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NFitMan MAKE IT COUNT: WEIGHTS AND STRENGTH TRAINING

A MAN’S GUIDE TO FITNESS

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

SETTING THE STANDARD

DR. PATRICK MCCABE ON EMBRACING HIS ATHLETIC NATURE AND STAYING COMMITTED TO HEALTH AND FITNESS

KILLING ‘EM SOFTLY HOW TO MASTER THE HIGH LOB

FIT COMMUNITY: ALAMO CITY WIN-WIN

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STEPS TOWARD FINANCIAL FITNESS

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GET BACK TO HAPPY AND HEALTHY MAKING LIFESTYLE CHOICES THAT WORK


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NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 06 A BETTER YOU

- Get back to happy and healthy - Make it count - Good for mind and body - Killing ‘em softly

18 NONPROFIT

- Win-win

22 GET INSPIRED

- How the famous stay fit - Making champions out of students

28 EVENTS

2013 CONTENTS

- Committed to excellence - Celebrate the season

DR. PATRICK MCCABE: SETTING THE STANDARD FOR MAINTAINING BOTH A BUSY SCHEDULE AND A HEALTHY LIFESTYLE WITH A “NO EXCUSES” ATTITUDE TOWARD FITNESS

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Cover and table of contents photography by: JOSH HUSKIN


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NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

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 A BETTER YOU

GET BACK TO

HAPPY AND HEALTHY CONSULT THE HELP OF HEALTHCRAVE MEDICAL CENTERS IN ORDER TO MAKE THE PROPER LIFESTYLE CHANGES TO GET YOUR HEALTH AND SELF-ESTEEM BACK ON TRACK.

DO YOU WANT to get healthy? For some, being healthy seems like an impossible task – especially with our fast-paced lives, when there are fast food restaurants on every street corner enticing us with their quick, inexpensive meals. But what we don’t realize in that quick decision to turn into that fast food restaurant or to grab that quick prepackaged meal on the self of the grocery store is the real price we are paying for that “quick fix.” We are slowing killing ourselves by consuming these unhealthy “fast” foods. Over time, we start to see some side effects such as gaining weight. So what do we do? We go on a short-term diet – once again, looking for that quick fix. These diets might work for some to shed a few pounds, but as soon as our diet is over, we gain the weight right back and start

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NFIT MAN NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

FIT MAN, ELNUR/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

BY ASHLEY HOLIFIELD


the cycle all over again. Most people stuck in this cycle might think that gaining weight is the biggest problem they have. But what they don’t realize is that while gaining weight does hurt your self-esteem, it also damages your organs, slowly yet surely. When the body has too much body fat, your heart goes into overtime. It has to pump faster and harder in order to get blood to the entire body. Unlike a day job, your heart never gets a break; it has to constantly be in overdrive. This can, in major cases, essentially lead to a heart attack. Though a heart attack doesn’t happen to everyone, over time, your heart will weaken due to this overcompensating, which can lead to many health problems in the future. Another issue that occurs because of this cycle is your metabolism gets destroyed. When you constantly put bad things into your body, it has to work extra hard to break these toxins down in order to excrete them from the body. And over time, this will slow down your metabolism due to the extra work it has to do. So how do you change the cycle? Obviously, eating healthy foods is the best way to be healthy. And regular exercise keeps the body in shape both inside and out. But for a lot of people, it isn’t easy to kick-start this new lifestyle. That’s why HealthCrave Medical Centers are here to help! “I started the HealthCrave diet after trying crash dieting, the Atkins diet, phentermine, OTC (over-thecounter) thermogenics and fat burners,” says Eloy Castaneda Jr. “These

{

CHEF JESSE RIOS, NUTRITIONIST

other diets diminished my low energy, resulted in muscle loss and left me feeling flabby. My weight quickly returned after the diet was discontinued. With the HCG diet, I lost a total of 40 pounds in 40 days. I found myself feeling satisfied with the portions of food consumed daily and had minimal difficulty with cravings. I have been off the HCG diet for a month and have not gained any weight back. I learned portion control and healthy eating habits while on the diet.” At HealthCrave medical Centers, the goal is to help you get healthy and stay healthy. With more than 12 different facilities, this center is a one-stop shop for your healthy lifestyle needs. One of the starting points for a lot of people to get healthy is to lose weight and get their metabolism working again. Luckily for you, HealthCrave offers medically supervised weight-loss programs for everyone’s needs. Whether you need to lose five pounds, 40

pounds or more, there is a program for you. This isn’t just a diet, though. It may seem like that at first, but it truly is a nutrition kick-off for a healthy lifestyle. HealthCrave’s weight-loss program not only will help you shed the weight and get your self-esteem back, but will most importantly restart your metabolism to its proper quality functioning while cleansing the body of past toxins, and teach you how to properly fuel your body in order to maintain a healthy and happy life. “I’m 17, a senior in high school, and my weight was 301.5 pounds,” says Noe, a past patient. “I lost 47.5 pounds and 55.7 inches throughout my whole body. I did the 40day HealthCrave diet program, and when I finished, my weight was 254. And it feels amazing!” This weight-loss program is medically supervised to ensure all patients get the right help, and it monitors patients’ bodily functioning to ensure they get to proper health. When you are a patient, your medical professional not only will monitor your health, but will be there for you for mental support and any questions you have throughout the program. “What helped me throughout the diet was my mom, who was also on the diet, and the only reason why she did it was to support me – her son. I can’t thank her enough for that,” Noe says. “And also Guyla – when I ever had any type of question whatsoever, she was always there for my mom and me. If it weren’t for my cousin, mom or Guyla, I would still be that 301.5-pound guy and who knows? Maybe even bigger.” This truly is a one-of-a-kind program that not only helps you lose weight, but helps you gain your life back with full confidence and a healthy, functioning body. ■

For more information, call 210-438-9355. You can also read more testimonials online at www.sahealthcrave.com.

AT HEALTHCRAVE MEDICAL CENTERS, THE GOAL IS TO HELP YOU GET HEALTHY AND STAY HEALTHY.

}

NFIT MAN NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

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 A BETTER YOU

MAKE IT

COUNT

LIFTING WEIGHTS AND STRENGTH TRAINING: TWO GREAT WAYS TO DO MORE NOW SO YOU WILL BE ABLE TO DO MORE LATER BY JEFFREY L. BROOKS

STRENGTH TRAINING is the most fun form of exercise on the planet! OK, maybe not everyone feels that way, but it is arguably one of the most beneficial physical activities you can do. The benefits are long term, and they affect almost all that you do. “Like what,” you ask? Well, once you cross that threshold of age 25 to 30, your muscle mass decreases consistently every year afterward. So what’s the big deal? A decrease in muscle mass means a decrease in your body’s fat-burning ability, for starters. Your muscle mass directly affects your metabolic rate (BMR), and the less muscle you have, the lower your BMR goes. Increased muscle mass has been a consistent and reliable tool in managing weight and promoting fat loss since the days of man rearranging stones in caves for décor instead of couches and ottomans. As you age, strength training becomes even more important because it has a direct impact on your bone density. Not into falling and breaking a hip when you get older? Good: Start strength training now. Muscle attaches to the bone and feeds the capillaries that keep the bones strong. More strength means fewer breaks. When it comes to muscle, you have to use it or lose it. The less you do now, the less you will be able to do later. As you lose muscle mass year after year, you lose the strength that goes with it – the strength to lift and play with your kids, the strength to do everyday chores around the house and even the strength to get yourself off of the floor, all slowly slipping away with each passing year. Of course, you can always rely on the endless array of gadgets and gizmos aimed at helping you do things you should be able to do yourself, right? On top of that, it’s muscle that makes you look

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lean, toned and athletic like many of us quietly desire. The new industry saying is “fit is the new skinny,” and I am really hoping that saying is here to stay. OK, so what should you do? In short, lift weights! Better yet, strength train! And no, the two are not one in the same. The difference is huge, but it isn’t not overly obvious unless you have done a little research on your own or worked out with someone who has. The end goal of strength training is to build muscle and develop more muscular strength. In order to do this, you have to make your muscles do more work than they can normally handle. No need to go off the deep end and try lifting a truck when you’re barely lifting a bicycle now. You just have to get outside of that comfort zone quite a bit. If you can press 10 pounds over your head 20 or 30 times, you don’t need any more strength in that muscle. In cases like this, you are working more toward muscular endurance, which does not build the muscle you need to get the benefits you’re after. If you try that same press with 25 pounds and can only manage to do it seven or eight times, you need more strength to lift that weight for the muscle building standard repetition range of eight to 12. The key lies in the weight you work with for the exercise you are performing. A good rule of thumb is to aim for 10 repetitions. If it is easy to do 10 and more, your weight is too light. If you struggle to get halfway there, your weight is too heavy. If you have a hard time getting those last two or three done, you are in the right ballpark. ■ Lift heavy, build muscle, get stronger and do more. For more information, visit www.fatburncafe.com.


WHEN IT COMES TO MUSCLE, YOU HAVE TO

MUSCULAR MAN, YEKO PHOTO STUDIO/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

USE IT OR LOSE IT.

NFIT MAN NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

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GOOD FOR MIND AND BODY

THE CONSUMER CREDIT COUNSELING SERVICE OF GREATER SAN ANTONIO PROVIDES THREE STEPS FOR GETTING FINANCIALLY FIT. BY SAMANTHA SALAZAR

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NFIT MAN NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

IT'S BEEN SAID that when it comes to physical training, pushing yourself to overcome the mental challenge is half the battle. The same can be said about facing financial obstacles. Financial problems have a way of creeping into other aspects of our life, including our mental, emotional and even physical health. Facing tough financial dilemmas can trigger the stress hormone cortisol, which in turn, kick-starts our natural “fight or flight” reaction. While this body function isn’t always bad, prolonging this type of stress often leads to long-term health-damaging consequences such as high blood pressure, heart attacks, diabetes and depression. Many individuals don’t want to face their financial issues. Some are too afraid to discover the extent of their dilemma, while others think there’s no way to fix the problem, so why bother? But the truth is that the first step to achieving the best financial health is to face the problem head-on. To do this, every person needs to: GET A FULL DIAGNOSIS OF THE SITUATION: To truly understand our financial issues, we need to see the whole picture. Debt and poor credit are often symptoms of a bigger problem –

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a need for better money habits. Individuals can go to the Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Greater San Antonio (CCCSSA) website to take a free MyMoneyCheckUp test from the National Foundation for Credit Counseling to find out how they score in different areas such as budgeting, saving, housing, credit and retire-

ment. Test results reveal which areas a person excels at and which could use improvement. In addition, the test will tell the person if they’re on a bad path and need to seek help. Consumers can also check their credit report by pulling a free copy from each of the three credit reporting bureaus at www.annualcreditreport.com. Knowing what’s on our credit report not only gives us a better picture of our financial situation – it can also warn us if we’ve become a victim of identity theft.

MAN & DOLLAR SIGN WEIGHTS, RA2STUDIO; CREDIT CARD, ZENTILIA/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

 A BETTER YOU


Create a plan to get healthy: Once we know what financial areas we need to improve, the next step is developing an action plan to tackle those issues. It may mean setting up automatic payments to make sure bills are paid on time, putting aside extra money to build savings and retirement funds or cutting back on expenses in order to free up money that can be used to pay off debt. It’s important to set short- and long-term goals so we can measure our progress. For example, a person’s long-term goal may be to pay off $10,000 of credit card debt within five years. Their short-term goal could be to pay $200 toward that debt each month. Their action plan to reach these goals may require them to cut expenses in their budget (such as not eating out, canceling a phone line, buying non-name-brand products, etc.). For those who want professional help in this area, nonprofit credit counseling agency CCCSSA can provide free budget and credit counseling in order to get an action plan in place.

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Put in the work to achieve financial goals: This may be the hardest step in the process, but for those willing to push through tough times, the reward in the end is worth it. For extra assistance and motivation, it can be helpful to use financial coaching through the nonprofit CCCSSA financial capability agency. Here’s how the system works: With the help of a financial coach, an individual sets an achievable goal and maps out a plan to reach their objective. In the next few months (or years depending on the magnitude of the goal), the financial coach keeps that person accountable to their action plan by asking about the person’s progress and motivating them when they want to give up. The financial coach provides a support system to fall back on, helping individuals continue moving forward when times are hard so they eventually overcome each obstacle and achieve their financial goals.

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Facing and fixing our financial dilemmas can be rough, but the result is better health overall. If you’re ready to improve your financial situation, you don’t have to do it alone. The certified counselors at CCCSSA can help you become financially fit in a free, confidential budget and credit counseling session in person or over the phone. For those interest-

FACING AND FIXING OUR FINANCIAL DILEMMAS CAN BE ROUGH, BUT THE RESULT IS BETTER HEALTH OVERALL. ed in long-term financial help, CCCSSA can provide financial coaching and debt management plans. ■ Your health shouldn’t suffer because of financial problems, so take the first step to getting financially fit. Call CCCSSA at 210-979-4300 or 800410-2227 (toll-free) to speak to a certified consumer credit counselor. You can also visit the agency online at www.cccssa.org.

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NFIT MAN NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

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 A BETTER YOU

»

KILLING ‘EM SOFTLY HERE’S HOW TO STOP THE BALL QUICKLY AROUND THE GREEN WITH TRAJECTORY.

YOU’VE SHORT-SIDED yourself, and to make matters worse, there’s a deep-faced bunker separating you from the putting surface and the green is sloping away from you. About the only chance you have of stopping this ball within 15 to 20 feet of the flag is to loft the ball practically straight up in the air so it lands perpendicular to the ground. You’re not going to get the ball to spin much from the grass, so the more vertical the landing angle, the sooner the ball will come to a stop. The high lob is essentially a controlled fat shot because you want to strike the ground about an inch to an inch-and-a-half behind the ball. This will allow the clubface to slide underneath the ball, very similar to a greenside bunker shot, launching it very high off the face. You don’t want to hit the ball low off the face, close to the leading edge, because that implies that the clubhead is ascending at impact and contact is liable to be too thin. The higher the contact point on the face, the more vertical the

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NFIT MAN NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

ball will climb and the softer it will land.

»SETUP: PRESET MORE LOFT

When hitting a high lob shot, use your most lofted wedge (preferably 58 or 60 degrees) and dial the clubface open slightly by turning the clubhead clockwise. The higher you want to hit the shot, the more you open the face. Use your full-swing grip (to allow for more wrist hinge and clubhead speed) and make sure to grip the club with the face already open; don’t grip it square and then turn your hands to the right, as that will promote more face rotation through the hitting area and a lower flying shot. Position the ball an inch or two left of center in your stance so that the club shaft is leaning slightly away from the target and your hands are behind the ball. This will expose more of the bounce or trailing edge of the clubhead so that the head will be able to accelerate through

the grass, dirt and soil without digging. With any short-game finesse shot, you want to grip down on the handle an inch or two for added control and feel. As a result, you’ll need to stand a little closer to the ball than normal. Place more weight on your left leg so that you’re less apt to move off the ball during the shot, and flex both knees more than normal to provide additional stability throughout the swing. Your stance and body should be fairly open, which promotes a steeper angle of attack and more of a cutting motion through impact.

»SWING:

DELIVER MAXIMUM LOFT Your setup will dictate how the ball is going to come off the clubface, but you still need to swing aggressively through impact if you want to get the results you’re seeking. Because there’s so much upward elevation to the lob shot, you need additional clubhead speed to

GOLFER, MIKAEL DAMKIER/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

BY RICHIE COUGHLAN


move the ball forward – otherwise it won’t have enough momentum to reach your target. Most amateurs either hit the ball thin or come up well short of their target because they release their hands and wrists too soon (from the top of the swing) and scoop underneath the ball. Therefore, the clubhead is actually in an ascending position at impact and slowing down. To ensure there’s a maximum amount of loft and clubhead speed at impact, assume your address position and then, as you swing down from the top, make sure to transfer your weight forward, onto your left side. Stay home on your left leg as you drive the clubhead down aggressively through the turf, from out to in (i.e., across the ball). As the clubhead approaches impact, feel as if you’re rotating the face underneath the ball rather than rotating it left in a closed position as you normally would. At impact, your hands should be slightly behind

the ball and the shaft angled back, away from the target, which delivers maximum loft to the ball. Essentially, you’re taking that 60-degree wedge of yours, opening the face at address to about 70 degrees and then adding even more loft through impact so that it’s playing more like 80 or 85 degrees. Combined with a fair amount of hand speed through impact, you should loft the ball plenty high with enough forward momentum to reach your target. ■

WITH ANY SHORT-GAME FINESSE SHOT, YOU WANT TO GRIP DOWN ON THE HANDLE AN INCH OR TWO FOR ADDED CONTROL AND FEEL.

Richie Coughlan is the head instructor at TOURAcademy TPC San Antonio. For more game-improvement tips, onthe-spot club recommendations and 3-D previews of each hole, not to mention realtime distances to all key hazards and targets on each hole, download the TOURCaddie PRO app at www.pgatourcaddie.com. NFIT MAN NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

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 COVER STORY

MIRACLE WORKER

THE

WITH A SUCCESSFUL DENTAL PRACTICE AND A “NO EXCUSES” ATTITUDE TOWARD FITNESS, DR. PATRICK MCCABE STRIKES A STELLAR LIFE BALANCE AND ALWAYS MAKES IT A POINT TO MAKE HIS HEALTH A PRIORITY. BY PAIGE CRAWFORD PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOSH HUSKIN

DR. PATRICK MCCABE, the Corpus Christiborn fitness enthusiast, sets the standard when it comes to exercising with a busy schedule. With a natural interest in sports and exercise, McCabe describes his commitment to health as “a way of life” – an unchanging part of his daily routine. McCabe attended the University of Texas for his undergraduate studies. Despite the demanding requirements of a pre-dental student, he always made time to exercise. Because “it’s a stress reliever,” he utilized exercise as an out away from his grueling coursework. Always focused, McCabe never strayed off of his path, choosing dentistry as young as 17 and continuing onto his degree and doctorate efficiently. While many of his friends went on to begin their careers, he was concerned that he was missing out on something, but his hard work proved to be well worth it. McCabe continued his education at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio from 1991 to 1995 for dentistry, where he would later end up settling down. Gaining experience as a dental associate for about four years, McCabe decided to

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open his own practice, McCabe Cosmetic & Family Dentistry. True to its name, McCabe Cosmetic & Family Dentistry is all about creating a welcoming family environment for their patients, offering amenities and services beyond the typical waiting room expectations most are used to. “I always try to keep up with the latest dental developments, techniques and studies through education so I can provide the best services for my patients,” McCabe says. “I also want to apply that in my workouts and overall health … what helps to motivate me is reading magazines and researching online and coming up with different workouts and ideas that I can apply.” Heavily involved in his 11-year-old son’s life, McCabe seems to work miracles when it comes to balancing his practice and family time while keeping his body in prime condition. Being physically active has become second nature to him, as he never provides himself with an opportunity to slack when taking care of his body. Thinking back to the origin of his interest in exercise, McCabe recalls involvement in sports and


”I FEEL THAT I CAN OVERCOME ANY OBSTACLE – IT’S JUST SETTING MY MIND TO IT.”

NFIT MAN NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

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WORKING OUT IS NOT ALWAYS EASY WHEN YOU HAVE A BUSY SCHEDULE, BUT I FEEL LIKE IT SHOULD BE A PRIORITY.“ exercise ever since the fourth grade. Coming from a large family with three brothers and four sisters, McCabe found a passion and outlet with sports and competition that has stayed with him. Growing up, he participated in everything from football and track to baseball, although he has transitioned into more of an endurance athlete in recent years, also incorporating weights into this routine. Engaging in a couple of major races every year, McCabe treats his body to half and full marathons and sprint triathlons alongside at-home workouts or gym sessions to provide a very well-rounded involvement in exercise. “It is not always easy when you have a busy schedule, but when it comes to health, I feel like that should be a priority,” he explains. McCabe’s sister, Rosanna, has proved to be a large influence in his transition into longdistance races. This brother-sister duo remains in contact, coordinating races together despite living in different cities. Rosanna has done many more marathons and triathlons than her brother, motivating him to embrace his athletic nature with endurance events. Averaging one or two marathons a year in addition to smaller races and sprint triathlons has been the trend for McCabe. He recently ran the Big Sur Marathon in California with his sister in April, which he followed up with the San Antonio Marathon in the fall. Utilizing their interest in long-distance races as a means to travel, McCabe and his sister have discussed preparing for the Yellowstone Half Marathon and possibly a half Ironman in California. McCabe and his son have a deep bond, despite having slightly different tastes in sports. His son enjoys and is very active in martial arts and was recently recommended to receive his black belt in Taekwondo. A disheartening family tragedy struck in 2010 when McCabe’s father was prematurely taken from him and his family as a result of pancreatic cancer. Although his father was present for most of his major life events, providing huge support in all aspects of his life, the feeling

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that he was taken too soon is prominent with his own son in knowing how much he is missing out on in his everyday experiences. McCabe describes his father as “the family stone,” holding everyone together. The void his father left is especially hard because he was the “glue” that held the family together. But McCabe says his father still has a warm presence in his life: “Whenever I am competing in a race, I feel like he is looking over me and encouraging me.” McCabe gets strength when he feels weak toward the end of a race by telling himself to do it for his father and for his son – these thoughts keep him moving through these challenges. McCabe and his siblings try to make it to a 5K for pancreatic cancer every November to honor their father and increase awareness of this disease. Heart disease and cancer run high in the McCabe family, which is another reason McCabe is rather health conscious – he’s “trying to avoid these pitfalls.” With his busy schedule, McCabe has no excuses, whether it means heading to the gym during his lunch break or getting in a quick P90X workout with his girlfriend at home to maintain his health. For those who are struggling to stay fit, he advises “changing things up in your workout so you don’t become complacent and bored with your ‘routine,’” which doesn’t have to include hours in the gym, but finding something you really enjoy to keep you active. “I feel that I can overcome any obstacle … it’s just setting my mind to it.” This quality McCabe has discovered when it comes to fulfilling his dreams and goals is a quality anyone would benefit from. For more information on Patrick McCabe and his practice, please visit www.mccabefamilydentistry.com. NFIT MAN NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

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PHOTO BY ROBERT REZAEI

PHOTO BY ROBERT REZAEI

 NONPROFIT

Paul Rezaei and Kyle Koehler shovel pea gravel for the Montessori Schoolhouse.

Jackie Islava and Richard Medina help move furniture.

WIN-WIN APTLY NAMED LOCAL NONPROFIT FIT COMMUNITY ALLOWS YOU TO WORKOUT AND STAY HEALTHY WHILE ALSO HELPING YOUR FELLOW MEMBERS OF THE ALAMO CITY COMMUNITY.

PHOTO BY ROBERT REZAEI

[SPECIAL TO NFIT]

David Hearin and Brittaney Schommer stain a local's fence.

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NFIT MAN NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

IMAGINE YOU STEPPED into a time machine and traveled to the distant past to bring a primitive man back with you. Everyday activities that are done now would probably seem very strange and bizarre to someone living back then. One familiar activity that person would certainly find odd is that of exercise. Picture trying to explain to him the concept of how we now gather in buildings to move things around with no purpose other than to keep our bodies healthy. Whether you’re moving your body, a pair of dumbbells or anything else, contemporary exercise consists of manipulating objects for personal health benefits and lacks the social and societal components previously

evident in human history. Primitive humans stayed healthy and fit from common life activities like hunting food and building shelters. We no longer need to do those things, thus the present exercise paradigm has risen.  So what’s the problem with that? Visualize all of the energy being expended by the millions of people exercising – moving things for the sole purpose of keeping their bodies healthy. Fathom the possibilities that same energy could have if channeled into a productive, purposeful force. “Functional training” is a term used to describe movements that mimic everyday activities. If you are going to do these movements to stay fit, why not do them while helping


PHOTO BY LIZ ESTRADA PHOTO BY BRITTANEY SCHOMMER

Cutting down some trees for a local resident.

PHOTO BY LIZ ESTRADA

Paul Rezaei transports debris for the Montessori Schoolhouse.

FIT COMMUNITY WORKOUTS ARE SCALED SO INDIVIDUALS OF ALL FITNESS LEVELS CAN ENGAGE IN A CHALLENGING AND REWARDING EXPERIENCE.

Laying grass for a local resident.

PHOTO BY LISA RAMOS

PHOTO BY ROBERT REZAEI

After a workout and making signs for the Wounded Warriors. Pictured: Paul Rezaei and Christina Alcala

Nathan Gamez participates in the Tower Climb and Run to benefit the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. NFIT MAN NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

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PHOTO BY ROBERT REZAEI

Shoveling pea gravel for the Montessori Schoolhouse.

PHOTO BY KELLI KOEHLER

PHOTO BY ROBERT REZAEI

Shoveling pea gravel for the Montessori Schoolhouse.

Javier Perez and Juan Salinas build a tire obstacle course.

» YOU CAN PARTICIPATE

Pushups between yard work. Pictured: Paul Rezaei and Nathan Gamez

PHOTO BY LIZ ESTRADA

➊ Finding people and organizations that would benefit from free labor ➋P  articipating in the events to “workout while you help out” ➌D  onating tools, workout equipment or money to the cause

PHOTO BY LIZ ESTRADA

IN FIT COMMUNITY BY DOING ANY OR ALL OF THE FOLLOWING:

Renovating a veteran's yard.

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NFIT MAN NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

someone else out at the same time? What kind of impact would it have on your community if everyone donated one workout per week to this idea?  This concept is the backbone of a nonprofit organization called Fit Community, which started right here in San Antonio. Fit Community assembles volunteers to improve the community while providing a workout for those who participate. Volunteering can consist of anything: renovating a resident’s yard, painting the walls of a church or business, helping other nonprofits, etc. With Fit Community, you exercise for free with an experienced certified personal trainer who, depending on how easy the volunteer task is, may incorporate additional exercise movements to ensure that everyone gets a great workout. From athletes to grandparents, workouts are scaled so individuals of all fitness levels can engage in a challenging and rewarding experience. Christy Andrews, one of cofounder Paul Rezaei’s clients, liked the idea of helping others while getting in shape. “I used to pay him for four years. When he told me I could workout for free on Saturdays and help the community, I was all over it.” Lawrence Webb hits the gym at USAA during the week, but he supplements his workouts with Fit Community. “I’ve made some amazing friends. It’s so fun … It’s become a social thing.” Lori Limon brings her daughter out. “As a parent, my job is to teach my child to be a productive member in her community and society. To volunteer with Fit Community helps her learn compassion, teamwork and giving. Our volunteering together helps us bond as a family in a very positive way.” Rezaei and fellow cofounder Nathan Gamez personally invite you to experience the fun and satisfaction you feel among new friends while helping yourself and the community. ■

Events are held weekly (normally in the mornings on weekends), and they go on for about an hour or two. For specifics about upcoming events and pictures and videos of previous ones, visit www.facebook.com/fitcommunitysa.


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 GET INSPIRED

HOW THE FAMOUS

STAY FIT

LOCAL CELEBRITIES REVEAL THEIR SECRETS FOR STAYING FIT BY SHARING THEIR DIET AND EXERCISE ROUTINES. [SPECIAL TO NFIT]

NFIT MAGAZINE asked 10 local celebrities to answer the following questions about their diet and exercise routines: 1) Describe your regular diet and exercise routine. 2) What do you like and/or dislike the most about exercising? 3) If you were stranded on a desert island for a year and forced to live on nothing but fish and coconuts the whole time, what meal do you think you would dream about the most?

1 URSULA PARI

KSAT 12 ANCHORWOMAN ➊ I am not on any particular diet, but I do try not to eat fried foods, starches or red meat every day. I am sort of a soup nut and like to make my own whenever I get a few hours on the weekend, then sip it all week. In fact, I love soup so much I judge any restaurant by how well they can pull off a good soup. My exercise program is ridiculously easy. I work on a ranch daily, lifting hay bales and 50-pounds sacks of feed and riding horses whenever I get a few minutes. ➋ I am not a gym rat, although I have done it on and off throughout my life. There’s a benefit there, but the air-conditioned, organized, mechanized, group class thing just has lost its luster in my old age. Oddly enough, I am in the best shape of my life right now and have not set foot inside a gym in four years. Go figure?   ➌ First off, the fish and coconuts would be yummy for a long time. After that, I’d be dreaming about crawfish boils, sizzling steaks and veggies dripping in butter. OK, now I’m hungry.

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NFIT MAN NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

2 SUSAN PAMERLEAU BEXAR COUNTY SHERIFF

➊ Oatmeal or a protein shake in the morning, plus a venti iced Starbucks coffee … every morning!Salads or a wrap for lunch, or a simple meal of chicken or fish with vegetables. Then, of course, there are plenty of business lunches and evening events … which mess up all of my best-laid plans! I workout with a trainer once a week (depending on my schedule). I get in as

much cardio as possible – I do the treadmill at 3.5 to 4 mph for 30 to 45 minutes three to five times a week. This is the most difficult with my schedule, since I have a fulltime job, various community events, on average two to three speeches per week and 12 hours in class each week. I used to have time to walk the River Walk, especially Mission Reach. Great places! ➋ What I like best: It feels really good to quit, although it’s always a good feeling when I do exercise – physically and psychologically. ➌ Probably a medium rare rib-eye steak … encrusted with bleu cheese … with a great Greek salad … and anything chocolate.


4 JASON PULLIAM

COUNTY COURT-AT-LAW JUDGE ➊ I follow a simple diet based upon portion control and moderation. I eat a staple fruits, vegetables, fish, chicken and some red meat. I try to avoid carbohydrates when I can. I workout three to five times a week. My base workout is the P90X program. I add some light running and long-distance walking when my muscles are tired from the rigors of the P90X program. 

3 RON NIRENBERG

SAN ANTONIO CITY COUNCILMAN ➊ Ideally, I do high-intensity resistance training (heavy weight, low volume) three to four days per week, along with low-intensity, long-duration cardiovascular training two to three days per week. I’ve been doing this for over 20 years. At different times during that period, I’ve competed in various amateur “heavy athletics” events, including power lifting, the Highland Games, bodybuilding

and strongman. For diet, I am quite obsessive about moderation. I eat several times per day, usually every two to three hours, fairly high protein, carbohydrates and a low to moderate level of fat. I try not to consume “empty” calories unless it feeds my soul. Very dark chocolate is at the top of that list. ➋ I don’t enjoy working out. If I did, I would call it “relaxing.” However, I do enjoy the time to disconnect from the business of the day and center myself physically, mentally and quite often spiritually when working out. And of course, the sense of well-being that I have after a workout is reason enough to continue. ➌ Coconut fish curry.

➋ I love the cathartic feeling I get after a really intense workout. It clears my head so that I can think much more clearly about professional or personal issues. I also enjoy the results of exercising. It makes all the hard work worth it.  ➌ I would go for my grandma’s homecooked Southern-style Thanksgiving dinner with turkey, ham, macaroni and cheese, stuffing and sweet potato pie.

5 LESLIE MOUTON

TELEVISION ANCHOR OF “GOOD MORNING SAN ANTONIO” ➊ I have a weight trainer who I workout with for an hour twice a week, and depending on the weather, I will either jog on a treadmill NFIT MAN NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

23


or run outside for about 45 minutes three other days a week. I love to ride bikes, but that’s weather permitting, as well. I try to get a good workout in four to five times a week. As for diet, I try to eat a balanced meal three times a day. For breakfast, a piece of fruit and a slice of peanut butter toast or oatmeal and yogurt or eggs. Lunch is usually a “Smart Ones” from Weight Watchers or a low-fat ham/ turkey sandwich on whole-grain bread with a small bag of baked chips. Dinner is grilled or baked chicken five nights a week, and I always splurge a little on the weekends with either a good steak and baked potato, or maybe even a homemade cheeseburger or veggie pizza.  ➋ Getting started is what I dislike the most. The feeling it gives me when it’s over is what I like the most!  ➌ That would be my worst nightmare! A juicy steak and baked potato with asparagus. A wedge salad would be on that list, too.

9 PHIL HARDBERGER

FORMER MAYOR OF SAN ANTONIO ➊ I workout five days a week, alternating between the YMCA and walking the dog.  ➋ I like to exercise, but I hate getting up in the morning to do it. And no other time seems to work.  ➌ A good steak with ice cream for dessert. 

7 SID HARLE

6 DR. RICARDO ROMO PRESIDENT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT SAN ANTONIO

➊ A few years ago, I went to a nutritionist at the University of Texas Health Science Center who helped give me a better understanding of how to create good diet habits. It comes down to three things: portion (eating in moderation); balance (including protein, vegetables, fruits and salad); and education (reading the labels on cans and packages). You can’t assume that just because something sounds healthy, like yogurt, it is. It could be high in calories or high in sugar. You have to read the label. For exercise, I set a goal of walking seven days a week for about 30 minutes at a good pace. I rarely miss that goal. In any given month, I may miss one day, but it will only be because I am traveling or have other obligations. For me, the best time to walk is at 6:00 in the morning or 7:00 at night when it’s a bit cooler. ➋ I like everything about exercising. I look forward to my walks every day, and I feel physically and mentally alert after I’ve exercised. The only thing I don’t like is if I miss a day of exercise or if I have an injury and can’t walk. I’ve exercised all my life, including running when I was in school. Now I can’t imagine a day without taking the time to exercise.  ➌ Since I would have spent that year eating my favorite – fish – I might go ahead and celebrate my survival with a juicy sirloin steak.

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NFIT MAN NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

DISTRICT COURT JUDGE ➊ Light breakfast, usually fruit, healthy lunch portion, chicken or salads, light dinner, very little red meat. I run three to five miles three times a week, do speed weights twice a week and do some crunches and sit-ups. ➋ I love to run once I get started. Weights are necessary, but not as enjoyable for me. ➌ Any steak, medium rare (not picky).

8 LAURA SALINAS

10 JOAQUIN CASTRO U.S. CONGRESSMAN

➊ Traveling every weekend between San Antonio and Washington, D.C., it is hard to keep a regular eating and exercise schedule. Because of the stress that comes from being in Congress, I try to run almost daily either in the mornings or the evenings. It feels great to get fresh air and get to know the city. The only drawback is that a few days ago, I got a tweet from a reporter in Washington who spotted me wearing a “Don’t Mess With Texas” T-shirt while I was running in the morning. ➋ I enjoy exercising because it allows me to clear my head. The hardest thing about exercising these days is finding the time to do it regularly. ➌ I would miss enchiladas de mole and Honest Tea, half and half. Sometimes Washington feels like a desert island because there is none of the great Mexican food and barbecue San Antonio offers. ■

BEXAR COUNTY COURT-AT-LAW JUDGE ➊ I workout with a personal trainer three times a week. He provides a nutritional plan to help guide my diet. ➋ I workout at 4:30 a.m., so waking up is always the most challenging part of my routine! While being sore isn’t always fun, at least I know the workouts are doing their job. ➌ Filet mignon and sushi.

These local celebrities were interviewed by Dan Corbett, a local educator and Republican political strategist. Corbett was previously named the most influential educator in San Antonio by Scene in SA Magazine, and he is the president of the British Society of San Antonio. He can be reached at corbett2004@ yahoo.com.


 GET INSPIRED

MAKING CHAMPIONS OUT OF STUDENTS

THE APTLY NAMED LOCAL STARTUP, MAKINGCHAMPIONS.COM, FORMS A PARTNERSHIP WITH YOUVERSION AND LAUNCHES NIGHT OF CHAMPIONS EVENTS WITH THE GOAL OF LEADING AND INSPIRING STUDENTS AND YOUNG ADULTS TO MAKE THE TRANSITION FROM THE BACKPACK TO THE BRIEFCASE. BY ROSANNE HUGHES Former professional basketball star Antonio Daniels and Community Bible Church Teaching Pastor John "Coach Val" Valenzuela at a Sept. 5 press conference at Rita's on the River. Daniels and Valenzuela talked about the kickoff of a new weekly event at the University of Texas at San Antonio called "Night of Champions." The event will be held each Sunday at 9 p.m. in the UTSA Convocation Center.

A NEW San Antonio-based startup, MakingChampions.com, launched an online community in September with a kick-off event at the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA). MakingChampions.com utilizes a combination of interactive curriculum, video-driven devotionals hosted by YouVersion and weekly events that inspire attendees to make a true transformation in their lives. YouVersion, one of the original free apps Apple offered when it launched its iTunes store five years ago, is an app that offers the

Bible in more than 600 versions and more than 400 languages. By sharing the curriculum through the Bible app, which just announced a milestone of 100 million downloads, the worldwide YouVersion community will have access to these innovative devotionals, as well. “We are excited to add the helpful content from MakingChampions.com to our app,” said Terry Storch, cofounder of YouVersion. “We see great potential to reach people across the world as multiple speakers and languages are added.”

MakingChampions.com launched with video study devotionals hosted by YouVersion, ongoing online teaching series, game-changing curriculum apps and weekly large group event education. The curriculum initially features video and study content from John “Coach Val” Valenzuela. Coach Val is a teaching pastor at Community Bible Church, a former UTSA student athlete and successful high school basketball coach. In additional to the online community, MakingChampions.com launched a weekly event called Night of Champions at 9 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 8, 2013, in the UTSA Convocation Center. Night of Champions, which takes place on Sunday nights, features a free concert and leadership training intended to help students make the transition from the backpack to the briefcase. “John is a dynamic speaker,” said Lynn Hickey, UTSA assistant vice president and director of ath-

letics. “His experiences as a coach are obvious, but his messages are pertinent to everyone. He has had a profound impact on our campus with both student-athletes and nonstudent-athletes.” The weekly events fall under the auspices of First Light Christian Fellowship, a registered UTSA faculty and staff organization. The inaugural Night of Champions event in September featured Coach Val and former professional basketball player Antonio Daniels as keynote speakers, and it was sponsored by local downtown Mexican restaurant, Rita’s on the River. ■ Rosanne Hughes is the director of community outreach. For more information, visit www.makingchampions.com. Note: While NFit officially adheres to AP style, certain exceptions were made in the editing of this article.

ABOUT MAKINGCHAMPIONS.COM

MakingChampions.com is an innovative online community that utilizes a combination of interactive curriculum, video-driven devotionals hosted by YouVersion and weekly events to lead and inspire attendees to make true transformation in their lives. Visitors are encouraged to follow www.makingchampions.com and its social networks as additional languages, speakers and writers are added in the near future. NFIT MAN NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

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 GET INSPIRED ERIC CASTILLO, a personal trainer and student athlete at the University of the Incarnate Word (UIW), is not your typical college football player. At age 28, he made his dream of playing collegiate football at UIW a reality, despite the fact that he had no previous high school football experience. As a 30-year-old senior and defensive back, Castillo (No. 38) was one of only 95 guys who received an invitation to UIW’s first Division 1 football camp this year. He may have been the oldest and the least experienced, but he achieved his dream through hard work and dedication. Castillo trained hard and learned fast in his pursuit to play college football, and his ability to work with a team coherently and efficiently has paid dividends for him in football – but it is what he has done off the field that has really begun to change lives forever in the San Antonio community. Every great story begins with a dream, and every great dream can only be shared through a great story. Castillo has shared his story at four Boys & Girls Clubs and around the South Texas area, and now he shares his story with NFit. In his own words, here is the powerful story and testimony of Eric Castillo:

THE POWER OF A DREAM ERIC CASTILLO: NOT YOUR TYPICAL COLLEGE FOOTBALL PLAYER [SPECIAL TO NFIT]

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NFIT MAN NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

My name is Eric Castillo. When I was growing up, as a kid, I was always surrounded by sports and fitness and always loved to play sports. My dad grew up here in San Antonio playing basketball, football and baseball at Lanier High School. He was fortunate to receive a scholarship to play football at the University of Missouri as a quarterback. His footsteps as an athlete were followed by me and my brother up until the high school level. In high school, I played basketball for four years. I graduated in 2001 from John Marshall High School. After high school, I took a different road than what I expected. At a young age, I started a landscape company from mowing residential yards, tree trimming, irrigation and concrete to full-out landscape jobs. At 19 years old, I had my first big commercial landscape contract with a local homebuilder. By 22, I was running two crews and was working with a few different homebuilders and real estate brokers. At 23 years old, I got married to the mother of my two children, Eric and Ethan. At the same time, I was privileged to obtain a fulltime job at a local real estate company that paid for my real estate classes and a position as an assistant property manager. While working for this company, I was still able to run my successful landscape company. With all of this work and money that I was chasing, I lost focus of the most important things in my life. I started drinking in excess, I said whatever came to my mind and I was doing what I wanted to please me. That was my life: an incredible banquet of all the things the world had to offer, but just never getting full, never being satisfied, never being able to push away and say, “that’s enough” – and suddenly, I was lost. I was happy, but unfulfilled. Something was missing. The lifestyle I was trying to live at such a young age took a toll on my family and me. The three things that I really knew in life (my wife and my two sons) were taking away from me at the same time. So I had to find something that made me feel comfortable. I went down a path of destruction. I lost my job and my landscape company that I built


in six years overnight. It wasn’t because of anybody else, but because the way I was living – the choices I was making. Everything in my life up until this point, I could do on my own. I didn’t need help from anyone. But the drinking I couldn’t stop. I wanted more and more. I had an accident one night to my right hand that almost took my life. I remember waking up the next day in a hospital with a cast on my right hand. The doctors told me I would never be able to use my hand again. My identity was gone. I felt like a rug just got yanked out from underneath me. I think God put a roadblock in my life: He had removed all of my distractions. Eventually, I was released from the hospital and I started to go to the gym to rehabilitate

“I MAY NOT BE A STARTER OR AN ALL-STAR FOOTBALL PLAYER, BUT EVERY TIME I STEP ON THE FIELD, I WORK HARD.” my hand. It started with baby steps. Things got harder after that. The hand started to get better. It was not an overnight transformation, but slowly, things started to change in my life. I understood I was a screw-up. I took my talents and abilities, and I spit on them. I took for granted the body that was giving to me. Six weeks out of the hospital, I ran my first 5K. The feeling I got from finishing that first run became an instant inspiration to me, and I wanted more of that. The path that I fell off of after high school was placed right back in my face. Fitness became my road to recovery spiritually, mentally and physically. I wanted to show people that I could overcome this injury and addiction. I started working for a small gym doing sales. After a few months at the gym, I was asked to take personal training classes. I still remember my first client: a 15-year-old overweight boy. I couldn’t believe his mom was about to pay me to try to change this little boy’s body health and life. I was optimistic about what I could do. I asked myself, ‘Am I changed? Is this path that I was meant to be on?’ I ended up building a client base of 20 clients until one day when I moved weights and machines into a friend’s garage, where we made a makeshift gym that we called a training studio. I trained out of the garage for six months until I saved up enough money and built up a total of 40 clients. I then moved into a shopping center and had my own commercial studio. I trained out of my studio for two years. I still remember sitting in the studio with some close friends and talking about adversity, life, dreams and goals. My dream and goal was to play col-

lege football. It was a dream that seemed so far because I never played high school football. In November of 2010, at 27 years old, I closed my gym down to chase the dream I had envisioned for two years. I was willing to lose it all for an attempt, but I had to try. I hired a personal trainer by the name of Nathaniel Dilworth, who had a background with track athletes. We trained for speed three days a week, as I found a little time to train a few clients at local high school football fields to keep my dream alive financially. I remember applying at the University of Incarnate Word in December of 2010. A few days after I applied, I met a man by the name of Ed Garza – he was a former mayor of San Antonio. I contacted him and we chatted about life, goals and dreams. A few days later, I drove to UIW and I still remember the admissions lady closing the door behind her. I knew it wasn’t good news: “You have not been accepted to UIW.” My heart dropped, and when I left, I was in tears of confusion. Later that night, Mr. Garza and I wrote an appeal letter. The next day at 9 a.m., I got a call from admissions saying I was accepted into the spring semester at UIW. I will never forget the feeling after I hung up with her. I was getting a second chance in life and a chance to chase my dream. I went to talk to the coach immediately and was able to walk on and start spring training with the UIW Cardinals, where I had an opportunity to play in their annual spring game. The players and coaches at UIW keep me grounded and inspired. I am surrounded by a great group of guys – high school all-star athletes and college transfers. I am playing a sport

I never played in high school, and I take every day as an opportunity to learn the game and the position from a great group of teammates and coaching staff at UIW. Every time I step on the field, I work hard. I know I may not be a starter or an all-star football player, but I do know I give it all I’ve got to help and inspire others around me. I have learned values like accountability, determination and teamwork. People always ask me, “What made you want to play a sport at a college level? You never played before and you’re 28 years old.” The only answer I have for them is that I do it for my sons, Eric and Ethan. I figured if they couldn’t be a part of my life now, I would do something in honor of them, and that just happened to be the path of football at UIW. Being on the team at UIW fills the hole in my heart that needed filling. Sometimes a man must follow a dream even if it seems impossible. Sometimes courage must overcome doubt and determination must overcome adversity, and in the moment of truth, inner strength must be found. Every great story begins with a dream, and every great dream can only be told through a story. I am now on my last season. I am a 30-year-old senior and Division 1 college athlete today, and I am living my dream through a powerful testimony. Never give up. ■

For more information, contact Eric Castillo at pinnacle.fitness@yahoo.com or 210-616-6212. NFIT MAN NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

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 EVENTS

CELEBRATE THE SEASON

RING IN THE HOLIDAYS AND THE NEW YEAR SAN ANTONIOSTYLE AT THE MANY FESTIVE EVENTS GOING ON IN THE ALAMO CITY IN LATE 2013 AND EARLY 2014.

»DEC. 6 & 7, 2013

San Antonio Health and Fitness Expo

»WEEKENDS IN DECEMBER 2013 Santa’s Railroad Wonderland

Enjoy moonlight train rides and hayrides and Santa sightings at this family-friendly event at the Texas Transportation Museum. Call 210-490-3554 for more information. www. txtransportationmuseum.org

»DEC. 2, 2013 TO JAN. 20, 2014

Spurs Youth Basketball League Registration  San Antonio boys and girls ages 6 to 14 are invited to stay active and fit by shooting hoops in the Spurs Youth Basketball League. League play officially begins in January with registration currently underway at several participating Parks & Recreation Department Community Centers. To sign up, parents are asked visit a participating community center to complete a registration form and pay the $10 fee (per child), which includes a team shirt.

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NFIT MAN NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

The San Antonio Health and Fitness Expo will be hosted for two consecutive days at the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center. This two-day event will provide an excellent opportunity to more than 60 exhibitors to showcase a wide array of health product and services aiming at the targeted prospective. Some of the products that will be displayed in the event will be running gear and sports apparel. This event will gather visitors from all over the world who will take a look at the exhibition and satisfy their demands and choices. The San Antonio Health and Fitness Expo is one of the dynamic events. Call 210-207-8500 for more information. www.sahbgcc.com

»DEC. 6 TO 22, 2013

Ford Fiesta de las Luminarias Experience the holiday serenity of the River Walk as you stroll along the lush banks of the San Antonio River guided by more than 6,000 luminarias. Warmly glowing candles in sandfilled bags line the walkways to symbolically mark the “lighting of the way” for the Holy Family. This centuries-old tradition begins at dusk on Friday, Saturday and Sunday only. Call 210-227-4262 for more information. www.thesanantonioriverwalk.com

»DEC. 7, 2013

Tamales! Holiday Festival at The Pearl The restored Pearl Brewery, the city’s newest culinary star, celebrates all things tamale.

SANTA, PRESSMASTER; COWBOY HAT, WILLIAM BERRY/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Hours at the community centers are Monday through Thursday from 2 to 9 p.m., Friday from 2 to 7 p.m. and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, call 207-3000. www.sanantonio.gov/parksandrec


Sample dozens of tamales, from traditional to dessert, plus storytellers, dancing, live music and fireworks. www.atpearl.com

»DEC. 21 & 22, 2013

Cowboy Christmas at Enchanted Springs Ranch Experience the season Old West-style with a cowboy Santa and his reindeer at a working ranch. Call 830-249-8222 for more information. www.enchantedspringsranch.com

»DEC. 30, 2013 FOOTBALL, BROCREATIVE/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

21st Annual Valero Alamo Bowl Major college football comes to the Alamodome in San Antonio. The Valero Alamo Bowl is an annual post-season collegiate bowl game featuring the No. 2 Pac-12 Conference selection (after the Rose Bowl) and the No. 3 Big 12 pick (after the Fiesta and Cotton Bowls). The bowl has quickly become one of the most popular bowls in the country, producing some of the most-watched bowl games in ESPN history while selling out in many years past. Call 210-226-2695 for more information. www.alamobowl.com

»DEC. 31, 2013

Celebrate San Antonio Ring in the New Year San Antonio-style! Enjoy spectacular fireworks, live music on multiple stages, food booths, family activities and more.

The event takes place on S. Alamo between Durango and Market Streets and at La Villita and HemisFair Park. Free. Call 210-212-8423 for more information. www.saparksfoundation.org

Alamo Helicopters Holiday Lights Tours Enjoy San Antonio’s holiday lights in a new and breathtaking way. Call 866-205-7084 for more information. www.alamohelicoptertours.com

BUILD YOUR SPEED!

NFIT MAN NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

29


NFit Magazine

&

srG athletics

are recoGnizinG san antonio’s

student athletes School DiStrictS incluDe: • San antonio Independent School District • North East Independent School District • Alamo Heights Independent School District • Northside Independent School District

Junior or Senior LeveL StudentS wILL BE RECOgNIzED FOR THEIR TALENTS AND ACHIEVEMENTS IN EACH ISSUE OF NFIT MAgAzINE. Keep an eye out for your local athletes in issues to come! the Youth athlete section IS SET TO TAkE OFF wITH THE January/february ISSUE OF NFIT MAgAzINE

Student athletes will also be rewarded individual prizes.

INTERESTED IN SPONS PLEASE CON ORINg THIS SECTION? Liz WhittakTACT THE PUBLISHER: er @ 210.6 21.7301

Meet the selection coMMittee

KimBerly Harle

Senior Public Affairs Coordinator/ H-E-B

Hollis macdonald

Community Responsibility Coordinator/ Spurs and Sports & Entertainment

roBert r. olivares, PH.d. Corporate V.P., Multicultural Marketing/ RNDC-USA

Brandy ralston-lint

Public Relations Program Manager/ Christus Children’s Hospital of San Antonio

Jacqueline ortiz San Antonio Anchor, Reporter/ News 4

sloan tHomas

Commercial Corporate Business Developer, Alamo Title/ Former Longhorn Football & NFL athlete

Brandon arceneaux

Co-Owner/ Reel Dinner Partners DBA Alamo Drafthouse


NFit Man Magazine Nov/Dec 2013