Page 1

Freedom Rodeo Pictures


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 2

Community Calendar Wednesday 9 a.m. The Woods County Senior Citizens Center, 625 Barnes, Alva, is open for games and other activities. Exercise is scheduled each day at 11 a.m. Transportation provided upon request. Noon Alva Kiwanis Club meets at Champs Restaurant. 2-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip Museum in Alva is open every day except Monday. For information or arranged tours, call 580-327-2030. 6:30 p.m. “Leap Into Health” is free weight loss support at the First United Methodist Church in Alva. People can join anytime. Current session finishes

Aug. 29 and next session begins Sept. 12. 7 p.m. Alva Moose Lodge men’s meeting is held every Wednesday. Thursday 9 a.m. The Woods County Senior Citizens Center, 625 Barnes, Alva, is open for games and other activities. Exercise is scheduled each day at 11 a.m. Transportation provided upon request. Noon Alva Rotary Club meets at Champs Restaurant. 2-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip Museum in Alva is open every day except Monday. For information or arranged

tours, call 580-327-2030. 5:30 p.m. Alva Weight Watchers meet at College Hill Church of Christ. 8 p.m. Alcoholics Anonymous will meet at 1027 8th (Wesley House) in Alva every Monday and Thursday. Friday 9 a.m. The Woods County Senior Citizens Center, 625 Barnes, Alva, is open for games and other activities. Exercise is scheduled each day at 11 a.m. Transportation provided upon request. 2-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip Museum in Alva is open every day except Monday. For information or arranged tours, call 580-327-2030.

Four one-pot meth labs found in Cherokee residence By Marione Martin A search warrant served on residents in Cherokee netted numerous items involved in the manufacture of methamphetamine. According to documents on file, a warrant was served by the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs on August 14 at 6:05 a.m. at 1020 S. Oklahoma Ave. in Cherokee. At the time of service, the residence was being rented by Steven and Erica Fausnaught. It was occupied by Steven and Erica and two juvenile children. During the search, items found in the master bedroom closet were an inactive one-pot type meth lab, cold packs, lithium battery strips, burned tin foil, battery parts, pseudoephedrine packs, and coffee

filters. Several glass type pipes with residue were located in the bedroom as well. Found in the utility room were two inactive one-pot labs, two jars with residue, and a black backpack containing an inactive one-pot lab, plastic tubing, coffee filters, lighter fluid, drain cleaner, cold packs, pseudoephedrine, and other items used for manufacturing methamphetamine. Other items located in the residence were a log depicting dates of pseudoephedrine purchases, receipts for pseudoephedrine and numerous plastic baggies with residue. Both Steven and Erica Fausnaught were arrested and booked into the Alfalfa County Jail. On August 15, formal charg-

es were filed. Steven L. Fausnaught, 39, has been charged with the manufacture of a controlled dangerous substance, maintaining a place resorted to by users of controlled substance and child endangerment, all felonies. He has also been charged with unlawful possession of paraphernalia, a misdemeanor. Erica L. Fausnaught, 30, has been charged with manufacture of a controlled dangerous substance, maintaining a place resorted to by users of controlled substance and child endangerment, all felonies. She has also been charged with a misdemeanor of unlawful possession of paraphernalia.


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 3


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 4

OHP institutes Collier — Olson announce engagement new policy on Gregory and Kimberly Martin of Owasso, Oklahoma and Gary and Kim Olson of Carmen, Oklahoma are pleased to announce the engagement and upcoming marriage of their children, Kristen Collier and Dane Olson. Kristen is a 2006 graduate of Bixby High School, a 2010 graduate with a degree in Community Health from the University of Central Oklahoma and will attend the University of Oklahoma Health Science Center Dental Hygiene program this fall. She is the granddaughter of William and Anna Givens of Gallatin, Tennessee, Ronald and Diane Watson of Lebanon, Tennessee, and David and Ann Carr of Gallatin, Tennessee. Olson is a 2004 graduate of Cherokee High School and a 2008 Presidents Leadership Council graduate with a degree in Organizational Communication from the University of Central Oklahoma. He is the grandson of Nina and the late Charles Burkes of Carmen, Max and the late Veneta Sims of Carmen, and Darla and the late Don Olson of Fairview. The couple will marry on Saturday,

September 8, 2012 at 6:30 p.m. in Tulsa, Oklahoma. The couple will reside in Oklahoma City.

Kristen Collier and Dane Olson

police chases

TULSA, Okla. (AP) — A new policy places restrictions on when Oklahoma Highway Patrol troopers can join pursuits when the chase is started by another law enforcement agency. Troopers are no longer allowed to join pursuits of fleeing drivers when the chase is started by another agency unless the agency asks the troopers for help. A special order was initially put in place in June to cover only Troop A, which includes Oklahoma City. The Tulsa World reports (http://is.gd/GamEZQ ) that the order was rescinded Aug. 1 and a new order was put in place Aug. 3 that covers the entire patrol. The newspaper obtained documents detailing the policy from a public records request. Lt. George Brown says no specific incident prompted the change and that the agency discussed the issue with Oklahoma City police.

NEED

MONEY for COLLEGE ? Go online and learn how

Federal Student Aid can help you realize your dream of an education after high school. U.S. Department of Education www.FederalStudentAid.ed.gov

1-800-4-FED-AID


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 5


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 6

Burlington School finances ‘in good shape’ By Yvonne Miller At the Burlington School Board of Education meeting Monday night, Superintendent Glen Elliott announced, “Financially the school is in good shape.” He attributes favorable finances to revenues from oil and gas production. He said that gross production is one revenue that still stays at the local level. “The increased ad valorem means less state aid from the state department,” Elliott said. But he was quick to say that is not a bad thing. The superintendent said the anticipated state aid was approximately $240,000, with enrollment of about 155 students. “I know we’ll receive less than that because of our increased gross production.” He said the gross production revenue and reduction in state aid is almost dollar for dollar. Elliott said the auditor’s report in September will reveal the anticipated increased ad valorem figures. Members present at the meeting were Allison Armbruster, Aaron Smith, Roger Allen and Terry Graham. Member Beth Guffy was absent due to illness. Besides Elliott and Principal Shane Feely, minutes clerk Jan Hill attended. The board discussed the state’s FR3 report, which the State Department of Education requires annually. Elliott said the state changed their coding, which causes some discrepancies in reporting. This does not affect the school’’s revenue received. Elliott said they received the first FR3 draft in July, and must have the final report ready in September.

E2020 Program The board voted to discontinue membership in the alternative education cooperative due to in house use of the E2020 programs this year. Elliott explained that E2020 is a software proram that makes scheduling easier. The program allows Burlington to offer three computer classes in one hour. He said the goal of many schools is for each student to have a computer. Elliott said many of last year’s seniors purchased their own computers to take concurrent enrollment classes through Redlands Community College. Currently 7th graders carry a laptoplike computer with them to classes as they take language arts, English, geography and personal finance. More Burlington School Board Business — Encumbrances, change orders, payroll accrual, and warrants were approved for the 2013 General, Building and Child Nutrition Funds, and for reserve funds from 2012 General, Building and Transportation Bond funds. The July activity fund report was approved. — The Burlington School Child Nutrition Procurement plan was reviewed and reaffirmed. Stephanie Marteney was approved as Compliance Coordinator. — The board voted not to enter into an agreement with the Cooperative Council for Oklahoma School Administration (CCOSA) to participate in the Legal Assistance Program. — Employee contracts were signed. — Elliott’s Superintendent’s report

included the upcoming OSSBA/CCOSA conference this weekend in Oklahoma City, the number of students at 155, bus routes, and the Alfalfa County Hazard Mitigation Plan. He said it’s a county-wide plan for disasters through the Northwest Oklahoma Development Authority. The mitigation plan affirms what buildings, etc., are in place to be eligible for FEMA relief in the event of a disaster. Mr. Feely’s Principal’s report included concurrent enrollment, the new E2020 program, upgrades to computers, and back to school activities. The board approved a resolution regarding high stakes testing to be sent to OSSBA to present to the legislature. After discussion, the board raised the rental price for the Little Gym to $75.00. The rental price has not been increased since the early 1990’s, and recent renovations have greatly improved the building. Hirings at Special Meeting The Board held a special meeting August 16. They approved employment of Danny Allen as temporary part time custodian, Bonnie Barnett as bus driver and paraprofessional, and Shawna Stewart as paraprofessional.

Don’t trade it, donate it!

Call the American Lung Association of Oklahoma Vehicle Donation Program at 800-577-5864 or visit us on the Web at www.oklung.org


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 7


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 8

Lynn Says

13+ things your child’s teacher won’t tell you

good-hearted, not necessarily the ones with the highest grades. 14. My rule for hormonal middle-schoolers: Keep your hands where I can see them. 15. My first year of teaching, a fifth-grader actually threw a chair at me. I saw him recently, and he told me he just graduated from college. That’s what makes it all worthwhile. 16. You do your job; I’ll do mine. I have parents, who are CEOs of their own companies, come in and tell me how to run my classroom. I would never think to go to their office and tell them how to do their jobs. 17. We don’t arrive at school 10 minutes before your child does; and we don’t leave the minute they get back on the bus. Many of us put in extra hours before and after school. 18. We are not the enemy. Parents and teachers really are on the same side. 19. The truth is simple. Your kid will lie to get out of trouble. 20. Encourage your child to keep reading. That’s the key to success in the classroom at any age. 21. It’s their homework, not yours. We can tell the difference between a parent helping their child with homework and doing it for them (especially when they’re clueless in class the next day). 22. Teaching is a calling. There’s not a teacher alive who will say she went into this for the money. 23. Check their homework. Just because your child says he did his homework doesn’t mean it’s true. You must check. Every night. 24. We get jaded too. Teaching is not as joyful as it once was for many of us. Disrespectful students and belligerent parents take a toll on us. 25. Talk to your kids. Parents give their kids the pricey gadgets and labels, but what kids really crave is for you to talk to them. Kids want to know you are interested in their lives. 26. We spend money out of our own pockets. Teachers often buy things our students need, such as school supplies and even shoes. 27. Supportive, involved parents are crucial. But some are “helicopter parents” — they hover too much. 28. Having the summer off is great, but... Many of us have to take on extra jobs — teaching summer school, tutoring — to make ends meet. 29. Academics aren’t everything. Success is not achieved by just making kids memorize flash cards and prepping them for an Ivy League school. Sensible parents know there is a college for every kid, and responsibility and good citizenship are what really drive success. 30. Nobody says “the dog ate my homework” anymore. But we hear a lot of “I left it on the kitchen table.” Then Mom will send in a note to back up the story. 31. Don’t ask us to do your dirty work. We wish parents would make their kids own up to their actions, instead of pressuring us to bend the rules. 32. We know you mean well, but... Please stop doing everything for your child, and allow them to make mistakes. How else will they learn? Kids are not motivated to succeed because they feel their parents will bail them out every time. 33. There are days when I just want to quit. But then, that You can no longer use the excuse, “My dog ate my homework.” one smile from that one kid changes it all.

By Lynn L. Martin (This piece is entirely from Reader’s Digest. With school just starting in our area, it IS a very good read for all of us.) 1. If we teach small children, don’t tell us that our jobs are “so cute” and that you wish you could glue and color all day long. 2. I’m not a marriage counselor. At parent-teacher conferences, let’s stick to your child’s progress, not how your husband doesn’t help you around the house. 3. We’re sick of standardized testing and having to “teach to the test.” 4. Kids used to go out and play after school and resolve problems on their own. Now, with computers and TV, they lack the skills to communicate. They don’t know how to get past hurt feelings without telling the teacher and having her fix it. 5. When I hear a loud belch, I remember that a student’s manners are a reflection of his parents’. 6. Your child may be the center of your universe, but I have to share mine with 25 others. 7. Please help us by turning off the texting feature on your child’s phone during school hours. 8. Guys who dribble a ball for a couple of hours a game can make up to $20 million a year. We educate future leaders and make about $51,000 a year. 9. We take on the role of mother, father, psychologist, friend, and adviser every day. Plus, we’re watching for learning disabilities, issues at home, peer pressure, drug abuse, and bullying. 10. Kids dish on your secrets all the time — money, religion, politics, even Dad’s vasectomy. 11. Please, no more mugs, frames, or stuffed animals. A gift card to Starbucks or Staples would be more than enough. A thank-you note: even better. 12. We love snow days and three-day weekends as much as your kid does. 13. The students we remember are happy, respectful, and


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 9


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 10

Four hired by Alva School Board Sue Gendron, standing, directed a teacher education seminar Monday morning at the NWOSU ballroom for about 200 area teachers. The focus of the meeting was to help teachers prepare for the new “common core” standards that have been adopted by 45 states. Video frame by Lynn L. Martin

Common Core Meeting for Area Teachers at NWOSU By Lynn L. Martin Sue Gendron, a former Commissioner of Education for the State of Maine, and now Policy Coordinator for the SMARTER Balance Assesment Consortium, met with about 200 teachers from Northwest Oklahoma to provide “Straight Talk on Common Core” in the NWOSU ball room Monday morning. Numerous studies, coupled with practical observation, reveal that public school educated youth in the USA have fallen behind academically compared to other students in the world. Gendron explained that beginning in 2002, the State of Maine moved to

one-on-one digital technology (laptop computers to each student) in all middle schools. Then in 2008, that one-on-one technological movement was also implemented at the high school level. She said, “This has dramatically changed the learning environment in Maine. Fortunately, we have had two Maine governors in a row who both announced goals that, “Maine students are going to be the most digitally savvy in the world.” Sue Gendron told the assembly that she wanted to explain what’s coming in the common core standards and provide details on how to prepare districts for the curricula changes. “At this moment, we have 45 states and the District of Columbia who have adopted common core,” She said. “The focus in mathmatics will be the most significant shift that teachers will have to adopt.” Also, she noted there will be significant shifts within English langauge arts. “Over and over again we have heard from business and industry leaders around the nation, that we have lowered our expectations dramatically. This is a movement to correct that shift,” she said. She promised, “We have to change dramatically the resources you use to engage students on a daily basis.” A few minutes of her talk at NWOSU are on the newspaper website at www. alvareviewcourier.com

By Lynn L. Martin The Alva Board of Education held a special meeting at 5:30 p.m. Monday to fill the ranks before classes start on Wednesday. A former teacher, Jarrod Hada was hired on a one-year temporary contract at the AMS to teach science and technology. He will also be an assistant girl’s basketball coach at Alva High School. Three paraprofessionals were hired in order to assist special needs students: Darcie Tidwell, Darraigh Parker and Nicole Watkins.

Jarrod Hada


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 11


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 12

Jenlinks celebrate their Old Okla. 70th wedding anniversary water plant converted for modern use Forrest and Doris Jenlink will be celebrating their 70th wedding anniversary on Sunday, September 2, 2012. Their children and grandchildren are honoring them with a casual come and go reception from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Jet Senior Citizens Center, and family and friends are invited to join them. Forrest and Doris were married September 5, 1942 in the home of the bride’s parents. The couple shared the September 5 anniversary date with the bride’s parents and grandparents. The Jenlinks graduated from Jet High School and have lived and farmed in that area since their marriage. They have two children, Carolyn Allen of Dallas, Texas, and son Ron and wife Suzanne Jenlink of Jet. The couple has nine grandchildren and thirteen great-grandchildren. They request no gifts but cards, memories and best wishes can be shared

at the reception or may be sent to Rt. 1, Box 97, Jet, OK 73749.

Doris and Forrest Jenlink

Oklahoma casting call for upcoming movie draws 4,292 TULSA, Okla. (AP) — Nearly 4,300 people answered the casting call for a movie based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning play, “August: Osage County.” The 4,292 people who stood in line at the Tulsa Promenade mall on Saturday were vying for a spot as an extra in the film, which will feature Oscar-winning actresses Meryl Streep and Julia Roberts. Edmond resident Suzi Watson was

the 1,000th person to be evaluated. She told the Tulsa World she put her odds of being picked at about 1,000 to 1. Katie Standlee told KOTV she’s wanted to be an actress since she was little, but will see where the audition goes. Extras will be notified as little as 24 to 48 hours before they’re needed. The film is set to begin shooting in Pawhuska and Bartlesville in September.

By Kirby Lee Davis, Journal Record TULSA, Okla. (AP) — Around a lonely corner of Mohawk Boulevard, just below the crest wall of Lake Yahola, rest six brick-and-concrete buildings garnished with numerous Art Deco flourishes. But for the plaza fountain at the entryway, the complex offers Tulsans something of a step back in time, to when much of the city’s commercial district consisted of such one- and twostory red brick edifices. But while these walls stand pretty much as they first appeared in the Roaring 20s, their interiors are now far drier and human-friendly. For these structures originally just five brick buildings and a huge copper holding tank encased in brick were designed to move and clean the water Tulsans drank, bathed in, and sprayed across their cars and lawns. The Mohawk Water Treatment Plant opened as part of the $7.5 million Spavinaw Dam and watershed project, the primary source of Tulsa’s water since its 1924 debut. That engineering marvel came from the head of The Benham Group founder William Rea Holway. Overcoming political and racial battles, he devised and produced a gravity-flow system for delivering millions of gallons daily across more than 50 miles of pipes. Lake Yahola served as the final resting place before treatment, sitting just outside the 3600 E. Mohawk Blvd. plant. Holway again used gravity to move water from Yahola to a series of basins, filters and clarifiers, some sitting under the sun, others indoors. During times of heavy usage, a low-lift building augmented the gravity flow by drawing water from the bottom of the lake to feed the basins. The Mohawk plant then used a pair of steam turbines fired by natural gas boilers to supply Tulsa up to 100 million gallons of clean water daily. See Plant Page 36


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 13


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 14

Inspections reveal a busy schedule of bridge repair/building in Alfalfa County By Roger McKenzie Alfalfa County has the fourth highest number of bridges (those measured 20-feet or more in length) in the entire state of Oklahoma. With big traffic increases and much bigger trucks and trailers becoming the norm rather than the exception due to the ongoing oil and gas boom, those bridges are being worn out faster. Some are even being broken down due to heavy loads imposed on them. State and federal support takes care of some of the county’s bridges. The county takes care of the rest in a program overseen by Circuit Engineering District 8, with money the county gets from various road related revenue sources. Some of the less intensive work is done by county employees, a process that stretches the money the

county gets. The more intensive work is generally contracted out. Twenty-five of the county’s bridges have been recently renovated, repaired, or rebuilt. At Monday’s regular meeting of the Alfalfa County commissioners, Donny Head with the CED8 presented them with inspection invoices for the 25 bridges, as well as a “report of conference.” District 1 got a bill for $1,380 for the inspection of six bridges;District 2’s bill was $2,825 for the inspections of 13 bridges; and District 3 will pay $1,290 for the inspections of six bridges. Eleven of the bridges (four in District 1, five in District 2, and two in District 3) are are part of the state’s bridge replacement (BR) program. They are paid for with state and federal funds. They represent almost half of the 24 new bridges, which are part of the current year’s portion of the county’s fouryear building schedule. Five more bridges, one of them a BR bridge, have actually been completed, but they have not yet been inspected. They will be part of the next inspection cycle. Road Crossing Permits Twenty-three road crossing permit requests were approved at Monday’s meeting. The total fees derived from them was $22,500. As usual, most of the requests (13) were for crossings in District 1. They totaled $13,750 in fees.

District 2 granted six permits for $4,250 in fees, while District 3 approved four permits, also totaling $4,250 in fees. Other Business In other business, the commissioners approved an easement to allow storage of cement blocks for washouts, a cash transfer and two vehicle transfers. Some $7,179 in sheriff’s appropriations were shifted from a cash fund to a revolving fund for the sheriff’s department. A 1993 county owned Chevrolet pick-up was transferred from Carmen Responders to Helena Rescue, while a 1999 Chevrolet Blazer went from the sheriff’s department to the county assessor’s office. The commissioners also approved minutes of their previous regular meeting and the special meeting held Thursday, Aug. 16. In that meeting, the commissioners made official a new sales tax allotment which had been discussed at two town meetings. The sales tax resolution for 2012, good through Dec. 31, 2016, was approved. It divides the county’s two percent sales tax the following ways: 55 percent for emergency services, 22.5 percent for county blacktop roads, 12.5 percent for the county government, and 10 percent for the Alfalfa County Fairgrounds. Also approved were maintenance and operations warrants and blanket purchase orders.


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 15


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 16


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 17

Tips for Motorists

When a school bus or children are present slow down and proceed with caution, obeying all traffic laws and speed limits. Always stop for a school bus that has stopped to load or unload passengers. Red flashing lights and an extended stop arm tell you the school bus is stopped to load or unload children. If you are on a two-lane roadway, you must stop. If you are on a roadway that has two or more travel lanes traveling in each direction and you are traveling the same direction as the bus, you must stop. If you are on a roadway that has at least two or more travel lanes traveling in each direction and you are approaching, meeting the bus, you do not have to stop, merely proceed with caution. Be alert and ready to stop. Watch for children walking in the street, especially where there are no sidewalks. Watch for children playing and gathering near bus stops. Watch for children arriving late for the bus, who may dart into the street without looking for traffic. When backing out of a driveway or leaving a garage, watch for children walking or biking to school. When driving in neighborhoods or school zones, watch for young people who may be in a hurry to get to school and may not be thinking about getting there safely.

ALVA STATE BANK & TRUST COMPANY 518 College Ave. - Alva, OK 73717 580-327-3300


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 18

Jayna Lynn Martin Photography - 800-526-1087

HADWIGER

1 of 3 senior photo sessions throughout the senior year we’ll shoot of Jayna.


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 19

Shane Feely comes home with experience as Burlington School Principal By Yvonne Miller A man referred to as Principal Feely walked the halls of Burlington School for about 16 years. His name was Joe. Now students again have a Principal Feely. His name is Shane, the son of Joe and Dee Dee. As a youth, Shane also walked the halls of Burlington, played as an Elk, sat in the classrooms and graduated from there in 1993. He graduated from NWOSU in 1997. His wife Kiley (Rieger) is also a Burlington graduate. Also in education, she’ll teach K-12 vocal music at South Barber School in Kiowa, Kan., this fall. After college, Feely first coached and taught at Drummond, then Waynoka four years, and Buffalo two years before joining the Okeene School. At Okeene seven years, he taught several history classes, coached basketball from elementary through high school, fastpitch softball, high school baseball and elementary track. “We really enjoyed Okeene,” Feely said. The couple and their family were in Okeene when Kiley was diagnosed with cancer. She’s been in remission nearly four years, he said. “The people of Okeene took care of us when Kiley was sick,” Feely said. With his parents and more family in the Burlington area and her parents at Newcastle, the Feelys decided it was time to be closer to family. Feely took a job with Sandridge Energy for a little over a year when returning to this area. Their children are Jackson, who will be a 3rd grader at Burlington; Hudson, who will be a 1st grader; and Lincoln who is not yet in school. Feely earned his master’s degree in 2009 through Southwestern. “I had the opportunity to be a principal elsewhere, but chose Burlington,” Feely said. “It was just a matter of timing, and this was the right time. We like the small town, being close to family and knowing we have a really good school here.” In addition to his principal duties, Feely teaches a one hour computer class with three students. He’s helping with the new E2020 program which, he said “gives us flexibility in our schedule.”

Feely said, “The kids participating (in E2020) have to really hook up to get through all the material.” “I’m continuing to work on curriculum to better prepare our kids – for not only going to college, but finishing,” Feely said. “Our teachers are really good. Research shows teachers are the most important thing in that classroom. In Burlington there’s always been a good partnership with the school and community to push kids to achieve high. I’ve been lots of places, and that’s not true everywhere. It’s a big priority here,” Feely said. The new principal said, “I’m all about helping students get their credits in before they graduate. It’s important they get their basics in before their senior year, as much as possible – then focus on concurrent classes. It’s a good transition between high school and college.” Feely said those ideas are just part of his “broad, general vision.” When asked about his outside interests, Feely replied, “Being at home with my family . . . working in the yard. We’re big (OKC) Thunder fans and hardly miss a game.” A longtime coach, he said, “I

miss coaching a great deal, but I don’t miss getting on the bus and getting home late. I look forward to seeing what it’s like to just watch ballgames.”

Shane Feely, a 1993 BHS graduate, brings his educational experience back to his hometown as the new Burlington School Principal.


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 20

Texas. In lieu of flowers, please send donations to www.cancer.org, 800-ACS2345.

Donna Cox Wade of Douglass, Kansas; nieces, nephews and many friends. She was preceded in death by her parents, infant sister and twin sister, Inez Kaylor. A celebration of Ivy’s life will be held at Burlington Riverside Church of Christ at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, August 22, 2012. Arrangements are under the direction of Lanman Funeral Home, Inc. of Cherokee. www.lanmanmemorials. com In lieu of flowers, the family cordially requests remembrances be made to the Byron/Amorita Fire and Rescue in care of Lanman Funeral Home, Inc. of Cherokee.

Obituaries JESSIE MAE HADA HART Jessie Mae Hada Hart, 81, of Grand Prairie, Texas, died August 15, 2012 at Ethicus Hospital in Euless, Texas. Widow of Wayne L. Hart, she is survived by two sons, Robert W. Hart and Wesley E. Hart; two daughters-in-law, Mary Ann Hart and Vanessa L. Hart; four grandchildren, Felisia Byrd, Hunter S. Hart, Jesse M. Hart and Michael W. Hart; and one grandchild, Alexandra M. Byrd. Born in Alva, on March 17, 1931, Jessie married Wayne Leroy Hart in Shaunavon, Saskatchewan on January 7, 1950. A 1979 graduate of the University of Texas Health Science Center with a degree in Rehabilitation Science, Jessie was an internationally known esophageal speech teacher and a 1997 recipient of the American Cancer Society’s Courage Award. She taught thousands of students during her 39-year stint as a volunteer for the American Cancer Society. She served on the Board of Directors of the International Association of Laryngectomees for more than 30 years. She was the first chairman on the Texas Laryngectomee Association, established in 1990. A two-time survivor of cancer, her 1997 Courage Award read in-part: “Jessie Hart is truly an inspiration to all — a symbol of courage and hope. She possesses all of the wonderful traits that exemplify the Courage Award Winner: Understanding, patience, compassion, sincerity, humility, perseverance, loyalty and commitment.” Funeral services were Monday, August 20, 2012, at Martin Methodist Church at 2621 Bedford Road, Bedford, Texas. Burial followed at Dallas-Fort Worth National Cemetery in Dallas,

IVY ILENE HOUSER MALTBIE A wonderful mother, grandmother, sister and friend passed away on August 17, 2012 . She was one of the twin daughters born on November 25, 1934 to Charles Lawrence and Mina Margaret Colvin Houser in Douglass, Kansas. She was raised in the Smileyberg Community east of Douglass, Kansas. She attended a country school named Waverly the first five grades. She then went to Douglass schools from sixth grade until she graduated from Douglass High School with the class of 1953. After graduation, she worked as a nurse’s aide at William Newton Memorial Hospital at Winfield, Kansas, for two years. She then worked at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Wichita, Kansas, for three years. She married Harland Maltbie on May 28, 1960 at the Northside Church of Christ in Wichita. They were married by minister Louis Tandy. They lived in Wichita two months before moving to the farm northwest of Amorita to take over the farming due to the failing health of Harland’s father. They lived on the family farm for 28 years and later moved east of Amorita in 1989. She was a member of the Amorita Church of Christ for many years, and more recently a member of the Riverside Church of Christ in Burlington. She enjoyed helping and planning funeral dinners and also the Memorial Day Celebration in Amorita. She enjoyed talking on the phone to many of her close friends and neighbors. Another highlight of her life was going to the beauty shop every Friday. She is survived by her husband, Harland; one son, James Maltbie and wife, Janet of Burlington; one daughter, Brenda Maltbie Smith and husband Scott, of Allen, Texas, and three grandchildren, William and Jenna Maltbie of Burlington and Chandler Scott Smith of Allen, Texas. She is also survived by one sister,

SANDRA JEAN REED Sandra Jean Reed passed away on Sunday, August 12, 2012 at Alva, Oklahoma. Memorial service was held Thursday, August 16, 2012 at 11 a.m. at Lanman Chapel in Kiowa, Kansas. Arrangements were by Lanman Funeral Home, Inc. of Kiowa, Kansas. Condolences may be shared with the family at www.lanmanmemorials.com Sandy was born on March 8, 1936 to Ralph and June Mott Reed in Kiowa, Kansas. She attended Barber County country school, then went to Capron, Oklahoma for Junior High and graduated from Capron High School. She went to Salt City Business College. She served in the US Air Force, following military duty she worked for Trans World Airlines, a stock brokerage firm in Kansas City, and medical companies in Arlington, Texas. Sandy retired and moved to Alva, Oklahoma to care for her mother where she participated in the Moose Club and assisted in Capron school alumni activities. She was preceded in death by her parents and one brother, Gary Reed. She is survived by her brother, Dr. A.J. Reed and wife, Esther; sister-inlaw, Jeraldine Reed; three nephews Mike and wife, Kelly; Brent and wife, Karen; Todd and wife, Laura; one niece Alicia Desario and husband, Crash; two great nephews, Harrison and Jackson; a host of other relatives and friends. Memorials may be given to Oklahoma Medical Research or donors choice through Lanman Funeral Home P.O. Box 42 Kiowa, Ks. 67070


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 21


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 22

The members that helped with cleaning up the rodeo grounds were: Back Row (left to right) Lexi Hoy, Krystin Hull, Madison Truesdale, Skylar Hull, Emerald Walborn, Kynadi Gaskill, Hannah Darr, Mackenzie Brune, Jill Whipple, Helen Hawkins. Front Row: Tyler Gavitt, William Walker, Kristopher Sittingdown, Jake Adair, Logan Meriwether, Andrew Baird, Curan Olson, Josiah Darr, Colton Reuss, Draven Smith, Kevin Hoy. Not Pictured Tanner Selvey.

Waynoka FFA wrangles trash at rodeo grounds By Josiah Darr The Waynoka FFA members like to begin their year with a community service project. This year’s project was

cleaning up the rodeo grounds after Waynoka’s Cimarron River Stampede Rodeo. On Friday and Saturday mornings and Sunday evening, many volun-

teers from the local chapter came and cleared the grounds of trash. The Waynoka FFA likes to start the year off right by giving back to their community.


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 23


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 24

Daresa Poe ‘outstanding’ CareerTech teacher Daresa Poe received the Oklahoma Association of Career and Technology Education Outstanding New Professional Award for the Family and Consumer Sciences Education division at the OkACTE 45th Annual CareerTech

Daresa Poe

Summer Conference. The conference was held August 2-3 at the Cox Convention Center in Oklahoma City. The event attracts some 3,500 CareerTech educators from across the state, and is one of the largest professional development educator conferences in Oklahoma. At Waynoka Schools, Poe is a FACS teacher and advisor for the related Family, Careers and Community Leaders of America student organization. “This award contributes to the professional development of six individuals who receive funding for the national ACTE annual convention,” according to Patrick McGregor, OkACTE executive director. “Recipients are recognized as potential leaders of their division and Oklahoma ACTE, and have been members of the OkACTE for no less than two, but no more than five years.” OkACTE is the professional organization for the state’s CareerTech administrators, teachers and staff members. In her third year at Waynoka Schools, enrollment in FACS classes more than

doubled due to Poe’s creativity in classroom instruction. The Waynoka chapter of FCCLA is the largest student organization in the district. For the second year in a row, this revitalized chapter has 100 percent of the FACS students who are members and involved in FCCLA. The objectives of the program are to provide students an opportunity to gain skills for personal development, career preparation and leadership development. Students who enroll are expected before graduation to complete a Career Cluster Pathway in either Travel and Tourism or Family and Community Services. These areas of focus were selected after evaluating interest and needs of the students and determining what was available to them in their local community. Under the direction of Poe, Waynoka FCCLA takes part in many community service opportunities, working closely with the Chamber of Commerce, Alumni Reunion Board and local food pantry. For more information about the Oklahoma CareerTech System visit www.okcareertech.org.

At left: Katelyn Garvie, Hannah King, and Mia Botta vie for the title of Miss Burlington. The pageant will be held in the Burlington Auditorium Thursday, August 30th at 7 p.m. The cost for the pageant is $3 for students and $4 for adults.


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 25


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 26

Study: Less religious states give less to charity By Jay Lindsay BOSTON (AP) — A new study on the generosity of Americans suggests that states with the least religious residents are also the stingiest about giving money to charity. The study released Monday by the Chronicle of Philanthropy found that residents in states where religious participation is higher than the rest of the nation, particularly in the South, gave the greatest percentage of their discretionary income to charity. The Northeast, with lower religious participation, was the least generous to charities, with the six New England states filling the last six slots among the 50 states. Churches are among the organizations counted as charities by the study, and some states in the Northeast rank in the top 10 when religious giving is not counted. The study also found that patterns of charitable giving are colored in political reds and blues. Of the 10 least generous states, nine voted for Democrat Barack Obama for president in the last election. By contrast,

See Give Page 38

Taylor DeVine is all smiles after being crowned the 2012 Freedom Rodeo Queen. Photo by Julie Whiteman


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 27


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 28

Apple sets record for company value at $623B By Peter Svensson, AP Technology Writer NEW YORK (AP) — Apple is Wall Street’s all-time MVP —that’s Most Valuable Property. On Monday, Apple’s surging stock propelled the company’s value to $623 billion, the world’s highest, ever. It beat the record for market capitalization set by Microsoft Corp. in the heady days of the Internet boom. After a four-month dip, Apple’s stock has hit new highs recently because of optimism around what is believed to be the impending launch of the iPhone 5, and possibly a smaller, cheaper iPad. Apple Inc. has been the world’s most valuable company since the end of last year. It’s now worth 53 percent more than No. 2 Exxon Mobil Corp. Apple’s stock hit $664.74 in midday trading before retreating slightly to $662.38. That was $14.27, or 2.2 percent, higher than Friday’s close. Microsoft’s 1999 peak was $620.58 billion, according to Standard & Poor’s. The comparison to Microsoft does not take inflation into account. In inflation-adjusted dollars, the software giant was worth about $850 billion on See Apple Page 36

Dusty Culvin takes lap around the arena after being name the 2012 Freedom Rodeo Princess. Photo by Julie Whiteman


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 29

For only $6 per month Pay Pal bank draft, you can know what’s going on in your town. Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram 580-327-2200


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 30

Monty Goodwin of Waynoka hangs on through the Saddle Bronc competition of the Freedom Rodeo Thursday evening. Photo by Julie Whiteman


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 31


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 32

August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 33


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 34


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 35

Dogs give emotional boost to sick kids in Quito

BRINGING GENERATIONS TOGETHER - Wes Nixon and grandson Hudson Caddell wait anxiously for the 2012 Freedom Rodeo to kick off. Photo by Juile Whiteman

QUITO, Ecuador (AP) — Every Wednesday, Lancelot and Juci scamper into a special mission: nudging and pawing youngsters into smiles at the only hospital in Ecuador’s capital that treats children with cancer. Veronica Pardo, the hospital volunteer who owns the dogs, says the animals are used to cheer up the most discouraged of the patients, especially those with the grimmest prognosis. “Sometimes they do not want to eat, their moms haven’t visited them, they don’t want to take their medicine, or they don’t want to talk with the doctor,” Pardo said. Then she brings her dogs in on Wednesdays, and small miracles happen as the sick youngsters caress and cuddle the dogs. “The children smile, talk. They’re infused with life.” Pardo recalled a patient named Dana, a 7-year-old girl who took a special liking to Lancelot, a 15-month-old American cocker spaniel, before she died early this month. “When she died, her parents told me: ‘You have no idea how my daughter had fun on Wednesdays,’” Pardo said. See Dogs Page 40

The 2012 Freedom Rodeo Old Cowhand Elmer Maddux is escorted around the arena by his family in the opening cermemony Thursday evening. Photo by Julie Whiteman


August 22, 2012

From Page 28

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Apple

Dec. 30, 1999. Microsoft is now worth $257 billion. Analysts believe Apple’s stock has room to grow. The average price target of 38 analysts polled by FactSet is $745.80. Despite the surge, Apple’s stock is not particularly expensive compared to its earnings for the last twelve months. The company’s “price-to-earnings ratio” is 15.6, compared to 16.1 for the S&P 500 overall. That suggests investors, unlike analysts, don’t believe the company can grow its profits much from current levels. By contrast, Microsoft had a priceto-earnings ratio of 83 at the 1999 peak. The stock was caught up in the Internet mania of the time and investors believed it could boost its future earnings massively. Analysts believe the launch of a new iPhone in a month or two will be Apple’s biggest product introduction yet. Scott Sutherland at Wedbush Morgan noted that some investors sold Apple shares last summer, when iPhone sales slowed down as consumers started holding off for the new model. Those investors missed out on a 50 percent jump in the stock price. “This time around, investors are a little bit smarter across the board ... they don’t want to be caught not involved in the stock on this next iPhone launch,” Sutherland said. Analysts also speculate that a “mini iPad,” could expand the number of

people who can afford one of Apple’s tablets. The cheapest iPad cost $399, compared to $199 for the latest Google and Amazon tablets. Analysts are speculating —based on rumors— that Apple plans to make a TV set to complete its suite of consumer electronics products. Apple usually doesn’t comment on its future product plans until a few weeks or days before a launch. Apple’s stock surge has made it a major part of many investment portfolios, often without the investors realizing it. The company makes up 4.7 percent of the value of the S&P 500 index, which is used as the basis for many mutual funds. Figures supplied by FactSet imply Microsoft’s market capitalization record was $619.25 billion, somewhat lower than the $620.58 billion calculated by S&P. The difference lies in the number of outstanding shares the firms ascribe to Microsoft at the time. China’s largest oil company, PetroChina, could lay claim to having hit a market capitalization even higher than Apple’s, because of the particularities of the Chinese stock market. PetroChina was briefly worth $1 trillion after it listed on the Shanghai stock exchange in 2007, but only based on its price on that exchange, which is isolated from the rest of the financial world because of Chinese laws on foreign investment. PetroChina’s shares also trade in Hong Kong and on the New York Stock Exchange. Based on prices there, its market capitalization never went as high as $500 billion. By coincidence, the peak price for one Apple share is now less than two dollars away from the retail price of the Apple I computer in 1976. It sold for $666.66.

Page 36

From Page 12

Plant “It was state-of-the-art, because there was no art before that,” said Tulsa Water Supply Manager Robert Brownwood, citing the era’s pioneering efforts at water purification. Aided by a 1956 upgrade, the Mohawk plant served Tulsa’s needs for four decades. In 1974 the city augmented its output with the A.B. Jewell Water Treatment Plant, a 20-million-gallon-capacity complex that in 1982 was expanded to 90 million. It now can handle up to 120 million daily. City leaders moved to replace the original Mohawk plant after a 1992 leak flooded one building. Six years later, a new 100-million-gallon treatment system opened on the hill above the plant, its cost more than $80 million. “This plant isn’t any bigger than the other one,” Plant Superintendent Warren Williams said. “It’s just much easier to operate.” The 1920s buildings were converted into plant offices, meeting areas and classrooms. The low-lift building became a visitors center and water treatment museum, displaying one of its original pumps. The roundhouse copper tank was adapted into a storage building. “A lot of the stonework of the old plant was carefully moved and taken to some place in Kansas, where they cleaned it and installed it back here,” said Williams, who will start his 29th year at Mohawk in September. “You can see it all around here.” With the high quality of concrete construction from Tulsa’s “black gold” era, and the city’s careful maintenance and renovations, Brownwood said the Mohawk campus could endure many years to come. “Some of these concrete walls are in the neighborhood of 5 feet thick,” said Williams, in a reference to their original coal boilers. “They built the thing to withstand a coal explosion.”


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 37


August 22, 2012

From Page 26

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 38

Give

of the 10 most generous states, eight voted for Republican John McCain. But Peter Panepento, the Chronicle’s assistant managing editor, said that political breakdown likely speaks to a state’s religious makeup, not its prevailing political views. He noted the lowest-ranked Democrat states were also among the least religious, while the top-ranked Republican states were among the more religious. “I don’t know if I could go out and say it’s a complete RepublicanDemocrat difference as much as it is different religious attitudes and culture in these states,” he said. The study was based on Internal Revenue Service records of people who itemized deductions in 2008, the most recent year statistics were available. By focusing on the percentage given to charity from discretionary income — the money left over after necessities are paid for — the study aimed to remove variables such as the differing costs of living around the country, Panepento said. The data allowed researchers to detail charitable giving down to the ZIP code, he said. The most generous state was Utah, where residents gave 10.6 percent of

their discretionary income to charity. Next were Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee and South Carolina. The least generous was New Hampshire, at 2.5 percent, followed by Maine, Vermont, Massachusetts and Rhode Island. In Boston, semi-retired carpenter Stephen Cremins said the traditional New England ideal of self-sufficiency might explain the lower giving, particularly during tight times when people have less to spare. “Charity begins at home. I’m a big believer of that, you know, you have to take care of yourself before you can help others,” Cremins said. The study found that in the Northeast region, including New England, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and New York, people gave 4.1 percent of their discretionary income to charity. The percentage was 5.2 percent in the Southern states, a region from Texas east to Delaware and Florida, and including most of the so-called Bible Belt. The Bible mandates a 10 percent annual donation, or tithe, to the church, and the donation is commonly preached as a way to thank God, care for others and show faith in God’s provision. But it has a greater emphasis in some faiths. In Mormon teachings, for instance, Latter Day Saints are required to pay a 10 percent tithe to remain church members in good standing, which helps explain the high giving rate in heavily-

Mormon Utah. “Any LDS member who is faithful does that,” said Valerie Mason, 70, of Mesa, Ariz., during an interview in Salt Lake City. “Some struggle with it. Some leave the church because of it. But we believe in the blessing. ... Tithing does bring the blessing of God’s promise.” Alan Wolfe, a political science professor at Boston College, said it’s wrong to link a state’s religious makeup with its generosity. People in less religious states are giving in a different way by being more willing to pay higher taxes so the government can equitably distribute superior benefits, Wolfe said. And the distribution is based purely on need, rather than religious affiliation or other variables, said Wolfe, also head of the college’s Boisi Center for Religion and Public Life. Wolfe said people in less religious states “view the tax money they’re paying not as something that’s forced upon them, but as a recognition that they belong with everyone else, that they’re citizens in the common good. ... I think people here believe that when they pay their taxes, they’re being altruistic.” When only secular gifts are counted, New York climbs from No. 18 to No. 2 in giving, and Pennsylvania rises from No. 40 to No. 4. Among other notable findings of the study: — People who earn $200,000 per year give a greater percentage to charity when they live in ZIP codes with fewer people who are as wealthy as they are. — People who earn between $50,000 and $75,000 annually give a higher percentage of their income to charity (7.6 percent) than those who make $100,000 or more (4.2 percent).


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 39

Half the population likes reading newspapers Half the population likes reading their news on a web site.

Help wanted and for sale ads reach a totally different audience on our web site.

AlvaReviewcourier.com attracts 1.5 million page views per month.


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 40

From Page 35

Dogs When Pardo first started bringing dogs in 2005, they stayed in the hospital garden and played with children before chemotherapy treatments. Over the next five years, statistics at the hospital showed that on Wednesdays, fewer children had to be kept over because of problems after chemotherapy. Doctors found that youngsters’ adrenaline levels rose from being with the dogs, boosting their resistance to chemo’s side effects. So the hospital began allowing Pardo’s dogs to visit children in their beds. She and her husband have 18 dogs in all that they work with. Edison, an 8-year-old farm child whose cancer is declining, is delighted to see Juci, a 5-year-old Parson Russell terrier, holding her tight. “He knows a lot about animals, because they live in the country,” Pardo said.

Medicine Lodge head football coach Faron Kraft points out a problem as he directs the offensive and defensive lines during practice. Photo by Roger McKenzie

As Assistant Coach Josh Ybarra watches the defenders’ reactions, Medicine Lodge quarterback Scott Beecher zeroes in on a receiver during a practice drill. Photo by Roger McKenzie


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 41

Insurer Aetna to buy Coventry in $5.7 billion deal

By Tom Murphy, AP Business Writer Aetna, one of the nation’s biggest health insurers, claimed a bigger stake in the burgeoning market for government-funded coverage Monday when it announced plans to buy a leading provider of Medicaid and Medicare coverage for $5.7 billion. The Hartford, Conn., company’s proposed acquisition of insurer Coventry Health Care will bolster its Medicaid business a few months before millions of people are expected to become eligible for the state- and federally-funded program for the needy and disabled under President Barack Obama’s massive health care overhaul. It also will boost the company’s portion of business from the federally-funded Medicare program, which covers seniors over age 65 and those who are disabled, at a time when interest in these plans is growing in part because the baby boomers are aging. The deal underscores the major changes taking place in the health care industry as a result of the landmark overhaul. It marks the second time since the Supreme Court upheld the law in June that a big insurer has snapped up a smaller company focused on government coverage. Last month, WellPoint Inc., which offers Blue Cross-Blue Shield plans in 14 states, announced a $4.46-billion deal to buy Amerigroup Corp., and more acquisitions are likely. Aetna is the nation’s third-largest health insurer based on enrollment, trailing only UnitedHealth Group Inc. and WellPoint.

Coventry, a smaller insurer, is one of the leading providers of both Medicaid and Medicare-based coverage. States hire insurers like Coventry to offer Medicaid coverage to their residents. Coventry said last month that its Medicaid enrollment had doubled to about 932,000 people. It also provides Medicare prescription drug coverage to about 1.5 million people. Aetna officials said Monday the acquisition of Coventry will help it grab new business in a number of ways after the overhaul’s coverage expansions start in 2014, about six months after the deal is expected to close. That’s the year when more people will become eligible for Medicaid and the government also will start providing incomebased subsidies to help people buy private insurance. Customers will be able to buy private coverage or sign up for Medicaid by visiting online marketplaces that act like souped-up versions of travel websites for booking vacations. “You need to be in all of those businesses with the ability to track your members through their life stages so that you can keep them in an Aetna product,” Aetna Chief Financial Officer Joe Zubretsky said. “We don’t think the market fully appreciates that, but we’re very focused on that.” Aside from the overhaul expansion, insurers also see growth opportunities in Medicaid due to patients who are eligible for both that program and Medicare. States are starting to move these so-called “dual eligible” residents, who generally have expensive medical conditions, into managed care programs that coordinate care and cut wasteful spending. The deal also ramps up Aetna Inc.’s Medicare Advantage and Medicare prescription drug businesses. Medicare Advantage plans are privately run, subsidized versions of Medicare that frequently offer extras such as dental or vision coverage. These plans are expected to grow because more baby boomers are aging and becoming eligible for the Medicare. Medicaid and Medicare Advantage currently represent small slices of Aetna’s enrollment. But the company expects the deal to raise the revenue it draws from government business to more than 30 percent, from 23 percent. Zubretsky said the broad portfolio of businesses Aetna will acquire from Coventry makes the acquisition a “fabulous deal” regardless of how November’s presidential elections turn out and whether the overhaul survives political opposition into 2014. “We believe this acquisition positions us very well for all possible scenarios,” he said. Aetna will pay $42.08 for each share of Coventry stock. That includes $27.30 in cash and a portion of its stock. The price represents a 20 percent premium on Coventry’s Friday closing price of $34.94. Fitch Ratings also said the deal will benefit Aetna, but the ratings service placed the insurer’s debt on a negative ratings watch. Fitch noted in a statement that the acquisition is bigger and more complex than other deals the insurer has done, and it will be financed mostly by debt. Aetna expects the acquisition to modestly help earnings next year, not counting transaction costs. Aetna forecasts a gain of about 45 cents per share to its annual earnings in 2014 and 90 cents per share in 2015 from the deal. Shares of Coventry climbed nearly 20 percent, or $6.89, to $41.83 Monday afternoon, while Aetna shares rose 5 percent, or $1.91, to $39.95. Broader trading indexes fell slightly.


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 42

First Orthodox Christian school in Kansas opens

The Waynoka Railroader defense lines up to stop the Deer Creek-Lamont offense during a football scrimmage held at Waynoka on Aug. 17. Photo by Roger McKenzie

WICHITA, Kan. (AP) — The first Orthodox Christian school in Kansas has opened in Wichita. Christ the Savior Academy, a private school at St. George Orthodox Christian Cathedral, opened Monday with 18 students from pre-kindergarten through second grade. Jennifer Sebits, president of the school’s board of trustees, says the school is open to students of all faiths. The Wichita Eagle reports (http://bit. ly/Pzx5xS ) the school offers a classical curriculum, with classes in Latin, Greek, art and violin, math, science and reading. Sebits says the school plans to add one grade each year for the next three years until it offers pre-K through fifth grade. She says it will take about five years for the school to receive accreditation. Tuition at the school is $2,500 a year.

Sedgwick County sheriff gets wrongful death claim Kan. man pleads WICHITA, Kan. (AP) — Relatives of a man who committed suicide at the Sedgwick County Jail have filed a wrongful death claim against Sheriff Robert Hinshaw. The family of Jonathan Haehn is seeking $250,000 in damages in the

wrongful death claim, which is the first step toward filing a lawsuit. Haehn hanged himself with a bedsheet on May 24. The family claims they warned jail staff that Haehn was bipolar and an alcoholic and was a risk for suicide. Hinshaw told The Wichita Eagle (http://bit.ly/OQF9fq ) that the county has denied the claim because a screening on Haehn didn’t show him being at risk of suicide. The sheriff also says Haehn claimed he was not feeling suicidal. Haehn was jailed on a warrant alleging he violated his probation for a DUI conviction.

guilty to abusing 3-month-old

HUTCHINSON, Kan. (AP) — A Kansas man who called police last year to report committing a sexual act on a 3-month-old child has now pleaded guilty to the crime. The Hutchinson News reports (http:// bit.ly/NcLnpY ) that 25-year-old Michael Sherman faces up to life in prison following the plea Monday to aggravated criminal sodomy of a child. He could receive parole after 25 years, under Kansas law. Sherman’s lawyer and Reno County District Attorney Keith Schroeder both say there was no plea agreement in the case. Sherman had been scheduled to go on trial Tuesday. Sherman was arrested at his Hutchinson home last December after reporting to police what he had done. Hutchinson Police Detective Scott Carlton says it’s unusual for a suspect to report himself and then plead guilty.


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 43

Need an aerial photo? We do lots in Oklahoma & Kansas

Freedom Rodeo

Get the session plus an album of 10 x 8 photos for $489.00.* Lynn Martin Photography (580) 327-1686

*Fuel needs to be replaced.


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 44

Kan. rep. apologizes for nude Sea of Galilee swim By John Hanna TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — A Republican congressman representing Kansas has apologized for embarrassing his supporters by swimming naked at the holy site of the Sea of Galilee while on a factfinding mission to Israel. Freshman U.S. Rep. Kevin Yoder, 36, has not been charged in the Aug. 18, 2011, incident in which he and about 20 other lawmakers and staff members jumped into the water. Politico reported Sunday that he was the only one among them who wore no clothes. “It’s an embarrassing situation, and I regret it,” Yoder said during an interview on public radio station KCUR-FM in Kansas City, Mo. “I know that many constituents out there are sort of scratching their heads, saying, ‘What is this guy up to? What was he doing? What was he thinking?’” Yoder had been scheduled to participate Monday in a discussion on energy policy at an oil and natural gas industry convention in Wichita, but he did not attend. However, he did the radio interview at the station’s studio, accompanied by his wife, Brooke. Some Christians consider the Sea of

Galilee a holy site because they believe Jesus walked on water there. Swimming in the lake is permitted but public nudity is not allowed, according to Israeli police spokesman Micky Rosenfeld. “If someone walks around the beach naked, that’s an offense,” Rosenfeld said in Jerusalem. He said no official complaint had been made against Yoder, but it was possible he could still be charged even a year later. “If that kind of incident takes place and someone makes an official compliant, we’ll investigate,” Rosenfeld said Monday. Kansas Democratic Party Chairwoman Joan Wagnon called Yoder’s behavior “inexcusable” and said if the incident had occurred in Kansas, he would be forced to resign. She later issued a statement calling for him to step down. “I’m astonished these people think they can go on these junkets like this and no one will know what they do,” Wagnon said. The Aug. 13-21 trip was sponsored by the American Israel Education Foundation, a charity whose mission is to provide grants for educational programs and conferences, and to educate politicians and influential people about the importance of the U.S.-Israel relationship. “At the time, it seemed very spontaneous,” Yoder said. “Somewhat afterwards, maybe the next day, I started thinking that maybe that wasn’t the smartest decision.” Yoder said it was dark and he was in the water for only about 10 seconds. He said his wife was with him but did not go into the water. He said members of the party jumped in individually, not as a group, and not everyone did. “I jumped in, was in for 10 seconds,

jumped back out,” Yoder said during his radio interview. “Just in and out — just to have the experience, really.” Yoder acknowledged that he and his wife had wine with dinner before the incident but added, “Alcohol really played no role in the decision to go in. It was really a spontaneous moment with members at the Sea of Galilee, which is obviously a special place.” Yoder said in his radio interview that Rep. Eric Cantor of Virginia, the senior Republican on the trip, was “very frustrated and upset” over the swimming and scolded delegates for their behavior. Yoder’s sole opponent in the upcoming general election is Libertarian Joel Balam, of Overland Park. Yoder served in the Kansas House from 2003 through 2010 and was chairman of its Appropriations Committee. He also is a former University of Kansas student body president. In February 2009, Yoder, then the Appropriations Committee chairman, was cited by the Kansas Highway Patrol for speeding and refusing to take a breathalcohol test following an early-morning traffic stop on a state highway in the Lawrence area. He later pleaded guilty to refusing to take the test and paid a $90 fine. The traffic stop briefly caused ruffles during his successful 2010 run for Congress, but Yoder’s campaign said he’d refused to take the breath test because he’d passed another field sobriety test and wasn’t driving under the influence. Wagnon promised that Democrats would field a strong candidate against Yoder in 2014 and would remind voters of the incident. “I’m just sorry I don’t have anyone running against him, and it isn’t for lack of trying,” Wagnon said.


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 45

Wal-Mart brings back holiday layaway By Anne D’innocenzio NEW YORK (AP) — After seeing high customer demand for layaway during last year’s winter holiday season, Wal-Mart is expanding the interest-free pay-over-time program for Christmas. The new program will last a month longer than last year’s and will include more items than the toys and electronics featured last year. The world’s largest retailer says its mostly lower-income shoppers are still having a hard time stretching their dollars to the next paycheck. A little more than three years into the economic recovery, shoppers, particularly in the low-income bracket, remain particularly hard hit by unemployment and other financial worries. The return of layaway is also occurring after the discounter, based in Bentonville, Ark., saw its sales momentum slow at its namesake U.S. business according to its latest quarterly results, though business has rebounded from a more than two-year slump. The announcement, made Monday, also presages what’s expected to be an-

other intensely competitive holiday shopping season where merchants will do whatever it takes to lure shoppers into stores. “Last year, millions of Americans replied on layaway at Wal-Mart to provide a great Christmas for their families,” said Duncan MacNaughton, chief merchandising and marketing officer for WalMart’s U.S. store division, in a statement. “Because of their feedback, we’re offering the service again this year and making it better than ever.” Wal-Mart says its layaway program, which will begin Sept. 16 and end Dec. 14, will give shoppers an extra month to spread their payments. The list of items that will be available for layaway has broadened too and goes beyond last year’s toys and electronics. Shoppers will be able to set aside small home appliances and select sporting goods such as trampolines and large exercise equipment. Wal-Mart is still requiring that each item is priced at $15 or more, and the total layaway purchase must be at least $50. A down payment of 10 percent or

$10, whichever is greater, is required and will be applied to the purchase, the same terms as last year. There’s also a $15 fee to open an account. If the order is cancelled or not paid in full, the $15 is not refunded, but no additional cancellation fee will be charged. Shoppers who make their final layaway payment get a full refund of the $15 fee in a form of a WalMart gift card. In comparison, last year, the open fee was $5, but shoppers had to pay a cancellation fee of $10. Layaway became popular during the Great Depression. Before the most recent recession, easy credit had made it largely a thing of the past. But when credit dried up and the job market soured, Sears, Toys R Us and other merchants added back or expanded the service. Citing increased costs and lower customer demand, Wal-Mart phased out its layaway in September 2006 — roughly a year before the recession began — with the exception of jewelry. But the discounter faced criticism because it built its reputation on helping the low-income shoppers.

Iraqis wait to see gains from country’s oil boom By Adam Schreck BAGHDAD (AP) — Iraq is fast becoming an oil producing powerhouse, but you’d never know that by looking at the faded Unknown Soldier gas station in downtown Baghdad. There’s no repair garage or mini-mart, just a cramped office with tattered vinyl couches. Horns blare as a string of waiting cars backs up into busy Sadoun Street, slowing traffic. Electricity from the power grid is available only for a few hours a day, so a noisy generator burns through 200 liters (53 gallons) of fuel daily just to keep the lights on and pumps running. That eats into what little profit is left over after government-imposed price caps, says manager Anmar Abdul-Sattar. Like many Iraqis, he sees little reason to celebrate the postwar petroleum gains that have turned Iraq into a leading oil producer. “The country is increasing its oil revenues, but we’re not feeling it on the ground,” he said. It’s a widely shared sentiment. Frequent power cuts, the state’s inability to prevent near-daily bloodshed and yawn-

ing gaps in basic services have left ordinary Iraqis convinced they are sharing little in the country’s growing oil wealth. Insurgent attacks have killed more than 200 people just since the start of this month. “There is no electricity, no public services. No respect for the people of Iraq,” Mohammed Salem said as he gassed up his taxi at the station, which is named after a monument that once stood nearby. The billions being made off Iraq’s oil, Salem believes, are simply “being stolen by government officials and sent to banks outside of Iraq.” Iraq last month crept into second place behind Saudi Arabia among OPEC’s top oil exporters, according to the latest figures from the International Energy Agency. The shift marks a symbolic victory over neighboring Iran, long the bloc’s No. 2. The rise stems from a steady increase in Iraqi output and the effect of international sanctions that are crimping Iran’s ability to market its own crude. Foreign oil majors such as Exxon Mobil Corp.

and BP PLC have been brought in to develop Iraq’s vast oil fields, and new export facilities are coming online. The architect of Iraq’s postwar energy policy, Deputy Prime Minister for Energy Hussain al-Shahristani, is proud of the country’s achievement. He recently boasted that Iraq is now pumping 3.2 million barrels a day, a figure that also puts it ahead of oil-rich Kuwait and the United Arab Emirates. The difference is that citizens of those nearby countries enjoy income levels, pensions and standards of health care far higher than their Iraqi counterparts. Their modern metropolises — which in the UAE’s case host some of the tallest and most innovative buildings in the world — bear little resemblance to crumbling, concrete Baghdad and other strained Iraqi cities. Embittered Iraqis are acutely aware of the disparity. Many blame not the United States or international oil companies, but a government they see as ineffective and See Boom Page 56


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 46

Alfalfa County Sheriff’s Log August 13, 2012 1:54 p.m. tanker blocking traffic 4 E on Hwy 11, has both lanes of traffic blocked, advised another truck has pulled him out and traffic is moving. 4:18 p.m. man walking W of Jet, respondents wife was leaving Jet, an older man was walking and he was swerving from ditch to hwy, officer advised & enroute, advised subject ok just walking for exercise. 6:54 p.m. 8-10 roping steers out in Ingersoll, moving from the N side of hwy to the S side, advised possible owner, they advised they were on their way. 7:07 p.m. car back from step daughter in Aline, respondent advised step daughter took his car and will not bring it back, just wants the car back, wants to talk to an officer about the situation, advised officer. 7:17 p.m. cattle out 3 S of 64 on Hwy 58, advised possible owner, he was going to see if it was his, individual advised put cow in and it is probably their cow but she is not sure, it is in the fence at this time. 9:38 p.m. cattle out N of 4-way on W side, advised possible owner. 10:05 p.m. cattle out 2 miles E on Crystal Rd, 20 head of cattle out on road and in ditch, advised possible owner. August 14, 2012 1:28 p.m. minor accident at 8/11/58 Jct, semi has jack knifed, diesel is leaking, A/B was paged out & enroute, officer request contact ODOT and advise of stop sign down on Hwy 8, did advise them, A/B back at station. 4:13 p.m. keys locked in pickup at bunk house in Cherokee, advised officer, pickup has been unlocked. 7:18 p.m. break in at 600 block of W. Broadway in Aline, respondent said her husband was served with divorce papers, she was at a shelter in Enid, she got a phone call saying her ex is breaking into her house, needs an officer there ASAP, advised officer. 9:09 p.m. hit a black cow on Hwy 11 W of Hwy 38, advised officer & OHP, officer enroute, driver will need a tow truck. August 15, 2012 7:38 a.m. under aged waitress at Smok Shak in Ingersoll, respondent ate lunch at Smok Shak and there are females serving beer and she is sure that they are under age, her husbands niece works there, officer came in and was ad-

vised. 9:20 a.m. medical call to Greer/CR 540 for possible heart attack, CPD was advised, ambulance enroute, respondent advised that the ambulance passed them, CPD was advised, ambulance going to Share in Alva. 1:31 p.m. reckless driver southbound on Hwy 8, pink/purple rock truck all over the road, wants him stopped now, he is southbound past Aline turnoff, advised respondent that I will contact Major Co. 2:57 p.m. cattle out on Crystal Rd, advised possible owner, he advised it was 1 bull and it belonged to someone else, he called him and is going to help him get the bull in. 2:56 p.m. grass fire 3 W of Carmen 1 ¼ S in ditch, Carmen advised they were responding, back at shop. 6:11 p.m. gentleman unresponsive on Hwy 64 W of Jet, need an ambulance, advised Helena Ambulance, advise the patient is combative and they need a deputy as soon as possible, officer enroute, Helena advised officer could take no further action, man was refusing help at this time, he is at residence and intoxicated, officer advised still enroute to talk to respondent, officer advised subject is extremely intoxicated and respondent there said he has been drinking for 2 days, Helena back at station. August 16, 2012 7:49 a.m. grass fire 4 E on Hwy 11 in ditch, CFD was advised. 12:47 p.m. accident seriousness unknown at 3.5 E of old flashing lights, 2 vehicle accident, roadway is not blocked, unsure if injuries, ACSO advised Cherokee Ambulance & OHP. 6:15 p.m. loud music in Carmen 1 block N of the bank, wants to talk to sheriff, advised 2 officers, 1 enroute, respondent has been given statement forms, other man has been told to turn it down again. 8:40 p.m. unwanted guest at 100 block of S Penn, advised subject is drunk, she wants him gone, he has left on foot toward the AEC, advised CPD, prisoner in custody. 9:28 p.m. keys locked in car at the laundry mat, advised CPD, they don’t unlock cars anymore, advised deputy to unlock vehicle. 9:43 p.m. cattle out ½ E Grand on Cemetery Rd, black cow with green ear tag, advised he found an owner and will make contact.

10:52 p.m. domestic at 1100 block of S Penn, subject is at their house causing problems and fighting, advised CPD and deputy. August 17, 2012 2:38 a.m. people outside house at 400 block of N 3rd in Carmen, wife called respondent at work saying she heard people outside her house, would like an officer to do a drive by and check, officer advised & enroute, no contact with anyone. 4:08 a.m. noises in house in Ingersoll, respondent barricaded himself and his 2 children in a room because they are hearing strange noises in and outside their house, officer enroute. 12:04 p.m. keys locked in vehicle at Cherokee Jiffy Trip in front of the pumps, no one is available but when deputy comes in he will come out. 7:33 p.m. black cattle out at Cozy Curve, advised possible owner, he is going to go check. August 18, 2012 12:53 a.m. man walking, individual has taken off walking from Cherokee to OKC area, last seen between Jet & Nash eastbound, tried to get him to take his phone or car and he refused, left the house with a cane and a bottle of water, respondent already contacted Cherokee PD & Garfield Co, advised OHP. 8:56 a.m. 2” pipeline on fire E of McWillie, OHP advised not a burn off, if there is gas & oil there could be a problem, Helena FD advised & enroute, fire taken care of, no need to call SandRidge, they were having a safety man come out and check what happened, it was a pop off valve, back at station. 9:17 a.m. electricity off whole town of Carmen, individual advised he had no oxygen, his electric was off, did not want an ambulance there, just his brother, contacted his brother, brother helped get his tank going until OG&E got the electric back on, if he needed us before the tank ran out call and we would have an ambulance enroute to him so he would not be without oxygen, advised respondent I was finally able to get a hold of AEC and he advised the electric was back on. 10:38 a.m. calf out on Cemetery Rd, called possible owner, no answer, called another individual, no answer, left message, individual advised he was taking care of the calf. See Sheriff Page 56


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Fill in the online order at AlvaReviewCourier.com or call 580-327-2200.

A $7 Action Ad in the Newsgram can make your garage sale excel!

Page 47


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 48

The cost difference between great wedding photos and run-of-the mill photos is not very much.

Heather Ramsey Shawn Gamache

www.LynnMartin.com (800) 526-1087 A $99 deposits locks in a wedding date on our calendar.


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 49


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 50

Alfalfa County Court Filings According to the affidavits and petitions on file, the following individuals have been charged. An individual is innocent of any charges listed below until proven guilty in a court of law. All information is a matter of public record and may be obtained by anyone during regular hours at the Alfalfa County Courthouse. The Alva Review-Courier will not intentionally alter or delete any of this information. If it appears in the courthouse public records, it will appear in this newspaper. Criminal Filings Steven L. Fausnaught, 39, Cherokee: (1) Manufacture of controlled dangerous substance; (2) Maintaining a place resorted to by users of controlled drugs; (3) Child endangerment ($1,098.30). Erica Louann Fausnaught, 30, Cherokee: (1) Manufacture of controlled dangerous substance; (2) Maintaining a place resorted to by users of controlled drugs; (3) Child endangerment ($1,098.30). Misdemeanor Filings Steven L. Fausnaught, 39, Cherokee: Unlawful possession of paraphernalia ($229). Erica Louann Fausnaught, 30, Cherokee: Unlawful possession of paraphernalia ($229). Civil Filings Triad Energy Inc. vs. George D. Smith: Appointment of appraises ($155.70). Small Claims Filings Farmers Cooperative of Carmen vs.

Nelson Ray Frantz: Indebtedness for an amount more than $3,500 ($208). Farmers Cooperative of Carmen vs. Mark McDonald: Indebtedness for an amount more than $1,500 ($208). Divorce Filings Barbara Wheeler-Hotchins vs. Manley Hotchins: Divorce ($193.70). Marriage Filings Micheal Ray Calwonsen, 35, Fairview and Holly Gayle Anderson, 33, Fairview: Marriage ceremony performed by judge ($60). Kyle James Hunter, 25, Helena and Latoya Rachelle Drawbridge, 23, Helena: Marriage license ($50). Traffic Filings Willie Charles Harrelson, 23, Alva: Failure to pay all taxes due state ($211.50). Timothy M. Henigman, 54, Enid: Operate vehicle on which all taxes due to state have not been paid ($211.50). Davetta Heidi Fesmire, 31, Helena: Inattentive driving ($211.50). Mykal Saad Birmingham, 28, Dallas, TX: Operating a M/V w/out a valid driver’s license ($256.50). Tromayne Jorell Givens, 44, Houston, TX: Operate vehicle on which all taxes due to state have not been paid ($211.50). Kevin Leeroy Lawson Jr., 21, Ponca City: Operate vehicle on which all taxes due to state have not been paid ($211.50). Brandon Dee Ellis, 21, Wichita, KS: Operating a motor vehicle in unsafe con-

dition ($211.50). Gary Lowell Lyon, 39, Alva: Failure to carry insurance verification ($231.50). Shy-Ann Lakota Swanson, 18, Fairview: Inattentive driving ($211.50). Timothy Dewayne Moulton, 27, Enid: Operating a motor vehicle in unsafe condition ($211.50). The following individuals received a citation for speeding: Steven Anthony Martinez, 43, Yukon: 1-10 over ($188.50); Jefferson Eugene Parker, 31, Houston, TX: 15 over ($306.50); Willie Charles Harrelson, 23, Alva: 26 or more over ($341.50); Jose Rangel Perez, 43, Ringwood: 16-20 over ($241.50); Gabriel Seth Kern, 29, Alva: 15 over ($226.50); Lisa Ann Taylor, 52, Dacoma: 1-10 over ($188.50); Joseph Tyrelle Simpson, 22, Center, TX: 1-10 over ($188.50); Mykal Saad Birmingham, 28, Dallas, TX: 1-10 over ($188.50); Michael Ray Murphy, 49, Little Elm, TX: 15 over ($226.50); Randy Don Mackey, 47, El Reno: 11-14 over ($226.50); Kevin Leeroy Lawson Jr., 21, Ponca City: 16-20 over ($241.50); Billy Dean Gregory, 35, Blanchard: 1620 over ($241.50); Ulman Raymond Chism, 45, Hunter: 1-10 over ($188.50). The following individuals received a citation for failure to wear seatbelt ($20 fine): Armando Rodriguez Vega, no age or address listed; Robert Lee Whitesides, 33, Jet; Ashley Renee Sciara, 22, Helena; Alexander Scott Kuhr, 21, Hazelton, KS; Dilan Lee Black, 19, Jones.

Alfalfa County Real Estate Transactions Start Book 687, page 491 Real Estate Transfers • Sherry K. Lowden and Bob Lowden to Robert E. Kirkpatrick and M. Louis Kirkpatrick: the South Half of Lot 5 and all of |Lot 6 in Block 18 in the Town of Byron; quit claim deed. • Sherry K. Lowden and Bob Lowden to Robert E. Kirkpatrick and M. Louis Kirkpatrick: a tract of land as described lying West of Lot 16 in Block B, in the Town of Byron; and Lot 16 in Block B in the Town of Byron; quit claim deed. • Letty Louisa Goltry, aka Letty Goltry Barnes to Letty Goltry Barnes: land described in several ways, includ-

ing legally described as the Northwest Quarter and the Southwest Quarter of Section 7, Township 23 North, Range 9 WIM, containing 316.32 acres more or less; quit claim deed. • Aaron Hoggard to George Hoggard and Deborah Hoggard: Lots 23 and 24 in Block 30 in the Original Town of Cherokee; quit claim deed. • Daniel Lemoine Harris aka Dan L. Harris and Colleen Allison Harris aka Colleen Harris to D & Ce Harris Family, LLC: the North Half of the Southwest Quarter of Section 25, Township 27 North, Range 11 WIM; quit claim deed. • Crystal Lee Rose to Justin Levi

Rose: the South Haff of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter in Section 31, Township 27 North, Range 12 WIM; quit claim deed. • The Town of Amorita to Monte Stewart and Shelly Stewart: all of that of First Street lying between the North Half of Block 29 and the North Half of Block 30 in the Town of Amorita; quit claim deed. • Margy M. Ewalt Trust No. 1 to the Steve Waldschmidt and DiAnna Waldschmidt Inter Vivos Trust dated April 23, 2012: the North Half of the NorthSee Real

Estate Page 54


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 51


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 52

Barber County Court Filings Criminal Filings Debra A. Menkhoff, 1961, Medicine Lodge: Giving a worthless check; Value < $1,000. Ginger Gregory, no date of birth listed, Medicine Lodge: Giving a worthless check; Value < $1,000. Tayler W. Bradford, 1992, Waynoka, OK: Liquor; Purchase/consumption alcoholic liquor/CMB by minor. Tappan Daniel Smith, 1983, Kiowa: (1) Burglary; Vehicle/other means of conveyance to commit fel, theft or sex battery; (2) Criminal deprivation of property; Motor vehicle; (3) Driving while cancelled/suspended/revoked; 1st conviction. Civil Filings KBW Oil & Gas Co vs. Damso 1978 SEA Limited Partnership etal: Judgment for an amount more than $46,500. Limited Civil Filings Dennis A. Walker d/b/a E Z Mart vs. Jessica Miller: Indebtedness for an amount more than $500. Domestic Relations Filings Gabreail Doane vs. Calvin Doane: Divorce. Timothy J. Naegele vs. Amanda

Naegele: Divorce. Lori Fowle vs. John Fowle: Divorce. Marriage Filings Leslie Howard Williams, 53, Medicine Lodge and Kandi Sue Simmons, 44, Medicine Lodge. Scott Andrew Hull, 26, Medicine Lodge and Cheyann Estelle Stivers, 21, Medicine Lodge. Jordan Adalaska Lytle, 26, Medicine Lodge and Laura Jan Lawrenz, 28, Medicine Lodge. Nathan Dane Dutton, 25, Medicine Lodge and Savanah Rae Henke, 17, Medicine Lodge. Traffic Filings William L. Bailey, 35, Medicine Lodge: Failure to wear seatbelt ($10). Merrisa A. Blystra, 31, Medicine Lodge: Renewal of registration of certain vehicles ($98). Joseph H. Cox Macoubrie, 27, Alva, OK: Failure to wear seatbelt ($10). Ryan I. Lee, 36, Alva, OK: Failure to wear seatbelt ($10). Levi T. Poindexter, 23, Norwich: Failure to wear seatbelt ($10). The following individuals were cited for speeding:

Buford W. Cloyd, 71, Kiowa: 77 in 65 ($155); Mona K. Gasaway, 69, Wichita: 75 in 65 ($143); Loyd D. Johnson, 73, Stratford, OK: 85 in 65 ($203); Paul J. Mohr, 58, Wichita: 75 in 65 ($143); Pratik V. Patel, 30, Hutchinson: 75 in 65 ($143); Adolfo Alvarado-Pena, 25, Liberal: 78 in 65 ($161); Rudawn S. Blankenship, 55, Amarillo, TX: 75 in 65 ($143); Gregory S. Ennis, 39, Silverthorn, CO: 83 in 65 ($191); Garren N. Eyestone, 21, Agra, OK: 79 in 65 ($167); Bennie L. Griffin, 55, Kiowa: 80 in 65 ($173); Brooke N. Murphy, 18, Kiowa: 77 in 65 ($155); Travis W. Tillman, 22, Palestine, TX: 92 in 65 ($266); William L. Bailey, 35, Medicine Lodge: 83 in 65 ($191); Andrew K. Harmon, 17, Sharon: 89 in 65 ($239); Kristoffer T. Karnes, 25, Ft. Worth, TX: 83 in 65 ($191); Ryan I. Lee, 36, Alva, OK: 83 in 65 ($191); Earvil L. Miller Jr., 56, Sallisaw, OK: 78 in 65 ($161); Todd P. Peace, 28, Enid, OK: 77 in 65 ($155); Travis B. Trevizo, 30, Prague, OK: 78 in 65 ($161); Robert T. Wechsler, 35, Elk City, OK: 75 in 65 ($143); Daniel P. West, 39, Medicine Lodge: 93 in 65 ($275).

Barber County Sheriff’s Log • 08-16-12 Kiowa Ambulance transferred patient from Kiowa Hospital to Wichita. • 08-17-12 Deputy Rugg responded to a report of trespass west of Mingonia. • 08-17-12 Elwood Township Volunteer Fire Department responded to a grass fire about 7 miles west of Hardtner. • 08-18-12 Medicine Lodge Ambulance transported patient from Stolp

Street to Medicine Lodge Hospital and thence to Wichita. • 08-19-12 Kiowa Rural and Hazelton Volunteer Fire Departments responded to a bale fire on Hawkins Road west of Bethel Road. • 08-19-12 Lake City Volunteer Fire Department responded to a vehicle fire in Lake City. • 08-19-12 Annette Smith, Taloga, Oklahoma, driving a 2001 Dodge van struck a deer on U281 near Elm Mills.

Unknown amount of damage, no injury, accident worked by Deputy Rugg. During the week officers received 22 reports of cattle out; one report of horses out; one report of sheep out; one report of goats out; performed 12 Public Assists; and assisted 4 other agencies. Arrests: 08-15-12 Cory J. Bieber, Medicine Lodge, W/M, 46. Arrest by BASO. Court Committed for 48 Hours. Released 08-17-12 Time Served.


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Writers Needed Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram has openings for two writers: a full time news reporter and a part time sports reporter. Good writing, spelling and grammar skills needed. Photography skills helpful but not required as we provide training. Send resume to Alva Review-Courier, 620 Choctaw St., Alva, OK 73717 or fax 580-327-2454 or email marione@alvareviewcourier.net.

Page 53


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 54

Barber County Real Estate Transactions Beginning Book 136, Page 24 Real Estate Transfers • Megan Vandervoort and Larry Vandervoort to Grace Bible Fellowship: Lots 11, 12, 13, and 14 in Block 66 in the Town Company’s Addition to the City of Kiowa. quit claim deed. • The State of Kansas, acting by and through Debra L. Miller, as Secretary of Transportation of the State of Kansas to Richard A. Umbarger and Joan K. Umbarger, as Co-Trustees of the Richard and Joan Umbarger Living Trust, dated Aug. 14, 2007; two tracts of land as described in the Northeast Quarter of Section 12, Township 35 South, Range 12 West of the 6th Principle Meridian, each tract containing 6.20 acres more or less; quit claim deed. • C. Wesley Cline to Wesley Cline aka Clarence Wesley Cline, Trustee of the the Wesley Cline Trust dated April 28, 2011: Lot 3 in Block 4 in Regnier’s Amended Revised Second Addition to the City of Medicine Lodge; warranty deed. • Wesley Cline to Wesley Cline aka Clarence Wesley Cline, Trustee of the the Wesley Cline Trust dated April 28, 2011: the East Half of Section 25, Township 32 South, Range 15 West of the 6th Principle Meridian; warranty deed. • Wesley Cline to Wesley Cline aka Clarence Wesley Cline, Trustee of the the Wesley Cline Trust dated April 28, 2011: the West Half of the Southwest Quarter of Section 14 and the West Hal of the Northwest Quarter of Section 23, Township 32 South, Range 15 West of the Sixth Principle Meridian; warranty deed. • Wes Cline to Wesley Cline aka Clarence Wesley Cline, Trustee of the the Wesley Cline Trust dated April 28, 2011: the East Half of the Southwest Quarter of Section 14, and the East Half of the Northwest Quarter of Section 23,

all in Township 32 South, Range 15 West of the 6th Principle Meridian; warranty deed. • Danny R. Lukins, Trustee of the Robert D. Lukins and Lois M. Lukins Trust dated June 1, 1999 to Nathan L. Schrock and Lara L. Schrock; an undivided one-half interest in Outlots 46 and 47 to the City of Kiowa, aka described as the North Half of the Southwest Quarter of Section 12, Township 35 South, Range 11 West; trustee’s deed. • Danny R. Lukins, Trustee of the Robert D. Lukins and Lois M. Lukins Trust dated June 1, 1999 to Danny R. Lukins: an undivided one-half interest in Outlots 46 and 47 to the City of Kiowa, aka described as the North Half of the Southwest Quarter of Section 12, Township 35 South, Range 11 West; trustee’s deed. • M.T. Main to Jean Keller: Lot 15 in Block 1 in Oil Hill Subdivision to the City of Medicine Lodge, being part of the Southwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 1, Township 32 South, Range 12 West; quit claim deed. • Thomas A. Hutson, Jr. and Erica M. Hutson, formerly Erica M. Harbaugh to Jeanie R. Hubbell, Raelynn Hubbell, and Henry J. Liggenstoffer: Lot 12 in Block 57 in the City of Hardtner: warranty deed. • Cody L. Miller and Jennifer C. Miller to Cody L. Miller as Trustee, or his successors in trust, of the Cody L. Miller Trust, dated April 14, 2011: (1) Lot 6 and the West Half of Lot 7, in Block 1, in Deal’s replat of a part of Highland Ad-

From Page 50

dition to the City of Medicine Lodge, aka 416 W. Anthony Ave.; (2) Lots 5, 6, and 7 in Block 11 in Highland Addition to the City of Medicine Lodge, aka 410 W. Stolp Ave.; (3) Lot 1 in Hibbard’s Addition to the City of Medicine Lodge, aka 805 A-Way; (4) Lots 66, 68, 70, and 72 in Block F in Hammond’s Addition to the City of Medicine Lodge, aka 106 W. Petit Ave.; (5) Lots 13, 14, and 15 in Block 5 in Cook, Standiford and Co.’s Revised Addition to the City of Medicine Lodge, aka 307 S. Main Street; (6) Lot 96 in Block 6 in Oil Hill Subdivision, an addtion to the City of Medicine Lodge aka 200 West Blackgold Ave.; (7) a tract of land as described, also known as 422 W. Third Ave.; correction warranty deed. Mortgages Beginning Book 205, Page 251 • Duston T. Hoagland to The Peoples Bank (Pratt, KS): Lots 32, 33, 34, and 35 in the Northwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of Section 21, Township 32 South, Range 10 West of the 6th Principal Meridian; $24,750. • Matthew S.Cantrell and Jenny L. Cantrell to American AgCredit, FLCA (Pratt, KS). (1) the Northwest Quarter of Section 11, Township 34 South, Range 12 West of the 6th P.M.; (2) all of Outlot 73 to the City of Kiowa, except a tract as described; $100,000. • Robin E. Paxon and Renee D. Paxon to the First State Bank of \Kiowa: a tract of land as described in Lot 31in Stolp’s Addition to the City of Medicine Lodge; $30,000.

Real Estate

west Quarter of Section Thirty, Township 26 North, Range 12 WIM, quit claim deed. Mortgages • Bryce L. Hodgden aka Bryce Hodgden and Elaine E. Hodgden aka Elaine Hodgden to Farm Credit of Western Oklahoma, FCLA, a wholly owned subsidiary of Farm Credit of Wester Oklahoma ACA: the Southeast Quarter of Section 7; and in Section 18, Lot one, the Northeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of the North Half of the North-

east Quarter, less and except the tracts as described. All of the above in Township 25 North, Range 12 WIM; $198,000. • Bruce Edward Davis and Virginia Carol Davis to Farm Credit of Enid, PCA, a wholly owned subsidiary of Farm Credit of Enid ACA: (1) the Southeast Quarter of Section 22, Township 25 North, Range 12 WIM; (2) the Southeast Quarter of Section 23, Township 25 North, Range 12 WIM; (3) the Northeast Quarter of Section 26, Township 25 North, Range 12 WIM; $212,000.


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 55


August 22, 2012

From Page 46

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Sheriff

2:25 p.m. goat is out and running on hwy 1 mile N of Lambert Bridge, advised possible owner. 2:52 p.m. man missing from Cherokee, respondent advised her son was still missing, needed to make a report, advised her to call CPD since it was in city limits, called number back and no answer, left a message, she would have to call CPD and they would advise what they wanted done. 3:21 p.m. wood smoker during burn ban in Nescatunga, respondent called and asked if there was still a burn ban in Alfalfa Co, told him that there still was, respondent said that there was people behind the R Store with a wood smoker going, deputy said that they were just smoking ribs out behind the store, there was no open flame. 4:06 p.m. possible domestic in Goltry, respondent said they needed an officer at her daughters house because her daughter was dating a registered sex offender, DHS has gotten the kids taken away, her

From Page 45

Page 56

ex-husband had the kids now and the only way for her to get the kids back was for her boyfriend to leave, daughter told him to leave and he wouldn’t, called her ex-husband, he said he would call the SO or her mom would, boyfriend wasn’t letting her leave the house either, advised deputy he would head out there now. 8:30 p.m. drunk guys outside his house in Nescatunga, his kids were outside playing and some guys walked by and started picking on them, went outside to see what the problem was and one of the drunk guys threatened to kick his butt, wants officer to come check it out, officer said no one could be found out there, went by house, no one was out there, gonna head back to Cherokee. August 19, 2012 8:21 a.m. horses out N of Jet, contacted several individuals, would advise owner of horses out. 2:25 p.m. someone was breaking into the high school at the back, got into a little red car and went to the football field,

2 males, door is open to weight room, advised CPD. 6:43 p.m. cattle out on Hwy 11 & CR 660, 3-4 cows, tried several relatives to locate number to possible owner, got possible number, called it and no answer, still no answer from possible owner. 11:12 p.m. overdose in Jet, Enid PD officer advised a family from Jet brought their 2 yr old to St. Mary’s for taking an overdose of cold medicine, wanted to speak with our officer about it, advised deputy to call officer. August 20, 2012 2:46 a.m. domestic at 100 block of N 3rd in Aline, respondent advised there was a fight, needs an officer now, was using someone elses cell phone, advised the cop does not need to come to her house because they all left, said her son had cut himself but is gone now, officer advised, back at the house, the male has thrown all of the female’s things in the yard, there is blood where male had been walking, did not locate.

Boom

corrupt. “Go ask the government why we are living like this. It was better under Saddam,” said Ahmed Saadi, another driver filling his tank at the gas station, referring to dictator Saddam Hussein, deposed after the American-led invasion in 2003. “They said they were going to distribute the oil money to the people in a fair way. It didn’t happen.” Official government figures indicate 11 percent of Iraqis were unemployed at the end of last year, according to Planning Ministry spokesman Abdul-Zahra Hendawi. Another 25 percent are considered underemployed, suggesting they are unable to find steady, full-time jobs that meet their needs. Other Iraqi officials have quoted higher jobless numbers. The gaps in services are obvious in some of Iraq’s poorest areas. In Hay Tariq, a fast-growing Shiite slum on Baghdad’s outskirts, children cool off by swimming in a garbage-filled pond fed by wastewater runoff. Many residents there lack proper plumbing, so they use donkey-drawn carts

to haul plastic containers and even old oil drums to a municipal distribution center to collect fresh water. Resident Hadi Ibrahim said he sometimes has to wait hours before the water gets distributed. Even in nicer areas, such as the Sunni enclave of Azamiyah, residents say they have yet to see any improvement despite the increase in the flow of oil. During an interview in his cramped and cracking house there, fishmonger Sadiq Abdul-Jalil al-Obeidi described how old pipes in the neighborhood are clogged and falling apart, causing sewage to mix with drinking water. The power went out the moment he invited guests inside. It returned, at higher cost, only after a privately owned neighborhood generator kicked in. He accused Iraqi officials — “the whole government, without any exception” — of pocketing the country’s oil revenues. “Human nature is greedy,” he added mater-of-factly. Repeated attempts in recent days to reach Iraqi government spokesman Ali alDabbagh to discuss the bitter complaints

were unsuccessful. Other government officials, including some whose parties are allied with Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, say corruption and wasteful government spending are seriously diminishing any gains increased oil production is bringing to Iraq. Without better plans to spend the oil revenues, “Iraq will remain another Somalia instead of becoming more like Saudi Arabia or the United Arab Emirates,” said Shiite lawmaker Jawad Kadim alHassnawi, a member in the services and construction committee in the parliament. “The whole service system will totally collapse soon if the government continues to act in such an aimless way,” he warned. Salem, the taxi driver filling up in downtown Baghdad, is even more pessimistic. “It’s totally impossible,” he said when asked if Iraq’s standard of living can one day hope to rival that of other regional OPEC countries, such as Saudi Arabia and Kuwait. “We’d need Aladdin’s magic lamp for that!”


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Specialty Sandwiches & Soup

Animals and Pets

For Sale

Misty’s Dog Grooming

32 Park Avenue 5th wheel by Electra Super Slide, non smoker, Weekdays, evenings and Sat. new tires, seldom used, 5th wheel Call Misty 580-327-6653 lv msg and rail kit included, very nice For Sale $9500. Gene 316-312-1482 2 M Pointer Birddogs. 1 Sound For Sale $150. 1 Started $100. 620-635‘01 Monaco Monarch 32ft 5774 Motorhome. Jacks, large slide, Automotive 46,000 miles, $21,500. 580-3271796 Price Reduced Business Services Pop-Up Travel Trailer. Very good cond. 2 slide-outs. Has refrig, Pasture Tree Clearing stove, sink, electric AC, water Save moisture and Grass. Let me and propane. Call 580-327-6825 clear trees in your pasture. Skid For Sale Steer and Marshall Tree Saw. Ed Grover. 580-474-2465 or 580‘05 Chevy Equinox, Black, 542-0298 sunroof, power seat, 85,000 miles, great car. $10,000 obo. Small Home Daycare 580-273-3820 opening in September. Located in For Sale Alva. Openings avail for 1 child under 2 years and 4 children over ‘08 Chevrolet 1 ton Dually Crew 2 years. 580-484-9057 Cab LT 2wd, Duramax Diesel, New Laundry red/black interior, 106K with warranty, very good condition, Open 24 hrs a day, every day. sharp 23K, books at 30K+. 3166 new washers, 6 new dryers. 833-0606. Alva Open to public. 2 blocks south of NWOSU. Aspen Apartments, Want To Have Some Fun 602 Hart. Sanger Mini Cruiser Jet Boat. Ridiculous Savings! 20ft bubble deck with tandem axle trailer. Reconditioned 460 You owe it to yourself to check Ford and Berkeley Jet Drive with us for a new home or remodel. completely rebuilt with coast WFM Total Construction, guard approved parts. Very fast. LLC. 580-327-7935. www. $8500 or will consider trades. wfmtotalconstruction.com 580-541-2338. Aline, OK

caxca

Page 57


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Computer Plus For all computer repair needs. Call Adam Swallow at 580327-4449 or 580-748-2349 or come by 1329 Fair. Will do local housecalls

Free Session

with Dr. Kinzie and “Leap Into Health.” Wednesdays at 6:30 in the Alva Methodist Church Fellowship Hall (basement). Join at any time! “Leap Into Health” is a community support group Need New Sidewalks? for weight loss. Everyone is Driveway perhaps, we do all welcome. For more information types of concrete work. Give us call 580-430-3366 a call for estimate. 580-732-1028 T-Shirt Quilting Class Alva Sewing Center Saturdays, 9am-5pm Sept 8 & 22 Bow Tie Quilt Block. All pieced at Northwest Technology Center on your serger. I chose to make - Alva. Tuition $35 Call 580my blocks into a Halloween 327-0344 for a supply list and to Treat Bag. We will piece 4 blocks enroll. in the class period and what Massages by Vanna you so with them is up to you. Class will meet on Tue, Sept 11 At The Heatwave Day Spa: Get at 9:30am or 6pm. Class size is 2 Detoxes for $40, a savings of limited, $10 holds your place and $20! Come detox with a friend or any make or model serger, new loved one! All NWOSU & Alva or old is welcome. Don’t have a Goldbug students and staff will serger? You can reserve one from receive $20 off a massage until classroom. Supply list at store Sept 15th! 1016 Noble St. 580727-5209 All Knotted Up Kasie Mae’s Cafe Therapeutic Massage is now taking appointments beginning 412 N. Park ST, 1 block west of Sept. 10. Reserve your the bank. Come enjoy an Iced appointment today @ 580-748- Cold Beer, a game of pool, and 0189 or book online @ www. some famous Fried Catfish! 580allknottedup.appointy.com. 438-2259 Jamie Kilmer RN, BSN, CMT Only 23 Days Truck Driver Training till the Hunting Country Big 23 day course at Northwest Cruise and Car Show Technology Center - Alva. Mon Dan’s Pest Control thru Fri 7am-4:30pm Sept 19Oct 19. Tuition is $2800. Each Guarantees you a Pest Free home Students will receive $1000 or business, at an affordable price. grant monies, leaving cost of It is time to get your home treated class $1800. Successful students for Spiders, Scorpions, Wasps, will leave with a Class A CDL Ants, Flies, Bed Bugs & other and Entry Level Truck Driver flying & crawling pests. Dan and Certification. Class limited to Sherry will be servicing the Alva first 6. Call for class requirements area Aug 22, 23, 24. Sept 4, 5, 6, 7, 18, 19, 20, 21. 580-748-1953 and to enroll at 580-327-0344.

caxca

Page 58


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Trustworthy Home Repair

For Your Const Needs

and Remodeling. Alva, Cherokee, Helena, Medford. Accepting all major credit & debit cards. Like us on Facebook. Facebook.com/ RepairYourHome. Aaron Gottsch 580-884-0626

From A-Z, New Construction, Roofing, Additions, Remodeling, Siding, Windows, Int/Ext, Painting, All Work Guaranteed. Improve the value of your home. Call 580-732-1028

Professional Upholstery

Pony Boy Lures

with all types of furniture. Over 600 Mimosa, Alva, OK. 58055 yrs experience. Goltry, OK. 327-1233, 580-430-5547. P.S. E. 580-496-2351 Archery. Buy-Sell-Trade Pistols, Rifles, Shotguns, All Types New Release Ammo New on DVD and BluRay at Employment Rialto Video, “The Hunger Games,” “The Dictator” and “A Help Wanted Separation” Daytime Waitress. Wed, Thur and Depot Bar & Grill Fri. Depot Bar and Grill. 580327-7011 or pickup application Wed Lunch Special-Pork Loin, at 3 N College Mashed Potatoes, Gravy, Green Beans, Cherry Puff. ThurHelp Wanted Chicken Noodle Casserole, Part-time after school and Salad, French Bread, Pineapple weekends. Pick-up applications Sheet Cake. Fri-Chicken Fry, at Garnett’s Conoco. 518 Okla Mashed Potatoes, Gravy, Corn, Blvd. Alva, OK. 580-327-2691 Roll, Chocolate Cake. Full menu Haskin Healthcare everyday. Carry-Out available. 580-327-2212. Immediate Is seeking RN/LPN at $20-$30/ opening for Daytime Waitress Hour. CNA/CMA at $12-$14/ Guns-Buy/Sell/Trade Hour. Apply in person at 2501 N Van Buren, Enid. 580-237-5444 Glen Hasty. Aline, OK 580-4305400 Accepting Applications Carpentry Interior-Exterior improvements. Room additions. Plaster Repair & Painting. Handicap Upgrades. Will also accommodate Farm & Ranch. 580-307-4598 or 620825-4285. Farmers Market

The Cherokee Strip Museum is accepting applications for the position of Director. Some evenings and weekends, paid time off, EOE. Apply within 1-5pm Tues-Sat at 901 14th or call 580-327-2030. Applications deadline is Aug 31

Help Wanted Cherokee Main Street Farmers Motivated Office Manager with Market Every Thursday, 5-7 pm moderate computer skills. Submit at the Armory Building at 2nd Resume to PO Box 21, Alva, OK and Kansas. 73717

caxca

Page 59


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

caxca

Page 60

Positions Available

Help Wanted

Multi Family Sale

FT/PT in University Foodservice. Apply in person at NWOSU Cafeteria. EOE/ AA/M/F/D/V

Gambino’s is now taking applications for all shifts. Pick-Up applications at 720 Okla Blvd

1211 2nd St. Fri 4:30pm-8pm. Sat 8am-?

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Depot Bar and Grill is looking for Bartender. Apply in person at 3 N College. 580-327-7011

Alan Ritchey, Inc. is looking for a Diesel Mechanic. Primary responsibility is performing preventative maintenance. Would prefer someone ASE certified and with at least 3 years experience. Benefits include Medical, Dental and Vision Insurance. 401K, Cafeteria Plan, Holiday and Sick Pay. If you are interested please apply online at www.alanritchey.com. EOE M/F/H/V

Help Wanted Lite-N-Nite. Apply in person. 1624 Okla Blvd Help Wanted Share Medical Center job openings. Certified Nurse Aides, Full-Time Night Shift RN. Administrative Assistant for the Homestead. Applications available at 800 Share Drive in Alva. Call 580-327-2800 for more information. Truck Mechanic Nicholas Services has expanded their fleet and is now seeking a highly motivated mechanic that takes pride in their work. Duties include truck maintenance, brake work, A/C, electrical and general shop maintenance, organizational skills a must. Paid hourly based on experience, position includes exceptional benefits package. Job is located in Medicine Lodge, KS. 620930-7511

Farm Supplies Farmer’s Please Help! 64 Yr old looking for a hunting lease for deer. Preferably on river system. Will pay top price for good place. 580-554-0999 Want to Buy Bales of Feed. 580-829-1319 or 580-5413285 Garage Sales Garage Sale N of Town just past bridge-44848 Jay Road. 8am-noon 2 Family Garage Sale 607 N 5th St. Carmen. Sat 9/1 8am-5pm. I Beam Trolley, 2 ton Chain Hoist (Manual), power hand tools, 10 x 10 tent, TV, Sony DVD and VCR player, over 400 movies and episodes, some clothes Garage Sale Guns, books, coins, household items, clothes, cast iron items, much much more. Sat 8/25 8am-3pm. No Early Birds

Garage Sale 1123 Center 3-8pm Fri only. Teen clothes, tv, misc. Miscellaneous Rain Courtesy of the Cub Scouts Pack #392. Sorry for the delay. We postponed our camping trip until August this year The “Pop” Box (People offering prayer) James 5:16. Need Prayer? Let us pray and believe with you. Send your prayer requests to PO BOX 1026, Alva, OK 73717. All requests will remain confidential. No last names or addresses needed Quilt Guild Interested in quilting, join an informative, fun group. Meet: First Tuesday of the month, Sept 4, 2012. Location: Graceful Arts back room studio. Time: Social 6:30pm. Meeting: 7pm. Contact: Connie Allen 580-824-9001, Carolyn Demaree 580-430-5307 Tires For Sale Kelly Safari Trex, like new. 2-265/70R17 $200. 1-Maxtrax M/S 245/75R16 $75. Toro Personal Pace Push Mower w/bagger/ 6.75hp. 580-430-1642 For Sale Lawn Mower with bag, self propelled $150. 12” Planner $200. Clarinet $300. Framing Nail Gun with nails $175. 30” under cabinet white microwave $50. 12” x 12” sand packer $50. Call 580-327-3884 or 580-748-1852

Continued on page 62

MURROW

REAL ESTATE & AUCTION

580-327-1998

www.murrowlandandhome.com www.murrowrealestateandauction.com


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The father of a central Oklahoma high school valedictorian said Monday his daughter’s diploma has been withheld because she used a curse word during her graduation speech. The Prague High School superintendent said in a statement Monday that Kaitlin Nootbaar “used language that was inappropriate for a graduation exercise.” Prague is about 60 miles east of Oklahoma City. David Nootbaar said his daughter said during her May speech that she had wanted to be a nurse, then a veterinarian, but when people ask what she wants to be now, she said “How the hell should I know? I’ve changed my mind so many times.” He said Kaitlin’s speech was inspired by an installment of the “Twilight” movie series, in which a character used a similar phrase during a graduation scene. He said the written version of her speech used the word “heck,” but that she inadvertently used the curse word. School Superintendent Rick Martin issued a statement in which he called Kaitlin “an outstanding student” whose written speech had been approved. “Unfortunately, she did not present the speech as written and used language that was inappropriate for a graduation exercise,” Martin said. Nootbaar said he and his daughter went to the school Friday to get her di-

ploma and were met by Principal David Smith “He said ‘Shut the door.’ I shut the door and he pointed at her and said, ‘You and me have a problem,’ “ Nootbaar said. Nootbaar said the diploma was on the principal’s desk. “He said right here’s your diploma and you’re not going to get it,” and then told her she would have to write a letter of apology, Nootbar said. Martin said he thinks the principal’s request for an apology is “reasonable.” Kaitlin Nootbaar has no plans to apologize, her father said. “She said ‘Dad, if I write them a letter it’s not going to be a nice letter. It’s not going to be an apology,’ “ Nootbaar said. Martin said he has had no communication with the family and hopes they’ll “contact me personally so that

caxca

Page 61

Okla. school withholds teen’s diploma for cursing this matter may be resolved between the proper parties.” Nootbaar said he has tried, to no avail, to contact the superintendent. Kaitlin Nootbaar is attending Southwestern Oklahoma State University in Weatherford on a full scholarship, her father said, and is majoring in biology with plans to become a marine biologist. He said the university previously accepted his daughter’s high school transcript and 4.0 GPA as proof of her graduation. “She didn’t cuss anybody,” David Nootbaar said, “and the funny thing is, the school she graduated from, its mascot is a devil.” The school’s website identifies the mascot as the Red Devils and shows a cartoonish devil with horns and a pointed tail, winking and holding a trident.


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

caxca

Page 62

10% Off Scentsy

Paying Ca$h

Country Home for Rent

All orders now until Sept 1. Call Jaci at 620-825-6130

for all Coin, Token, & Currency Collections. Top prices paid for gold & silver. Coins-Jewelry-Flatware. Call 580233-0007 or come by CC Coins at 813 W. Maine, Enid, OK

Older 4-5bdrm 1bth on small acreage 15 miles NW of Alva, paved road $1200/Mo. 620-635-5774

For Sale Lexington Classic Oak Dining Room furniture. Table w/2 leaves and pads 93”, 2 arm chairs, 6 side chairs. Lighted China Cabinet, Mobile Lighted Server. Lexington low poster king size bedroom suite, dresser w/mirror, entertainment cabinet, 2 night stands. This furniture is heavy oak in excellent condition. 580-3273185 or 580-327-7246

For Sale Colorado Peaches. 580-829-1359 Show Your Colors Paracord Bracelets in Goldbug, NWOSU, OSU, OU, Thunder colors. Contact 785492-7226 for pricing

For Sale

Real Estate

New wooden 8 x 6 Quick Shed Building kit. Everything you need for assembling the building except shingles and paint. $640. 580-748-1258

For Rent

Happy 80th Birthday Send greeting to Joyce Hickman at 1018 Barnes. St. Alva Mary Kay 50% Off Instock items only. Pick up a list at 412 Flynn St. Alva. 20% off items ordered. Sale ends 9/8. Amber Kohlrus 580-7481755 Coldest Drink in Town ICEE (coke or cherry) available “Happy Hour” priced all day everyday (carryout only) also regular drinks available featuring all flavors. Vendors Wanted Hardtner Trade Show Sept 8th. Call 620825-6130 for more information For Sale (7) orange fencing T-posts $20.00 for all. 580-748-1258

3bdrm 2bth, 2 garage home avail now. $1500/Month. 580-984-2286 For Sale Jet, 2 homes on a 1/2 blk, both 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 2 living, 4 car garage, plenty of room for several RV’s, highway frontage. 580554-4436 or 580-554-4437. For Rent in Medicine Lodge, KS. Newly remodeled 2bdrm apartments. CH/A. Stove, refrig, microwave, dishwasher, 6 month lease, city bills paid. no pets, no smoking, $750/ Mo. 877-684-5277 For Sale ‘09 3bdrm 2bth Mobile Home set up in Alva. 806-228-0568 First Time Home Buyer Own your own home. Zero Down! 100% Financing. Bankruptcy okay. Free Credit Report and Repair. Low Fixed Interest Rates. 620 Credit Score required. Immediate Pre-Approval. USDA Approved Lender. John Angleman, Founders Mortgage, Inc. 580-222-8862. Visit www.foundersmortgage.com. Lic #208765 Home for Sale 321 S 6th, Medford, OK. Move in Ready! Must See! 3bdrm, 2bth, 3 car garage, RV Hook-Up, Fireplace, Cellar, Corner Lot, new CH/A Unit in 2010, includes Refrigerator, Oven, Microwave, Dishwasher, Water Softener. 580-7411108

Room For Rent 580-370-6872 Rooms for Rent Capron All utilities included in rent. Many extras. Satellite TV, Satellite Wireless Internet, Tenants own living room and 2 bathrooms. 580-884-0514 For Rent RV spaces w/ full hookups. 580-430-1389 House For Sale 1700 sq feet, brick home with stone corners, 4bdrm, 2bth and completely updated inside! 121 Monroe. Asking $120,000. Call 580-216-0401 For Sale Nice 3bdrm country home with 2 car garage, corrals, barns, good roads, sits on 5 acres. Located between Alva and Cherokee. 580-884-7760 or 580-884-7447 For Rent Students or Corporate. Starting at $350 per person. View them at www.nwokrental. com. 580-594-2408 Home For Sale 10 acres mol, 4 bdrm, 2 1/2 bth, 5 car garage/shop, 11.3 miles W of Fairview, OK. Call Greg Jensen at Smith Real Estate 580-548-4895 Lease Hunting Land for Deer. Gary Clay 918-685-5400 For Rent Bunkhouse 2bth, 3bdrm. Game Room. Very Nice. $2500/mo. Utilities Paid. 580594-2408 For Sale or Lease in Medicine Lodge, KS. 3bdrm house avail Sept 1. CH/A, fenced yard, no pets, no smoking. 877-684-5277 4 Open Houses Sun, Aug 26 1-3pm. 809 3rd * 1445 Young * 1914 11th * 1807 Skyview. Schuessler Real Estate. alvahouses.com


August 22, 2012

Alva Review-Courier/Newsgram

Page 63

Each week, you can view or buy newspaper sports photos on our website at AlvaReviewcourier.com


Newsgram August 22, 2012  

news, classified ads, advertising, public records

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you