)

in a frenzy.” Full degrees were not granted until 1921.

Dean also wrote of other bicycle adventures, including meeting horses on the road that “would invariably begin to prance stand on their hind legs, panic stricken.” He learned to get off his bike, “lay my bicycle down in the weeds and wait till they passed… It was exasperating.” One time in Decorah, Iowa, Dean encountered a team of mules, which “bolted the instant they saw me.” They were carrying tanks of “splendid rich pure cream,” which fell and “smeared the whole landscape.” Dean panicked and “rode until I was near dead from fatigue” to get away.

The bicycle craze waned as the automobile craze took over after 1900, profiting from the paved roads promoted by the bicyclists. One might say bicycles also “paved the way” for other transportation. The first U.S. production of motorcycles came in 1898. Also in the 1890s, a teenager in Northfield, Lincoln Fey, adapted bicycle parts as he experimented with auto invention at local bicycle shops. And bicycle mechanics Orville and Wilbur Wright worked on airplane creation in Dayton, Ohio, using bicycle technology.

www.marriedtothesea.com/060210/devil-wheels.gif

Cartoon courtesy of marriedtothesea.com The bicycle mania involved “inOne last personal note: This is dividuals, small groups and large the second time I have written parties” who “took long trips, ranged over the countryside and about bicycling. The first time was when I was a columnist for ‘desecrated’ the Sabbath,” wrote Edgar Bruce Wesley in a 1938 our local newspaper in New York and my daughter Laurel, at book about Owatonna. A “young wheelmen” club was formed age 7, was learning to ride a bike. So, of course, I wrote about it. in town for the promotion of fellowship in 1894. The ride from “How far away from home can you get on a tricycle?” I asked. Owatonna to Faribault, with a steep climb just beyond Medford, “Ah, but a bicycle! Those two wheels can get you away from was said to be the test of cycling ability. Mother’s eyes much farther and faster than three. So the

May 2014

g

ra

ta

ge

Au

i ho 12 ser Ba !S n ur s at d

Fe 2, st

Thanks to Carleton College archivist Eric Hillemann, Rice County Historical Society executive director Sue Garwood, Ariel Butler of the Northfield Historical Society and Steele County Historical Society archives director Daniel Moeckly for their help with this story.

i ba 12 201 va nd 4 l s

Laurel still rides a bicycle in San Francisco. I think it is mostly fun for her. And she has learned the lesson I ended my column with so many years ago in New York: “You cannot expect to coast through life. Sometimes you must also pedal.”

nd

In 1895, Anthony had asked a reporter, “Why, pray tell me, hasn’t a woman as much right to dress to suit herself as a man?” There were those who fearfully watched long-established gender rules of behavior and dress being broken down as women gained more independence and freedom. (The expression “Who wears the pants in the family?” is a vestige of this attitude.) The backlash against this “new woman” who was asking for equality was illustrated in 1897 when it was proposed that women should be admitted as full members of Cambridge University in England. Male students strung up an effigy in the main town square. It was a woman on a bicycle. Bicycling historian Sheila Hanlon wrote that when the resolution failed, “the triumphant mob tore down the effigy” and then “savagely attacked the mannequin, decapitating and tearing it to pieces

“It’s not fair!” she said. “It’s supposed to be fun.”

Fu

In 1896, leading women’s rights advocate Susan B. Anthony said she thought bicycling “has done more to emancipate women than anything in the world. I stand and rejoice every time I see a woman ride by on a wheel…Off she goes, the picture of free, untrammeled womanhood.” Sans chaperone.

romance with the bicycle begins…” Laurel’s inspiration was a neighbor boy named Dennis who had graduated from tricycle to bicycle (with training wheels). Her bicycle was pink with the name Sweet Thunder emblazoned on it and her prayers at night now included, “Help me to be a good girl, help me to ride my big bike up hills and down. Amen.” And although she was excited when she finally mastered the elusive balance, her enthusiasm was tempered by finding out that pedaling could involve work, especially on hills.

Vi n

In February of 1895, Bush’s Bicycle Rink opened inside a large hall in Northfield’s Central block. The rink had a run of 20 laps to the mile for only $1 for the season. In August, an announcement of a new bicycling club gave an estimate that Northfield had more than 100 gentlemen and a dozen lady riders. At the Minnesota State Fair, an entire day was devoted to a “bicycle program,” including a mammoth parade with a bicycle band from St. Cloud, trick bicycle riding and racing.

Check us out online at www.entertainmentguidemn.com

41


Non-Rules of the Gravel Road By Nathan Nelson They came into the Contented Cow one night bruised, battered, and in bike shorts. “Who are those guys?” I thought to myself. Wait, I know some of them. I’m used to seeing them clad in colorful lycra, climbing off expensive carbon fiber bikes fitted with the finest components money can buy. Usually, there’s a serious air as the ride is analyzed and dissected. There are a few laughs but mostly a lot of theories about the weight of bike parts and the effectiveness of the latest training methods. Well, it’s the same guys but on this night but they look and act differently. (L to R): Gary Duden, Nate Nelson, Jesse Rushton, Sarah Jansen, Michael Lehmkuhl, Susan They are full of dust, sweat and one guy is bloodied. They are not wearing Welch, Jeff Stremcha and Joe Pahr. Photo by Bruce Anderson. the expensive bike clothes and they washboardy. We would have to roll up the windows to keep the dust are riding beatup older bikes. They’ve also got headlamps on their out but it would still come in through the back speakers and get on bike helmets. Everything is dirt and dust. The effect of the dust and our clothes. My brothers and I did a lot of running, hiking, getting sunburns makes their teeth look unusually white. Yes, they look lost and looking for lost animals on the roads around the farm. We like miners but they act more like cowboys. They are doing a lot of never rode bikes, though, because somebody told us that the gravel laughing and even standing up as they tell their tall tales and drink would ruin the gears. their beers. They are gravel road bike riders. So, what’s the deal with these gravel road riders? Are they working I’ve done some of the group bike rides in Northfield on paved roads. There’s a lot of protocol, which is necessary for everyone to have a good time and not get in an accident. The goal is to ride in a tight pack to reduce wind resistance. You have to pay attention and it can be hard to keep up with the pack. Rides start on Bridge Square. Before the ride everyone is milling around and happy to share their bike knowledge. Don’t be fooled by the congeniality, though. Once you’re on the bike they would love nothing better then to push you into zones of pain that even Donald Rumsfeld would find cruel and unusual. It’s sneaky how it works. You’re keeping up with the group early and feeling good about yourself. Everyone is joking around and you feel part of the gang. After some miles you start hitting the hills by Cannon City or perhaps you enter Sogn Valley and if you’re not careful, you’ll get dropped like third period French. When you’re dropped you have to battle the wind by yourself. You start talking to yourself and the words aren’t pretty. Forget it; if you are alone without the benefit of a drafting off someone, there is no way you can catch up to the group. It’s a lonely battle out there filled with regret, envy and a sore butt. When you see the guys and gals at the coffee shop later in the morning, they have been there awhile. Surprisingly, instead of gloating, they are happy to see you and full of encouragement. Road bikers admire anyone who is trying to get better. I love gravel roads. I grew up in Forest Lake but we also had an 80acre rundown farm 25 miles north by Harris. In the spring the frost would go out of the roads and with a little rain they became full of mud. We would get stuck in our ’68 Mercury Montego at the same bend in the road every year. In late summer, it would get sandy and

42 info@entertainmentguidemn.com

out deep psychological problems or do they simply like to play in the dirt? It was time to find out, so I contacted fellow Hamline alum Joe Pahr to see if he would let me ride with the gravel gang. He immediately thought it was a good idea, at which point I figured I was getting set up for pain or humiliation or both. I’ve heard the term “gravel gods” bandied about by bike riders but now I was thinking that it wasn’t just a joke and I was in for some serious rites of passage. What were they going to make me do to get initiated…steal chicken feed and try to jump a barbed wired fence? The Ride

As usual we met at Bridge Square. Our group of nine had every type of bike there was. There were bikes specifically made for gravel, skinny road bikes fitted with knobby tires, mountain bikes, and a bike with tires so huge you could put them on a tractor. This particular April evening was the warmest day in six months and consequently everyone’s mood was way up. The chattiness was almost nonstop. Bruce Anderson came up with a great route for us. With a huge wind on our backs, we set off northeast out of Northfield. After riding on pavement for a few miles we hit the gravel and crossed Highway 19. We immediately spread out in a random fashion as we came into the valley of the Cannon River. The dirt on the road was hard and fast and there were some edges that you had to look out for. We went back and forth across several streams. We noticed the last few snowdrifts petering out in the ditches. There was quite a bit of talk about spring being the best time of the year to see things. In the winter the snow covers everything up and in summer there is so much foliage that you can’t see very far. But on an evening like this, far-off water towers, wind turbines, and college dorms glow in the setting sun.

© The Entertainment Guide


Small groves of gnarly hardwood trees popped up everywhere. They encircled abandoned old farm buildings like they were slowly choking them out of existence. Each farmstead told a different story. There were beautifully manicured farms where everything looked coordinated and in synch and there were farms with no continuity at all, which had buildings and machinery from just about every decade. About halfway through the ride, we stopped in a beautiful little cemetery on a slight height of land. We looked around and wondered what the original settlers might think of us riding long distances just to do it. Back on the bikes, we next came to an area that had black soil almost ready for planting and some intermittent pines. It was time to head back towards town. On the return we were somewhat protected from the headwinds by the valley of Cannon River. There was only one stretch of tough riding. We had to go uphill into the wind to get out of the valley. The two women riders in our group slipped through the wind with ease and got quite far ahead. Back on 19, it was just a few miles past Carleton and into town and the ride was over. The good vibes continued after the ride on the deck of the Cow as Joe, Bruce, Mike, Jesse and I swapped stories. Joe said, “There aren’t a lot of rules on gravel and each ride is different. One time it might be a quick pace and everyone’s together and then the next time people are getting off the bikes to hike around and explore.” Mike told the story of a gravel race in Wisconsin where the riders had to carry their bikes through deep water across a flooded road. Joe and Bruce have done some 100 mile gravel races and plan to do more. At a gravel race there are few rules, just a start time and a map. Joe

Gravel bike riding near Northfield. Photo by Bruce Anderson.

fondly recalled the teamwork involved in a cold and wet race called “The Heck of the North.” He and a friend had to work together to get through it. I can think of no better way to experience the rural landscape than on a bike on a remote dirt road. It’s great as a solitary activity or with a bunch of friends. So is there anything wrong, you know, mentally with gravel riders? As it turned out, I was left with few clues as to their psychological make-up. They might be fairly normal. In fact, I think I’ll join them for some more rides, although I won’t be too shocked if things get a little weird.

Stop by and see our brand new rambler design at 2213 Greenfield Drive E.

CONTACT US TODAY FOR A FREE CONSULTATION ABOUT A REMODEL OR BUILDING PROJECT. MN LIC #: BC656599

May 2014

www.landmark-homes.com • 507-649-0489 • info@landmark-homes.com • Find us on Check us out online at www.entertainmentguidemn.com

43


Northfield: Bike Town, USA? by Bruce Anderson Northfield is well on its way to becoming what I would consider a bike town. Evidence that Northfield is developing into a great cycling community can be seen in the growing number of people bike commuting yeararound, droves of people biking around town in nicer weather, large groups of spandex-clad riders heading out of town on road rides on Saturday mornings, regular gravel rides departing from Bridge Square in the evenings and the increasing number of bike races and events spring through fall. We’re by no means on a par with Amsterdam (or even Minneapolis, Portland, Davis or Boulder – yet), but Northfield is fast becoming a great place to ride a bike. It hasn’t always been so. When my family moved to town in 1967, my Schwinn StingRay was my freedom machine. I’d ride around town to school, baseball games, the pool, and to play with friends (even riding all the way out to Dennison once, a HUGE solo adventure for a 10-yearold). However, most of the bikes I would see around town as a kid in the late ’60s through late ’70s were ridden by other kids, with just the occasional adult being seen, such as the eccentric (because he was riding a bike?) elderly chap who rode his balloon tired bike around town slowly and lived in the Central Hotel (above today’s Rare Pair). When I did some road racing in the early ’80s, I would rarely, if ever, see other people when I was out on training rides, and no one else from Northfield, to my knowledge, was racing at that time. Things changed, slowly, over time. When I moved back to Northfield in 1993 after living out of town for about a decade, I began seeing other road riders, and adults riding their bikes for transportation were a somewhat more common sight. In about 1995, I joined a few friends who had started doing regular Saturday morning road rides. Soon, the loose and informal Northfield Bike Club was born. Things really started picking up about 10 years later, as more and more people joined us, and more and more people were out riding their bikes in general. Bikes seemed not to be “just for kids” anymore, and bike commuters and other utilitarian riders were in evidence in increasing numbers, as well as an increased number of recreational (and racing) cyclists. In about 2011, a new, somewhat more official local bike club, the Cannon Valley Velo Club, sprang up and began filling a need for regular, organized recreational rides both for those looking for Bike Sites Beyond the Northfield Area

• Faribault Flyers Bike Club, all levels, contact Glenn Holman at 507/332-7693 for information. • Owatonna Bicycling Club, all levels, owatonnabikeclub.com • Owatonna Mountain Bike Club, facebook.com/ owatonnatrailsassociation • Erik’s Riders Club, Burnsville, all levels, 952/898-5111, ext. 5, shopEriks.com • Silver Cycling, Lakeville, an official USCF Cycling Team, silvercycling.org

44 info@entertainmentguidemn.com

long, vigorous rides and for those looking for something a little more relaxed. By the spring of 2014, two new bike advocacy groups had come into existence (BikeNorthfield and CROCT – Cannon River Offroad Cycling and Trails). BikeNorthfield’s mission is to work with community and regional partners to promote safe and convenient bicycling for transportation, recreation and tourism in and around Northfield. The mission of CROCT is to advocate, build, maintain and enjoy sustainable trails for offroad cycling and other recreational use. Other bike-related groups are active as well, including Mill Town Trails, working assiduously for many years to connect the Cannon Valley Trail (Cannon Falls to Red Wing) to the Sakatah Trail (Faribault to Mankato), and the Northfield Pedalers, a group of senior recreational cyclists. Things aren’t perfect, as there remains a great need for improved cycling infrastructure in and around Northfield, but things have come a long way since I first tooled around town on my Sting-Ray. The townships surrounding Northfield are blessed with great gravel and asphalt roads for riding, and Northfield is the kind of compact community that lends itself well to getting around by bike. I’m hopeful that as a critical mass of cyclists of all persuasions grows in the community, Northfield will become a true bike town in the foreseeable future. Resources:

• BikeNorthfield – facebook.com/BikeNorthfield • Cannon Valley Velo Club – sites.google.com/site/ cannonvalleyveloclub/, https://www.facebook.com/ groups/214761018548879/ • CROCT (Cannon Valley Offroad Cycling and Trails) – croct. org/, https://www.facebook.com/Cannonriveroffroadcycling trails • Mill Town Trails – milltownstrail.org/ • Northfield Pedalers – northfieldseniorcenter.org/ • 4th of July Criterium – contact fittobetrid.com/ for information • Tour de Save – facebook.com/pages/Tour-deSAVE/188765119864 • Jesse James Bike Tour – jessejamesbiketour.org/ • Minnesota Gravel Championships – mnstategravelchampion ships.com/, https://www.facebook.com/minnesotastategravel champs Bruce Anderson is an avid lifelong cyclist, the chair of ­BikeNorthfield and a member of the Cannon Valley Velo Club.

‘Tis the Month for Biking

Although more than half of the U.S. population lives within five miles of their workplace, lack of knowledge and incentive has deterred many from commuting by bike.

Sponsored by the League of American Bicyclists, Bike Month also features Bike to Work Week, May 12-16; Bike to Work Day, May 16; and Bike to School Day, May 7.

© The Entertainment Guide


Clubs, Classes and More… Cannon River Winery, Cannon Falls –

cannonriverwinery.com, 507/263-7400 Wine Club with a Book Problem – Th, May 22, 6-8pm – This month’s book is 11/22/63 by Steven King. A great way to read wonderful books and stay connected with friends over a delicious flight of local wine. Call the winery to reserve your spot. There is a $10 registration fee. Crossings at Carnegie, Zumbrota – crossingsatcarnegie.com, 507/732-7616 Classes in the arts for preschoolers through adults. Matisse & Merlot – May 16, 7-9pm – An evening of wine, acrylic paint and fun. Grab your partner, BFF or co-worker, bring your favorite beverage and leave with a work of art created by you. No painting or drawing ability required. Using arbitrary flat color and pattern, be inspired by the works of Matisse. Professional artist Odell Portz will guide you. Glass Garden Beads, Northfield – glassgardenbeads.com 507/786-9595 1st and 3rd Mondays: Open Beading, 6-9pm – A good starting point to learn beginning beading techniques. Just Food Co-op, Northfield – 507/650-0106 Mondays: Knitting Night, 7-9pm, 507/645-6331 Lakeville Area Arts Center – 952/985-4640 Find art-related classes at lakevilleareaartscenter.com Northfield Arts Guild – 507/645-8877 Dance to the music! Ballet, modern, folk, tap, ballroom, Mexican folklórico: The Arts Guild has it all for ages five years and up. Too young to dance? Bring your tots to Music Together instead. Northfield Buddhist Meditation Center – Children’s Circle Class (ages 3-9), Sundays, 3-4pm. Children and their parents

meditate, do yoga and learn about Buddhism in a fun, peaceful atmosphere of exploration. Everyone welcome. Northfield Community Services • nfld.k12.mn.us, follow the Community Services link • 507/664-3750 ECFE New Family Welcome Tour – Mon through May 19, 8am12pm, NCRC Parent Ed Room YW 108 – Whether you are new to Early Childhood Family Education or new to town, you’re invited to see the classrooms, meet other parents and be introduced to ECFE staff. Young children are welcome to accompany you. Free registration online. Summer Community Band Practice – Wed, 7-8:30pm; Northfield High School Band Room – Instrumentalists may simply show up at rehearsal. The Community Band performs on Bridge Square every Thursday June 5-26, 7-8pm. Northfield Dance Academy – Northfielddance.com, 507/6454068. Northfield Garden Club – Invasive Species: Controlling New Threats – May 13, 12:45pm at United Methodist Church, Northfield. Presented by Ashley Tabery, District Technician, Rice County Soil and Water Conservation District.

May 2014

Northfield Public Library – 507/645-6606

First Steps Early Literacy Center, Mon, Fri, Sat, 10-12pm Patty Cake Infant Lapsit, Tue, 10-11am Toddler Rhyme Time, Wed, 9:30 and 10:30am Walk-In eReader Assistance – Wed, 2:30-4:30pm Literary KIDS Club – Sat, 1-3pm Nutrition Program: Fats Are Good For You – May 8, 7-8pm – Review which fats promote health and how to add them to your health strategy. Learn tasty, healthful recipes that use quality fats. Presented by Noel Aldrich, PhD, licensed nutritionist with a PhD in nutrition from the U of M. Northfield Senior Center – northfieldseniorcenter.org 507/664-3700. Programs for active older adults in a premier fitness facility with an indoor pool and certified fitness instructors. Bike club, hiking trips, ping pong, nutrition talks, art classes, writing classes, card groups, dining center, fitness classes and more. Northfield Yarn – 507/645-1330 – Northfield Yarn – 507/6451330 – Open Stitching, Thursdays, 6-8pm at Northfield Yarn. Bring a project and share in the fun. Free. Owatonna Arts Center – 435 Garden view Ln • 507/451-0533 oacarts.org Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault – 507/332-7372 Find art-related classes for kids and adults at paradisecenterforthearts.org Intermediate Watercolor Class with Kathy Miller – Wed, April 30-May 21, 12:30-3:30pm – Designed for those who have previous watercolor experience and would like to further advance their basic watercolor knowledge. Work on individualized projects with the guidance of the instructor, while learning more advanced techniques in order to enhance your paintings. The perfect way to continue developing your relationship with this unique medium. $84 members, $108 nonmembers. Byzantine with a Twist – May 3, 10am-4pm – Learn how to transform sterling silver wire into a beautiful bracelet. Using simple tools students will make silver jump rings that are knitted together in a byzantine pattern with pliers. Instructors: Kim Bakken-Parr & Lee Parr. $42 members, $54 nonmembers, $45 materials. River Bend Nature Center, Faribault, 507/332-7151 – Classes and activities at rbnc.org. May is an exciting month at RBNC: wildflowers are in bloom, birds are busy nest-building, and we have many fun, educational programs all month long. We’ll start the month with two free programs: Bagels & Birds May 3 and our Free Animal Feeding May 5. We have a Lectures in Nature program May 6 about rain gardens featuring guest Dustin Demmer from Blazing Star Gardens. Also on the 6th, the new Weekly Naturalist Walk programs will begin, continuing each Tuesday of the month. Bird lovers will want to reserve time for Raptors of Minnesota on the 17th featuring live raptors from the Raptor Center in St. Paul, and on the 18th for Bird Banding with Dan and Erika Tallman. Seniors are invited to join us on the 21st for lunch and a talk by Alan Anderson on “Climate Change and You.” For more information and to register, visit rbnc.org.

Check us out online at www.entertainmentguidemn.com

45


El Tequila – 1010 Hwy. 3 S. • 664-9139 • 11 a.m. -10 p.m.,

DINING Carbone’s Pizza & Sports Bar

Page 29

620 So. Water St, Northfield, MN 55057, 507/645-2300, carbonesnorthfield.com, Mon-Sat 11-1am, Sun 11am to midnight. Family friendly sports bar. Monthly and daily food and beverage specials. 2-for-1 happy hour daily, 11am-7pm, 10pm-12am. Half-price appetizers Mon-Fri 3-7pm. Chapati

Back Cover

214 Division St., Northfield • 645-2462 • chapati.us, closed Mondays – Cuisine of India. Variety of curry and Tandoori entrees including a large selection of vegetarian items. Wine and beer. Contented Cow

Back Cover

302 Division St. S., Northfield • contentedcow.com • 3pm-close British-style pub with authentic British specialties and a variety of soups, salads and sandwiches. Extensive patio overlooking the Cannon River. Great selection of imported and domestic draft beer and a full selection of wine and spirits. Dairy Queen

Inside Front

900 N Highway 3, Northfield • 507/645-8912 • dairyqueenofnorthfield.com • Feb-Apr: 10am-9pm, May-Aug: 10am-10pm, Sept-Oct: 10am-9pm – Dairy Queen treats and cake, homemade or southern style BBQ brisket sandwiches and famous juicy Polish hotdogs. Home of the Blizzard.

Support Our Advertisers Jim Altoff, Realtor��������������������29 Anna’s Closet������������������������������ 8 Apple Chevrolet Buick��������47-48 Aquatic Pets������������������������������14 The Arts & Heritage Center of Montgomery����������������������36 Bierman’s Home Furnishings & Floor Coverings����������������� 11 Bridge Square Barbers�������������10 Buff & Coat������������������������������36 Burkhartzmeyer Shoes�������������33 By All Means Graphics������������39 Cannon River Winery���������������17 Cannon Valley Regional Orchestra����������������31 Cannon Valley Veterinary Clinic���������������47-48 Carbone’s Pizza & Sports Bar��29 Carleton College Fine Arts�������27 Carriage Cleaning Service���47-48 Chapati������������������������ back cover The Club������������������������������������� 1 Club Tiki������������������������������������� 7 Cocoa Bean Toys & Sweets�����24 Coldwell Banker South Metro��� 3 College City Beverage, Inc.�����19 Community Resource Bank�����15 The Contented Cow Pub & Music Bar����� back cover

Crossings at Carnegie����������������� 2 Custom Drapery and Blinds�����22 Dairy Queen����������������inside front eco gardens�������������������������������29 Eclectic Goat������������������������������ 8 Edward Jones����������������������������36 Faribault Chamber of Commerce�������������������������33 Fashion Fair�������������������������������� 9 Flair Furniture & Gift Gallery��33 Froggy Bottoms River Pub������20 Girls Nite Out����������������������������� 7 Gooter’s Dough to Go��������������19 Graphic Mailbox�����������������������16 Hideaway Coffeehouse & Wine Bar����������������������������25 Hogan Brothers�������������������������27 Johnny Angel’s Eatery & Pub��12 Johnson-Reiland Builders & Remodelers����������inside back J Grundy’s Rueb ‘N’ Stein���9, 14 Just Food Co-op������������������������30 Kildahl Park Pointe������������������17 Knecht’s Nurseries & Landscaping������������������47-48 KYMN Radio���������������������������35 L&M Bar and Grill�������������������27 Lakeville Area Arts Center������� 11

46 info@entertainmentguidemn.com

­ orthfield – ­Family restaurant offering authentic Mexican cuisine as N well as wonderful margaritas and more. Fireside Lounge and Supper Club – 37540 Goodhue Ave., Dennison

507/645-9992 • firesidelounge.net – Tu-Su 10am-close, closed Mon. A menu to satisfy all tastes, from burgers and sandwiches to steaks and shrimp dinners. Friday night fish special, Saturday night prime rib special and Sat/Sun breakfast specials. Like FiresideLoungeSupperClub on Facebook and receive a coupon for a free appetizer – limited time offer. Froggy Bottoms River Pub

Page 20

The HideAway Coffeehouse & Wine Bar

Page 25

Hogan Brothers

Page 27

J. Grundy’s Rueb ‘N’ Stein

Page 14

307 S. Water St., Northfield • 507/301-3611 • Tue-Wed 11am-10pm, Thu-Sat 11-1am, Sun 11am-9pm. Closed Mondays – Upper-class bar food including appetizers, salads, burgers and more. Open for lunch and dinner. Entrees starting at 5pm.

421 Division St., Northfield • 507/664-0400 Mon-Fri, 6am-10pm, Sat-Sun 7am-10pm – Cozy bistro atmosphere serving unique appetizers and sandwiches. Coffee drinks, wine and beer specialties.

415 Division St., Northfield • 645-6653 • Sun-Tue 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri and Sat 9 a.m.-10 p.m. – Hot hoagies since 1991. Also soup, sandwiches, Espresso, gourmet coffee and ice cream.

503 Division St., Northfield • ruebnstein.com • 507/645-6691 11am-close – Great burgers and famous Ruebens. Casual relaxing atmosphere. Huge selection of imported and domestic beers, fine spirits and wines. Game room, happy hour 3:30-6pm, Karaoke on Fridays at 9pm. Larson’s Printing����������������������14 Landmark Homes���������������������43 Left Field������������������������������������ 5 Mandarin Garden Restaurant���25 Maria’s Catering�����������������������10 Martha’s Eats & Treats��������������� 2 Merlin Players���������������������������� 4 The Measuring Cup�������������������� 9 David K. Miller, Pianist������������25 Monarch Gift Shop��������������������� 9 Montgomery Meander��������������18 Nest Midwest������������������������������ 8 Northfield 2014 Gypsy Jazz Jam Series����������������inside front Northfield Arts Guild����������������26 Northfield ArtsTown������������������� 2 Northfield Construction������������34 Northfield Dance Academy�������� 1 Northfield Garden Club������������15 Northfield Fireworks Ball��������23 Northfield Lines������������������������10 Northfield Liquor Store������������32 Northfield Olive Oils & Vinegars�����������������������������28 Northfield Retirement Community����������������������������18 Northfield Senior Center����������36 Paradise Center for the Arts�����34

Prairie’s Edge Humane Society� 20 Professional Pride Realty���������13 Quality Bakery��������������������������25 Quarterback Club���������������������16 Ragstock������������������������������������� 8 The Rare Pair������������������������8, 31 The Reiland Team�������inside back Riverwalk Market Fair��������������� 6 River Bend Nature Center��������37 Schmidt Homes Remodeling��������������inside back Shops of the Archer House��������� 9 The Sketchy Artist���������������������� 8 Spare Room Underground Shoppe��������������� 9 State Farm�������������������inside front Jan Stevens, Realtor�����������������27 Tagg 2����������������������������������������� 7 Tandem Bagels�����������inside front Taste of Northfield��������������������21 Timber Lodge Steakhouse������������� front banner Vohs Floors�������������������������������33 Welcome Services��������������������18 Winjum’s Shady Acres Resort of LeCenter����������������26 Witt Bros., Service, Inc�������������� 4

© The Entertainment Guide


Johnny Angel’s Eatery & Pub

Page 12

L&M Bar & Grill

Page 27

37592 Goodhue Ave., Dennison 507/645-6666 • Tue-Thu 4pm-2am, Fri-Sun 12pm-2am – American (Traditional), Italian, Pizza, Sandwiches. Nightly specials include Wednesday-Baby Back Ribs; ThursdaySpecialty Pasta; Friday-Fish Fry; Saturday-King Cut Prime Rib. 224 Railway St. N, Dundas • 507/645-8987 – Great burgers, cold beer, pizza, breakfast cooked to order and daily lunch & dinner specials. The friendly place to go in Dundas. Mandarin Garden Restaurant

Page 25

107 East 4th St., Northfield • 507/645-7101 – ­MandarinGardenNorthfield.com, Lunch: Wed-Fri 11:30am-2pm, Dinner: Tue-Thu 4:30-9pm. Fri/Sat, 4:30-10pm. Authentic Peking and Szechuan cuisine, freshly prepared, dine-in or take-out, since 1981. The Ole Store Restaurant – 1011 St. Olaf Ave., Northfield

olestorerestaurant.com • 507/786-9400 – Mon-Th 11am-9pm, Fri/ Sat 11am-10pm (breakfast: Sat 7am-12pm, Sun 7am-1pm) – Contemporary dining with neighborhood charm. Relax at a table with linens and fresh flowers or sit in our cozy lounge. A full menu including appetizers, rustic flatbread pizzas, salads, soups, entrees, steaks, fresh seafood, sandwiches and gourmet desserts. Reservations available.

Quality Bakery and Coffee Shop

Page 25

Quarterback Club

Page 16

410 Division St., Northfield • 645-8392 – Opens 6 a.m. Tue-Sat Owned and operated by the Klinkhammer family since 1949. Quality baking from scratch using delicious family recipes with no preservatives. Custom cakes, homemade breads, donuts, pies, cookies, espresso, lunch and more.

116 3rd St. W., Northfield • 507/645-7886 • Mon-Sat 6am-9pm, Sun 10:30am-8pm – Family friendly dining in Northfield for 37 years. House specialties include broasted chicken, BBQ ribs and flame-broiled hamburgers. Tandem Bagels

Inside Front

317 Division St., Northfield • tandembagels.com • 507/786-9977 Mon-Fri 7am-5:30pm, Sat 7am-5pm, Sun 7:30am-4pm. Genuine kettle-boiled and hearth-baked bagels. Made-from-scratch baked goods. Breakfast and lunch bagel sandwiches. Hot toasted specialty sandwiches. Fresh, seasonal, local and organic ingredients. Quality, soulful food in an inviting setting, leaving a small carbon footprint with eco-friendly serving materials. The Tavern of Northfield – 212 Division St., Northfield • 507/663-

0342 • ­tavernofnorthfield.com • Sun-Thu 6:30am-10pm, Fri-Sat 6:30am-11pm, lounge open daily 3pm-midnight. Located in the historic Archer House since 1984, The Tavern offers casual dining with a wide variety of homemade menu items and specials daily featuring fresh fish on Fridays and prime rib on Saturdays. The Tavern Lounge sports a deck overlooking the Cannon River, appetizers and a full bar with live music Thur-Sat. Winjum’s Shady Acres Restaurant

Page 26

7759 177th St W, Faribault, on Roberds Lake winjumsbarandgrill.com – Tue-Sun 11am, Fri and Sat open until 1am. Kitchen open until 10pm. – This bar and grill restaurant at Winjum’s Shady Acres Resort has a great view of Roberds Lake near Faribault and is open for lunch and dinner year round. Burgers, salads, sandwiches and pastas. Featuring fish, ribs and steaks. Friday fish fry and Saturday prime rib special.

Kid and Pet Safe Cleaning Carpet, Upholstery, Mold, Fire & Water, Tile & Grout Cleaning 1600 Cannon Lane • Northfield, MN 55057

507-645-5619 • 866-253-8049 SHOP OUR ENTIRE INVENTORY

APPLEAUTOS.com

1000 varieties of landscape plants

5

VALUABLE

$

Off

coupon on flip side

1601 Hwy 19 W Northfield, MN

507•645•5015

May 2014

• Huge retail nursery • Landscape design • Landscape installation

Experience • Knowledge • Customer Service • Guaranteed!

Faribault: 507/334-1774

Northfield: 507/650-0774

CarriageCleaning.com

SELF DOG WASH $11 per dog

1/2 hour limit

We provide all the supplies & clean up the mess!

www.Knechts.net Check us out online at www.entertainmentguidemn.com

47


BUSINESS CLASSIFIEDS Organic, Salad Bar, Grab & Go Deli. Local produce! 516 Water Street South www.justfood.coop • 507-650-0106.

Naturally safe, purely effective essential oils for health and wellness

Carol Fletcher-Andringa Independent Product Consultant

www.doterra.myvoffice.com/takecare 612-202-0201 • andringa21@gmail.com

Just Me Geralyn and Glass

Salt & water delivery, Commercial & Residential softeners, drinking water. 507/645-6621 • culliganwaterminnesota.com

thoughtful design quality building

www.justmegeralynandglass.com 507-581-1239

Mr. JST Technology conSulTing Mr. JST Technology Consulting

Gift Boxes Original Fused Glass Plates & Vases Alone Or With Olive Oil, Soap, Cheese, Chocolate, Dips Weddings, Moms, House Warming, Thank You, Business Gifts, Any Occasion

is your ON-SITE solution for training, support and maintenance. www.MrJST.com • 507/786-9578

jrbandr.com 507.366.1288 Faribault, MN

Center for Human Resources

A psychlogical counseling clinic

®

Unique Designs in Fresh Flowers

A quality resource serving Northfield and surrounding communities since 1976

REAL SCIENCE

REAL RESULTS

Weddings • Special Events • Sympathy Tributes 300 Railway St. N • Dundas 507-645-0008 JudysFloralDesign.com

Chad W. Fercho 866-543-5498

www.chr-northfield.com

www.cfercho.nerium.com cfercho@omorfoderma.com

Two GREAT Resources ~ One GREAT Shop

507-663-7937

17 Bridge Square Northfield, MN 55057

Find us on Facebook!

THE trusted go-to regional

Your hometown print shop

507-645-9304

CHILDREN ADOLESCENTS ADULTS COUPLES FAMILIES

entertainmentguidemn byallmeansgraphics

source for arts & entertainment

15 OIL CHANGE 507-663-7937 SAVE

$15-$30

Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning

$

99 Includes FREE car wash!

Up to 5 quarts of conventional oil. Vehicles that require dexos, synthetic oils, and diesels extra. Please present coupon upon arrival, not valid with other coupons. Expires July 31st, 2014 1600 Cannon Lane • Northfield, MN

507-645-5619 • 866-253-8049

~HOURS~

Some restrictions apply. Call for details.

Monday-Friday 9am-4:30pm 1200 S Hwy 3, Northfield, MN • cannonvalleyvet.com • 507-650-7208

10%

off entire retail purchase of food, dog & cat supplies, toys and treats.

48 info@entertainmentguidemn.com

APPLEAUTOS.com

Expires 5/31/14

5

$ Coupon has no cash value. Not valid with other offers. Expires 5/31/14

Off Coupon on qualifying purchase of $25 or more.

Huge retail nursery • Landscape design • Landscape installation

507•645•5015

www.Knechts.net

1601 Hwy 19 W, Northfield, MN

© The Entertainment Guide


507.366.1288

Experience Gets Results!

&BUILD

Design

your custom dream home

sed Rea en l

20

r to

1

#

family run • thoughtfully designed

“I grew up in the business, alongside my dad – building, developing, buying, selling.” Lic

Paul Reiland

jrbandr.com

YEARS

Brokerage 14 Years Running

CALL TODAY 952-292-5999 ASK FOR YOUR NO-OBLIGATION CONSULTATION reilandteam@edinarealty.com • reilandteam.edinarealty.com

“We are continually complimented on the beauty and workmanship of our new custom home.” - satisfied customer

Faribault, MN

507-663-0482

www.SchmidtHomes.com 1325 Armstrong Road Northfield, Minnesota

May 2014

Steven Schmidt Construction, Inc. is a certified Wellborn Cabinet, Inc. dealer.

Check us out online at www.entertainmentguidemn.com

49


50 info@entertainmentguidemn.com

Š The Entertainment Guide

May 2014 Entertainment Guide  

An array of happenings for the month of May in and around several southern Minnesota communities including music, arts, theater, food and ot...

Advertisement