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Take a Closer Look

For more than 130 years, St. Olaf College has been an integral part of the Northfield community. Rediscover what we have to offer with a visit to campus. Attend a concert by our world-renowned music ensembles See our stages come alive during a theater or dance production Cheer our 27 varsity athletic teams Worship with us at our daily chapel services

Your neighbors at Carleton College wish you a

warm and cheerful holiday season

Hike our natural lands

Visit the daily calendar of events at stolaf.edu.

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Holiday Party Options Available with Northfield Golf Club • Book a party in one of our rooms and experience delicious food prepared by our culinary team • We bring the food to you with our on-site catering service • Treat your guest to a new and exciting experience with our Chef preparing the food right in front of you in your home or business • Order from our banquet menu and take it with you

Contact: Jill Metz, Event Coordinator, at 507-645-4026 ext. 3 or jill@northfieldgolfclub.com

Upcoming Events at the Club Italian Pasta Night – Saturday, December 19 Breakfast with Santa – Sunday, December 20 All-You-Can-Eat Prime Rib Night – Saturday, December 26 New Year’s Dinner – Thursday, December 31 *Please call with questions and to make reservations

Friday Night Specials Salad and Pasta Bar – $13.95 Prime Rib (includes soup and salad) – $19.95

“Great Open Dining To The Public” Restaurant Hours Open for lunch Monday-Friday from 11am to 2pm Open for dinner Tuesday, Friday and Saturday from 5pm to 9pm

707 Prairie St. • Northfield • 507-645-4026

northfieldgolfclub.com

DECEMBER 2009

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Welcome Vol. 5, Issue 12

December 2009 17 Bridge Square Northfield, MN 55057

507/663-7937 neg@northfieldguide.com Publisher: Rob Schanilec By All Means Graphics Advertising: Kevin Krein Kevin@northfieldguide.com or 507/663-7937 Contributors: Susan Hvistendahl Locallygrownnorthfield.org Northfieldarttown.com Breanna Zarbinski Felicia Crosby Online: at northfieldguide.com! A flippin’ cool digital edition, downloadable PDF, archives and content submission form.

to the NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE™ Your No. 1 Guide to what’s going on in and around Northfield – music, food, fun.

Contents

Theater ..........................................................................7 Happenings – Up Close .....................................5-19 Sports .............................................................................7 Local Galleries .............................................................5 Local Focus ..................................................................4 A Month at a Glance........................................22-25 Who’s Playing At A Glance .................................. 28 Just Curious: Barbara Zaveruha..................38-39 Historic Happenings ...........................................34-36 Clubs, Classes and More ....................................... 27 Dining ......................................................................... 33 Advertisers’ Index ................................................... 33 Winter Walk Schedule ..............................................8 Beaux Arts Ball......................................................... 40 On the Cover:

The Northfield Arts Guild will celebrate their 50th Anniversary with a community-wide Beaux Arts Ball Dec. 19 in Carleton’s Great Hall. Tickets are going quickly. See Illustration by Felicia Crosby page 40 for details.

– Paid Advertisement –

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DECEMBER 2009

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WebDesignValley.com Locally Owned Web Design & Hosting Services Affordable web design starts at $195.00 Web hosting with Google Analytics for as low as $19.99/month

Free web design for non-profit organizations Contact us at

WebDesignValley@gmail.com or (507) 581-9451 4 NEG@northfieldguide.com

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Northfield Arts Guild ArtOnWater

Eclectic Goat

217 S. Water St. • 507/786-9700 artonwater.com • Th-Sa 3-7

418 Division St. • 507/786-9595

The Flaten Art Museum

“a favorite cup” – functional ceramics of Colleen Riley, Donovan Palmquist plus many other local and Minnesota-connected potters. Fine art from the potter’s hand – personal use – great gifts. Also continuing: “Fired Art – Glass, Clay” – fused stained glass by Northfield artist Tonya and Cayenne Kjerland, plus new oak-framed decorative American Opal(escent) Glass by Dean Kjerland.

Carleton College Art Gallery One N. College St. • 507/646-4469 carleton.edu/campus/gallery Gallery closed this month.

Craft Collective 200 Division St. • Tu-Sa 11-5, Th 11-7, Sun 12-4 • www.finecraftcollective.com Local artisans have joined ranks for your shopping pleasure and convenience. Artists are Nancy Carlson, Cathy Collison, Matt Eastvold, John Ehresmann, Meredith Fierke, Annie Larson, Heather Lawrenz, Marisa Martinez, Amy Merritt, Shona Murphy, David Peterson, Jessica Peterson White, Colleen Riley, Leigh Schrader, Amanda Stremcha, Leanne Stremcha, Carla Thompson and Jennifer Wolcott. Holiday reception: Dec. 20, 2-6 p.m.

Dittmann Center 1520 St. Olaf Ave. • 507/646-3556 stolaf.edu/depts/art/ • M-W & F 10-5, Th 10-8. Sa/Su, 2-5 Museum closes Dec. 14 until January. The Unorthodox art of James and Janice Tanner – through Dec. 13. Minnesota Artists James and Janice Tanner present mixed-media sculptures to enliven imaginations. Groot Gallery: First and Last (sabbaticals) – through Dec. 13. Tenured faculty members Ron Gallas and John Saurer exhibit work produced while on a 2008-09 sabbatical. Saurer teaches printmaking, drawing and sculpture and employs video, sculpture and prints in his cross-media work. Gallas teaches ceramics and sculpture. His whimsical and colorful art is bound to make you smile, even laugh. A Mighty Fortress, Far from Lake Wobegone – Rolvaag Library Gallery, through Jan. 3. Photographs by award-winning Wing Young Huie highlight immigrant Lutheran congregations in the Twin Cities. The display includes related publications and documents.

The Garage 18 Bridge Square • Th-Sa, 11-5 www.artoffuel.com the art of fuel

Grezzo Gallery 220 Division St., River Level 507/581-2161

“Annual Members Show” – Dec. 9-Jan. 2. A diverse mixed-media exhibit open to adult members of the Northfield Arts Guild. Opening reception Dec. 10, 7-9 p.m.

Paradise Center for the Arts 321 Central Ave., Faribault 507/332-7372 paradisecenterforthearts.org “Ivan Whillock – Watercolor Paintings” – Dec. 4-Jan. 9. Opening reception: Dec. 11, 5-7 p.m.

Studio Elements 16 Bridge Square • 507/786-9393 • Th 5-8, F/Sa 10-8, Su 12-5 • studioelements.net A monthly market of fine art, unique gifts and fun junk. Open Dec. 3-6.

swag 423 Division St. • 507/663-8870 Tu-Sa, 10-5:30 Minneapolis artist Amy Rice’s opaque acrylic, spray paint and gouache on found objects.

“Windows on Paradise” Art Gallery 904 Division St. So. • 507/645-5563 Landscapes and inspirational art by Mark Daehlin. Viewings by appointment. • Embroidery • Screen Printing • Cad Cut • Logo Design • Quality Clothing • Photo Transfers

Festival of

Wreaths

December 3: 5-9 pm; December 4: 10 am-5pm December 5: 11am-3 pm

View & bid on artist-made wreaths and ornaments & see 50th anniversary artwork PURCHASE ONE-OF-A-KIND WREATHS & GIFTS Ø

304 Division St. • 507/645-8877 www.northfieldartsguild.org • M-F 10-5, Sa 11-3, Sun 12-4 (through Dec. 20 only). “Festival of Wreaths” – Dec. 3 until 8, Dec. 4 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Dec. 5 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Silent auction for artistdecorated wreaths, artist-made ornaments for sale, 50th Anniversary Mugs, Craig Perman portraits and 50 Canvases on display. NAGCracker performances Dec. 3, 6:30 and 7:30 p.m.

Ø

nAgCRACKER Dance Performance December 3, 6:30 & 7:30 pm Free admission

Place your custom orders by December 12th for holiday giving. Choose from our nice selection of ready-made gifts. Add a name, etc. to personalize your gift. 427 Division St. Northfield MN 55057 (507) 645-6576 Toll Free: (800) 343-9715 Fax: (507) 645-0414

www.rockytopmn.com linda@rockytopnorthfield.com


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S P O R T S Here are the home games Tuesday, December 1

HOCKEY – Northfield Raiders Girls’ vs. Academy of Holy Angels, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, December 2

BASKETBALL – Carleton Men’s vs. Gustavus Adolphus College, 7:30 p.m. Friday, December 4

HOCKEY – St. Olaf Men’s vs. Hamline University, 7 p.m. BASKETBALL – Northfield Raiders Boys’ vs. Rochester Century, 7:30 p.m. Saturday, December 5

HOCKEY – St. Olaf Women’s vs. Hamline University, 7 p.m. Monday, December 7

BASKETBALL – St. Olaf Men’s vs. Hamline University, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, December 9

BASKETBALL – Carleton Women’s vs. St. Olaf, 5:45 p.m. Carleton Men’s vs. St. Olaf, 7:30 p.m. Thursday, December 10

NORDIC SKI – Northfield Raiders vs. Winona Senior, 3:30 p.m. WRESTLING – St. Olaf vs. Central College, 7 p.m. BASKETBALL – Northfield Raiders Girls’ vs. Henry Sibley, 7:30 p.m. Friday, December 11

WRESTLING – High School Invitational at Northfield High School, 5 p.m.

Theater Donata’s Gift

Dec. 4-5, 7:30 p.m.; Dec. 6, 2 p.m., Northfield Arts Guild Theater Inspired by the Italian Christmas legend of Old Begana, “Donata’s Gift” is a story of giving and redemption. Donata is an embittered and eccentric old woman accused of a terrible crime. A young orphan helps to show her and the community that there is a fresh beginning in generosity, love and acceptance. Filled with music and dancing and well seasoned with humor, this play is a perfect addition to the holiday season. Written and directed by Christine Kallman with music by Dan Kallman. Newly scored for chamber orchestra by the composer. Tickets: $15 adults, $10 students. Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat

Dec. 4-5 and 10-12, 7:30 p.m.; Dec. 6 and 13, 2 p.m. Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault This fit-for-the-holidays rock-n-roll retelling of the story of Joseph was Andrew Lloyd Webber’s first musical and continues today to be a great crowd pleaser.

Saturday, December 12

WRESTLING – High School Invitational at Northfield High School, 8 a.m. BASKETBALL – Carleton Men’s vs. St. Scholastica, 3 p.m. HOCKEY – St. Olaf Women’s vs. Gustavus Adolphus College, 7 p.m. Tuesday, December 15

Mike’s Bicycle Shop Trek • Gary Fisher • Surly

SWIM & DIVE – Northfield Raiders Boys’ vs. Faribault, 6 p.m. GYMNASTICS – Northfield Raiders Girls’ vs. Faribault, 6:30 p.m. BASKETBALL – Northfield Raiders Boys’ vs. Saint Thomas Academy, 7:30 p.m. HOCKEY – Northfield Raiders Girls’ vs. Farmington, 7:30 p.m.

general repair parts & accessories including Bontrager free pick-up and delivery winter tune-ups

Thursday, December 17

NORDIC SKI – Northfield Raiders vs. Prior Lake, 3:30 p.m. GYMNASTICS – Northfield Raiders Girls’ vs. Red Wing, 6:30 p.m. HOCKEY – Northfield Raiders Boys’ vs. Rochester Lourdes, 7:30 p.m.

416 Grastvedt Lane • Northfield, MN

507-645-9452

Friday, December 18

WRESTLING – Northfield Raiders vs. Hopkins, Chanhassen, 5 p.m. Saturday, December 19

BASKETBALL – Northfield Raiders Boys’ vs. Winona Senior, 2 p.m. Northfield Raiders Girls’ vs. Faribault, 7:30 p.m. HOCKEY – Northfield Raiders Girls’ vs. St. Paul Academy, 2 p.m. Monday, December 21

HOCKEY – Northfield Raiders Girls’ vs. Dodge County, 7:30 p.m. Thursday, December 22

HOCKEY – Northfield Raiders Boys’ vs. Faribault, 7:30 p.m.

Aquatic Pets “A Unique Pet Shop” Tropical & Marine Fish Aquariums & Supplies For All Pets

414 Division St. S. Northfield, MN 55057 (507) 663-1096 Steve & Liz Messner, Owners

DECEMBER 2009

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Downtown Riverwalk Market Faire to be a reality in Spring 2010 Each year, Northfield’s beautiful riverwalk lures thousands of residents and visitors to its geographic and aesthetic heart, the Cannon River. Beginning Spring 2010 – thanks in part to an incentive grant from the Southern Minnesota Initiative Foundation (SMIF) – there will be another reason to gather at the Cannon…the new Saturday morning Riverwalk Market Faire! To be held May through September, this upscale, collaborative open air market will feature Northfield-based artists, entertainers and food merchants offering art and handmade artisan goods, organic/local/ethnic foods and produce, gourmet baked goods and coffees, and fresh cut flowers. “The idea grew out of a SMIF Town Meeting in May where projects were presented that promoted local entrepreneurship,” commented Northfielder Gail Jones Hansen. “The concept was a top vote-getter, and it was clear there was great enthusiasm for an ongoing event that would in a practical way help local fine art and fine crafts people sell their wares. Because the fair also will feature many other goods and services, we hope to draw people who not only love art, but who view strolling, shopping and socializing along the Riverwalk a great way to spend a Saturday morning.” In addition to funding from SMIF, the Riverwalk Market Faire is supported by matching sponsorships and donations from Northfield individuals and businesses. It is a separate but related project

of the Riverwalk Arts Quarter, a newly established Minnesota nonprofit corporation. Dean Kjerland, Riverwalk Arts Quarter, has long championed the idea of a Saturday morning Market Faire, and has led the effort to seek funding from SMIF. “We know our town’s treasures, and we perhaps tend toward keeping them for ourselves,” he observed. “However, we can’t afford to do that; we lack industry and its substantial tax base. We want good dining, successful merchants, and a vibrant arts and entertainment scene, but we can’t achieve this by simply buying from each other. Visioning such as ArtsPlan 06 and the Riverwalk Arts Quarter recognizes the economic development potential of our historic and ‘people’ assets, including Northfield’s rich arts and culture resources and our colleges. Identifying and attracting those who share our values to visit, shop and consume creates partners in our growth and vitality.” The Market Faire is expected to be self-sustaining, generating at least a portion of its revenue from modest vendor fees. “Its success will be assured by local collaborations and regional promotion,” stated Kjerland. “We will support Northfield entrepreneurs by attracting a regional visitor base to experience our unique local art, ‘eats’ and entertainment.” Watch future issues of the Entertainment Guide for updates on Northfield’s newest downtown event!

Winter Walk 2010 offers festive holiday fun downtown on Dec. 3 Experience downtown Northfield by candlelight Dec. 3 from 5 to 9 p.m.! Stroll through unique shops, dine at fine restaurants, and enjoy caroling, sleigh rides, storytelling, luminarias, decorated storefronts and much more! 5 p.m. – Caroling by Northfield Middle School Choirs on Bridge Square and in the downtown area 5 p.m. – Dance performance by Northfield Dance Academy on Division Street 5 p.m. – Krumkake demonstration at Paper Petalum, 212 Division St. 5 p.m. –Treats and free one-week pass to Curves at the Curves table on Bridge Square 5-5:30 p.m. – Drive thru hot cider and donuts with live snowmen at Millstream Commons, 210 West 8th St. 5-7:30 p.m. – Spread warmth overseas! Hot dogs, fries and cocoa sale at VFW, 516 Division St. Proceeds will be used to purchase phone cards for military personnel stationed overseas. Donations also accepted. 5-8 p.m. – Animal adoption with the Rice County Humane Society at the KYMN Studio Building, 200 Division St. 5-8 p.m. – Christmas Café and free hot beverage at Moravian Church, 713 Division St. 5-8 p.m. – Picture with Santa at Community Resource Bank, 25 Bridge Square

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5-8:30 p.m. – Kids color a T-shirt for Christmas at Rocky Top Screen Printing & Embroidery, 427 Division St. 5-8:30 p.m. – Model railroad train display at Northfield Public Library, 210 Washington St. 5-9 p.m. – Fine Craft Collective presenting an assortment of handmade local art just north of KYMN Radio, 200 Division St. 5-9 p.m. – Christmas puppet shows, 6, 7 and 8 p.m., hospitality and box for prayer requests at Northfield Prayer Room, 315 ½ Division St. 5-9 p.m. – Various ensembles from the Northfield High School Band at Quality Bakery and Coffee Shop, 410 Division St. 5-9 p.m. – Trumpet carols by Steve Bonde strolling through the downtown area. Sponsored by The Rare Pair 5:30 p.m. – Caroling by Bethel Lutheran Church Adult Choir in downtown area 5:30 p.m. – Dance performance by DanceN-Fitness students outside Dance-n-Fitness Studio, 311 Division St. 5:30-6:15 p.m. – Caroling by I Cantanti in downtown area 5:30-8 p.m. – Pictures with Santa at First National Bank, 329 Division St. 6 p.m. – Caroling by Laura Baker Services in the downtown area 6-6:30 p.m. – Caroling and dance performance by Just for Kix in downtown area and near Bridge Square

6-7:30 p.m. – Interactive live Nativity (performances at 6, 6:30, 7 and 7:30) at Moravian Church, 713 Division St. 6-9 p.m. – Pictures with the James-Younger Gang sponsored by the Defeat of Jesse James Days Committee at Northfield Historical Society Museum, 408 Division St. 6-9 p.m. – Booksigning and premier of the Northfield History Series, “Pioneer Women.” Author Jeff Sauve will sign copies at Northfield Historical Society, 408 Division St. 6-9 p.m. – Chocolate tasting with B.T. McElrath at Present Perfect, 419 Division St. 6-9 p.m. –NAGCracker dance performance, 50th anniversary visual arts exhibit, Festival of Wreaths at Northfield Arts Guild, 304 Division St. 6:30 p.m. – Storytelling at Women & Kids on Division, 314 Division St. 6:30 p.m. – Dance performance by DanceN-Fitness students, outside Dance-n-Fitness Studio, 311 Division St. 6:30-7 p.m. – Dancing by the HiLiners near Bridge Square 7-7:30 p.m. – Caroling by the Madrigal Singers in the downtown area 7-8 p.m. – Northfield Trombones performance in the downtown area AND MORE…

© NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


HAPPE N I NG S TUESDAY, DECEMBER 1 Acoustic Jam Session • 8 p.m.

The Contented Cow Acoustic musicians of all levels gather to jam. WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2 Full Moon Snowshoe/Hike • 6:30 p.m.

River Bend Nature Center, Faribault Hike only, unless we get snow. Enjoy winter at night! Take a moonlit excursion around the trails. If there is six inches or more of snow, it will be on snowshoes. Otherwise, plan to hike. Dress for the weather! Rent a pair of snowshoes or bring your own. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3 Festival of Wreaths and NAGCracker Dance Performance

Northfield Arts Guild See page 5. Booksigning: Layne Kennedy and Greg Breining • 5:30 p.m.

St. Olaf Bookstore Authors of “A Hard-Water World: Ice Fishing and Why We Do It.” Wake-Robin • 6-8 p.m.

Bittersweet A local duo on strings playing Celtic and Civil War period tunes.

Winter Walk • 5-9 p.m.

Downtown Northfield Experience downtown Northfield by candlelight! Stroll through unique shops, dine at fine restaurants and enjoy caroling, sleigh rides, storytelling, luminaries, decorated storefronts and much more! Schedule of events on page 4. St. Olaf Christmas Festival 7:30 p.m.

Skoglund Center, St. Olaf This is the first of a four-day event. A service of hymns, carols, choral works and orchestral selections that celebrates the birth of Christ. The festival features more than 500 student musicians. Participating choral ensembles include the St. Olaf Choir, the Viking Chorus and the Chapel Choir, the Cantorei, the Manitou Singers and the St. Olaf Orchestra. Each group performs individually and as part of a mass ensemble. This event is listed as one of the five significant global holiday events in The New York Times International Datebook. Reserved tickets required.

305 Water St. S. • 664-0260 www.froggybottoms.com DECEMBER 2009

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HA P P E N I N G S

Thursday, Dec. 3 continued

Peter Ostroushko • 7:30 p.m.

Newhall Auditorium, Shattuck-St. Mary’s, Faribault Peter Ostroushko gathers some of the best musicians in the business for his “Holiday in the Heartland” project. He is regarded as one of the finest mandolin and fiddle players in acoustic music. For more than 25 years, he’s been a frequent performer on “A Prairie Home Companion” and has appeared on “Austin City Limits,” “Late Night with David Letterman” and even “Mr. Roger’s Neighborhood.” His brilliant compositions have been used in Ken Burns’ films. “Ostroushko’s gorgeous melodies are sometimes bittersweet, and like Ansel Adams’ photographs, capture the essence of a place.” – Minneapolis Star Tribune. Tickets: $15, $10 students.

Todd Thompson Trio • 8-11 p.m.

The Tavern Lounge Local acoustic music. Dolce Woodwind Quintet

The Contented Cow A favorite classical music quintet returns to play the Cow. Karaoke • 9:30 p.m.

Froggy Bottoms

Dolce Woodwind Quintet

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4 Annual Holiday Craft & Bake Sale • 9 a.m.-3 p.m.

Sayles Hill Great Space, Carleton Festival of Wreaths • 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

Northfield Arts Guild See page 5.

Monday-Saturday • 9 a.m.-10 p.m.

116 5th Street W., Northfield • 507-645-5153

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Norseman Band Mini Concert • 5 p.m.

Theater: Donata’s Gift 7:30 p.m.

Boe Chapel, St. Olaf Conducted by Paul Niemisto.

Northfield Arts Guild Theater See page 7.

Occasional Jazz • 5 p.m.

Theater: Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat 7:30 p.m.

The Contented Cow Mainstream classic jazz of Miles Davis, Theionious Monk, Duke Ellington, Dave Brubeck and others in the same style.

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault See page 7. DJ Music • 9 p.m.

Rueb ‘N’ Stein Karaoke

Booksigning: Betty Vox Hemstad • 5:30-7 p.m.

Norseman Band

Castle Rock N Roll Bar & Grill, Castle Rock

Buntrock Commons Bookstore, St. Olaf Author of “Wildflowers of the Boundary Waters.”

Chance Meeting

The Contented Cow A group of Northfield musicians that met “by chance” at local jams and other events. They are Scotty Friedow, John Hiscox, Chris Moen, Gail Moll, Neil Rowley and occasionally Richard Brooks – making for a real mix of styles and genres.

Chuck Godwin • 6-9 p.m.

Butler’s Steak & Ale Piano. The Norwegian Cowboy • 7-11 p.m.

The Tavern Lounge Old-school country, ’80s rock, alt-country and alt-rock. Songs you don’t want to admit you like. Not really a cowboy, but voted Northfield’s best male musician of 2008. St. Olaf Christmas Festival 7:30 p.m.

Skoglund Center, St. Olaf This is the second of a four-day event. See Dec. 3 description.

DECEMBER 2009

Mark Mraz

Froggy Bottoms Forget about life for awhile with the piano man. From Billy Joel to Kermit the Frog – Mraz tickles the ivories and entertains requests from the audience.

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SATURDAY, DECEMBER 5 Deck the Falls

Cannon Falls The official kick off to the holiday shopping season in Cannon Falls. Merchants will host holiday open houses featuring in-store specials, drawings and goodies. Holiday parade/lighting of the community tree begins at 4 p.m. from 4th Street to Mill Street. Meet Santa and Mrs. Claus 2-4 p.m. at the Hi-Quality Bakery. For complete schedule and details, visit www.cannonfalls.org/events.html.

Bagels & Birds • 8:30-9:30 a.m.

River Bend Nature Center, Faribault Join a naturalist in the warmth of the building to observe the bird (and other) visitors to our backyard habitat feeding area. Enjoy coffee and bagels in a relaxed atmosphere while watching the antics of wildlife. Free and open to all ages. Holiday Gift Market • 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

Bachrach Building (across from Paradise Center for the Arts), Faribault Artists, crafters and other creative individuals sell their wares. Jewelry, batik, purses, stationary, candles, memento boxes, creams, handmade soaps, textiles, vintage jewelry, antiques, woodworking, pottery/ceramics, basketry and more. Affordable, fun, unusual and creative! Festival of Wreaths • 11 a.m.-3 p.m.

Northfield Arts Guild See page 5. NHL Alumni Game • 2:45 p.m.

Northfield Ice Arena Admission: $5, kids 5 and under free. Followed by an Over 21 beer and wine tasting at the Northfield Golf Club at 6 p.m. (hors d’oeuvres 6-7). $25 in advance (through Papa Murphy), $30 at the door. Merry Tuba Christmas Concert • 3 p.m.

Buntrock Commons Crossroads, St. Olaf Booksigning: Peg Meier • 5:30-7 p.m.

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Buntrock Commons Bookstore, St. Olaf Author of “Bring Warm Clothes: Letters and Photos from Minnesota’s Past.” Jeff Ray • 7-11 p.m.

The Tavern Lounge Mighty fine guitar and harp. Ray walks a thin line between blues and folk, one minute strutting a slide-guitar ballad on a resonator guitar, the next minute blasting off into a one-man-band train ride. “Ray has a quality that could only come by blending the birthplaces of Bob Dylan and the blues.” (Des Moines Register).

© NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


Poker • 7:15 p.m.

St. Olaf Christmas Festival • 7:30 p.m.

Skoglund Center, St. Olaf This is the third of a four-day event. See Dec. 3 description. Theater: Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat • 7:30 p.m.

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault See page 7. Theater: Donata’s Gift • 7:30 p.m.

Northfield Arts Guild Theater See page 7. Karaoke • 9 p.m. Donata’s Gift

L&M Bar and Grill, Dundas

Froggy Bottoms Play Texas Hold ’em for points and prizes. Free! Nordic Jam • 8 p.m.

The Contented Cow Listen, jam, enjoy. Man Cave Monday

Paradise Center for the Arts Men, movies and madcap fun! (And beer...don’t forget the beer.) Take in films that are politically incorrect and horrifying to the feminine senses. Additional refreshments are available. Tickets: $5. TUESDAY, DECEMBER 8

DJ Music • 9 p.m.

Acoustic Jam Session • 8 p.m.

Rueb ‘N’ Stein

The Contented Cow Acoustic musicians of all levels gather to jam.

DJ Music

Froggy Bottoms

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10

Burning Chrome

Exhibit Opening Reception 7-9 p.m.

The Contented Cow Castle Rock N Roll Bar & Grill, Castle Rock

Northfield Arts Guild Annual members show. See page 5.

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 6

Wine Club • 7-9 p.m.

St. Olaf Christmas Festival • 3:30 p.m.

The Grand Events Center

Elvis Impersonator

Skoglund Center, St. Olaf This is the fourth of a four-day event. See Dec. 3 description.

Theater: Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat 7:30 p.m.

Booksigning: Beatrice Ojakangas 1:30-3 p.m.

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault See page 5.

Viking Theater, St. Olaf Author of “Petite Sweets: Bite-Size Desserts to Satisfy Every Sweet Tooth” and “The Best Casserole Cookbook Ever.”

Senior Dance Concert • 7:30 p.m.

Theater: Donata’s Gift • 2 p.m.

Joe Meyer • 8-11 p.m.

Northfield Arts Guild Theater See page 7.

Kelsey Theater, St. Olaf Senior dance majors choreograph and perform. The Tavern Lounge

Theater: Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat 2 p.m.

Study Hall

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault See page 7.

The Contented Cow This includes Peter Lynn and Terry VanDeWalker and these guys really rock the house – digging deep into obscure covers and original tunes.

Politics and a Pint • 6 p.m.

Karaoke • 9:30 p.m.

The Contented Cow Join discussions on local issues at this “lightly moderated” open forum. For topics, go to www.contentedcow.com. Northern Roots Session • 7 p.m.

Froggy Bottoms FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11 Exhibit Opening Reception • 5-7 p.m.

The Contented Cow Acoustic music with roots in the north, particularly the Nordic countries.

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault “Ivan Whillock – Watercolor Painting.” See page 5. Chuck Godwin • 6-9 p.m.

Quiz Night • 8 p.m.

The Contented Cow Stop in anytime to sign up. Foursomes compete for prizes and the chance to drink from the “Winner’s Mug” the week following their triumph!

Butler’s Steak & Ale Piano. Area 51 • 7-11 p.m. Northern Roots Sesssion

MONDAY, DECEMBER 7 Bling Bingo • 6:30 p.m.

Eagles Club Play bingo and support the Rice County Humane Society.

DECEMBER 2009

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The Tavern Lounge Take eight from the fields of education, architecture, communications and medicine; mix in guitars, drums, saxophones, harmonicas, voices and cowbells and you’ve got “music from the heavens.”

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HA P P E N I N G S Friday, Dec. 11 continued Theater: Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat • 7:30 p.m.

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault See page 5. Senior Dance Concert • 7:30 p.m.

Kelsey Theater, St. Olaf Senior dance majors choreograph and perform. DJ Music • 9 p.m.

Rueb ‘N’ Stein

New Moon Trio

The Contented Cow Here’s a taste of 100 years of popular tunes, random requests and spontaneous harmonies featuring Ross Currier on bass, Lance Heisler on drums and Justin London on guitar. Karaoke

Castle Rock N Roll Bar & Grill, Castle Rock

weCreate A Center for Collaborative

DJ Music

Froggy Bottoms

Design and Innovation

STEMScience, Education Technology,

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 12

Engineering & Math

BioScience Opening a Window to the Medical Field

Upcoming SSM Events: Jingle Bell Run • 8 a.m. registration, 9 a.m. run

Northfield Armory 5k run, 2k run/walk. Free long-sleeve Tshirt for adults; short-sleeve for registered children. Free jingle bells for everyone. Free holiday stockings to all children registered for the 2k walk – with stocking stuffers handed out along the route. Free coffee, cider and treats after the race. Live brass music. Horse-drawn wagon. Registration information at jinglebellrunwalk.org or by calling 507/645-8887.

14 NEG@northfieldguide.com

Christmas Walk Saturday, Dec.12, 2009 1:00 - 4:00 p.m. Figure Skating Exhibition, 4:30 p.m. Shattuck-St. Mary’s School 1000 Shumway Ave, Faribault

Christmas in the Chapel Sunday, Dec.13, 2009 4:00 & 7:00 p.m. Shattuck-St. Mary’s School 1000 Shumway Ave, Faribault

© NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


Christmas Walk • 1-4 p.m.

Theater: Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat 7:30 p.m.

Shattuck-St. Mary’s, Faribault Followed by skating exhibition at 4:30. Northfield Youth Choirs Winter Concert • 3 p.m.

Senior Dance Concert • 7:30 p.m.

Skinner Chapel, Carleton “Sing Allelu.”

Kelsey Theater, St. Olaf Senior dance majors choreograph and perform.

Jon Manners • 7-11 p.m.

The Tavern Lounge Voted Northfield’s best male musician of 2009! Playing guitar since 1957, Manners has been in bands including: The Stingrays, The Fabulous Intruders, The Critters, The Sticky Wickets, Yellow Fish, The Glass Eye, The Windjammers, No Dice, Rockaday Jonny, Diesel Goose, Zebra, Berceuse, Shriek, Neoneon, The Kitty Younger Band, Flight Time, The Great? Imposters. In the early ‘70s, he associated with Andrew Loog Oldham, one-time producer for The Rolling Stones. Now playing solo, he says “it’s easier to call a rehearsal and it gives me complete control over the songlist.”

DECEMBER 2009

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault See page 5.

High School Choir Concert • 7:30 p.m.

Skinner Chapel, Carleton “Traditions.” DJ Music • 9 p.m.

Rueb ‘N’ Stein DJ Music

Froggy Bottoms Chance Meeting

Butler’s Steak & Ale Northfield musicians that met “by chance” at local jams and other events. They are Scotty Friedow, John Hiscox, Chris Moen, Gail Moll, Neil Rowley and occasionally Richard Brooks.

Check us out online at www.northfieldguide.com

15


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 13 Theater: Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat 2 p.m.

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault See page 5.

Quiz Night • 8 p.m.

The Contented Cow Stop in anytime to sign up. Foursomes compete for prizes and the chance to drink from the “Winner’s Mug” the week following their triumph! MONDAY, DECEMBER 14

St. Olaf Philharmonia 3:30 p.m.

Poker • 7:15 p.m.

Froggy Bottoms Play Texas Hold ’em for points and prizes. Free!

Boe Chapel, St. Olaf Conducted by Martin Hodel.

Nordic Jam • 7:30 p.m.

Skate with Santa • 5:15-6:45 p.m.

Northfield Ice Arena Free open skating (with a non-perishable food item) with special guests. Limited rental skates available. Politics and a Pint • 6 p.m.

The Contented Cow Join discussions on local issues at this “lightly moderated” open forum. For topics, go to www.contentedcow.com. Northern Roots Session • 7 p.m.

The Contented Cow Acoustic music with roots particularly the Nordic countries.

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Nordic Jam

The Contented Cow This weekly open acoustic jam session plays from the Nordic countries and their immigrant communities in North America.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15 Acoustic Jam Session • 8 p.m.

The Contented Cow Acoustic musicians of all levels gather to jam. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 17 Northfield High School Orchestra Concert • 7 p.m.

Middle School Auditorium Mark Mraz • 8-11 p.m.

The Tavern Lounge Forget about life for awhile with the piano man. From Billy Joel to Kermit the Frog – Mraz tickles the ivories and entertains requests from the audience.

© NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


Karaoke • 9:30 p.m.

Froggy Bottoms The Favorite Child

Contented Cow FRIDAY, DECEMBER 18 Johnny Holm Dinner/Dance 6 p.m.

The Grand Event Center The evening begins at 6 p.m. with socializing and hors d’oeuvres, followed by your choice of five entrees and dessert, then hitting the dance floor at 8:30. Call 507/663-1773 to reserve your space. Johnny Holm Band Photo Daniel John Paul Garceau

Chuck Godwin • 6-9 p.m.

Butler’s Steak & Ale Piano.

Joey Heinz & Friends • 7-11 p.m.

The Tavern Lounge DJ Music • 9 p.m.

Rueb ‘N’ Stein DJ Music

Froggy Bottoms Karaoke

Castle Rock N Roll Bar & Grill, Castle Rock

Pam Gillespie

®

REALTOR

507-645-1181 pamgillespie@edinarealty.com

DECEMBER 2009

Check us out online at www.northfieldguide.com

17


HA P P E N I N G S

Friday, Dec. 18 continued

Area 51

The Contented Cow Take eight from the fields of education, architecture, communications and medicine; mix in guitars, drums, saxophones, harmonicas, voices and cowbells and you’ve got “music from the heavens.” SATURDAY, DECEMBER 19 Saturday Stroll • 9-10 a.m.

River Bend Nature Center, Faribault Each session explores a different area and has a different theme. Dress for the weather and wear comfortable winter boots. Free and open to all ages.

Beaux Arts Ball: Fire and Ice • 7 p.m.

Great Space, Carleton Lucky ticket holders will don evening wear from the elegant to the fantastical and celebrate the Northfield Arts Guild’s 50th Anniversary. It’ll be a night of fanciful finery and delectable fare, dancing to the Bend in the River Big Band, a premier choral performance by the Northfield Youth Choirs and other visual and performance arts. It’s a celebration of the arts – for the artist in each of us. Tickets: $60 ($50 NAG members), limited and available through the Northfield Arts Guild. See article on page 40. Joe Carey • 7-11 p.m.

The Tavern Lounge DJ Music • 9 p.m.

Rueb ‘N’ Stein Karaoke • 9 p.m.

L&M Bar and Grill, Dundas Spruce Top Review

DJ Music • 9 p.m.

The Rueb ‘N’ Stein DJ Music

Kids Event • 12-2 p.m.

Froggy Bottoms

Castle Rock ‘n’ Roll Bar & Grill Kids karaoke, crafts and a visit from Santa!

Spruce Top Review

Big Screen at the Bend • 1:30 p.m.

River Bend Nature Center, Faribault Watch movies on the big screen! It’s a fun and free activity for Saturday afternoons! Call or email RBNC for titles.

The Contented Cow Eclectic repertoire of urban folk that may be familiar and obscure. Interpretations of folks like John Prine, Steve Earle, Bob Dylan and the Beatles, traditional and contemporary Irish music and more.

AFFILIATED WITH: • Most Insurances • Employee Assistance Programs • Tricare

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• Individual, Couple & Family Therapy

• Adjustment & Life Transitions

• Child, Adolescent & Adult Services

• Anxiety & Depression

• Services for Problem Gambling & Affected Others

• Grief & Loss

• Services for Military Families • Stress Management

© NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 20

MONDAY, DECEMBER 21

Christmas Carol Sing • 9:30 a.m.

Poker • 7:15 p.m.

St. Peter’s Lutheran Church Dr. Anton Armstrong conducts the St. Olaf Choir. Holiday Gallery Reception • 2-6 p.m.

Craft Collective Politics and a Pint • 6 p.m.

The Contented Cow Join discussions on local issues at this “lightly moderated” open forum. For topics, go to www.contentedcow.com.

Froggy Bottoms Play Texas Hold ’em for points and prizes. Free! Nordic Jam • 8 p.m.

The Contented Cow This weekly open acoustic jam session plays from the Nordic countries and their immigrant communities in North America. TUESDAY, DECEMBER 22 Acoustic Jam Session • 8 p.m.

Northern Roots Session • 7 p.m.

The Contented Cow Acoustic musicians of all levels gather to jam.

The Contented Cow Quiz Night • 8 p.m.

The Contented Cow Stop in anytime to sign up. Foursomes compete for prizes and the chance to drink from the “Winner’s Mug.”!

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 26 Snowshoe Hike • 1 p.m.

River Bend Nature Center, Faribault An outdoor adventure for the whole family trekking across the tundra in search of winter life. Rent snowshoes or bring your own.

The holidays are a time of giving and receiving...

Just make sure it’s not the flu.

Save time and money!

No appointments necessary

We Care for Everyone – all ages from infants to geriatrics. We are an alternative to the hospital ER or your private physician’s office when you seek treatment for an urgent Clinic Hours illness or injury. Mon-Fri 8am to 8pm

507-664-9999

DECEMBER 2009

Saturday 9am to 5pm Sunday 12pm to 5pm

Check us out online at www.northfieldguide.com

19


CUISINE of INDIA

Open for lunch & dinner Lunch Buffet ~ A La Carte Catering Take-out Parties Welcome GOOD BEER GOOD FOOD GOOD COMPANY

New Year’s Eve Party Live Music Free Appetizers at 9 pm Free Champagne at Midnight

Merry Christmas from all our staff Northfield 507-645-2462 • 214 Division St. S.

Sundays • Politics & A Pint 6pm • Northern Roots Jam 7:30pm • Quiz Night 8pm

Mondays Nordic Jam

Tuesdays Acoustic Jam Open 3 pm www.contentedcow.com 302 Division St. • Northfield 20 NEG@northfieldguide.com

www.chapati.us © NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


The Norwegian Cowboy • 7-11 p.m.

The Tavern Lounge Old-school country, ’80s rock, alt-country and altrock. Songs you don’t want to admit you like. Not really a cowboy, but voted Northfield’s best male musician of 2008. DJ Music • 9 p.m.

Rueb ‘N’ Stein Karaoke • 9 p.m.

L&M Bar, Dundas Karaoke

Castle Rock N Roll Bar & Grill, Castle Rock Bridgewater Ramblers

The Contented Cow This local group is best described as a variety band focusing on country/folk and variety type music with a strong vocal orientation. Artists and groups covered include Susan Ashton, The Beatles, Greg Brown, Crosby, Stills & Nash, The Eagles, John Fogerty, Dan Fogelberg, John Gorka, Faith Hill, Michael Johnson, Allison Krause, Gordon Lightfoot, Kenny Loggins, Paul Simon, Al Stewart and Doc Watson. SUNDAY, DECEMBER 27 Politics and a Pint • 6 p.m.

The Contented Cow Join discussions on local issues at this “lightly moderated” open forum. For topics, go to www.contentedcow.com. Northern Roots Session • 7 p.m.

The Contented Cow Listen, jam, enjoy. Quiz Night • 8 p.m.

The Contented Cow Stop in anytime to sign up. Foursomes compete for prizes and the chance to drink from the “Winner’s Mug.”! MONDAY, DECEMBER 28 Poker • 7:15 p.m.

Froggy Bottoms Play Texas Hold ’em for points and prizes. Free! Nordic Jam • 8 p.m.

The Contented Cow This weekly open acoustic jam session plays from the Nordic countries and their immigrant communities in North America. TUESDAY, DECEMBER 29 Acoustic Jam Session • 8 p.m.

The Contented Cow Acoustic musicians of all levels gather to jam. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 31 Karaoke • 9:30 p.m.

Froggy Bottoms New Year’s Eve Party

The Contented Cow Live music, free appetizers at 9, free champagne at midnight.

DECEMBER 2009

Check us out online at www.northfieldguide.com

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SUNDAY

MONDAY

r e b m e c e D TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

2

1

Full Moon Snowshoe/Hike 6:30 p.m., River Bend Nature

Acoustic Jam Session • 8 p.m.

Center, Faribault

The Contented Cow

503 503 Division Division St. St. •• Northfield Northfield •• 645-6691 645-6691

6

7

8

St. Olaf Christmas Festival 3:30 p.m.

Bling Bingo • 6:30 p.m.

Acoustic Jam Session • 8 p.m.

Eagles Club

The Contented Cow

Skoglund Center, St. Olaf

Poker • 7:15 p.m.

Booksigning: Beatrice Ojakangas • 1:30-3 p.m.

Froggy Bottoms

Viking Theater, St. Olaf Theater: Donata’s Gift 2 p.m., NAG Theater Theater: Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat • 2 p.m.

9

Nordic Jam • 8 p.m.

The Contented Cow Man Cave Monday

Paradise Center for the Arts

GET IN THE GUIDE

Paradise Center, Faribault Politics and a Pint • 6 p.m.

The Contented Cow Northern Roots Session 7 p.m., The Contented Cow Quiz Night • 8 p.m.

The Contented Cow

Here’s how it works – we list happenings for free. I know – that’s cool and a great service to the community – but we want our publication to be a great resource for our readers to get out and take it in. Of course, we love our advertisers – and we’ll love you, too, if you get us your happenings information AND advertise. Our rates are affordable and you get a FULL MONTH OF COOL

22 NEG@northfieldguide.com

EXPOSURE! But whether you advertise or not – you need to get information our way: title, time, place, cost, description, photo(s). We’re easy to work with so don’t be shy. There’s a form online at northfieldguide. com, give us a call, 507/663-7937, or e-mail to neg@northfieldguide.com – we’re nice people. And to advertise – ask for Kevin.

© NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

3

4

5

Festival of Wreaths and NAGCracker Dance Performance

Annual Holiday Craft & Bake Sale 9 a.m.-3 p.m.

Northfield Arts Guild

Sayles Hill Great Space, Carleton

Deck the Falls, Cannon Falls Bagels & Birds • 8:30-9:30 a.m.

Booksigning: Layne Kennedy and Greg Breining • 5:30 p.m.

Festival of Wreaths • 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

St. Olaf Bookstore

Norseman Band Mini Concert • 5 p.m.

Wake-Robin • 6-8 p.m., Bittersweet Winter Walk • 5-9 p.m.

Boe Chapel, St. Olaf

Downtown Northfield

The Contented Cow

St. Olaf Christmas Festival •7:30 p.m.

Skoglund Center, St. Olaf

Booksigning: Betty Vox Hemstad 5:30-7 p.m., Buntrock Commons

Peter Ostroushko • 7:30 p.m.

Bookstore, St. Olaf

Shattuck-St. Mary’s, Faribault Todd Thompson Trio • 8-11 p.m.

Chuck Godwin • 6-9 p.m., Butler’s The Norwegian Cowboy • 7-11 p.m.

The Tavern Lounge

The Tavern Lounge

Dolce Woodwind Quintet

St. Olaf Christmas Festival • 7:30 p.m.

The Contented Cow

Skoglund Center, St. Olaf

Karaoke • 9:30 p.m., Froggy Bottoms

Theater: Donata’s Gift • 7:30 p.m.

Northfield Arts Guild

Occasional Jazz • 5 p.m.

Northfield Arts Guild Theater Theater: Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat • 7:30 p.m.

River Bend Nature Center, Faribault Holiday Gift Market • 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

Bachrach Building, Faribault Festival of Wreaths • 11 a.m.-3 p.m.

Northfield Arts Guild NHL Alumni Game • 2:45 p.m.

Northfield Ice Arena Merry Tuba Christmas Concert • 3 p.m.

Buntrock Commons, St. Olaf Booksigning: Peg Meier • 5:30-7 p.m.

Buntrock Commons Bookstore, St. Olaf Jeff Ray • 7-11 p.m., Tavern Lounge St. Olaf Christmas Festival • 7:30 p.m.

Skoglund Center, St. Olaf Theater: Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat • 7:30 p.m.

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault Theater: Donata’s Gift • 7:30 p.m.

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault DJ Music • 9 p.m., Rueb ‘N’ Stein Karaoke, Castle Rock N Roll Bar & Grill, Castle Rock Chance Meeting, The Contented Cow Mark Mraz, Froggy Bottoms

Northfield Arts Guild Theater Karaoke • 9 p.m., L&M, Dundas DJ Music • 9 p.m., Rueb ‘N’ Stein DJ Music. Froggy Bottoms Burning Chrome, The Contented Cow Elvis Impersonator, Castle Rock N Roll Bar & Grill, Castle Rock

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Exhibit Opening Reception • 7-9 p.m.

Exhibit Opening Reception • 5-7 p.m.

Northfield Arts Guild

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault Chuck Godwin • 6-9 p.m., Butler’s Area 51 • 7-11 p.m., The Tavern Lounge

Jingle Bell Run • 8 a.m. registration, 9 a.m. run, Northfield Armory Christmas Walk • 1-4 p.m.

Wine Club • 7-9 p.m., The Grand Theater: Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat • 7:30 p.m.

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault

Theater: Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat • 7:30 p.m.

Senior Dance Concert • 7:30 p.m.

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault

Kelsey Theater, St. Olaf

Senior Dance Concert • 7:30 p.m.

Joe Meyer • 8-11 p.m., Tavern Lounge

Kelsey Theater, St. Olaf DJ Music • 9 p.m., Rueb ‘N’ Stein New Moon Trio, The Contented Cow Karaoke, Castle Rock N Roll Bar & Grill, Castle Rock DJ Music, Froggy Bottoms

Study Hall, The Contented Cow Karaoke • 9:30 p.m., Froggy Bottoms

DECEMBER 2009

Shattuck-St. Mary’s, Faribault Northfield Youth Choirs Winter Concert • 3 p.m.

Skinner Chapel, Carleton Jon Manners • 7-11 p.m.

The Tavern Lounge Theater: Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat • 7:30 p.m.

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault Senior Dance Concert • 7:30 p.m.

Kelsey Theater, St. Olaf High School Choir Concert • 7:30 p.m.

Skinner Chapel, Carleton DJ Music • 9 p.m., Rueb ‘N’ Stein DJ Music, Froggy Bottoms Chance Meeting, Butler’s Steak & Ale

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23


SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

13

14

15

Theater: Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat • 2 p.m.

Poker • 7:15 p.m.

Acoustic Jam Session • 8 p.m.

Froggy Bottoms

The Contented Cow

Paradise Center, Faribault St. Olaf Philharmonia 3:30 p.m., Boe Chapel, St. Olaf Skate with Santa • 5:156:45 p.m., Northfield Ice Arena Politics and a Pint • 6 p.m.

WEDNESDAY

16

Nordic Jam • 7:30 p.m.

The Contented Cow

The Contented Cow Northern Roots Session 7 p.m., The Contented Cow Quiz Night • 8 p.m.

The Contented Cow

20

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Christmas Carol Sing 9:30 a.m., St. Peter’s Church Holiday Gallery Reception 2-6 p.m., Craft Collective Politics and a Pint • 6 p.m.; Northern Roots Session 7 p.m.,: Quiz Night • 8 p.m.

Poker • 7:15 p.m.

Acoustic Jam Session • 8 p.m.

Froggy Bottoms

The Contented Cow

23

Nordic Jam • 8 p.m.

The Contented Cow

The Contented Cow

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28

29

Politics and a Pint • 6 p.m.

Poker • 7:15 p.m.

Acoustic Jam Session • 8 p.m.

The Contented Cow

Froggy Bottoms

The Contented Cow

Northern Roots Session 7 p.m., The Contented Cow Quiz Night • 8 p.m.

Nordic Jam • 8 p.m.

The Contented Cow

The Contented Cow

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THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

17

18

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Northfield High School Orchestra Concert • 7 p.m., Middle School

Johnny Holm Dinner/Dance • 6 p.m.

Saturday Stroll • 9-10 a.m.

The Grand Event Center

River Bend Nature Center, Faribault

Mark Mraz • 8-11 p.m., Tavern Lounge

Chuck Godwin • 6-9 p.m., Butler’s Joey Heinz & Friends • 7-11 p.m.

Kids Event • 12-2 p.m.

The Tavern Lounge DJ Music • 9 p.m., Rueb ‘N’ Stein DJ Music, Froggy Bottoms Karaoke, Castle Rock N Roll Bar & Grill, Castle Rock Area 51, The Contented Cow

Big Screen at the Bend • 1:30 p.m.

Karaoke • 9:30 p.m., Froggy Bottoms The Favorite Child, Contented Cow

Castle Rock ‘n’ Roll Bar & Grill River Bend Nature Center, Faribault Beaux Arts Ball: Fire and Ice • 7 p.m.

Great Space, Carleton Joe Carey • 7-11 p.m., Tavern Lounge DJ Music • 9 p.m., Rueb ‘N’ Stein Karaoke • 9 p.m., L&M, Dundas DJ Music • 9 p.m., The Rueb ‘N’ Stein DJ Music, Froggy Bottoms Spruce Top Review, Contented Cow

24

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26 Snowshoe Hike • 1 p.m.

River Bend Nature Center, Faribault The Norwegian Cowboy • 7-11 p.m.

Get a FULL MONTH OF COOL EXPOSURE! Advertise: 507/663-7937 or kevin@northfieldguide.com

The Tavern Lounge DJ Music • 9 p.m., Rueb ‘N’ Stein Karaoke • 9 p.m., L&M Bar, Dundas Karaoke, Castle Rock N Roll Bar & Grill, Castle Rock Bridgewater Ramblers, The Cow

31 Karaoke • 9:30 p.m.. Froggy Bottoms New Year’s Eve Party • Contented Cow

DECEMBER 2009

Check us out online at www.northfieldguide.com

25


Get home safely from all your holiday parties. Please choose a Designated Driver.

Happy Holidays CCB

from Your Local Budweiser Distributor College City Beverage, Inc. Dundas, MN

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Š NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


Clubs, Classes and More… Cub Scout Pack 300 – 612/490-4048 www.cubs300.org Glass Garden Beads Beading Class – 507/645-0301

First and third Mondays Just Food Co-op – 507/650-0106

Tuesdays: Knitting Night, 7-9 p.m., 507/645-6331 – knit, chat, share ideas and get help. Cooking through the Co-op: Soup Basics – Dec. 3, 6:30-8 p.m. Utilize leftovers and make the basis of a soup or stew. A slow cooker chicken stock will be made along with a flavorful stove top vegetarian stock. Each participant will make their own scratch noodles to take home. Recipes and ingredients provided. Bring containers for leftovers. Menus subject to change because the freshest local ingredients are used. Cost: $18 (includes meal); preregister at the front of the store. How to: Food Chemistry – Dec. 5, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Why does bread rise? What is the difference between bread flour, pastry flour and all purpose? Are milk and water interchangeable in a recipe? Learn why some things work and others don’t in home cooking. Come with questions or recipes you’d help with. Cost: $12; preregister at the front of the store. Gluten-Free for the Holidays – Dec. 10, 7 p.m. Whether you are the host or the guest you can have delicious, stress-free, glutenfree holiday meals. Amy Leger will recommend tasty gluten-free holiday fare and provide recipes for Christmas, Hanukkah and New Year’s. Learn how to ensure the holiday turkey does not contain gluten, as well as how to prepare gluten-free stuffing and pie crust. Amy will provide GF recipes for standard holiday baked goods and show you how to convert other recipes to gluten-free. Cost: $8 members, $10 non-members. Preregister and pre-pay by phone or with a cashier. The Key

Wednesdays: College Prep, 7-8:30 p.m. – learn about the ACT, financial aid, how to write a college essay, etc. The Key will pay for college applications for those not able. Most who show up are paired with a caring and knowledgeable adult. Thursdays: Art Night, evening Sundays: Writing Workshop, 3-5 p.m. – for details, call 507/6630715. Northfield Arts Guild – 507/645-8877 – Find classes for kids

and adults at www.northfieldartsguild.org KidsARTS for ages 4-6 now offers two class time options: Tuesday 9:30-11:30 a.m. or Thursday 11 a.m.-noon). Two hours of fun and learning in the arts, especially designed for preschoolers, kindergartners and home-schoolers. $64(nonmembers)/$58(members)/4-week session. Start anytime. Ballroom Dance – get ready for the Beaux Arts Ball! Two choices remain in the series: Rhumba/ChaCha with Ian Hathaway, Sat., Dec. 5, 1-3 p.m., $25/person; and An Evening of Ballroom Dance with Brian Sostek, Sat., Dec. 12, 6:30 p.m., $15/person Music Together – Thur., Dec. 10, 9:15-9:45 a.m. or Wed., Dec. 30, 10-10:30 a.m. Try a free sample class of this great music and movement class for parents and children ages 0-5.

DECEMBER 2009

Northfield Buddhist Meditation Center – Children’s Circle

Class (ages 3-9) – Sundays, 3-4 p.m. Children and their parents meditate, do yoga and learn about Buddhism in a fun, peaceful atmosphere of exploration. Everyone welcome. Northfield Public Library – 507/645-6606 - Closed Dec. 24

First Steps Early Literacy Center: Monday, Friday and Saturdays, 10 a.m.-noon Infant Lapsit: Tuesdays, 10 a.m. Toddler Rhyme Time: Wednesdays, 10 a.m. Pre-School Story Time: Thursdays, 10 a.m. (no storytimes the week of Dec. 21 or Dec. 28-31.) Reindeer Games – Dec. 28-30, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. and 1-3 p.m. –The meeting room will be open for kids of all ages (under five need a parent or caregiver present) to play games of all sorts. No charge. Supervised. Paradise Center for the Arts – 612/216-1206 More classes and activities at www.paradisecenterforthearts.org. Open Textile Lab (Ages 15+) – Second Monday of the month, 6:308:30 p.m. – Get acquainted with the textile lab and do a small project planned by instructors. Registration encouraged. $10 members, $15 nonmembers. Instructors: Deb Johnson and Arlene Wolf. Open Studio – Wednesdays (by appointment), 6-8 p.m. and Saturdays, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. – Preregistration is recommended. Members receive ten hours of open studio time with their paid membership. Cost is $6/hour. Make Holiday Figurines from Clay – Dec. 5, 10:30-11:30 a.m. – Kids and adults are welcome! $5/person. Make Wrapping Paper for the Holidays – Dec. 5, 12-1 p.m. – Kids and adults work side-by-side using clay to have fun and create original exciting gifts for the whole family. $40/members; $50/nonmembers. PJ’s Fabric and Crafts, 507/332-7151 – Classes include crocheting,

knitting, sewing, quilting and more! For a full calendar schedule visit, 111.emailcontact.com/calendar/view/5132 River Bend Nature Center, 332-7151 – go to www.rbnc.org. Want to list a club or a class? Call for information – 507/663-7937 or email Kevin@northfieldguide.com

Check us out online at www.northfieldguide.com

27


Who’s Playing at a Glance Acoustic Jam Session.............................................. Tuesdays – Cow Area 51..................................................11 – Tavern, Dec. 18 – Cow Bend in the River Big Band .....Dec. 19, Beaux Arts Ball, Carleton Bridgewater Ramblers...............................................Dec. 26 – Cow Burning Chrome .........................................................Dec. 5 – Cow Joe Carey ................................................................Dec. 19 – Tavern Chance Meeting....................................Dec. 4 – Cow; 12 – Butler’s Dolce Woodwind Quintet ..........................................Dec. 3 – Cow The Favorite Child ....................................................Dec. 17 – Cow Chuck Godwin ..................................................... Fridays – Butler’s Joey Heinz & Friends ............................................Dec. 18 – Tavern High School Choir .............................................Dec. 12 – Carleton High School Orchestra ............................Dec. 17 – Middle School Johnny Holm Band ................................................Dec. 18 – Grand Jon Manners ..........................................................Dec. 12 – Tavern Mark Mraz ..............................................Dec. 4 – Frog; 17 –Tavern Joe Meyer ...............................................................Dec. 10 – Tavern New Moon Trio .........................................................Dec. 11 – Cow

Will I see you at the Ball? December 19 – Carleton’s Great Hall A Night not to be Missed! See page 40.

Nordic Jam ..............................................................Mondays – Cow Norseman Band......................................................Dec. 4 – St. Olaf Norwegian Cowboy .......................................... Dec. 4, 26 – Tavern Northern Roots Session .......................................... Sundays – Cow

Northfield Youth Choirs

Northfield Youth Choirs ....................................Dec. 12 – Carleton

WINTER CONCERT

Peter Ostroushko..................................................Dec. 3 – Shattuck Jeff Ray ......................................................................Dec. 5 –Tavern Spruce Top Review ....................................................Dec. 19 – Cow St. Olaf Philharmonia ..........................................Dec. 13 – St. Olaf Study Hall ..................................................................Dec. 10 – Cow Sweet Jazz ................................Dec. 19 – Beaux Arts Ball, Carleton

Sing Allelu

Todd Thompson Trio ............................................. Dec. 3 – Tavern Wake-Robin .......................................................Dec. 3 –Bittersweet

studio elements a monthly market of fine art, unique gifts & fun junk

December 12 at 3 p.m. Carleton College, Skinner Chapel All are welcome. Freewill offering.

december 3-6 16 bridge square, northfield, minnesota 55057 507-786-9393 • www.studioelements.net

28 NEG@northfieldguide.com

© NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


– Paid Advertisement –

Northfield Retirement Community Innovation. Choice. Tradition. It is the mission of Northfield Retirement Community to offer a continuum of care and living services in a caring Christian environment to help older adults realize their maximum physical, spiritual, psychological and social potential.

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Fall 20 09

Northfield Retirement Community Celebrates 40 Years of Service

Choice

Our 40th Anniversary year continues with more celebrations and receptions.

et, seniors who are dealing with the need for housing and supportive services have too often been faced with only unpleasant options and little or no choice. At Northfield Retirement Community we recognize the dilemma seniors may face and the need for positive choices in a changing environment. Over the years, the number of life-enhancing choices, options, and amenities available in senior living has grown dramatically. Technology has begun to play an important role in providing safety, quality of life,

E

arly winter will bring a 40th Anniversary Recognition Gettogether for friends of NRC. In the spring, the general public will join us for our 40th Anniversary Dinner Gala and Silent Auction. Further details will be included in a future newsletter and will be added to our website. We celebrate the blessings NRC has received and shared with others. We are grateful to members of our Board and staff who have demon-

strated their dedication in service to our elder community. For 40 years, NRC has provided living services and health care to the area’s senior citizens, and in doing so, has earned the appreciation of family members and a reputation in the community for excellence and innovation in providing a range of living options for the important older adults NRC is honored to serve.

Our Mission

A Christian Community of Senior Housing with Services

When making decisions in today’s society, we have come to expect choices, options, and the likelihood of a positive outcome.

:

continued on page 2

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DECEMBER 2009

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29


– Paid Advertisement –

Northfield Retirement Community Honors Seniors and their Desire for Choice Our Vision at Northfield Retirement Community (NRC) is to be a leader in creating warm, safe, and comfortable housing choices for seniors.

'

rom the care center to independent living, NRC services and options are designed to meet a wide variety of seniors’ needs. Understanding this diversity of need has driven the development of a broad spectrum of housing choices. Our housing choices for independent seniors offer market-rate and subsidized rental options for people who are active, independent, and 55 and over. For seniors needing special care, NRC offers: t 4LJMMFE/VSTJOH'PSUIPTFSFquiring 24-hour long-term care or short-term rehabilitation. t "TTJTUFE-JWJOH1SPWJEFTBOE

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For independent seniors, supportive service choices are also available: t $BUFSFE4FSWJDFT1SPWJEFT supportive care by health care professionals for those living in an independent environment. t )PNF$BSF1SPWJEFTIFBMUIPS social assistance for those wish-

ing to stay in their homes. t )PVTJOH8JUI4FSWJDFTo1SPvides sleeping accommodations. This choice may also include one or more health related services for an additional fee. Enhancing these choices, the NRC campus includes a chapel with regular services, a library with Internet access, a cafÊ, and a convenience store, along with dining rooms and a variety of lounges. Additionally, the campus includes exercise and activity areas, a beauty and barbershop, as well as on-site medical and dental clinics. Northfield’s first cooperative for adults 55 years and above of-

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communication, care coordination, peace of mind and reduction of health care costs. Recognizing the potential benefits of advanced technology, Northfield Retirement Community JTXPSLJOHXJUI)FBMUITFOTF BDPNpany that has developed a system that can monitor an individual’s home activities and automatically call for help if it detects a possible problem. The remote monitoring system detects significant changes in an individual’s daily living activities, such as sleeping, eating or toileting. Changes in these activities may be QBHF

coordinates both health and personal services for those needing 24-hour assistance or supervision. t .FNPSZ$BSF1SPWJEFTBTTJTtance with daily living activities for individuals with dementia, including Alzheimer’s, and other related disorders.

early indicators that call for caregiver intervention. Use of the system can enable individuals to stay in their current living situation, forestalling the need for a more expensive living environment. Another advancement occurring in senior campuses is the provision of options for diversified living environments that offer not only different levels of care but also the flexibility to accommodate varying levels of income. Because Northfield Retirement Community recognizes the need for positive choices, we have

created building projects designed to increase occupancy and services beyond skilled nursing care. Our campus offers townhouses, cooperative living, independent apartments, assisted living, assisted living plus, NFNPSZDBSF BOEDBSFTVJUFToUJFE together with a core emphasis on an active life style. Choices abound at Northfield Retirement Community. To learn and see more, visit our web site at www.northfieldretirement.org for video tours and descriptions of our housing options and amenities.

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Š NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


– Paid Advertisement –

NRC TODAY fers a new retirement opportunity UPUIFDPNNVOJUZ,JMEBIM1BSL 1PJOUFJTBOBĂŞPSEBCMFBMUFSOBUJWFUP home ownership with a community lifestyle and freedom from home maintenance responsibilities. While NBOBHFECZ/3$ ,JMEBIM1BSL 1PJOUFJTDPNQMFUFMZPXOFEBOE operated by its members. Whether your need is for nursing care, assisted living, or

independent housing, there are options available at Northfield Retirement Community. The choice is yours. Our pledge is to continue to be innovative and in touch with the ever-changing needs of our community.

T

NRC Today, a publication of the NRC Foundation, is published four times a year. Fall 2009 7PMVNF /VNCFS President and CEO: ,ZMF/PSEJOF -/)"

Tonic Sol-fa Rocks NRC’s 40th Anniversary onic Sol-fa, a standout .JEXFTUFSOBDBQQFMMBHSPVQ  wowed everyone attending NRC’s 40th Anniversary Concert with their great music and impres-

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sive harmonies. A good turn-out crowd enjoyed the concert, helped support NRC Foundation and celebrated our 40 years of service to the older adults of the Northfield area.

Editor: *OHSJE"OEFSTPO4BNQP 7JDF1SFTJEFOU 'VOE%FWFMPQNFOU Contributing Photographers: 1BVM,SBVTF .JMPTIB.BMFDIB  *OHSJE"OEFSTPO4BNQP

Northfield Retirement Community

Thank You NRC Donors! During this season of giving and celebration, we extend a heartfelt thank you to the many donors and contributors who have supported

/3$EVSJOH1MFBTFMPPLGPS your name in our annual donor thank you list in next quarter’s edition of NRC Today! 

DECEMBER 2009

Innovation. Choice. Tradition. A Christian Community of Senior Housing with Services

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Check us out online at www.northfieldguide.com

31


– Paid Advertisement –

NRC: Pioneering Innovation and Choice for More Than 40 Years March 1962 

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September 1962

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February 1963   

   June 1968 September 1969 October 1969 November 1981 1989 June 1994 March 1999 2002 April 2004 



Spring 2005 2006 Fall 2007 



January 2008 February 2008



(SPVOECSFBLJOH$FSFNPOJFTGPS-VUIFSBO)PNFPGUIF$BOOPO7BMMFZJTIFMEXJUIJUT First Administrator, Rev. Gerhard Nygaard introduced. -VUIFSBO)PNFPGUIF$BOOPO7BMMFZPQFOTJUTEPPST -VUIFSBO)PNFPGUIF$BOOPO7BMMFZJTEFEJDBUFE /PSUIÍFME.BOPS CVJMUVOEFSUIF)6%4FDUJPOQSPHSBN JTEFEJDBUFE Emelda Rasmussen succeeds Gerhard Nygaard as Administrator. /3$$IBQFMBOE1BSL7JFX"QBSUNFOUTBSFEFEJDBUFE 1BSL7JFXFYQBOTJPOJTEFEJDBUFE ,ZMF/PSEJOFJTOBNFE1SFTJEFOUBOE$&0PG/PSUIÍFME3FUJSFNFOU$PNNVOJUZ $BOOPO7BMMFZ4VJUFTPQFOT)PNFDBSFTFSWJDFTBSFNBEFBWBJMBCMFUPSFTJEFOUTJO 1BSL7JFX8FTUBOEUIF.BOPS A new gift shop, Northwood Gifts, opens. &WFSHSFFOTPGUIF$BOOPO7BMMFZ5PXO)PNFTPQFO &NFMEBT.BSLFUQMBDFCFHJOTTFSWJOHUIF/3$DPNNVOJUZ/ZHBBSEɨFBUFSJTDPOTUSVDUFE 'JSFTJEF-PVOHFJTBEEFE$PVSUZBSE-JCSBSZBOE$PNQVUFS$FOUFSBSFEFWFMPQFE'PVOUBJO Fitness Center opens. .BJO4USFFU$BG�JTCVJMU4PVUIWJFX4VJUFTJTFTUBCMJTIFE,JMEBIM1BSL1PJOUF$PPQFSBUJWFPQFOT &WFSHSFFO-PEHF.FNPSZ$BSFPQFOTJUTEPPST

May 2008

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July 2008 

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January 2009

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Delegates are selected to represent their respective churches in future planning. The 1MBOOJOH$PNNJUUFFCFDPNFTB#PBSEPG%JSFDUPSTUIFOBNFPGUIFPSHBOJ[BUJPOBOEB NJTTJPOTUBUFNFOUBSFFTUBCMJTIFEJOUFOUUPTFDVSFBOPQUJPOGPSBDSFTPG#SVDFMBOEGPS -VUIFSBO)PNFPGUIF$BOOPO7BMMFZJTBOOPVODFE

/FXF/FJHICPS™5FDIOPMPHZJTJOTUBMMFE/3$57$IBOOFMTBSFFTUBCMJTIFE for residents campus-wide.

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Š NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


DINING

Support the restaurants that support the Northfield Entertainment Guide.

Butlers Steak and Ale

Page 21

620 Water St. • www.butlerssteakandale.com 786-9797 – 3-9 p.m. Mon-Thurs; 3-midnight Fri & Sat; 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Sun. Steaks, fish, chops and much more. Fine wines, signature cocktails, and Irish coffees. Happy hour 3-5 Mon-Thurs and 10 p.m.-midnight Fri & Sat. Chapati

Page 20

214 Division St. • 645-2462 (office 645-1665) www.chapati.us – Closed Mondays – Cuisine of India. Variety of curry and Tandoori entrees including a large selection of vegetarian items. Wine and beer. Contented Cow

Page 20

302 Division St. S. • www.contentedcow.com 3 p.m.-close – British-style pub with authentic British specialties and a variety of soups, salads and sandwiches. Extensive patio overlooking the Cannon River. Great selection of imported and domestic draft beer and a full selection of wine and spirits. El Tequila

Page 17

1010 Hwy. 3 S. • 664-9139 • 11 a.m. -10 p.m. – Family restaurant offering authentic Mexican cuisine as well as wonderful margaritas and more. Froggy Bottoms River Pub

Page 9

305 S. Water St. • www.froggybottoms.com 664-0260 • Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-close. Closed Dec. 24-27, open Dec. 31 until 10 – Steaks, salads, pasta and more. Wide selection of beers and wines. Non-smoking restaurant with cozy atmosphere, thousands of frogs and a beautiful outdoor patio overlooking the Cannon River. The HideAway

Page 10

421 Division St. • 645-0400 Mon-Fri • 6 a.m.10 p.m., Sat-Sun 7 a.m.-10 p.m. – Cozy bistro atmosphere serving unique appetizers and sandwiches. Coffee drinks, wine and beer specialties. James Gang Coffeehouse & Eatery Page 19

2018 Jefferson Rd. • 663-6060 • Mon-Fri 6 a.m. -8 p.m., Sat- Sun 7 a.m.-5 p.m. – Voted Best Coffeehouse in southern Minnesota. Fresh daily roasted coffee. Wraps, soup, sandwiches, salads, desserts, ice cream and non-espresso drinks. Free wireless internet and business catering available. J. Grundy’s Rueb ‘N’ Stein

Page 22

503 Division St. • www.ruebnstein.com 645-6691 • 11 a.m.-close – Great burgers and famous Ruebens. Casual relaxing atmosphere. Huge selection of imported and domestic beers, fine spirits and wines. Game room, happy hour 3:30-6 p.m., Karaoke on Fridays at 9 p.m.

DECEMBER 2009

Northfield Golf Club

See page 1

707 Prairie St. • 645-4026 northfieldgolfclub.com • Lunch Mon-Fri 11 a.m.-2 p.m., Dinner Tue, Fri and Sat 5-9 p.m. – The upper level of the clubhouse, with a breathtaking view of the historic Northfield course, offers a complete restaurant/lounge area. An exquisite array of entrees is professionally prepared by Executive Chef Rafael Perez and staff. Quality Bakery and Coffee Shop

See page 27

410 Division St. • 645-8392 • Opens 6 a.m. Tuesday-Saturday – Owned and operated by the Klinkhammer family since 1949. Quality baking from scratch using delicious family recipes with no preservatives. Custom cakes, homemade breads, donuts, pies, cookies, espresso, lunch and more. Quarterback Club

Page 26

116 3rd St. W. • 645-7886 • Mon-Sat • 6 a.m.9 p.m., Sun 10:30 a.m.-8 p.m. – Family friendly dining in Northfield for 37 years. House specialties include broasted chicken, BBQ ribs and flamebroiled hamburgers. The Tavern of Northfield – 212 Division St. •

663-0342 • Sun-Thu 6:30 a.m.-10 p.m., Fri-Sat 6:30 a.m.-11 p.m., lounge open daily 3 p.m.midnight. – Located in the historic Archer House since 1984, The Tavern hosts casual dining with a wide variety of homemade menu items and specials daily featuring fresh fish on Fridays and prime rib on Saturdays. The Tavern Lounge sports a deck overlooking the Cannon River, appetizers and a full bar with live music Thur-Sat. Tiny’s Dogs All Day

See page 36

321 Division St. S. • 645-6862 • Mon-Thu 9:30 a.m.-7 p.m., Fri 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 8:30 a.m.5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-2 p.m. – Historic former pool hall, Tiny’s continues to delight patrons with great hot dogs, sandwiches, non-alcoholic beverages and snacks. Features include New York-style coneys, Chicago-style Vienna Beef, as well as Tiny’s own classic dog. Since 1947 Tiny’s has offered Northfield’s largest selection of specialty tobaccos and quality cigars. Willingers Bar & Restaurant – 6900 Canby Trail, Northfield • 952/652-2500, Sun-Thurs • 11 a.m. -9 p.m.; Fri-Sat 11 a.m.-10 p.m. – High above the course, with views of Willingers Golf Club’s fairways, greens, lakes, wetlands, ponds and trees, this venue offers dining with casual, upscale cuisine. Enjoy dinner or simply a beverage at the bar. Also available for wedding receptions, banquets, meetings or small gatherings.

Check us out online at www.northfieldguide.com

Support Our Advertisers Ameriprise Financial ............................... 35 Anna’s Closet ..............................................19 Aquatic Pets .................................................. 7 Bridge Square Barbers ............................ 24 Butler’s Steak & Ale ...........................21, 33 Carleton College ...................... inside front Chapati .................................................20, 33 College City Beverage ........................... 26 The Contented Cow .........................20, 33 Craft Collective ...........................................12 Detjen Counseling ....................................18 Eclectic Goat ................................................. 4 El Tequila ...............................................17, 33 Fashion Fair................................................ 40 First National Bank .................. back cover Froggy Bottoms River Pub ................9, 33 Pam Gillespie, Realtor® ........................... 17 The Grand Event Center .........................37 Hogan Brothers ........................................ 33 The HideAway .................................... 10, 33 James Gang Coffeehouse ............. 19, 33 Michael Jordon, Realtor®........................18 Just Food Co-op .........................................12 KYMN 1080 Radio...................................... 3 Dianne Kyte, Realtor®............................. 24 Left Field ......................................................... 2 Mike’s Bikes .................................................. 7 Northfield Arts Guild .....................................5 Northfield Arts School ............. inside back Northfield Chamber of Commerce ........................ front cover Northfield Dance Academy .................. 40 Nfld Downtown Develop Corp.......... 6, 9 Northfield Golf Club ................................... 1 Northfield Kitchen Concepts ................ 26 Northfield Lines, Inc. ................................10 Northfield Liquor Store............................10 Northfield Retirement Community..29-32 Northfield Urgent Care ............................19 Northfield Youth Choirs ............................28 Paper Petulum........................................... 39 Paradise Center for the Arts ..................16 Present Perfect ...........................................11 Quality Bakery ...................................27, 33 Quarterback Club ..............................33, 35 Ragstock...................................................... 25 Rare Pair .......................................................16 Rocky Top Printing ..................................... 5 Rueb ‘N’ Stein .....................................22, 33 Schmidt Homes.................................. 15, 36 Shanti Tattoo ............................................. 28 Shattuck-St. Mary’s ...................................14 Sisters Ugly ................................................. 26 The Sketchy Artist .....................................11 St. Olaf College......................... inside front Studio Elements ........................................ 28 The Tavern ................................................. 33 Tiny’s Dogs All Day ......................... 33, 36 Web Design Valley ..................................... 4 Women and Kids on Division ..............37

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HISTORIC

HAPPENINGS

NORTHFIELD STYLE By Susan Hvistendahl

Early College Football in Northfield, 1918-1950 No doubt fans of football at St. Olaf looked enviously across the Cannon River during the first two decades of the 20th century when autumn brought football fever to town. As described in last month’s “Historic Happenings” column, the right to play what was considered to be dangerous intercollegiate football was regularly turned down at St. Olaf, despite numerous student petitions. Interclass games had to suffice, where lack of training and coaching could sometimes create as many injuries as intercollegiate competition. Meanwhile, Carleton (which had its first sanctioned football team in 1891) had outscored opponents 1,520 points to 79 between 19101917, with 66 wins, 17 losses and two ties over the years 1905-1917 and had upset the University of Chicago 7-0 at Chicago in 1916. And Northfield High School had been playing football against other schools since 1892 (including against Carleton). It was no wonder that St. Olaf students agitated to be able to join this football fraternity. Intercollegiate football was finally recommended by the St. Olaf faculty in 1917 and approved for colleges of the Norwegian Lutheran Church in 1918. But the first season of intercollegiate football for St. Olaf in the fall of 1918 brought an unlikely pairing. There were Student Army Training Corps units at colleges due to World War I, and a Northfield Independent story on Oct. 17, 1918, said, “All military and athletic operations at Carleton and St. Olaf colleges have been organized on an entirely military basis and will be carried out hereafter as if by one unit under the name Carleton-St. Olaf.”

materialized.” The two colleges had met for “common purpose upon the gridiron” and “a new and closer bond of friendship has been formed.” The writer encouraged this bond to be strengthened and kept “as we mix from time to time in our athletic contests.” Alas, in a summary of the 1918 football season in Carleton’s Algol yearbook, the writer claimed that there was “deadly antagonism” from the start in the combined team: “The interest was in the colleges, rather than the unit, and the student bodies gave credit only to their representatives on the team. With such spirit, it was impossible to produce a good team.” The next game for the combined squad was a 59-6 loss to the University of Minnesota at Lexington Park field in St. Paul on Nov. 2 on a “slippery” field. The Northfield News account of the game on Nov. 8 said, “The light Unit line put up a hard fight and got many Minnesota runners for losses.” The Unit missed the defensive play of the team captain, who became ill the night before the game. It is possible that the captain had contracted the Spanish influenza which became an epidemic that fall and led to the disbanding of the S.A.T.C. team after only a couple contests. But Carleton and St. Olaf players organized themselves to play three other games against each other, with Carleton taking two of the three. The first St. Olaf team to play a full season in 1919 had a 2-3 record under its first football coach, Endre Anderson, including a 15-7 loss to Carleton. By the time Anderson departed in 1928, his record was 34-25-3. In 1922, his team was undefeated, tied St. Thomas for the Minnesota Conference championship and had secured its first official win over Carleton, 19-0. As at Notre Dame, St. Olaf had its own “Four Horsemen” as leaders for its conference championship run of 1923: Carl “Cully” Swanson, Harry “Whitey” Fevold, Frank Cleve and Ingvald Glesne. Fevold was the only St. Olaf athlete to win 16 letters and had the longest drop-kick field goal in the state at 45 yards. Swanson was featured in Robert Ripley’s “Believe It or Not,” which was syndicated to newspapers all over the country, for his 1924 record of having 121 completions in 226 attempts for 1,644 yards, an average of 205 ½ yards passing for eight consecutive games.

Between 20 and 25 men from St. Olaf were taken by bus to Laird Field each afternoon to practice with teammates from cross-town rival Carleton, under Carleton’s coach Howard Buck. The first game was played Oct. 19, with a resounding 400 win over Pillsbury Academy of Owatonna. The Manitou Messenger account on Oct. 22 noted that, from the beginning, “the S.A.T.C. unit surpassed their opponents in every aspect, and had the game well in hand…The game as a whole was full of vim and pep from beginning to end. Spirited action and novel plays were common features of the game.” The writer praised the Pillsbury team for playing “a steady and clean game,” but said they were outclassed by the “husky” S.A.T.C. team. Godfrey of Carleton “won for himself admiration by a beautiful 65-yard run” and Thune of St. Olaf had “repeated brilliant gains” and “again and again brought the crowd to their feet with a roar.” History was made that day, said the writer, as “the Oles were let loose, “with a “vision

34 NEG@northfieldguide.com

St. Olaf and Carleton battle at St. Olaf in 1925, with Carleton winning 13-0. St. Olaf still holds an overall 46-43-1 advantage after this year’s Carleton gridiron victory. Photograph courtesy of Carleton Archives.

© NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


Ade Christenson became football coach at St. Olaf in 1929 and held that position from 1929-42,1946-48 and 1951-57, with an overall record of 101-75-11. One highlight of his long career was the 1930 football team which, along with upsetting South Dakota State, kept pace with colleges such as Alabama and Notre Dame by being one of only 11 undefeated, untied college football teams that year. It was the top-scoring team with 302 points in eight games. The $30,000, 15-acre Manitou Field was inaugurated this year. Also in 1930, Northfield native Harry Newby’s achievement of scoring on his first play in four consecutive games was featured on Nov. 29 in Ripley’s “Believe It or Not.” Though he weighed only 147 pounds, Newby had touchdown runs of 58, 72, 45 and 35 yards. He was used sparingly, playing a total of only 16 minutes in those four games. The Northfield News said, “The Northfield boy is a racehorse, not a work horse. Did Dan Patch [a famous racehorse] help with the fall plowing?”

B. Fouch, Jr., of Lewisburg, W.Va., told me that his father, who was killed in a 1945 auto accident, had a workshop at his dental office in Minneapolis and was an artist who was quite “handy with small tools.” Ranthus, Jr., was aware his father had carved the “Slab of Bacon” trophy, but had not heard about the “Goatrophy.” He was interested to learn that his father’s “Goatrophy” is still exchanged in Northfield. This year, on Oct. 3, Carleton won the bragging rights with a 17-13 win over St. Olaf, retaining the goat and keeping the eagle on top of the Civil War statue in Bridge Square facing east. St. Olaf holds the overall 46-43-1 advantage between the two teams.

1914 Gopher Yearbook photo of Ranthus B. Fouch, creator of the “Goatrophy.” Photo-

George Gibson was head coach at Carleton from 1934-38. In his first season, the team finished 6-1 and outscored opponents 85-14, with shutouts in five of the seven games. His 1936 team won the Midwest Conference title, with its only loss coming to the University of Iowa, 14-0 (the last game played against a Big Ten team). Carleton had previously played against the University of Wisconsin in 1922 and 1930, Northwestern in 1925 and 1926 and against Army at West Point in 1928 and 1932 (no wins).

The year 1931 brought the inauguration of the first graph courtesy of the University of football “Goatrophy,” awarded that first year to St. Archives, University of Olaf for its 25-6 victory over Carleton. As described Minnesota Minnesota-Twin Cities. in the November Entertainment Guide, the troCarleton had no football teams during the war years phy given each year to the Carleton-St. Olaf football winner was of 1943-45. St. Olaf had 20 recruits for the 1943 season, but only half designed by Dr. R.B. Fouch, who also created the “Slab of Bacon” had prior experience. Only three games were played, with two losses trophy fought for by the universities of Minnesota and Wisconsin from 1930-43. Further investigation has revealed that Dr. Ranthus B. to River Falls Normal and a Homecoming victory over Luther. In the 1944 and 1945 seasons, Navy cadets on campus were allowed to Fouch was a graduate of the college of dentistry at the University of Minnesota in 1914 (see photo). In a phone call, Fouch’s son, Ranthus compete for St. Olaf. History Continued on next page

DECEMBER 2009

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35


History Continued from previous page

Post-war highlights through 1950 include St. Olaf’s first west coast trip in 1947 to compete against Pacific Lutheran University in Washington (a 14-0 loss) and Carleton’s 1948 team which, bolstered by returning veterans, allowed only 52 points in eight games. In a 1950 game at Grinnell College, Carleton won 21-19 by scoring two touchdowns in the last 32 seconds. In 1950, Carleton students voted to adopt the name “Knights” as a team name for varsity sports. At St. Olaf, the team once known as the Vikings was renamed the Lions after the lion on the St. Olaf seal in 1941. But for many people, it will always be “Oles” and “Carls” doing battle on the field. And few will remember the fall of 1918 when the Oles and the Carls were teammates. Thanks to Eric Hillemann of the Carleton Archives, Jeff Sauve of the St. Olaf Archives, coaches Tom Porter, Bob Sullivan and Jim Dimick, Erin George of the University of Minnesota Archives, R.B. Fouch, Jr., and historian and curator Kent Stephens from the College Football Hall of Fame.

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St. Olaf Face Mask in the College Football Hall of Fame When Tom Porter (St. Olaf football coach from 19581990) was researching his 2005 book of St. Olaf College football history, “The Greatest Game,” he visited with Al Droen, a member of the 1930 undefeated football team and a 1931 Honor Athlete. Droen told Porter that the College Football Hall of Fame had accepted a face mask he had offered to them for their collection of memorabilia. Kent Stephens, historian and curator of the College Football Hall of Fame in South Bend, Indiana, confirmed to me that in October of 1996, Al Droen of Inver Grove Heights, Minnesota, came in to the Hall of Fame with a “personal artifact” he wished to share.

Stephens explained that before face masks became commercially produced in the 1940s, “several players created home-made face masks. In our collection we have two or three other homemade masks. The most famous belonged to Jay Berwanger, the first Heisman trophy winner from the University of Chicago. His elementary bird cage face mask earned him the nickname of the ‘Man in the Iron Mask.’ Another in our collection was a quite detailed bird cage face mask designed by Jack Kaava of Hawaii in the mid 1930s. In an era where grabbing the face mask was perfectly legal, Kaava remedied this tactic by having barbs Al Droen, St. Olaf Class of 1931, placed at several points on the face mask. The donated this face mask to the College Football Hall of Fame in Droen mask is unique in that it is not a precur1996. Photograph courtesy of the sor to today’s face masks but an applied form College Football Hall of Fame, South of protection.” Bend, Indiana.

“Mr. Droen informed me that he played college football in the late 1920s and early 1930s at St. Olaf College. And that due to injury he sustained, he created a metal face mask to protect himself from further injury. The face mask looked to be reminiscent of a Phantom of the Opera mask. Inside the mask were the remnants of a leather pad that was riveted to the inside of the mask. With the passage of time, I have forgotten how Droen wore the mask. But as no means of affixing the mask to a strap or the helmet appears evident, I can only assume that the mask was form-fitting. His mask became one of our collection’s unique oddities and it is exhibited frequently.”

Porter said that Droen was “anxious to get back into play” after a facial injury and “had the mask formed by someone in the Carpenter Shop at the College.” On at least one occasion, according to what Droen told Porter, “a game official denied him permission to play while wearing the mask.” In a Northfield News story of Nov. 20, 1931, Droen was described as “a great blocker and runner, and a fine low hurdler. He probably gets more fun out of hitting and being hit hard than any gridster in Northfield.” No doubt having the face mask helped.

Celebrate the Holidays at The Grand with

The Johnny Holm Band Friday, December 18

$10 per person for the Dance 9:00 p.m.-12:30 a.m. (Doors open at 8:30 p.m.) Limited seating still available for Dinner 7:00-8:30 p.m.

Call The Grand at 507-663-1773 for reservations.

316 Washington St • 663-1773 thegrandnorthfield.com DECEMBER 2009

Check us out online at www.northfieldguide.com

37


Just Curious…

wheel. I went to Northern Clay Center in the Twin Cities at about the same time that a beginning pottery class was starting. The woman teaching the class was a really good teacher. She was able to break the process down so that even a beginner would have success.

By Breanna Zarbinski

BZ: What made you decide to start a career from this passion? Zaveruha: I ended up taking six classes at the Northern Clay Center, and I started to think, “I should have been doing this 30 years ago!” I began to think that I could make a living doing this. I had never really had a long-term job. I started out in an engineering program in college and then moved to sociology, and then to anthropology. In the middle of that I worked as a systems analyst for about a year. I finally finished a Ph.D. in anthropology, but when it came time to find a job, I did not have the drive to go and get a job in that field. I was curious about it, but I didn’t have the passion to work in the field. Then, I was a mother for a while and I helped my husband’s business with accounting. I actually ended up writing the user manuals for the product that they were making, and doing some technical work. With all of this experience though, I hadn’t ever found a real job that I wanted to do.

And so a few quick questions and answers.

Barb Zaveruha, relatively new to Northfield, has found a niche in our arts community as a potter selling her items at the Northfield Arts Guild, her home right outside of town, and at this year’s Jesse James Days. Zaveruha discovered her passion for pottery later in life while happening upon some natural clay on a walk. Since that day, she has become an expert in the field, taking classes, learning from other masters, and even constructing her own kiln. BZ: How did your interest in pottery begin? Zaveruha: I never had my hands in real clay as a kid, so I did not know about pottery until about 1993. I found some clay in a wild area where I was walking my dog. When I first stepped in it, I didn’t realize it was clay, and I spent 15 minutes trying to get it off my boots. Later, I realized that it must have been clay, so I went back and collected some. I went to the library and found seven books on pottery, and took them all home. One of them told me how to process found clay. Basically, you dry it, break it up, put it in water, and then you sieve it to get out the stones and organic matter. Then you dry it again and you can make pottery. BZ: What did you make from that clay? Zaveruha: I made several tiny bowls from it. I still have a few of them. I fired them in my fireplace, and I was hooked. You start with earth, water, fire and air, and you end up with dishes. BZ: How did you learn how to create more professional pieces? Zaveruha: When I made those little bowls, I burnished them, the way primitive pottery is often burnished to get a smooth surface, and I thought the burnishing would be much faster if done on a potter’s wheel. But I had no idea where to find a potter’s wheel. A few years after I found the clay, I started looking for a potter’s

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BZ: How would you describe your every day job now? Zaveruha: Well, on a good day, I can start working on pottery before breakfast, and I get to work for at least 6-8 hours over the course of the day. Then there are other days when this and that needs to be taken care of, and these four errands need to be run, and no pottery gets done at all! Over the last several years, I have been trying to develop my pottery-making as a business, and I feel that this year it is really starting to come together. I want to get to the point where I work on pottery every day. A potter’s work is governed by the kiln cycle. You throw until you can trim. Then you trim until you have enough pieces to fill the bisque kiln. Once again, you can throw some more. When you have enough pieces bisqued, you can glaze them and do a glaze firing. Then you begin all over again. That’s what I want to be doing full time, even though I’m not quite there yet. BZ: When did you move to Northfield? Zaveruha: We built a house six miles south of town in 2003 and moved in during January of 2004. BZ: It seems like you have tried a lot of different things. Is there a common thread running through your past? Zaveruha: Well, in retrospect, everything that I have done, from the art that I did as a child and teenager, to the engineering, mathematics and chemistry, has contributed to my work as a potter. The art is obvious: form, composition, use of a brush. The chemistry makes it easy to understand glaze formulation. And potters very often use engineering knowledge for building tools, kilns, kiln sheds, etc. BZ: Where did you make most of your pottery before you moved to Northfield? Zaveruha: After Northern Clay Center, a friend of mine decided that there was a business niche in the cities for people who were beyond beginners, but didn’t have their own equipment. She started Fired Up, a firing service studio for semi-professionals where members can use all of the equipment: wheels, roller, extruder, glazes, spray booth, etc. Then they do the firing for you. While I was there, I went to a workshop by Richard Bresnahan, who is the potter Artist in Residence at St. John’s University. I thought about his workshop for about eight months. Finally, I called him up and said, “I want to learn from you.”

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BZ: What made you decide to ask him to be your “mentor”? Zaveruha: What impressed me about him was how everything fit together in his pottery-making process. It was a very efficient system, suited to a business. When I first asked him to teach me, he tried to send me to another person. After some persistence on my part, he told me that they were loading the big kiln, a huge wood-fired kiln that they fire once a year, and that I could come as a volunteer to load, help with the firing, and clean the pots afterward. After about the third week of volunteering, he started to refer to me as an apprentice, and I knew that I had passed that test. BZ: How long did you work with Richard? Zaveruha: I did that from the fall of 2000 through 2002. If I had been doing full-time apprentice work, it was about four months worth of apprenticeship. BZ: Do you still use the techniques that you learned from Richard? Zaveruha: Oh yes, my purpose was really to learn that whole system. As an apprentice, you learn not just the steps in throwing this or that form. You also learn how to make clay, how to make and use your tools, various decorative techniques, how to make glazes, and how to fire. The Japanese-style kick-wheel that I use now is an integral part of the whole system. (While I was apprenticing, Richard had a local carpenter make several wheels for his apprentices, and I got one.) Richard had apprenticed with the Nakazato family on Kyushu, the southern island of Japan, so you can see many Asian influences in my work. Several centuries ago, Japan invaded Korea and kidnapped a number of potters, and brought them to Japan to produce their pottery. I recently looked at a book on the history Korean pottery, and recognized many of the forms and decorative techniques that I had learned from Richard. BZ: How do you continue to create new and unique pieces? What inspires you? Zaveruha: You know, artists now always seem to be trying to make unique pieces. I think of myself as closer to a craftsman. I want to make good pots that are a pleasure to use, both because they are beautiful to look at and to hold, and because they function well. If I get that right, I’m going to make more than one of them! But there are two ways in which my work changes. First, when you are making things by hand, they evolve – you aren’t a machine duplicating the last piece every time. Sometimes it is a gradual evolution from piece to piece, the way my vases have changed over the last three years. I might think “Let’s try that!”, and maybe I like the results. Or I’m sitting at the wheel, warming up, just playing, and something good appears. Then there are the bigger changes.

vases and plates. Seeing other people do new things, seeing new techniques and trying new things out for myself was really productive. I also worked this summer with Nancy Halling. She was making rectangular plates and trays, and she urged me to try making some, so I did. It took my work in a completely different direction. BZ: If someone were interested in purchasing a piece from you, how would they contact you? Zaveruha: I have a website (Zaveruha.com) that displays some of my work. It has also my phone number and email, and people are free to contact me. I am also very happy to sell out of my house. Someone can come, look at what I have on the shelves, and purchase the items right there.

BZ: What are some of these “bigger changes”? Zaveruha: Last January, for instance, I was dissatisfied with everything that I had been doing, and I needed to try something different. All of my ideas were fermenting, but none of them were coming to the surface. So I took a class at Fired Up for advanced students on surface decoration. We made tea bowls and teapots,

DECEMBER 2009

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39


Tickets still available for the Beaux Arts Ball By Felicia Crosby Take a journey with me into the future, specifically to the 20th of December, 2009 (it’s a short journey). It’s Sunday, the Sunday before Christmas; the first Sunday after Hanukah ends. Gifts have been bought, perhaps delivered; depending on the holiday, the house has been cleaned for the relatives or is just now calling for attention, dust bunnies the size of prairie jack rabbits under the beds. There have been three trips to the Mall of America, at least that many down Division Street; the treks to and from the airport have been calculated with a mathematical precision, and most of what’s needed for the holiday menus have been tucked into the fridge (you forgot the marshmallows, but don’t worry about that just now). Cards are mailed, the kids are off from school, and a small, guilty part of you counts down the days till Bing Crosby and Charlie Brown go back into hibernation. Where, in this busy season of giving, is there a respite from the lists and the trips and the planning; an evening, perhaps, just for you? And then the phone rings. It’s your friend; you know, the one who holiday shops in August and gets the outdoor lights up while the temperature’s still in the positive range, whose kids spend school vacations on educational projects made with homemade PlayDoh. And this friend is waxing rhapsodic about last night’s party – the one you forgot to get tickets for – the Beaux Arts Ball; and it was, apparently, a night to remember. A night, the friend says, that was made for the partygoer; a reason to dress up and go out, full of live music and entertainment; Carleton’s Great Hall provided a winter wonderland backdrop for the fun and the fantasy of the “Fire and Ice” theme. The capstone celebration of the Northfield Arts Guild’s 50th anniversary, the arts were on full display; even the food, provided by Bon Appetit under the direction of Chef Michael Delcambre, was art. The dancing was big band but not only; the

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19-piece band Bend in the River played foot-tapping, fingersnapping favorites that made it impossible to sit. Visual arts were displayed and admired, highlights from Arts Guild performances were revisited; even the Northfield Youth Choirs sang a specially commissioned piece to the delight of all present. Apparently, too, this was an evening for friends and co-workers as well as couples. Groups of friends showed up together; there were a number of office parties – now that’s a fun work event! – toasting the end of the year, and everyone was relaxed and enjoying the magic, while celebrating the Northfield Arts Guild’s 50 years of community arts involvement. A perfect break, your friend says, from the holiday rush. You sigh, and look at your half-finished list; the kids are fighting in the next room and it’s time to get off the phone and run to the mall. If only you’d stopped at the NAG a few weeks earlier to see Sheryl; she had tickets in hand, with a smile on her face. Now come back to the present; it’s not yet the 19th, there’s still time and Sheryl has tickets at the office, at 304 Division St., 507/645-8877, or go to www.northfieldartsguild.org. But act quickly; because once they’re gone, they’re gone. And then there’s nothing left but that phone call the next day.

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Art and Soul Gallery seeks to promote artists whose work inspires, uplifts and encourages people in profoundly positive ways. Bette Myers, our featured artist for December, has helped to change peoples’ lives for the better. Bette experienced a cardiac arrest and while in a state of death met and talked to Jesus. She was told that she must go back and paint her masterpiece. Our friend Mike Ball was living the wild life of a rock and roll musician, seriously addicted to drugs, when he was given a gift of art. It was a picture of Jesus by Bette Myers called, “The Masterpiece.” Within one year of receiving the gift, Mike turned his life over to Christ and has been sober for five years. Now an ordained Reverend at the Household of Faith Church in St. Paul Park, Mike invites people to contact him at 612-275-8893 or email, songmike63@earthlink.net. To learn more about Bette Myers go to: truefaceofjesus.com. From Gwen and Greg Smith at Northfield Art School...

DECEMBER 2009

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Who makes holiday shopping easy? We do. First National has the perfect gift for everyone on your list – a Visa® gift card! Gift cards can be purchased in any amount from $25 to $500, and can be used everywhere Visa is accepted. Stop by First National’s Downtown or South locations today.

At the heart of Northfield since 1872. Downtown

329 Division Street 507-645-5656

South

firstnationalnorthfield.com

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Motor Bank

1611 Honey Locust Drive 507-664-0820

529 Division Street 507-645-5673

Member FDIC

© NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE

December 2009 Northfield Entertainment Guide  

An array of happenings for the month of December in and around Northfield including arts, dance, theater, food, music and other forms of ent...

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