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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 43, ISSUE 22 THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 2020 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

TAKING BACK THE

POWER

Cities stand up to PG&E BY SCOTT THOMAS ANDERSON

PAGE

16

4

BIG, FAT PENSIONS

8

SUPES DEBATE

20

FOLK ARTIST


FOR DENTURES WITH EXTRACTIONS ONLY

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CN&R

JANUARY 23, 2020


CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 43, Issue 22 • January 23, 2020 OPINION

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES

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Weekly Dose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

GREENWAYS

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EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

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COVER STORY

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ARTS & CULTURE

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Arts feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

REAL ESTATE

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CLASSIFIEDS

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ON THE COVER: ILLUSTRATION BY MARIA RATINOVA

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Staff Writers Andre Byik, Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Trevor Whitney Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Rachel Bush Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Josh Cozine, Nate Daly, Charles Finlay, Bob Grimm, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Neesa Sonoquie, Robert Speer, Wendy Stewart, Evan Tuchinsky, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Elisabeth Bayard-Arthur Ad Designers Naisi Thomas, Cathy Arnold Publications Designers Katelynn Mitrano, Nikki Exerjian Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Advertising Consultants Adam Lew, Jordon Vernau Office Assistant Jennifer Osa Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Matt Daugherty Distribution Staff Michael Gardner, Andrew Garske, Ken Gates, Bob Meads, Randall Morrison, Larry Smith, Courtney Tilton, Placido Torres, Richard Utter, Jim Williams, Barbara Wise, David Wyles 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website newsreview.com

N&R Publications Editor Debbie Arrington N&R Publications Associate Editors Derek McDow, Thea Rood N&R Publications Writers/Photographers Allen Pierleoni, Anne Stokes N&R Publications Editorial Assistant Nisa Smith Marketing & Publications Lead Consultant Elizabeth Morabito Marketing & Publications Consultants Julia Ballantyne, Greta Beekhuis, Chris Cohen, Joseph Engle, Laura Golino, Sherri Heller, Rod Malloy Art of Information Director Serene Lusano President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at PressWorks Ink on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN.

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

SECOND & FLUME

EDITORIAL

Sheathe knives till November There’s a saying that any publicity is good publicity.

Two of the leading Democrats in the presidential primary, Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren, have gotten a lot of media coverage the past few weeks for a remark Sanders allegedly made to Warren in the aftermath of the 2018 midterm elections about the prospects of a woman running for president. We don’t see any good from this publicity. Set aside the question about whether or not Sanders said a woman couldn’t beat Donald Trump. The problem, in our opinion, is not a memory match between two senators. Rather, it’s the return of wedge politics from 2016—the cannibalism that helped Trump reach the White House. Monday (Jan. 20), as the candidates locked arms on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Politico published an article about the mood in Iowa ahead of the caucuses on Feb. 3, exactly a month before the California primary. “Interviews with more than two-dozen voters ... made clear that the hard feelings between the two progressive icons have extended to their supporters,” the report said. “Despite Warren and Sanders’ attempts to move on … the interviews show that the collision has at least temporarily colored the opinions

each candidate’s supporters have of the other.” This isn’t a time for division or divisiveness. With the president impeached by House Democrats but likely to be acquitted by Republicans in his Senate trial, like-minded people need to band together. We’ve already seen what happens otherwise. Hillary Clinton—counterargument No. 1 to any publicity is good publicity—won the popular vote convincingly but lost electorally pivotal states by thin margins. Sanders, runner-up for the nomination, had urged his backers to vote for her, and made dozens of campaign speeches on her behalf. Yet, a segment of them refused. It was Bernie or bust; Hillary was tainted. Speaking of Clinton, her recent incendiary comments about Sanders—that he’s a career politician whom nobody likes and wants to work with, among other things—certainly aren’t helping the situation. But back to the 2020 primary and the new rift. Did Warren create it for political gain? Did she do so for a greater good of exposing hypocrisy? That’s a matter for debate. What’s undeniable is whoever wins this skirmish Ω will have a tougher battle with the real enemy.

GUEST COMMENT

Coping with dread Arecently Climate change. War. Political divide. I read that even people pleased with President

lot of people have fear of the future right now.

Trump are filled with a terrible dread of what might happen if he loses re-election. I’m in the same boat. When I smell smoke in the air, I often feel a little wave of panic hit me, the residue of losing a home to the Camp Fire. I could scarcely wait for the rains to come this winter, checking the weather forecasts, reading the wind levels with a knot in my stomach. I wish I knew a way to get rid by of dread—I would happily see my Joe Wills therapy practice dwindle and read The author is a the newspaper without a clenched psychotherapist and jaw. What I do instead sounds writer in Chico. nutty—I pay attention to the fear.

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JANUARY 23, 2020

By that I mean I sit down and try to describe it, or draw what it looks or feels like, or write about it, like I’m doing here. It changes a hidden thing to bring it into view. On the one hand, it seems less scary, not buried away in your gut or your mind. But it also is treating it with respect, like the old phrase, give the devil his due. And in so doing, you are treating yourself with respect. I know there is a counter view to handling awful emotions like dread—why feed a fire, give it air? To which I would say, if you can distract yourself from it, turn away from it, let go of it, rejoice. Do what works for you. If there was one sure road to contentment, we would all know it by now. What we do know is that we can’t as individuals remove all sources of dread—fix the climate, end war, end strife. We can, however, give voice to our hope, speak of injustice, come alive, each of us. Strangely, by also bringing our fears into the open, the aliveness grows even more. Ω

by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

Pension talk When CN&R reporter Andre Byik drew my attention to a vague media advisory about a press conference at which Chief Mike O’Brien was “to address the future of the Chico Police Department,” it didn’t take long for the two of us to figure out that the city’s top cop was announcing his retirement. My question: How much longer would he stick around as the city searches for his successor? I guessed six months—enough time for City Manager Mark Orme to launch a national search, hold interviews and whittle down a list of candidates. I was off by about a month. As you’ll see in Byik’s report this week, which provides color from the chief reflecting on his tenure but also focuses on the task before Orme, O’Brien’s last day will be June 5. That’s almost exactly five years from the date he was sworn in to lead the department. We weren’t caught off guard because we knew O’Brien was already fully vested under the California Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS). Public safety officials who were hired before 2013 and spend 30 years on the job earn 90 percent of their highest salary for life. The caveat: They must be at least 50 years old. Unlike a certain former police chief, O’Brien didn’t retire the moment he became eligible for that max payout. Upon retirement, he’ll have been in law enforcement for 31 years, 28 of them in Chico. Multiple factors likely played into his decision to stay on for a bit. For starters, I suspect he wanted to see his department through the roughest patches brought on by the city’s massive, unprecedented population surge post-Camp Fire. O’Brien also probably wanted to keep his word that he’d stay on the job for “five to six years,” as he told the CN&R upon his swearing in. Further incentive may have come from watching a few of his predecessors get a public lashing for jumping ship after serving less than three years when they hit that magical birthday. I’m referring to former Chief Kirk Trostle (June 2012-December 2014), who retired nine days after turning 50. He didn’t make it to 30 years of service, but his pension is nothing to sneeze at. In 2014, he raked in $109,589 but now makes more than $123,421, thanks to cost-of-living adjustments. Think that’s outrageous? Trostle’s predecessor, Mike Maloney (September 2009-April 2012), made more than $150,000 in 2013, his first full year on the sidelines. In 2018, the last year for which records are available, he made $162,114. He, too, retired when he turned 50. Then he started working at Butte College. In 2017, he earned $103,597 in regular pay at the community college. That same year, he also made $147,622 in so-called “other pay.” I haven’t found records for a second pension under the California State Teachers’ Retirement System (CalSTRS), but it looks like he’s eligible. I don’t doubt that policing is excruciatingly stressful work that often ages people beyond their years. Case in point: Before I knew otherwise, I thought Maloney was a decade older than his true age— albeit genetics probably have something to do with that. Still, these retirement packages seem excessive, especially considering the cost of living in Butte County and the city’s increasingly crushing pension debt ($141 million as of 2018). Am I wrong?

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R


LETTERS

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

A cathartic read Re “Self-care basics” (Cover story, Healthlines, etc., by CN&R staff, Jan. 16): I have an affinity for “Self Care 101,” starting with the editor’s Crohn’s disease flare-up (I was diagnosed with Crohn’s at 31), mindfulness (I practice with varying degrees of diligence), diet (I fast 12 hours a day), exercise (I walk or bike daily), and sleep (always a strength of mine). And although I’m not in therapy, I meet a dear friend with a doctorate in the behavioral health field once a month for lunch. I also practice all the “Taking extra care” recommendations, most of them with vigor. My passion for self-care has been more 201 than 101 the past 12 months, with some hiccups. I started feeling whole a month ago when I gave up self-medicating with adrenaline via video games. Today, I’m less irritable, less

exhausted and happier with myself and those around me—more than I have been in years. Reading this issue was cathartic! Bill Mash Chico

Retort time Re “But … the economy” (Letters, by John Blenkush, Jan. 16): There is a major problem with John Blenkush’s recent letter on the Trump economy. It doesn’t appear to be true. The real unemployment numbers are nearly double the published number. Since the Clinton administration, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics has used the U-3 rate to calculate unemployment instead of the historic U-6 rate. The U-3 doesn’t count the “underemployed,” people who work part-time and desire full-time jobs or are employed below their education level. Also not counted are “discouraged workers,” people who are no longer seeking work. Also, according

to the most recent Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey (JOLTS), job openings in November dropped by a massive 561,000, the biggest annual drop since the financial crisis! The Trump tax cuts have been used by corporate America to set four consecutive quarterly records for stock buybacks, inflating the stock market. Commercial and consumer debt have increased and the government has set peacetime deficit spending records, soon to reach $1 trillion. You would have to be dreaming or not paying attention to believe what our government tells you about our economic situation. Blenkush is right about one thing: We’re “uninformed.” No honest news from the Corporate Propaganda Ministry, our media. Paul Ellcessor Durham

Speaking of POTUS Re “Poor get poorer in Trump’s economy” (Guest comment, by LETTERS C O N T I N U E D

O N PA G E 6

JANUARY 23, 2020

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LETTERS c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 5 Roger S. Beadle, Jan. 9): Dear Mr. Beadle: I just read your piece in the guest comment and about lost it. You claim the economy is not good; I’m not sure you would have a clue when it is good. You claim that people are having to work more than one job to make ends meet. I’m not really sure how that is Trump’s fault? We raised the minimum wage in this state and it keeps going up, but all that will happen is businesses will go out of business due to not being able to pay people that much money. No business owner would stand for such nonsense. You do realize poor people eat at fast food, too, so when the value meal is no longer a value it hurts them worse. The unemployment rate is the lowest it’s ever been, the economy is red hot as jobs are everywhere. Please give credit where it is due, and the fact that companies love less regulation is showing in this booming economy. Travis Smith Biggs

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Election chatter I’m excited about Sue Hilderbrand’s candidacy for Butte County supervisor. I first heard about Sue while I was employed at Chico State. Students commented to me how much they enjoyed political science classes she taught. Since then, I’ve had occasion to work with Sue on projects with a local nonprofit organization. I’m very impressed by her organized, collaborative approach to problem-solving and getting things done. Because I was raised in Butte County, and worked on the almond harvest as a young person, I know first-hand how important agriculture is to our economy. This is especially true for District 4, which includes farming communities such as Richvale and Durham, as well as parts of south Chico. Sue has demonstrated strong understanding and respect for agriculture. Water issues are vital to Butte County, especially policies related to water sales. Sue has a solid grasp on these issues and will fight to be sure our water doesn’t get shipped south, which would hurt small farmers and residents dependent on wells. As a supervisor, I’m confident Sue will keep all stakeholders in mind to protect our precious water resources.

For these reasons and many others, Sue Hilderbrand deserves your vote. Nancy Park Chico

I’m observing something very interesting in the District 4 supervisor’s race. I see a few liberal Democrats endorsing Tod Kimmelshue in that race. They say he’s a nice fellow and a reasonable moderate and they appear to believe he would enact their vision of what is best for Butte County. Then I see him getting enthusiastic support from some far-right Trump-loving Republicans. They obviously believe he’s one of them and will enact their vision of what is best for Butte County—a very different vision from the other group. Then he’s getting quite a lot of financial support from outside business interests who don’t care a lick what’s good for Butte County, but must believe he will be good for their business. And, for some of them, their business appears to be exporting water from Butte County and promoting sprawl development. My conclusion? All these people can’t be right. Somebody is getting fooled. That’s why I’m supporting Sue Hilderbrand—the candidate who is beholden only to the regular working people of Butte County. This time in our county’s history is too important to take a chance. David Welch Chico

We are writing to support Sue Hilderbrand for county supervisor of District 4. As owners of a small farm in Butte County, TurkeyTail Farm, we worry about water. We have experienced our well going dry in August. We know there is increasing pressure on our aquifer in Northern California. Sue Hilderbrand will stand up for the preservation of water for our community. Moreover, she will ensure a transparent process. As Camp Fire victims, we appreciate the attention Sue has given to those who have lost so much. She also understands that the county is facing development pressures. We are wary of big development moving into our area and creating increasing pressures on our infrastructure. Sue wants smart

growth, not outsiders who want to make a buck. We have known Sue since we moved to Butte County. We’ve seen her bring together diverse groups of people to work on a common cause. One of the things we appreciate about Sue is that she listens to people. We need someone with her energy and commitment to bring people together to solve problems. Sue Hilderbrand will listen to regular folk and take their issues seriously. We need her as a Butte County supervisor. Susan and Stephen Tchudi Yankee Hill

Remember Korematsu Jan. 30 is the 101st birthday of Fred T. Korematsu, a California state holiday. Korematsu was an American civil rights activist who refused to go to this country’s incarceration camps for families of Japanese descent during World War II. After conviction and appeals, the Supreme Court ruled that incarceration was justified due to military necessity. Supreme Court Justice Frank Murphy dissented in the case declaring, “I dissent from this legalization of racism,” making it the first Supreme Court opinion ever to use the word “racism.” Recently, I and others from Butte County joined Tsuru for Solidarity for a protest at the ICE detention center at the Yuba County Jail in Marysville. Tsuru for Solidarity is a group of survivors now in their 80s and 90s who were children in the U.S. incarceration camps. Their website reads: “Americans turned their backs on us as we disappeared but we will not do the same to the asylum-seekers now crossing our border.” Korematsu would agree that history is repeating itself and that we must close all migrant detention camps. He urged us to speak up when you see injustice. We must reunify children with their families. Fund humanitarian aid and solutions. Never again is now. Diane Suzuki-Brobeck Chico

More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past cn&r articles.


What’s your favorite style of music?

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Early blues and jazz. Particularly protest music that came out of deep Mississippi from the ’20s and ’30s to World War II. It’s heartfelt and has strong messages about things like hard living.

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I like a little bit of everything, including a lot of the local bands, especially the funk ones, like Smokey the Groove.

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If I’m trying to get active and energetic, I’ll probably listen to some good rock ’n’ roll. If I’m trying to hang out, chill and maybe study, I’ll put on some low-fi hiphop or R&B. If I’m trying to focus or unwind, I’ll put on some classical. And a little jazz always soothes the soul.

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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE

A closer look

CHICO CRIME FALLS

In 2019, overall crime fell 2 percent in Chico when compared with 2018, according to the Chico Police Department. The decrease was aided by a 9 percent drop in violent crime, which includes aggravated assaults, robberies and rapes. Property crime—burglaries, larcenies and vehicle thefts—was flat year-over-year. Addressing the perception in some circles that crime has been on the rise, Police Chief Mike O’Brien suggested social media may be playing a role. “A lot of information now is in the hands of the public,” O’Brien said. “That’s a good thing, but that information needs to be provided in context. And sometimes just listening to a scanner does not provide context.”

PROGRESSING ON POT

The Chico City Council took another step toward legalizing commercial cannabis sales on Tuesday (Jan. 21), making decisions on potency and advertising. Butte County Public Health Officer Andy Miller offered his concerns, citing studies that show higher-potency products can increase the risk of psychosis and dependency. The council stuck with state regulations, however, which apply to edibles and concentrates, but not to flower. As for advertising, the council voted to prohibit portable “sandwich” signs in public rights-of-way, as well as the following signs: digital, spinner, monument, pole, marquee, roof, temporary, moving or super graphic (those encompassing an entire side of a building). Businesses cannot use any depiction of a cannabis leaf. The vote was 5-2 with Councilmembers Sean Morgan and Kasey Reynolds dissenting.

HACKING UPDATE

After being down for two weeks, Enloe Medical Center’s network infrastructure was “nearing full-functional restoration” on Friday (Jan. 17), according to a press release. On Jan. 2, the hospital’s system was targeted by a ransomware attack (see “Network interference,” Newslines, Jan. 9). There is “no indication or evidence” suggesting patient data was accessed, according to the release. “We truly appreciate the patience and support of our community while we were focusing on the investigation into this incident and restoring our core operating systems to full-functionality,” Enloe CEO Mike Wiltermood (pictured) said in the press release.

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Divisions revealed during supervisorial candidates forum

Tbetween elicited a back-and-forth discussion District 4 supervisorial candidates he question was one of the few that

Sue Hilderbrand and Tod Kimmelshue: What do you think about the Butte story and Regional Conservation photo by Plan (BRCP)? Andre Byik The Butte County and re b @ Board of Supervisors n ew srev i ew. c o m hopefuls were facing off at a candidates Next up: forum held Jan. 15 at Butte College, and The League of Women Voters’ “speed dating” Kimmelshue, a retired event for Butte County agriculture finance primary election adviser, said he opposed candidates. the BRCP, which has 9:30 a.m.-noon Feb. 1, Chico High School. been billed as a way to streamline environmental permitting processes for development. “It affects agriculture in a poor way,” he said, noting that he believes the agricultural landscape will undergo a transformation over the next four to five decades. “The plan says that if you decide to put your land into the conservation program, then you have to do with that land what they tell you. In other words, if I have a piece of rice land … all I could do is grow rice because rice

protects certain species.” Hilderbrand, a Chico State political science lecturer, said she supports the BRCP in part because it streamlines development. “We’re going to see a lot of development in the next 10 years,” she said. “We need housing and we need to do it in a way that preserves what makes Butte County so beautiful.” She further noted landowner participation is voluntary and lamented the Butte County Farm Bureau’s opposition. Kimmelshue, a past president of the bureau, said the opposition stems from long-term conservation easements that would become a cloud on a title, leaving in place land restrictions that future owners would be required to abide by. “And the next owner understands the restrictions on the title,” Hilderbrand responded. The forum, which was hosted by the League of Women Voters of Butte County, was the first of two events the league has planned ahead of the March 3 primary election. In addition to featuring candidates for District 4 (south county), those vying for District 1 (Oroville area) were on hand. The league said Doug Teeter, who is seeking a third term in District 5 (on and around the Ridge), had a scheduling conflict but that

he and his opponent, Henry Schleiger, will attend the next event, which is scheduled for Feb. 1 at Chico High School. In District 4, Hilderbrand and Kimmelshue are running for the seat being vacated by current board Chairman Steve Lambert. Hilderbrand said while she previously did not aspire to be an elected official, her skills are needed in a post-Camp Fire landscape. Pointing to her experience offering disaster relief in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina, Hilderbrand said she witnessed how special interest groups took advantage of a community struck by disaster, rebuilding the city in a way that suited them, not the locals. “We are a community in crisis, and we are not organized enough to counter those outside special interests,” she said. “I know how to do this. It’s what I’ve always done. … I do have a background in public policy, and I have a lot of experience in strategic planning.” Kimmelshue said he is seeking office because being an elected leader is about community service. He noted that the positions he’s held at the Farm Bureau, the Butte County Water Commission and Chico State Enterprises exemplify the seriousness with which he commits to service. “I’m running to make sure that this


Tod Kimmelshue and Sue Hilderbrand, candidates for the Butte County District 4 supervisorial seat, field questions at a forum Jan. 15 at Butte College.

county is saved and is preserved for many, many future generations to come,” Kimmelshue said. “And so when I decided to run for office, I was overwhelmed at the support that I have been given.” Kimmelshue said public safety ranks at the top of the list of priorities facing the district, noting his campaign has the backing of Sheriff Kory Honea and law enforcement groups. He said he would work to ensure funding for public safety programs. “I’ve knocked on 5,000 doors throughout the district,” he said, “and that is the No. 1 issue that I come across.” Hilderbrand, a former director of the Chico Peace and Justice Center who is backed by first-term Supervisors Debra Lucero and Tami Ritter, offered that the concept of public safety must include issues such as economic stability and mental health. She added that the most pressing issues in the district also may depend on which community is being referenced. When talking about the Hispanic population in Gridley, for example, there are concerns about unemployment. In Thermalito, she said, speeding and flooding rank highly. And in Chico, homelessness and mental illness top the list. In District 1, Supervisor Bill Connelly is

seeking a fifth term against challenger Ian Greene. The incumbent supervisor said public safety is his No. 1 issue. On that front, he said, the Butte County Jail, which is undergoing an expansion, is ill-suited to address the county’s needs because of state legislation addressing prison overcrowding. He also criticized the condition of the facility, noting the women’s section “is terrible.” Greene, a care provider, focused on wresting control of utilities from private corporations, saying local control could help prevent disasters like the Camp Fire. While Connelly chided PG&E’s management of its infrastructure and criticized the California Public Utilities Commission’s oversight of the utility, he cautioned that any plans for a takeover may leave customers worse off. “It’s OK to have a corporation in America,” he said, “but it’s got to be run in a way that protects the safety of the people you’re serving.” Ω

Long goodbye Chico city manager launches national search as police chief announces June retirement The plan was to leave sooner.

Chico Police Mike O’Brien told the CN&R he had been mulling over a lucrative job opportunity several months ago. His résumé and application were ready for submission. But after counseling with his family, O’Brien shifted course. The new gig would have come about six months following the Camp Fire, which reshaped the city, expanding the population by about 20,000 people. “We thought, You know, it’s not all right,” the police chief said. “You can’t do that. … We need to stick this out for another year.” At a news conference last Thursday (Jan. 16), O’Brien announced his intention to retire from the police department effective June 5, a move that has launched a search for his successor. At 58, O’Brien will have served 31 years in law enforcement at the time of his retirement, with 28 in Chico and the last five as chief of police. His tenure as the top cop is among the longest in recent city history, and he said he would not be stepping down if he was not confident in the leadership of the department. O’Brien personally endorsed his deputy chief, Matt Madden, for his job. “It’s been my distinct privilege to serve in this capacity, but we have navigated several crises that have happened in the city and I think as a leader— as a chief—you only have so much of those in you to navigate,” O’Brien said. “I think there are times where you have to realize that it may be

time to allow others that you have prepared to take the reins.” The hiring of a new police chief will fall on the shoulders of City Manager Mark Orme, who told the CN&R he intends to recruit nationally for candidates, akin to the city’s search for a fire chief in 2017. Steve Standridge was hired out of Colorado for that post. As for O’Brien’s endorsement, Orme said he did not doubt Madden’s skills or competency and did not rule out an internal hire. The city manager expects tough competition for the role, which he said requires a person who will serve in the public’s interest, garner the respect of police officers and work collaboratively with other city departments. Public input will be sought through City Council members, Orme said, as well as a

SIFT ER Trump is still flunking In January 2018, after President Trump had been on the job for one year, 35 percent of registered voters in America gave him a grade of F for his overall performance. This month, now three years in, the Morning Consult and Politico conducted the same poll, and voters think he’s doing about the same, with 38 percent saying he’s flunking. Opinions vary widely when divided along party lines: 71 percent of Democrats gave the president an F and only 1 percent gave him an A;

5 percent of Republicans flunked Trump compared with 51 percent who gave him an A; and 37 percent of independents gave him an F, while 11 percent responded that he deserved an A.

Trump’s 2020 report card Grade % of voters F............................38 D ...........................11 C ...........................10 B ...........................17 A ...........................21 Don’t know......... 3

Chico Police Chief Mike O’Brien will retire effective June 5. PHOTO BY ANDRE BYIK

panel he will assemble. To that end, Emily Alma, coordinator for Concerned Citizens for Justice, a local group formed following the fatal police shooting of Desmond Phillips in 2017, said while the police department has made progress—such as instituting a mobile crisis response unit— there is a need for more improvements. A new police chief, Alma said, should review the department’s use-of-force policies, ensure compliance with state legislation that gives the public the right to access certain police misconduct and use-of-force records, and implement ongoing officer training in implicit bias and de-escalation techniques. Finally, Alma said, a new chief must engender trust between residents and law enforcement through a comprehensive community policing plan, which should include the restructuring of the Police Community Advisory Board to foster more engagement and “give and take” between citizens and law enforcement. During O’Brien’s time as chief, city police have fatally shot three men: Eddie Sanchez Jr., Phillips and Tyler Rushing. Work has been done to mend community relations and “heal those wounds,” the police chief said, adding that those efforts continue. “It’s not something that you just fix in a short period of time,” he said. “It’s an ongoing relationship that you must have, and it involves transparency. It involves good policy. It involves having good people in your employ, and we have that.” —ANDRE BYIK a nd r e b @ newsr ev iew.c o m

NEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D JANUARY 23, 2020

O N PA G E 1 1

CN&R

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21st AnnuAl

Snow Goose Festival JAnuAry 22 – 26 | ChiCo, CAliforniA www.snowgoosefestivAl.org

frEE

Events and Activities

Saturday/Sunday January 25 - 26, 2020 • Chico Masonic Family Center 1110 W. East Ave. Chico

The Maze of Maps

build a leGo bird

Sat 9:00 am - 4:00 pm • Sun 9:00 am - 3:00 pm

Sat. 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Location: Chico Masonic Family Center This year we will feature an eclectic assortment of interesting maps from around the North Valley and beyond. Get the bird’s eye view of our local landscape features. Stroll through maps in the CMFC hallway and let your curiosity take you on a tour. exhibiTs & Vendors Galore Sat 9:00 am - 4:00 pm • Sun 9:00 am - 3:00 pm

Location: Chico Masonic Family Center Displays by State, Federal, and Non-profit organizations. Plus vendors selling everything from binoculars to bird books.

Location: Chico Masonic Family Center Swoop into our collection of thousands of LEGO to design and customize your own LEGO bird creation. Then attach your bird to our zip line to watch it “fly” across the room. After a brief compare and contrast between real bird flight and LEGO bird flight, Play-Well TEKnologies instructors Amber Drake and Matthew Greening will assist kids with designing, building, and “flying” LEGO birds. While participants do not get to keep their creations, they do get to play and build with our massive LEGO collection and develop skills and inspiration that they can apply to building at home. Youth ages 6-12 welcome, but you must arrive by 1:00 pm to participate. (LEGO is a registered trademark of the LEGO Group)

Sat 9:00 am - 4:00 pm • Sun 9:00 am - 3:00 pm

Location: Chico Masonic Family Center All 100 California winners from nearly 2,000 entries will be on display. Don’t forget to see the Chico winners. MeeT sMokey bear and The blue Goose Sat 9:00 am - 4:00 pm • Sun 9:00 am – 3:00 pm

Location: Chico Masonic Family Center Smokey Bear and the National Wildlife Refuge’s Blue Goose will be visiting at various times courtesy of the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge. Also be sure to visit the US Fish & Wildlife Service fire safety exhibit booth. Junior naTuralisT acTiViTies Sat 10:00 am - 3:00 pm • Sun 10:00 am – 3:00 pm

Location: Chico Masonic Family Center Along with the Live Raptor Presentation, Meet Smokey Bear and Blue Goose, Junior Duck Stamp Display, children may earn a Junior Naturalist Certificate by participating in a few activities designed just for children. There will be nature crafts, opportunities to build bird feeders, make a bird call and much, much more! bird olyMpics neW Sat. 10:00 am – 3:00 pm • Sun 10:00 am – 3:00 pm

Location: Chico Masonic Family Center Participants will fly through this fun activity learning through play about the physical attributes of birds by comparing their own physical abilities to those of birds. Presenter: Chico Creek Nature Center oWl pelleTs neW Sat 10:00 am – 12:30 pm • Sun 10:00 am – 12:30 pm

Location: Chico Masonic Family Center What do owls get up to at night? Learn a lot about what they eat by dissecting a little owl pellet. Don’t know what a pellet is, come on down and find out. Presenter: Chico Creek Nature Center skins & skulls Sat 10:00 am – 4:00 pm Sun 10:00 am – 3:00 pm

We’ll open a treasure box on loan to us from Lassen Volcanic National Park and explore a brand new educational set of over 20 demonstration skulls and pelts. Gently feel the sharp teeth of a large predator, the tip of an eagle’s beak, a beaver’s buck tooth, or a deer’s grinding molars. Skulls are beautiful in form and function. Each skull is full of clues as to what the animal eats and how it makes its living. Our high quality animal pelts include the thick fur of river otter and beaver, the silky fur of bobcat and rabbit as well as that of a rare red fox and more.

Saturday-Sunday 9aM-2PM

Live Music

Saturday 11aM-2PM

Sat. 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

This program begins by meeting a live insect eating bat, native to Chico. Then learn about bats, especially those who help agriculture through a family friendly PowerPoint including pictures and short videos. Finally three species of native bats are displayed, one at a time, using a movie camera so the bats are projected larger than life. Presenter: Corky Quirk founder of NorCal Bats usinG your sMarTphone for Wildlife phoTos neW Sat. 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Location: Chico Masonic Family Center We will spend an hour learning how to use your smartphone and your own optics to capture remarkable telephoto quality photos and even videos which you can share with friends. Presenter: Bruce Webb, Swarovski Optik Field Tech sunday only all abouT baTs! Sun. 11:00 am - 12:30 pm

Location: Chico Masonic Family Center They are one of the most beneficial, yet most misunderstood animals in the world. Learn more about the habits, habitats, and species of bats that reside within the unique ecosystems of California’s valleys and forests. Presenter: Linda Angerer birds in sacraMenTo Valley’s WinTer WeTlands sun. 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm Location: Chico Masonic Family Center Birds in Sacramento Valley’s Winter Wetlands was filmed in the Gray Lodge Wildlife Refuge, the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge, the Llano Seco Wildlife Refuge, and the wetlands and rice fields in and around the counties of Butte and Colusa in California. The new film gives viewers a close-up look at many of the migratory birds that come from as far away as Siberia and the Arctic Circle to make their homes in the Sacramento Valley’s wetlands each winter. Presenter: Henry Ganzler rapTor force asseMbly sun. 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm Location: Chico Masonic Family Center West Coast Falconry is coming to the Snow Goose Festival! Falconers have played a pivotal role in raptor conservation, captive breeding techniques, and educating the public on seeing the world through the eyes of nature’s elite predators. Get an up-close look at hawks, falcons, owls, and a precocious vulture. Bring your cameras and questions -- we will be flying several birds during the presentation.

MENU HIGHLIGHTS Cinnamon pancakes with cream cheese frosting Steak and eggs Assortment of different benedicts served on our very own pepper jack cheese potato cakes War Pig - pulled pork, bacon, black forest ham Mimosa flights with fresh squeezed juices 1/3 lb Burger made from our own blend of ground beef / brisket / short ribs Many more exciting dishes!

Perfect for Large Parties!

opTics deMo

saTurday only liVe rapTor experience

Sun 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Sat. 10:00 am – 12:00 pm & 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Location: Chico Masonic Family Center Come see the Center for Reconnecting with Nature’s display of raptors and falcons. Live birds of prey will be present and the Center will be sharing about their mission, which focuses on reconnecting both youth and adults with nature. The exhibit of live raptors will be open from 10am to noon and 1pm to 3pm.

Location: Chico Masonic Family Center Learn the basics about Binoculars and Spotting Scopes for bird watching! What do the numbers mean? Isn’t higher power always better? This will be a “show and tell” discussion about the differences in size, quality, and construction of optics so that you can make a good choice for your needs and budget. Sample optics will be available from numerous manufacturers to illustrate. Presenter: Marilyn Rose from Out of this World Optics

See complete list on our website:

www.snowgoosefestival.org • (530) 592-9092 CN&R

WITH US!

baTs eaT The buGs ThaT buG us neW

federal Junior duck sTaMp display

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BRUNCH

JANUARY 23, 2020

229 BROADWAY BROADWAY CHICO CHICO 530.487.7207 530.487.7207 LASALLESCHICO.COM Open Wednesday-Friday 4PM, Saturday-Sunday 9aM Sat & Sun Brunch 9AM -2PM Daily Happy Hour 4PM-6PM Live Music Thur 6PM-9PM, Fri 4PM-6PM, Sat 11AM-2PM Check out our patio with fire pits & games to enjoy!


NEWSLINES

C O N T I N U E D F R O M PA G E 9

Boundaries and bathrooms Council chooses district map, moves to add four restrooms When it came to finalizing Chico’s

election districts at Tuesday’s (Jan. 21) City Council meeting, the pleas of the public from across the political spectrum seemed to fall on deaf ears. That night, citizens clamored for one of three maps drawn by local planner Bryce Goldstein (also a Chico planning commissioner). Two dozen people spoke, with the majority advocating for her proposals to be considered. Among their reasons: The maps preserved important Chico neighborhoods and their boundaries were based on natural environs and not to preserve incumbency. Several speakers advocated for her maps because of the representation they would offer historically disenfranchised neighborhoods. “We need to prioritize that they have a voice,” Chaz Kelley said. Others said they felt the maps were bipartisan, as evidenced by the broad public support: “For me to agree with a socialist is kind of crazy, but I am tonight,” said Jynaia Badie. Instead, the panel opted for a map (plan Lavender) by demographer Michael Wagaman. This was mentioned by a few speakers as their preferred option. It’s a slightly

modified version of an original map (plan Purple; see map details at tinyurl.com/ChicoDistricts). For the modifications, which were specifically requested by the council, Wagaman slightly shifted the boundary lines of one district, which resulted in Councilmembers Ann Schwab and Karl Ory ending up in the same one (both of their terms end in 2020, but Ory has decided not to run). The map wasn’t the controversial decision for the council, however—Councilman Scott Huber was the only nay. When it came to choosing which districts would be up for grabs in the 2020 general election, that’s when things got sticky. Ory suggested that districts in south and west Chico be in the running. These include ones that represent the south campus neighborhood, downtown Chico, and the Barber and Chapman/ Mulberry neighborhoods. They’re the proposed districts where Mayor Randall Stone, Vice Mayor Alex Brown, and Ory and Schwab reside. (The south Chico district encompassing the Barber and Chapman/ Mulberry neighborhoods has no incumbent).

Councilman Sean Morgan immediately made a substitute motion, advocating for odd-numbered districts to go on the ballot. This would implement one change: swapping his district for Brown’s. After the progressives shot that down, Morgan pressed for the reasoning. Ory said his intent was to include districts that have the highest non-white populations in order to increase representation. Morgan argued that it was clearly to shut him out of the running for 2020 (at this time, he has not submitted his intent to run). The vote on Ory’s motion passed narrowly, with Morgan and Councilwomen Kasey Reynolds and Schwab against. The audience’s response: a resounding “boo.” Since Brown’s term runs through 2022, she will serve until then, regardless. But she can choose to run this year, in order to secure an additional two years, since her district is on a 2020-24 cycle (if she loses, however, her successor would serve the two years from 2022-24). Also at Tuesday’s meeting, an often-

argued topic re-emerged: Is it enabling to provide services to

Resistance 2020 Nearly 1,000 people attended the fourth annual Women’s March on Chico on Saturday (Jan. 18), once again held on the same day as hundreds of sister rallies around the nation that began upon President Trump taking office in 2017. PHOTO BY CHARLES FINLAY

the homeless? This item related to providing public restrooms in city parks. The Bidwell Park and Playground Commission (BPPC), spurred by a proposal submitted last August by Commissioner Scott Grist, began examining adding restrooms to solve sanitation and environmental health concerns caused by human waste left in riparian areas. The council approved of most of the BPPC’s recommendations, adding 24-hour portable restrooms to the Humboldt (or Windchime) Park, Comanche Creek Greenway, Parking Lot 1 (where the Saturday morning farmers’ market is held) and the bridge over Lindo Channel at The Esplanade. For the latter, staff will look into placing the portable north of the channel, given the proximity to Chico Nut Co. The panel approved $83,500 for the project—staff will recommend where those funds will come from at a future meeting. While the majority of public speakers supported adding restrooms, some voiced concerns over proximity to their homes, arguing that they could encourage people to camp or congregate and pose a safety risk. Reynolds said she worried the city was taking a piecemeal approach—perhaps the council could consider a trial period, or put the $80,000 toward sheltering. Several council members and public speakers noted the importance of access for moral reasons as well as health and sanitation. Patrick Newman, of Chico Friends on the Street, called 24-hour access to restrooms a “fundamental human right.” Brown, who chairs the Greater Chico Homeless Task Force, said expanding 24-hour restroom access throughout the city is one of the group’s policy recommendations to the council. Indeed, 51 percent of those surveyed in the 2019 homeless census said they did not have access to a restroom on a daily basis (44 percent day and night, 7 percent only at night). Schwab added: “As our population grows, there is a need for more restrooms, and if people don’t have those facilities or can’t get back to their own home, then that is necessary for us to go forward.” —ASHIAH SCHARAGA ash ia h s@ newsr ev iew.c o m

Open Enrollment unTil January 31

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(530) 891-3090 www.inspirechico.org JANUARY 23, 2020

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HEALTHLINES Shelby Boston, director of the Butte County Department  of Employment and Social Services, and Scott Kennelly,  interim director of Butte County Behavioral Health, say  the goal of the new Community Services Center is to help  improve Camp Fire survivors’ access to care.

Before the fire, both departments were pro-

Shared vision County opens Community Services Center to improve Ridge access to care story and photo by

Ashiah Scharaga ashiahs@ n ewsrev iew. com

SHealth, clinician with Butte County Behavioral has had to meet her clients in a vari-

ince the Camp Fire, Jessica Gilligan, a youth

ety of unconventional places: RVs, churches, park benches, schools. This has presented new challenges to providing care. For example, it’s been difficult to create a comfortable space for kids to talk, Gilligan told the CN&R. “They’re not going to fully open up and trust the process if half their mind is wondering, Who’s listening through the wall?” or what someone nearby could overhear, she said. Gilligan used to see her clients at the Paradise Community Counseling Center. She’d been there for three years before the

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Camp Fire. But like so much of the Ridge’s health providers, her team scattered after the disaster—she moved to the county’s community counseling center in Chico; others ended up at facilities in Gridley or Oroville. Early this month, however, Gilligan officially joined the staff of a new office in Paradise shared by Behavioral Health and the Department of Employment and Social Services (DESS): the Butte County Community Services Center. On the center’s first day (Jan. 6), the excitement was palpable for Gilligan and her colleagues, who were working together again for the first time since Nov. 8, 2018, the day the fire torched the Ridge. It’s the county’s hope that this facility, located on the Skyway, will make life easier for survivors by creating a local one-stop shop for important services. People already are showing interest— the center has either seen or re-opened the

cases of 54 clients (35 youth and 19 adults). And county officials believe that demand will grow. There are approximately 3,700 active clients who still show a Ridge address on file.

Transportation is still a significant barrier for clients when it comes to accessing care ... Many families have had to make tough calls, like paying for diapers or the gas to drive to an appointment outside of town.

viding services on the Ridge across multiple locations, said Scott Kennelly, interim director of Behavioral Health. Now, they are housed in the same building, with DESS on one side and Behavioral Health on the other. The county is leasing the building from Youth for Change, he added, which used to use it for office space. Behavioral Health is providing adult and youth counseling services, Kennelly said, and will add psychiatric telemedicine next month. Kennelly added that he’s interested in reopening The Hub Wellness and Recovery Center there, but that will depend on staffing. The Hub, which was destroyed in the fire, offered critical wellness services, he said, such as peer-led recovery-oriented support groups (e.g., tobacco cessation, substance abuse) as well as yoga, Tai Chi and art classes. On the DESS side of things, eligibility workers help clients sign up for Medi-Cal and programs such as CalFresh, said Shelby Boston, the department’s director. On opening day, she led the CN&R on a tour while DESS employees worked at their computers. Boston was enthusiastic about putting the finishing touches on the building’s resource area, where clients are free to use computers to refine résumés and search for work. It’s not just county departments that have a presence at the Community Services Center; there’s also office space for local organizations. Northern Valley Catholic Social Services is offering disaster case management, and Catalyst Domestic Violence Services, which lost its Paradise location in the fire, is seeing clients there and providing restraining order services. Crisis outreach volunteers with California HOPE, which had been headquartered in Oroville, also are there now, making it easier for them to reach rural Ridge areas. Transportation is still a significant barrier for

clients when it comes to accessing care, several county employees told the CN&R. Many families have had to make tough calls, like paying for diapers or the gas to drive to an appointment outside of town, said Gilligan, the Behavioral Health youth clinician. Youth counselor Cheryl Oberg, Gilligan’s co-worker, added that the Ridge


Get in touch:

work and conversations with survivors that there was definitely a large enough population in need of help to warrant re-establishing a location on the Ridge, Kennelly said. “As soon as we realized we had enough people that were interested and available … we started looking for locations,” he added, and pursuing grant funding. The county received a onetime $100,000 grant from the North Valley Community Foundation to help open the center. But it’s Kennelly and Boston’s hope that it will grow and become an integral part of the recovery on the Ridge. “There are people here and they already have so many barriers and challenges to their progress,” Boston said. “This is a place they can come and get whatever service they need.” Ω

This guy saves you money.

location is a source of not just financial relief but also emotional relief—while the county provided some services on the Ridge, a lot of people had to make trips to Chico or Oroville since the fire, and it was a real hardship. “It’s really important for us to have a presence here,” she said. “A lot of times people [have said], ‘I just can’t get there.’” The Paradise center likely will improve staff efficiency as well, employees told the CN&R. Since the fire, the county has had workers reaching out to survivors across the Ridge, Kennelly said. Like Gilligan, they traveled to various locations to provide care. In the meantime, the county did a lot of assessing before deciding whether to open a physical location again. For example, it had to determine how many children would return to Ridge schools, and how many people would choose to stay in the region. It became clear through its

Walk-ins are allowed for the Department of Employment and Social Services (DESS) at 7200 Skyway. Call 800-499-9189 for DESS; 877-5845 to reach Behavioral Health.

WEEKLY DOSE Kid’s best friend

Attend An upcoming orientAtion: February 5th or February 12th 2020 Cnrsweetdeals.newsreview.Com

Growing up with a canine could lower the risk of developing schizophrenia as an adult. That’s according to a recent study of more than 1,300 individuals conducted by Johns Hopkins University and the Sheppard Pratt Health System. The findings, published last month by PLOS ONE, showed that those who have a dog before turning 13 are significantly less likely to be diagnosed with schizophrenia later—as much as 25 percent. Dr. Robert Yolken, the study’s lead author, said in a Johns Hopkins Medicine news release that this possible protective effect could be attributed to “something in the canine microbiome that gets passed to humans and bolsters the immune system against or subdues a genetic predisposition to schizophrenia.” Researchers reported mixed news for cat lovers: they found a slightly increased risk of developing both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder for those first exposed to a cat between the ages of 9 and 12.

Foster Grandparents are volunteers who provide support in schools, afterschool programs, preschools, and child care centers in Butte and Colusa County. They are role models, mentors, and friends to children, focusing on literacy, mentoring, and school readiness. If you are 55 or over and want to stay active by serving children and youth in your community, you have what it takes to be a Foster Grandparent. Foster Grandparents serve 5 to 40 hours per week. Volunteers may qualify to earn a tax-free, hourly stipend. You’ll receive pre-service screening, orientation, placement at your volunteer station and monthly training.

Advance reservations are required

cAll to reserve A spot todAy! orientations are from 10am-3pm and lunch is provided

35 Main Street Suite 205 Chico, CA 95928-5388 (530) 898-4307 www.passagescenter.org January 23, 2020

CN&R

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GREENWAYS

Bioneers pioneers Women’s group brings green ‘buzz’ back to Chico

story and photo by

Evan Tuchinsky

Sbroadcast Mexico to Chico when she happened on a that made a big impression. usan Wooldridge was driving from New

The public radio show, “Sounds True,” spoke about an environmental conference that—like she was doing—had relocated from Santa Fe to Northern California. Wooldridge, a poet and author, stopped her vehicle to take notes. “I decided to go,” she recalled last week. “And I dragged my poor son. He was 21—he didn’t want to go.” The organization that captured her attention back then, in 1999—and holds it to this day—is the Bioneers. Marking its 30th anniversary this year, the nonprofit group describes itself on its website (bioneers.org) as a “hub of social and scientific innovators with practical and visionary solutions for the world’s most pressing environmental and social challenges.” Its annual conferences, held since 1993 in the Bay Area (San Rafael specifically since 1999), draw acclaimed experts such as environmentalist Bill McKibben, activist-author Naomi Klein and civil rights attorney Valarie Kaur. “After listening to a few talks, my son, who’s very shy—in this giant auditorium of men and women, no young people—stood up and yelled, ‘Bill McKibben for president!’” Wooldridge said. “He got very excited.” As did Wooldridge. After settling into her new home, she got involved with the Chico Women’s Club. There she made two

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January 23, 2020

friends who share her passion for the environment and proactive solutions: Judy Fox and Rosemary Quinn. Fox and Quinn began attending Bioneers conferences—and became convinced the Bioneers experience should come to Chico. So, five years later, they inaugurated events at the Women’s Club at which they’d replay videos of conference speakers. That tradition resumes tonight (Jan. 23), after a 10-year hiatus, with a new element: live presentations. The organizers have invited local speakers to augment the conference talks. Those include Chico Vice Mayor Alex Brown and City Councilman Karl Ory— co-authors of the Chico Green New Deal— and Mechoopda ecological educator and artist Ali Meders-Knight. The Bioneers series will run three consecutive weeks (see infobox). “The buzz [conference-goers felt] in the audience was important to me,” Fox said. “I want Chico to get together to create its own buzz, a local buzz, and in creating the program for this month it was important that we have local speakers on local issues as well as Event info:

The Bioneers speaker series, featuring video from the national conference and live local presentations, will take place over the next three Thursdays—tonight (Jan. 23), Jan. 30 and Feb. 6—at 7 p.m. at the Chico Women’s Club. admission is free, though a suggested $10 donation will benefit the Chico Housing action Team.

the global and national issues presented at the conference.” The Chico Women’s Club group stopped hold-

ing Bioneers screenings after the organization began streaming conference speakers online. “I thought, ‘Why do we need to do this if people can listen to this in their living rooms?’” Fox explained. “But I’ve since found out from people who used to go how much they miss seeing it and hearing it together as a community.” Moreover, Wooldridge added, “Chico is central right now; I feel the whole world is focusing on Paradise and the Camp Fire.” Bioneers focuses on proactivity, answers and positive outlooks, Wooldridge explained. A presenter examining, for instance, gridlocked traffic may discuss how to repurpose highways once new modes of transportation replace cars. “The reason it’s struck me as so important is it’s unbelievably dedicated to solutions, not problems,” she said. “And [in localized efforts] we keep reinventing the wheel; the Bioneers is worldwide … there’s such a larger vision to connect to.” The local Bioneers series comprises three topics, with talks culled from three years’ conferences. “News From the Front Lines” tonight features Klein, McKibben and Kaur. “Solutions” (Jan. 30) features Bioneers co-founder Kenny Ausubel, environmentalist Paul Hawken and the activists known as Climbing PoeTree (Alixa

From left: Judy Fox, Rosemary Quinn and Susan Wooldridge share a passion for the environment and appreciation for the solution-oriented organization Bioneers.

Garcia and Naima Penniman), plus Brown and Ory. “Youth and Indigenous Voices” (Feb. 6) features 350.org’s May Boeve and forest biology professor Robin Kimmerer, along with Meders-Knight and student Meleiza Figueroa. “As hard as any of us work in any particular trench, you get [from these talks] the big picture that everybody is working as hard in other fields as you are in yours, that there are these other worlds you know so little about,” Quinn said. “Somebody brings you up close and personal.” What would the organizers like participants to glean from the Bioneers events? “I would like each and every person, in his or her way, to value the rights of nature over corporations,” Fox said. “For me,” Wooldridge said, “I would like people to take away that there’s a really large network coming together to solve things—a loving network—and there is hope.” Quinn pointed to the Bioneers’ slogan, “Revolution from the heart of nature,” and typography emphasizing the word “love” within it. “It must be done with our hearts,” she said. “Anger can be fuel; the urgency [of the climate crisis] can be fuel. But we must be together doing everything, from the heart—and there’s room for everybody in this revolution.” □


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS PHOTO BY JOSH COZINE

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

Back to biz in O-Town Rori Summers couldn’t stay retired. Summers formerly owned Our Family Automotive, and more recently, Almost Perfect thrift store in Oroville, before a medical procedure forced her out of the business game—at least, temporarily. After recovering from surgery, Summers found she missed running her own business. By November, after noticing several shuttered downtown Oroville storefronts with “for lease” signs on the windows, she started making some calls. Via social media, Summers tested the waters for an idea for a homemade and custom gift shop and got enough positive response to go for it. She also soon found the perfect location at 1934 Bird St., a 1,700-squarefoot space with two large rooms for gift displays, plus a back office. In early December, Summers opened Bird Street Vendors. There, she rents table and booth spaces to local artists and craftspeople who offer “homemade gifts and more”— from apparel and paintings, to dishware and custom embroideries. Call 990-1843, find the shop on Facebook, or pop by Monday-Saturday to check out the rotating vendors.

What sets your store apart? We have artists, we have sewing, we have decals, shirts, tie-dye …. So, it’s kind of like a one-stop shop of unique pres-

supp rt

real

news

Beautifying city centers

ents. Everyone has the stuff at Walmart, everyone has the stuff you can get at these big-box stores, but you don’t have the personalized stuff, and that’s why I think we’ll do a lot better. People like that special touch.

something was missing. I adopted three boys, and I was still missing something. I like the business end of stuff; I missed that kind of stuff and I missed dealing with people.

How did you find vendors?

It’s been good. We had our first First Friday event [Jan. 3], and we did really, really well on that day. Everybody here I think is happy and they’re all selling enough to make rent.

Facebook. A totally new thing for me. My old store didn’t have Facebook. I first asked if anyone would be interested in selling out of one location, and I posted in a vendor and craft fair group, and I had a great response, so I got a hold of the people who were interested. They’re all local, because one of the requirements in order to have a booth here is you have to come work here one day a week.

What caused you to close Almost Perfect? I have a gene called CHEK2; it’s like the BRCA gene for breast cancer, so I had a prophylactic breast mastectomy … in February.

Why open a new place? Ever since I closed my store

How’s business?

How much do you charge for shop space? From $25 for a 2-foot table, to the largest spot [for] $125—I think it’s about 9 feet. It all depends on the size.

Is that per month? Per month. I’m not in it to be super rich. I’m in it to try and help people in business— because I know how tough it is to start a business—and to be able to do what I love to do, which is business and [interacting with] people. —JOSH COZINE

by

Meredith J. Cooper meredithc@newsreview.com

Well-maintained public art adds a vibrancy to a town that not much else can. Of all the cities in the world I’ve been to, one of the brightest that comes to mind is Barcelona, with its prominent, colorful, wonderfully weird art all over the place. I bring this up because there’s an awesome new mural in downtown Oroville, near the farming equipment in the parking lot downtown at 2167 Montgomery St. The large depiction of an old gold mine is painted in the trompe l’oeil, 3-D style, and it turned an otherwise anytown wall into a cool link to history. (It’s also near the old gold mining equipment store, which adds to the effect.) The artists behind the gold mine mural are Ted Hanson and Frank Wilson. The former is owner of Brushstrokes Studio and Gallery just a few blocks down Montgomery; the latter owns his own Frank Wilson Fine Art out of Paradise. The project was one of four to receive funding (it cost about $8,500) last year through the city’s Arts Commission. It’s a fine addition to downtown, indeed.

SPEAKING OF STREET ART If you haven’t been to Durham lately, the building when

you first get to the four-way stop on Midway (home to the Durham Country Market) has completely transformed. Chico artist Christine Mac Shane started in April with a farm scene on the exterior. It’s since grown and wrapped around the building, lending a joyful pop of color to what used to be a drab corner.

DO-GOODERY I always like stories of businesses and businesspeople giving back

to their communities. Most recently, I got word about a gift from the Rotary Club of Oroville to that city’s branch of the Butte County Library. Apparently, a group of Rotarians toured the facility last summer and noticed that the large clock on the wall was not functioning (and didn’t even have hands), so they decided to fix it. The gift is not only a community service, reads a press release, it’s also a symbol of Rotary’s dedication to literacy. Cool deal!

NEW LIFE! The corner of Second and Main streets in Chico will soon be a little less empty, with the impending opening of Oya Mediterranean Grill where Pluto’s used to be. I could find out little about the place at first, but after additional digging linked it to Emin Tekin, a real estate agent who, along with his family, has owned several Mediterranean restaurants throughout the Bay Area over the years. I’m guessing that means Cafe Petra, which closed its next door space after a kitchen fire last year, won’t be reopening. BACK TO LIFE Fans of Chico’s Tacos Tijuana, which closed its doors at 15th and Park in December 2018, will be happy to hear that the restaurant recently reopened in Oroville. From what I hear, it is still the place to go for pozole, that perfectly comforting winter stew (available on weekends only). Check out the new spot at 1835 Oro Dam Blvd.

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Call 343-3666 JANUARY 23, 2020

CN&R

15


In the wake of fire devastation and blackout chaos, small communities try to reclaim their grids from PG&E by

Scott Thomas Anderson sc o t ta @ newsr ev iew.c o m

TAKING BACK THE

POWER ILLUSTRATION BY MARIA RATINOVA

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T

he last light of the year is rising as trucks exit the gates of Nevada Irrigation District in Grass Valley, turning toward a sharp, lavender lining ablaze under the morning’s flatiron clouds. The vehicles roll through a dim neighborhood of sleepy houses until they reach West Main Street and crest a hill overlooking its patchwork of Victorian and art deco buildings. Within seconds, they’re descending through a ramshackle corridor of Gold Rush survivors that mark the city once called the “Quartz Queen of the West.” Just like every morning, these Nevada Irrigation District technicians make their way by rows of standing history—the shadowed balcony of the Holbrooke Hotel, where Mark Twain stayed when he captivated Grass Valley with one of his early comedy showcases; the crimson, light-studded bricks of the Alpha Building, where a European countess with a pet grizzly bear once titillated miners while performing her famous “spider dance”; and a bend of buildings once called “the Waterfront” for the number of whiskeysoaked saloons. Today’s Grass Valley is a working-class mosaic of ranchers, farmers, merchants and artists of every background. Unlike the many frontier towns that later returned to dust, Grass Valley’s longevity was ensured when its scattershot of gold-sluicing camps was swept away by powerful mining monopolies. Big investors brought lasting infrastructure, rooted families and generations of job security. But lately, residents fear a different monopoly is dooming their way of life—and they’re thinking about doing something about it. Last fall, the city, along with surrounding communities in Nevada County, experienced four widespread, extended blackouts over the course of five weeks. Each event was triggered by PG&E’s new Public Safety Power Shutoff program, which the utility created in the midst of being sued for causing catastrophic loss of life and property in wildfires in 2017 and 2018. PG&E’s records indicate that few regions were hit harder by its safety outages than Nevada County. One area that that did fare worse included Butte County, where people are still recovering from the Camp Fire; PG&E severed power in various regions there seven times between June 8 and Nov. 21. In Nevada County, PG&E was planning a fifth shut-off just days before Thanksgiving, calling it off only hours before when an unexpected rainstorm arrived. For Grass Valley, the blackouts shuttered small businesses for days, leaving owners without revenue and employees with diminished paychecks. Thousands of residents also lost water, while


Shad Chittock, a water treatment supervisor for Nevada Irrigation District, works for the agency trying to take back a local power grid from PG&E. PHOTO BY SCOTT THOMAS ANDERSON

even more saw their internet and cellphone coverage evaporate. This communication collapse only made things worse as people scrambled to take care of isolated seniors and the sick and disabled who rely on power for their medical equipment. Some schools in the county reportedly lost nine days of class time. When PG&E CEO Bill Johnson told the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) on Oct. 18 that places like Grass Valley can expect ongoing power shut-offs for at least the next 10 years, residents and business owners alike began wondering if their community— indeed if any rural community under PG&E’s dominion—can sustain itself. So, many in Grass Valley are turning their hopes to the men and women of Nevada Irrigation District—and those big white utility trucks that roll through the city each morning. The district has a plan that could allow Nevada County to wrestle control of its power grid from PG&E. At the same time, leaders in Butte and Yolo counties are joining a larger movement to use political muscle to force a public takeover of PG&E altogether.

David and Goliath Jeff Rutherford drops a small propane tank onto a tree stump and fixes a nozzle to it as the day’s long winter shadow falls. Two men wearing flannels stand between Rutherford and their pickup trucks, holding more chipped and faded propane tanks to be filled.

It’s Rutherford’s turn to man the Rainbow Market, the small grocery store he owns on the outskirts of Nevada City. The place is a lifeline for those who live in this backcountry of quiet ridges and alpine meadows. There’s nothing out this way but his market and the Willow, a Western-style saloon that cooks steaks on an indoor fire pit between its time-worn bar and rustic dining room. Together, the Rainbow and the Willow mark a last stop on this north stretch of Highway 49 before the upper foothills give way to the isolation of the High Sierra. Both businesses went dark during the blackouts. “All our perishables went bad, and I had to throw them out, and then buy them again, and then throw them out again,” Rutherford recalled. “I didn’t really think [PG&E] would do it. I thought there were just too many people who’d be affected, too much life disruption.” Even when Rutherford finally got his market operating in a bare-bones manner by generator, he couldn’t use its popular propanefilling station, which is hard-wired to the power grid. That was not just a sales loss for him, it was also a major frustration for his customers, many of whom were trying to keep their own propane-fueled generators running. “There was a huge demand for propane, not just for generators that were down, but for those whose heaters were down and were trying to use makeshift propane heat,” Rutherford said. “It just seems like everybody I talked to got hurt. I can’t think of anybody I know that didn’t suffer financial loss.”

Jeff Rutherford fills propane tanks for customers at Rainbow Market on the outskirts of Nevada City. PHOTO BY SCOTT THOMAS ANDERSON

The numbers back Rutherford up. During the most widespread blackout in early October, virtually all of Nevada County went dark for four days. The Grass Valley Downtown Association and Nevada City Chamber of Commerce conducted a joint economic impact survey with local businesses. While only a fraction of them responded—69 between the two cities—the results were jarring. Those businesses estimated they collectively lost $1.3 million just between Oct. 9 and 12. “There were concerns with a lot of the

business owners about revenue that wasn’t made, and that they might not be able to pay their employees what they were planning for—employees who were then going to have trouble paying their own rent and bills,” said Marni Marshall, executive director of the Grass Valley Downtown Association. “It’s this huge trickle effect …. A lot of business here operate month by month, just like a lot of people who work here are living paycheck to paycheck. We knew this could be a tipping point for some people.” Even PG&E’s planned November blackout that was canceled for Nevada County had an impact, curbing tourism in the area, a cornerstone of the local economy. Marshall says that when business owners eventually gathered together to lick their wounds, news that Nevada Irrigation District might be able to help caught everyone’s attention. The publicly owned district was formed in Grass Valley in 1921, when the city’s Empire Mine was still in its gold-producing prime. The special district provides municipal, residential and agricultural water across 287,000 acres in Nevada and Placer counties and also produces clean, hydroelectric energy from the power plants it owns on local waterways, enough energy to power some 60,000 homes. On Nov. 6, about a week after the last blackout that crippled its customers, the district’s board of directors told staff to explore whether it could manage a takeover—or “take-back,” as some locals say— of the region’s entire power grid. District managers were directed to negotiate with PG&E for the purchase of its assets and operations in the north Gold Country before the corporate giant met its bankruptcy court deadline on Nov. 20. On Dec. 11, Assistant General Manager Greg Jones showed the board a plan that involves providing energy to some 87,000 customers in Nevada and Placer counties. The proposal—which has an initial $300 million price tag and calls for $550 million in revenue bonds—would also result in local ratepayers receiving smaller bills than they currently have under PG&E, while flowing as much as $150 million annually into the local economy. POWER C O N T I N U E D

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More important, Jones said the district would have the technology for smaller, more targeted shut-offs during red flag warnings for wildfires. In theory, the days of virtually every business and house in Nevada County going dark due to wind would be over. But by the time Jones made his presentation, PG&E had announced it had a plan to re-emerge from bankruptcy. Rather than requesting that the Nevada County Local Agency Formation Commission study its plan, the board voted to delay any action until it had more knowledge of how PG&E’s bankruptcy story would end. The board also wanted more data on how the district would handle its own liability risk from fires. Two days later, on Dec. 13, Gov. Gavin Newsom announced he was rejecting PG&E’s bankruptcy plan, calling it a lackluster attempt to reform the failing and controversial utility. Despite the news, Jones says the district remains interested in moving forward. “Our notice of intent to purchase PG&E’s assets is still on the table,” he said. “It’s still valid and we’re not rescinding it.” Emphasizing the district’s relationship with the community, Jones added, “We’re a public entity that’s right here. If a customer has any issue with their service, they’re able to walk right into our board meeting in Grass Valley and raise their hand up.” Elected officials in Placer County’s suburban cities of Rocklin and Lincoln also have begun exploring whether they can cut the cord from PG&E for good in favor of a local alternative. Residents and business owners in those areas are waiting to see if they’ll have that ability when the most intense wildfire threat returns in summer and fall. Marshall points out the collective dread around the outages

in Nevada County is still fresh in everyone’s minds. “This was an eye-opener for everyone, really, in terms of realizing how fragile we are,” she said. “When you don’t have electricity, running water or communication, things can start getting squirrelly really fast. There’s a lot of things that can go wrong here.”

Darkness in the scar Ria Abernathy walks from the door of her RV onto the grounds of the Magalia Community Church’s relief center, passing

by the looming, charred gray-and-red spur of Sawmill Peak. She crosses by a wide emergency tent recently brought down by snowfall, then stops at the modest memorial that looks out on sweeping views of bald hilltops to the south. This understated monument was built entirely with bricks from houses that burned in the Camp Fire. Abernathy is looking down at a brick from her own house that went to ashes. It bears the address she once lived at in Paradise, 6265 Fern, and it also has her name and the name of her teenage grandson who lives with her in the 24-foot RV. Abernathy is among families and individuals

living in more than a dozen RVs on the grounds of the church. For the last day they’ve all been listening to news about the wildfires in Australia, contemplating the images of people running for their lives, of animals burning in droves, of endless skies the color of a biblical nightmare. For the displaced refugees of this little makeshift community, the news is triggering tearful memories of watching their own world burn 14 months ago. Yet as difficult as this winter has been for Magalia, the storms and frigid temperatures have at least brought an end to the town’s relief center having its power cut by PG&E. Residents of the Ridge say the outages don’t just cause what people think of as a normal nighttime darkness. Rather, they say, the Camp Fire survivors are still living in RVs on the grounds of Magalia Community Church. PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

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Camp Fire survivor Ria Abernathy now volunteers at the relief center at Magalia Community Church. PHOTO BY SCOTT THOMAS ANDERSON

blackest kind of sheer blindness descends over the fire-scarred region. Abernathy had just moved into the RV at the relief center in early October when the safety shut-offs started. She watched the center’s workers and volunteers scramble to try to save thousands of dollars of frozen meat. “I was frustrated, stressed out and just in disbelief,” Abernathy said. “If you went through what we went through, you’re thinking, ‘Why are you doing this now, instead of when it could have made a difference?’ It’s just another slap in the face.” Doreen Fogle, a volunteer at the relief center, said PG&E shut-offs forced the operation to close for five days that it would have been open in September and October. “That means all of the people who come here for food, which is 200 to 300 on any given day we’re open, weren’t able to get the necessities they needed to sustain themselves,” Fogle said. Adding insult to injury, the church’s fiveunit HVAC system went out this month. Church officials were told by an electrician that the damage is the result of a “power surge,” perhaps due to the shut-offs, they say. They’ve since set up a “Warm the Hall!” fundraising campaign on gofundme.com. Like many rural areas in California, Butte County doesn’t have a local agency vying to take control of its power grid. While local leaders recently formed the Butte Choice Energy Authority, an effort to give the region


control of energy purchases, the grid’s infrastructure will remain in the hands of PG&E. That’s one reason Chico Mayor Randall Stone recently signed a letter that was sent to the CPUC on behalf of more than 50 elected officials. Citing PG&E’s repeated safety and service failures, the letter urges a complete public takeover. Stone says a few of Chico’s newer housing developments were repeatedly hit by the blackouts, along with neighborhoods in nearby unincorporated areas, while PG&E vaguely suggested the city’s downtown might go dark. “You’re looking at the volatility that’s injected into the community whenever there’s a proposal to shut off power, just from the anxiety it causes alone,” Stone said. “This is a community that’s already suffering terribly from the kind of chaos that PG&E’s infrastructure causes. The outages just make that pain even more acute.” Stone, a longtime financial planner, says he also signed the letter with his fellow mayors and county supervisors for a practical reason. “I think it’s necessary for PG&E to be publicly owned from a financial perspective alone,” he said. “It’s going to cost $50-$60 billion to bring PG&E’s infrastructure up to safe standards. That is an extraordinary amount of money. I just don’t see how it’s possible to do it unless the utility is customer-owned …. I think the Legislature is eventually going to come to the conclusion that it has to go this way.” Yolo County Supervisor Don Saylor agrees and signed on to the letter. While his constituents are largely supplied by Valley Clean Energy, all of their power runs through PG&E’s transmission lines and infrastructure and is thus subject to the blackouts. Last June, the small city of Winters in Yolo County was the first area to be hit by an intentional PG&E shut-off. Records indicate that Winters has been covered by every single shut-off since. “We’ve been concerned about the captive market for some time,” Saylor said of PG&E. “When we see dividends paid year after year to stockholders, and massive bonuses given to executives, it creates uneasiness because they’re not making the right investments in the infrastructure, and they’re not bringing lines underground. We think the money has been misspent and mismanaged, and there probably needs to be a fundamental restructuring.” For Davis Mayor Brett Lee, signing the letter urging a public takeover was imperative for the future of the state’s economy. Though Davis has largely been spared from the blackouts, Lee says Northern California can’t remain a leading hub of innovation with the world constantly seeing news stories about power being shut off from the Silicon Valley to the suburbs of the state capital. “We’re supposed to be the high-tech capital of the world, and there’s no electricity for a week?” Lee said.

Lee also believes that PG&E’s long history of negligence—it’s already under federal criminal probation for the 2010 San Bruno gas pipeline explosion that killed eight people—means Californians simply don’t have confidence in the company. “Not every public entity is transparent, or works in the best interest of the community they serve, but more often than not, compared to a private entity, they respond to the public more,” Lee said. “In our own backyard we have Sacramento Municipal Utility District, and there’s no weird scandals with them …. PG&E is accountable to their investors, by law. That’s their master.” As PG&E’s bankruptcy case hangs in legal limbo, leaders including Lee, Saylor and Stone are waiting to see if the governor and CPUC will start moving toward ending corporate ownership. Yet at Magalia’s relief center, many survivors find the idea of PG&E facing a true reckoning difficult to imagine. They also have more immediate concerns. Many are still living in cars and tents. There are still few jobs. Most locals have

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Submissions are now being accepted for the seventh annual Keep Chico Weird Art Show, happening March 19-22 at the 1078 Galley. • Art in all mediums is eligible Deadline for (including performance art for the reception on March 19) submissions is • Must be 18-over to submit Feb. 28 2020.

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Best Boss ✓ Chico Mayor Randall Stone was among the more than 50 city leaders around the state who signed a letter to the California Public Utilities  Commission that cites PG&E’s failures and urges a takeover of the utility.  Cn&r file photo

seen their friend or family networks vanish, lost to death or displacement. Abernathy was just assigned a disaster case manager after waiting for more than a year, but says it’s not clear what that person can really provide. “And we keep seeing more of the trees finally dying,” she reflected, pointing out to the seared, half-lunar landscape spanning the Ridge. “A lot of us loved living out here because we were surrounded by the trees. With every day, you see another tree die, and another little piece of yourself dies with it.” Ω

Do you have a GREAT BOSS? If so, the CN&R wants to hear from you. For our annual Business Issue, we’re looking for nominations for local bosses who deserve recognition for going above and beyond to treat their employees right and make their businesses rewarding places to work. Those chosen will be featured in an upcoming issue of the CN&R. Employees: Please tell us three things that make your boss so terrific. Be specific. And also tell us how we can contact him or her. Send nominations with “Best Boss” in the subject line to cnrletters@newsreview.com.

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION: FEB. 5 January 23, 2020

CN&R

19


Arts &Culture David Plant shows off a couple of prints in his studio.

THIS WEEK

David Plant makes his mark with fantastical linocut prints

AhavePlant considers himself lucky to grown up in Daly City, located

lthough he now lives in Chico, David

just a stone’s throw from San Francisco. As a young artist, he was able to immerse himself in the eclectic art hub of the West Coast, frequenting museums such as the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, de Young Museum and Legion of Honor. During one parstory and photo by ticular trip to the de Rachel Bush Young, he spotted a painting of a train rolling along the countryside, made Online: Find “David Plant by famed folk artist Art” on Facebook Grandma Moses. “I loved it,” said Plant during a recent interview. “I really like her stuff because it’s folk art, which is what I like to do, too.” Her personal journey held extra significance for Plant. As a self-taught painter who first started her craft around age 80, Moses came to symbolize tenacity and following one’s dreams, regardless of age or other circumstances. But Plant’s art pursuits started while he was much younger. “I was born in ’57, and I’ve been making art my whole life, so that’s a long time,’’ he explained. In the late-1970s, he received his associate of arts degree from Skyline College in San Bruno, and used the knowledge from his classes, along with his own curiosity, to continue fueling his creativity. Work oozed out of Plant in the form of ceramics, wood carvings, intricate ink and pen drawings, and jewelry (he donned his own hand-crafted silver 20

CN&R

JANUARY 23, 2020

necklace during our interview). While he’s dabbled in nearly every medium, he’s most well-known for his whimsical, folk art style of printmaking, where the likes of armadillos and bushy-tailed foxes live in harmony, surrounded by wooded forest scenes. Working in his garage/makeshift studio, he carves his ideas onto linoleum blocks, before adding ink and then transferring the results to paper. With the help of business mentor Doug Churchill (of the local We Care A Lot Foundation), Plant has sold and exhibited many of his prints around the

Chico and Redding areas. “He’s had his art displayed at the Chico Art Center, the Chico State Diversity show, Old City Hall Arts Center in Redding, and he has a permanent display at Far Northern Regional Center. And he’ll be vending at Chico Walks For Autism this Spring,” Churchill explained. “David is one of our most prolific artists.” “It all comes out of my head, and there’s always a new idea,” explained Plant, who added that he rarely struggles with creative blocks. His home is decorated with countless figurines, drawings and prints (many of which are his own). First-place ribbons from various arts and crafts fairs punctuate many of his works, including a large maroon dollhouse filled with tiny windows, passageways and depictions of domestic life. “It’s neat, huh?” Plant’s infectious enthusiasm has led him to myriad other creative projects over the years, including a recurring stint as Santa Claus at Macy’s in San Bruno (“the best job I ever had,’’ he said). Currently, he’s illustrating a children’s book, and works two days a week for Little Red Hen’s Tools & Trade Program, making goods that are sold in the organization’s stores. With a long history of artistic endeavors behind him, Plant continues to expand his list of creative goals. “I want to exhibit my art at MONCA, that place is cool. After I die, I want my stuff donated to a museum. And I’d like to teach kids with learning disabilities about printmaking. I want to share my talents with other people; I don’t want to keep it to myself.” □

23

THU

Special Events BIONEERS CONFERENCE SERIES: Curated selection of speakers from annual environmental and social-issues conference projected on the big screen, discussion will follow. Thu, 1/23, 7pm. $5. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St.

SNOW GOOSE FESTIVAL: Annual five-day celebration of the millions of waterfowl and thousands of raptors that migrate along the Pacific Flyway and call the Northern Sacramento Valley their home during the winter months. Field trips, workshops, art shows and other activities all over Butte County. Visit site or call for details. Thu, 1/23. 592-9092. snowgoosefestival.org

UNWINED COMEDY: Dillon Collins Comedy presents visiting stand-ups Chelsea D. Bearce (Los Angeles) and Annick Adelle (LA-via-Germany) and local Jacob McClain. Thu, 1/23, 7pm. $15. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

Theater GIRLS’ WEEKEND: A contemporary comedic romp about four women who travel to a cabin to consume copious amounts

of wine, laugh at their lives and trade stories. Thu, 1/23, 7:30pm. $12-$18. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. 530-877-5760. totr.org

MEASURE FOR MEASURE: Joe Hilsee directs Shakespeare’s serious-minded, sexually frank comedy about lust, hypocrisy and corruption. (Some things never change.) Thu, 1/23, 7:30pm. $15-$18. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St.. blueroomtheatre.com

THE MUSIC MAN Opens Friday, Jan. 24 Chico Theater Co.

SEE FRIDAY-SUNDAY, THEATER


FINE ARTS ON NEXT PAGE

26

SUN

Auditorium, Chico State, 898-6333. chicoper formances.com

Special Events

SUNDAY SUPERJAM: Jam with The Loco-Motive

ILLUSIONIST PETER SAMELSON: An afternoon of magic with the “soft-spoken conceptualist of sorcery.” Sun, 1/26, 2pm. $15-$20. Museum of Northern California Art, 900 Esplanade. monca.org

GIRLS’ WEEKEND

IMAGINING COMMUNITY: Meet and greet with local grassroots community group. Sun, 1/26, 10am. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

Opens tonight, Jan. 23 Theatre on the Ridge

MALTEAZERS AUDITIONS: The Maltese is holding

SEE THURSDAY-SUNDAY, THEATER

24

FRI

Special Events SNOW GOOSE FESTIVAL: See Thursday. Visit site or call for details. Fri, 1/24. 592-9092. snow goosefestival.org

SPAGHETTI DINNER & MAGIC SHOW: Magician Peter Samelson provides dinner entertainment. Fri, 1/24, 6pm. $10-$20. Oroville Eagles Hall, 2010 Montgomery St., Oroville.

VOLUNTEER FRIDAYS: Join in picking up litter and pulling weeds. For more info call Shane at 896-7831. Fri, 1/24, 9am. Bidwell Park.

Music MINARDI & FRANCIS: Two of Chico’s best vocalists, Samantha Francis and Max Minardi, team up for a happy hour set. Fri, 1/24, 4pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

SONGS OF RESILIENCE: Maryland activist-folk duo Emma’s Revolution celebrate the centennial of Pete Seeger’s birth. Fri, 1/24, 7:30pm. $20-$23. Chico First Baptist Church, 850 Palmetto Ave. riseupandsing.org

auditions for its “queer-friendly, bodypositive” house burlesque troupe. PM The Malteazers on Facebook for more info. Sun, 1/26, 6:30pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

Theater GIRLS’ WEEKEND: See Thursday. Fri, 1/24, 7:30pm. $12-$18. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. 530-877-5760. totr.org

MEASURE FOR MEASURE: See Thursday. Fri, 1/24, 7:30pm. $15-$18. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

THE MUSIC MAN: A conman has come to River City to stir hearts and stir up trouble in this classic Broadway musical. Fri, 1/24, 7:30pm. $20-$24. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Rd., Ste. F. chicotheatercompany. com

25

SAT

Special Events CRAB FEED: Knights of Columbus host crab and steak dinner. No-host bar. Sat 1/25, 5:30pm. $48-$55. St. Thomas the Apostle School, 1330 Bird St., Oroville.

LUNAR NEW YEAR CELEBRATION: “Processional Items of the Chico Chinese Temple,” by Keith

L. Johnson, to celebrate new year. Sat 1/25, 6pm. Chico History Museum, 141 Salem St.

SEED SWAP 2020: Gather and label your seeds to swap. Or dig up your dividable roots, bulbs or seedlings; take some cuts from your easy-to-root plants or scion wood from your favorite fruit trees. Sat 1/25, 12pm. Free. Trinity United Methodist Church, 285 E. Fifth St. 570-6872.

SNOW GOOSE FESTIVAL: See Thursday. Visit site or call for details. Sat, 1/25. 592-9092. snow goosefestival.org

WHOSE LIVE ANYWAY: The gold-standard of improv is back, with Whose Line is it Anyway? cast members Ryan Stiles, Jeff B. Davis, Joel Murray and Dave Foley on stage. Sat 1/25, 8pm. $40-$90. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville. goldcountrycasino.com

Music

SNOW GOOSE FESTIVAL: See Thursday. Visit site or call for details. Sun, 1/26. 592-9092. snow

Band at this weekly pro jam. Rock, blues, country, funk—anything goes. Sign up early, music starts at 2. Sun, 1/26, 2pm. Free. LaSalles, 229 Broadway St.. 4084492179.

TANNER RICHARDSON: Brunch tunes. Sun, 1/26, 10:30am. Red Tavern, 1250 Esplanade.

Theater GIRLS’ WEEKEND: See Thursday. Sun, 1/26, 7:30pm. $12-$18. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. 530-877-5760. totr.org

THE MUSIC MAN: See Friday. Sun, 1/26, 7:30pm. $20$24. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Rd., Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

27

goosefestival.org

Music PAT HULL: Happy hour tunes with local troubadour. Sun, 1/26, 3pm. The Commons Social Empourium, 2412 Park Ave.

ROCK THE VOTE: A concert fundraiser for Butte County supervisor candidate Sue Hilderbrand. Live music by Big Mo & Friends, plus the Alice Peake Experience. Plus, $5 bowls of chili! Sun, 1/26, 2:30pm. $15-$20. Chico Guild Hall, 2775 Nord Ave.

MON

Special Events CHICO LIVE IMPROV: Local improv troupe hosts classes at the gallery every Monday Mon, 1/27, 7pm. $5. 1078 Gallery, 1710 Park Ave. FARM STAND: Farmers’ market featuring local growers, bakery goods and more. Mon, 1/27, 4pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

SERAPH BRASS IN CONCERT: Chico Performances presents dynamic all-female brass ensemble. Sun, 1/26, 2pm. $15-$34. Laxson

FOR MORE MUSIC, SEE NIGHTLIFE ON PAGE 24

EDITOR’S PICK

AFROMAN: You might try to come up with a reason to miss this show, but getting high isn’t one of them. Local support TBA. Sat, 1/25, 9pm. $20. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

REESE WEILS: Singin’ and guitar slingin’ for brunch. Sat, 1/25, 11am. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. lasalleschico.com

Theater GIRLS’ WEEKEND: See Thursday. Sat, 1/25, 7:30pm. $12-$18. Theatre on the Ridge, 3735 Neal Road, Paradise. 530-877-5760. totr.org

MEASURE FOR MEASURE: See Thursday. Sat, 1/25, 7:30pm. $15-$18. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. blueroomtheatre.com

THE MUSIC MAN: See Friday. Sat, 1/25, 7:30pm. $20-$24. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Rd., Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

WHOSE LIVE ANYWAY? Saturday, Jan. 25 Gold Country Casino

SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www. newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

WETLAND REST STOP Every winter, migratory birds make the epic journey from Alaska’s Bering Strait to the southern tip of South America, and along the way many of them kick it in Nor Cal among a series of ecological reserves. Most prominently, tens of thousands of white snow geese fill the skies in January, and the Snow Goose Festival is the annual week-long celebration of their arrival. Jan. 22-26, there are education programs, birding tours, workshops, films, art, talks and more. Highlights include an art show at Museum of Northern California Art (Jan. 23-Feb. 9) and the Gathering of Wings banquet/silent auction on Saturday, Jan. 25, 5:30 p.m., at Chico State’s BMU Auditorium, with keynote speaker Karen Amstutz, a Yosemite National Park naturalist and environmental educator. Visit snowgoosefestival.org for full schedule. JANUARY 23, 2020

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21


SCENE

FINE ARTS

‘Marvelous toys’ “Tin Pan Dragon” (2006) by Duane Flatmo PHOTO COURTESY OF OAKLAND MUSEUM OF CALIFORNIA

Smithsonian’s traveling Burning Man exhibit FIRE AND WATER: ELEMENTS OF CHANGE Opens Jan. 23 Valene L. Smith Museum of Anthropology SEE MUSEUMS

Art 1078 GALLERY: Alluvial Treasure(s) + Iterations, video installation with two Pasadena artists, Melanie Nakaue and Terry Chatkupt. Through 1/26. 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org

CHICO ART CENTER: Member Showcase, annual group exhibit featuring works of various media by art center members. Through 1/31. 450 Orange St. chicoartcenter.com

HEALING ART GALLERY: Art by Kimberly Rachelle Ranalla, paintings by Northern California artist and brain tumor survivor. Enloe Regional Cancer Center’s Healing Art Gallery features artists whose lives have been touched by cancer. Through 4/17. Free. 265 Cohasset Road, 530-332-3856. enloe.org

MUSEUM OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ART: Snow Goose Festival Art Exhibition, annual group show in conjunction with Snow Goose Fest featuring original works in all media. Reception: Friday, 1/24, 5-8pm. Through 2/9. 900 Esplanade. monca.org

PARADISE ART CENTER: Coming Home, Wheeler Gallery presents first show of the season featuring artwork that speaks to the idea and concept of coming home and what it means to each artist. Through 1/25. 5564 Almond St., Paradise.

THE TURNER: Renaissanced, curated with history professor Jason Nice and students

22

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JANUARY 23, 2020

of Renaissance Civilization course. Exhibit talk 2/13, 5:30pm (in Zingg Recital Hall) with reception to follow. Arts & Humanities Building, Chico State, 8984476. theturner.org

Museums CHICO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: Tons of cool stuff for kids to explore, including a miniature city, complete with a junior vet clinic, dentist, cafe and farmers’ market, a giant fish tank, multi-sensory room, imagination playground and much more. Check the website for hours and admission information Through 3/25. $7-$9. 325 Main St. chicochildrensmuseum.org

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Albatross Life on the Wind and Sea, Hawaii artist and author Caren Loebel-Fried reveals the story of an imagined nesting Laysan Albatross through her intricate and colorful block prints Through 2/9. $5-$7. 625 Esplanade.

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Fire and Water Elements of Change, this exhibit curated by Museum Studies students observes our changing planet from an anthropological perspective, through two major elements: fire and water. Reception 1/23, 4:30-6pm. Continuing: Unbroken Traditions Basketweavers of the Meadows-Baker Families in Northern California. Through 7/31. Chico State.

N2018,Smithsonian American Art Museum in March stopped at the Cincinnati Art Museum, and

o Spectators: The Art of Burning Man opened at the

is now at its only West Coast venue, the Oakland Museum of California, through Feb. 16. I approached the show with a burning question: What does it mean to contextualize art that is inherently anti-institutionby al—and often straight-up anarchic— Kris Vagner inside a museum? Museum art and Burning Man art Review: exist in two separate worlds. One is No Spectators: The Art an arena of art schools, galleries, aucof Burning Man shows tions and sales. The other is a world through Feb. 16. of DIY-ers, everyone from entry-level Oakland Museum crafters to successful visionaries and of California engineers. These two worlds have 1000 Oak St. some crossover, but less than you 510-318-8400 museumca.org. might guess. They’re really playing two different games on two different fields, with two different sets of rules. So, what business would the Smithsonian, a federal-government-run institution, have conferring its approval on art made for a big party in the desert? Nora Atkinson, the Smithsonian curator who organized the show, became a Burner in recent years, and if her social media pics are any indication, she seems taken with the event’s magic. In work pictures, she looks like she descended from the Kennedys, all poise and pearls, and in her Burning Man pics she’s a tousled blond in a sequined halter, ready to rave. She made this point in a TED Talk: “When artists stop worrying about the critics and collectors and start making work for themselves, these are the kinds of marvelous toys they create.” As a Burner myself, I have quaffed a hearty slurp of this cult’s Kool-Aid—though I acknowledge that the event’s detractors make some sound points, like the disconnect between Burning Man’s widely flaunted claim of “radical inclusion” and the actual level of economic exclusivity involved in the whole pricey affair. But for all its contradictions, the event does accom-

plish some things that make me hesitate to throw out the baby with the bathwater. Sometimes art really does get to the true creamy middle of what we’re all about. Sources from Fox News to The New York Times to Web MD have proclaimed that modern humans are in the midst of a loneliness epidemic that affects our psyches, our health and our communities in ways that we have no idea how to fix. In my mind, one part of the solution is to show each other our humanity, our dreams, our efforts, our accomplishments—and to somehow articulate all that clearly, both to our immediate peers and to people outside our own respective bubbles. But that’s hard to do after a long day’s work. So, it helps to have some structures for it. Sports is one. Church is one. Music is one. Art is another one. And Burner art can be a particularly effective one because it’s beholden more to viewers’ experience more than it is to markets or institutions. On the day I visited No Spectators in Oakland, the gallery was packed—mostly with well-dressed people in their 60s and 70s, a few Gen-Xers, and a handful of kids and teens. I heard a quiet chorus of “ooh”s, “aah”s and “wow”s, and I saw, for the first time in my life, museum guards who did not look bored. A group of Chinese grandmas sat at a table to make origami “gifts,” to be distributed to other museumgoers, who were lined up at the “Gift-o-Matic,” an oversized gumball machine that dispenses the handmade trinkets. Boomers in clean Patagonia separates lay on cushions on the floor to gaze up at “Nova,” a trippy, meditative light show on the ceiling. And people climbed aboard a steampunk/art deco bus-like vehicle called “Capitol Theater,” to sit in rows of velvet seats and watch Chaplinesque silent comedies projected on a screen. These “marvelous toys” really do articulate that sense of intense wonder—and that sense of community—that people go to Burning Man for. And, in my mind, the potentially fraught mark of institutional approval worked out just fine. Atkinson distilled some of the most accessible, more socially practical parts of Burning Man into an afternoon’s worth of substantial marveling, and brought them on tour. □


REEL WORLD

FILM SHORTS Reviewers: Meredith J. Cooper, Bob Grimm, Juan-Carlos Selznick and Neesa Sonoquie.

Opening this week

Queen Elsa (voiced by Idina Menzel) and her sister Princess Anna (Kristen Bell) and the rest of the gang are back on a journey beyond Arendelle in this sequel to the massively popular animated musical animated flick. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

The Gentlemen

Just Mercy

The latest from writer/director Guy Ritchie (Snatch, Sherlock Holmes) follows the violent shenanigans that ensue after an American-born drug kingpin in London (Matthew McConaughey) announces his intentions to retire and sell off his empire. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

4

Invisible Life

See review this issue. Pageant Theatre. Rated R—J.C.S.

Jojo Rabbit

A daring dark satire about a young German boy in Nazi Germany who finds out his mother has provided refuge to a Jewish girl. Oh, and the kid’s imaginary friend is Adolf Hitler. Starring Scarlett Johansson, Sam Rockwell and Rebel Wilson. Feather River Cinemas, Pageant Theatre. Rated PG-13.

The Last Full Measure

Invisible lives

Christopher Plummer, William Hurt, Ed Harris, Samuel L. Jackson and the late Peter Fonda (in his last role) star in this historical drama on the posthumous awarding of the Medal of Honor to William H. Pitsenbarger Jr. for saving more than 60 fellow soldiers during the Vietnam War. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

An epic coming-of-age story of two Brazilian sisters separated by an ocean

IInFestival, is a lushly impassioned drama from Brazil. telling the story of two sisters—two very lively nvisible Life, a prize-winner at the 2019 Cannes Film

young women coming of age in Rio de Janeiro in the 1950s—it mixes a dreamy sort of by melodrama with dashes of a rather Juan-Carlos raw realism. Selznick The sisters are Guida (Julia Stockler) and Eurídice (Carol Duarte), and they are devoted to each other and look at times as if they might be twins. But they have contrasting temperaments and differences of age and height, etc. Invisible Life Guida is something of party girl, Opens Friday, Jan. 24. while the more reserved Eurídice Starring Carol Duarte, Julia Stockler and has ambitions of studying piano at Fernanda Montenegro. a Vienna conservatory. Directed by Karim Their seemingly idyllic relaaïnouz. Pageant tionship turns darkly dramatic Theatre. rated r. when Guida falls in love with a Greek sailor named Yorgos (Nikolas Antunes) and runs away with him to be married in Europe. When she returns home pregnant and still single, her sternly domineering father (António Fonseca) disowns her on the spot and forbids her sympathetic but docile mother (Flávia Gusmão) from intervening in any way. When the departing Guida asks about her sister, her father tells her Eurídice has gone to the conservatory in Vienna. With that turn of events, Invisible Life—which is based on a 2016 novel by Martha Batalha—becomes a strangely tangled and mysterious account of episodes in the separate lives of the two sisters in the years immediately after Guida’s return to Rio.

4

The Turning

Eurídice, who is told that Guida has not returned from Europe, accepts an arranged marriage to a wellheeled dolt named Antenor (Gregório Duvivier) and has a child with him. Guida gives birth to her child, tries to abandon it, but soon finds a home for the both of them with a big-hearted lady of the night named Filomena (Bárbara Santos). Writer-director Karim Aïnouz scrambles the chronology at times and weaves back and forth almost randomly between the separated sisters’ stories. That ostensibly freewheeling approach produces some mildly surreal results, but it also creates circumstances in which we can see ways in which the two young women’s misfortunes mirror each other as well as ways in which women of independent spirit can begin to live lives of their own in the shadows of crumbling patriarchy. Stockler and Duarte both give strong, quietly offbeat performances, and Aïnouz excels in creating characters and situations that resist easy categorization at the same time that they advance a complex set of feminist themes in ways that are never merely didactic. Santos glows with worldly calm in the role of Filomena, and Duvivier’s feckless Antenor is a little masterpiece of clueless bourgeois arrogance. The scene in which Guida and Eurídice visit the same cafe at the same time without noticing each other is a signature moment for the film as a whole and a worthy explication of its title. Aged Brazilian icon Fernanda Montenegro is superb in the film’s haunting final scene. Ω

A modern horror update of Henry James’ 1898 novella, The Turn of the Screw, with a nanny who discovers dark secrets in the Maine countryside where she is caring for a couple of orphans in a spooky house. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Now playing

4

1917

Sam Mendes’ sprawlingly detailed war film intrigues, above all, as a relatively simple and intimate tale told in spectacularly large-scale terms. Its plotline, in a nutshell, has two youthful British soldiers carrying a crucial set of orders through the labyrinthian trenches of a World War I “no man’s land” in hopes of preventing the likely massacre of two battalions. Lance Corporal Blake (played by Dean-Charles Chapman) and Lance Corporal Schofield (George MacKay) are longtime pals who follow orders with increasing fervor, even or maybe especially with the mounting indications that they and all their comrades are in way over their heads. The film’s main claims to some kind of greatness have to do with the ways in which the story of the pair’s battlefield journey is mounted. Mendes and ace cinematographer Roger Deakins keep their camera in close proximity to the two principles, and in the process create the impression of one long continuous take as Blake and Schofield trek through terrain that is by turns gruesomely confining and desolatingly expansive. It’s a fascinatingly operatic duet between the parallel battlefield journeys of Schofield and Blake on the one hand, and of Deakins’ camera on the other. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R —J.C.S.

Bad Boys for Life

In this third installment in the trilogy, the buddy-cop duo (played by Will Smith and Martin Lawrence) reunite to fight a cartel mob boss. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Dolittle

1 2 3 4 5 Poor

Fair

Good

Very Good

Excellent

Frozen 2

Screenwriter (Traffic) and director Stephen Gaghan has crafted this vehicle for Robert Downey Jr. to play the famous doctor who could talk to animals from Hugh Lofting’s classic children’s books. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

A biopic based on famed civil rights lawyer and social justice warrior Bryan Stevenson (played by Michael B. Jordan) and his work trying to overturn the conviction of Walter McMillian (Jamie Foxx), a black man in Alabama who was wrongfully accused of the 1986 murder of an 18-year-old white woman. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

4

Little Women

Director Greta Gerwig’s admirable update of Louisa May Alcott’s classic 1868 novel is beautiful to look at thanks to some of 2019’s best art direction and camerawork, and it’s chock-full of tremendous performances. Saoirse Ronan headlines as Jo March, eldest sister of the March clan that includes Meg (Emma Watson), Amy (Florence Pugh) and Beth (Eliza Scanlen). Ronan, not surprisingly, makes the intrepid character of Jo her own, a budding writer who is trying to get her ideas past a crusty editor, Mr. Dashwood (Tracy Letts). In a departure from past adaptations, Gerwig focuses more on the girls as adults, with flashbacks to their younger days. Timothée Chalamet plays boy-next-door Theodore “Laurie” Laurence, and there couldn’t have been a better choice for the role. His first dance with Jo, where they go a little crazy outside on a porch alone during a party, is as timeless as movie dancing gets. Little Women exemplifies how a period piece should be done. It’s a fresh take that makes you feel like you are experiencing a familiar story for the first time. Cinemark 14. Rated PG —B.G.

1

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker

Director J.J. Abrams and producer Kathleen Kennedy have failed at giving the main story of the Star Wars franchise the send-off it deserved. But money has to get made, so here it is, the last chapter of the nine-film/ three-trilogy Skywalker Saga, just in time for holiday movie going. What makes it so bad? The first hour is fast and furious, but with no editing flow and no sense of purpose. Fans going in looking for answers or meaningful storytelling will not only be bewildered, but probably pissed off as well. By doing everything it can to win back the fans that may have gotten disenchanted by The Last Jedi— continuity be damned—this film renders its predecessor as a complete joke. Even if some fans were displeased with Jedi, it doesn’t mean they wanted a Star Wars Happy Times Mix Tape in response. My advice is to pretend Rise of Skywalker didn’t happen. Allow hologram Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill) facing down Kylo Ren in Jedi to be the end of the Skywalker Saga and skip this one. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13 —B.G.

Underwater

Kristen Stewart and Vincent Cassel star in this sci-fi/horror flick set in an underwater research facility destroyed by an earthquake that awakens mysterious ocean creatures. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

Still here

4

Jumanji: The Next Level

Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13 —M.J.C.

Knives Out

Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

Spies in Disguise

Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

January 23, 2020

CN&R

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NIGHTLIFE AFROMAN

Saturday, Jan. 25 Tackle Box SEE SATURDAY

23THURSDAY

MEAT LOAF TRIBUTE: American Idol

winner Caleb Johnson fronts Meat Loaf’s official band the Neverland Express for a night of covers of the rock legend’s greatest hits. Thu, 1/23, 8pm. $15. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. goldcountrycasino.com

REGGAE NIGHT: Stay Positive Sound’s

DJ Cootdog & Diesel. Thu, 1/23, 7pm. The Commons Social Empourium, 2412 Park Ave.

STRUGGLE JENNINGS: Outlaw-rapper from Nashville is the grandson of Waylon Jennings! Thu, 1/23, 7pm. $15-$50. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

UNWINED COMEDY: Dillon Collins Comedy presents visiting stand-ups Chelsea D. Bearce (Los Angeles) and Annick Adelle (LA-via-Germany) and local Jacob McClain. Thu, 1/23, 7pm. $15. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

THURSDAY 1/23—WEDNESDAY 1/29 1/24, 9:30pm. $5-$10. Feather Falls

7:30pm. $20-$23. Chico First

Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

Baptist Church, 850 Palmetto Ave. riseupandsing.org

LIGHTWEIGHT: Sactown pop punk band performs with locals 5 Mile Myth, JAMM and Weak Daze. Fri, 1/24, 6:30pm. $5-$7. Ike’s Place, 648 W. Fifth St.

LONE STAR JUNCTION: Humboldt County crew will play a mix of classics and original songs with a modern take on outlaw country. Fri, 1/24, 9pm. $5. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

MICHAEL RUSSELL TRIO: The trio plays

a farewell performance. Fri, 1/24, 8:30pm. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

MINARDI & FRANCIS: Two of Chico’s best vocalists, Samantha Francis and Max Minardi, team up for a happy hour set. Fri, 1/24, 4pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St..

NATE SMITH: Live country music. Fri, 1/24, 7pm. The Commons Social Empourium, 2412 Park Ave.

OPEN MIC: Open mic hosted by Jeff

24FRIDAY

COMEDY NIGHT: S.F. comedian Matt

Gubser headlines, with Drew Absher, Sam Weber and Ivy Vasquez. Hosted by Becky Lynn. Fri, 1/24, 8:30pm. $5. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St..

GENERATION IDOL: Billy Idol tribute. Fri,

Pershing. Fri, 1/24, 7pm. $1. Down Lo, 319 Main St., 530-966-8342.

RIDGE STRONG: Live music. Fri, 1/24,

9pm. Free. Jen’s Place, 7126 Skyway,

Paradise., 413-9130.

SONGS OF RESILIENCE: Maryland activist-folk duo Emma’s Revolution celebrate the centennial of Pete Seeger’s birth. Fri, 1/24,

WOMEN’S HEALTH SPECIALISTS DANCE PARTY: A dance-party benefit and celebration of the 47th anniversary of Roe v. Wade. DJ sets from Matt Loomis, Evin Wolverton and Trasher Thrasher. Fri, 1/24, 8pm. $10. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

PARTY LIKE IT’S 2010

Take a decade off your tired bones and travel back to a simpler time in Chico when a rock show was four bands long and you had enough energy bang your head all night. This Saturday, Jan. 25, at Lost on Main, Chico ex-pats The Deaf Pilots will visit from L.A., joining fellow old-school local rockers Furlough Fridays (pictured) for a friend show of epic, uptempo proportions. Little Black Cloud and Runner Up round out the bill.

25SATURDAY

AFROMAN: You might try to come up

with a reason to miss this show, but getting high isn’t one of them. Local support TBA. Sat, 1/25, 9pm. $20. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

BASS MUSIC NIGHT: A night of bass music with artists from Chico and Sac, including Xan(dot), Jah-Rome, Bionix, I’me and Sadata. Sat, 1/25, 7pm. $5. Ike’s Place, 648 W. Fifth St.

THE DEAF PILOTS: A high-energy mix of classic and modern rock from Los Angeles, plus locals Furlough Fridays and Little Black Cloud. Sat, 1/25, 9pm. $7. Lost on Main, 319 Main St.

HOT POTATO TRIO: 1930s Gypsy swing jazz and romance. Sat, 1/25, 7pm. Free. Wine Time, 26 Lost Dutchman Drive, 899-9250.

JOURNEY UNAUTHORIZED: Faithfully capturing the spirit of Journey with open arms. Sat, 1/25, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3

Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfalls casino.com

KRATOM ALBUM RELEASE: Local psychmetal crew releases its album Zykodelyk. Carcosa opens. Sat, 1/25, 8pm. $5 ($12 w/CD). Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

LONE STAR JUNCTION: Humboldt County outlaw country. Sat, 1/25, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfalls casino.com

OFF THE RECORD: Live hits of the

1980s. Sat, 1/25, 8:30pm. $5. Unwined

M-F 9am-5pm Sat 10am-5pm Sun 10am-4pm

Equipment

24

CN&R

JANUARY 23, 2020


THIS WEEK: FInD MOrE EnTErTaInMEnT anD SPECIaL EVEnTS On PaGE 20

26SunDay

FRED EAGLESMITH: The Ontario,

Canada-based country singer/songwriter returns to Chico. Sun, 1/26, 7:30pm. $25. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. kzfr.org

MALTEAZERS AUDITIONS: The Maltese is holding auditions for its “queer-friendly, body-positive” house burlesque troupe. PM The Malteazers on Facebook for more info. Sun, 1/26, 6:30pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

SERAPH BRASS IN CONCERT: Chico Performances presents dynamic all-female brass ensemble. Sun, 1/26, 2pm. $15-$34. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State, 898-6333. chicoperformances.com

SEraPH BraSS Saturday, Jan. 26 Laxson Auditorium

29WEDnESDay

SEE SaTurDay

THE BIDWELLS: Live music from Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave., 228-9300.

OVERDRIVE: 1970s and 1980s rock. Sat, 1/25, 9pm. Free. Jen’s Place, 7126

Skyway, Paradise, 413-9130.

2020 VISION: Perfect Dark hosts a house/techno-flavored EDM night. Sat, 1/25, 10pm. $2. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.., 343-7718.

RON MATHEWS: Late-night funk party

with local tunes. Sat, 1/25, 10pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

STRUNG NUGGET GANG: Nor Cal blue-

grass string trio. Sat, 1/25, 8pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville. theexchangeoroville.com

WHOSE LIVE ANYWAY: The goldstandard of improv is back, with Whose Line is it Anyway? cast members Ryan Stiles, Jeff B. Davis, Joel Murray and Dave Foley on stage. Sat 1/25, 8pm. $40-$90. Gold Country Casino & Hotel, 4020 Olive Highway, Oroville. goldcountry casino.com

UP TO 11: Hard-rock covers. Sat,

DANCE NIGHT: Four lady DJs with large vinyl collections select a fresh slice of wax every Wednesday for your boogie pleasure. Wed, 1/29, 10pm. $1. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

TOM & SHAWN: Live music. Wed, 1/29, 6pm. Free. The Allies Pub, 426 Broadway, Ste. 130., 809-1650.

1/25, 9pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582

Esplanade.

nOrTH aMErICa’S TrOuBaDOur

local acoustic duo. Wed, 1/29, 6pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

Ontario, Canada, singer/songwriter Fred Eaglesmith has been on the road for more than 40 years, has recorded 22 albums, and according to his press materials, the country musician “can talk to you about almost anything. Chances are, he’s had that car, tractor, job, relationship, idea, and hat.” KZFR is hosting the Eaglesmith show, which includes songs, stories and his partner, multi-instrumentalist/singer Tif Ginn. Sunday, Jan. 26, at Chico Women’s Club.

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CN&R

25


ARTS DEVO

CHOW

by Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

old is new again

Live at the Box “Our Man Burger consists of a half-pound polish dog, one pound of beef, eight slices of cheese, a jalapeño and 14 slices of bacon served on a 14-inch bun and topped with all the fixings and a side of fries.” Holy moly. When the Tackle Box goes big, it goes biggest. Not only does the south Chico bar and grill cap off its burger menu with that beast (for $25), longtime booker shaina Paulsen has put together a winter/spring livemusic calendar that is just as huge— an impressively eclectic roster of visiting big-ticket rap, reggae, punk, rock and country acts. Starting with red-eyed rapper afroman this Saturday (Jan. 25), a sampling of what’s coming to town over the next three months includes Black Uruhu (Feb. 3), nappy Roots (Feb. 8), Brother ali (Feb. 19, in conjunction with JMax Productions), Colt Ford (Feb. 21), Jason Boland & The stragglers (March 20) and Brother Ali skate-punk pioneers agent orange Photo By Mika väisänen (April 29, also with JMax). Dang!

New seeds and plants for 2020 are twists on past favorites

W smaller pumpkins and oldfashioned flowers in modern hues. e want bigger tomatoes,

But a revolutionary turnip? At least, that’s what we’ll find as we peruse seed catalogs and browse online for 2020’s new plant by introductions. Debbie Yearning for Arrington the past (heirloom tomatoes, fragrant roses, colorful zinnias), consumers still demand modern convenience (disease resistance, prolific production, easy care). That’s a challenge for plant breeders, who continually put new twists on familiar favorites. For example, Burpee—the seed catalog giant (burpee.com)—boasts nearly 100 new varieties for 2020. Promising to “add flair and flavor to your life and home,” Burpee chairman George Ball introduced his three favorites this way: “Our plant breeders’ achievements begin 2020 with ‘Bodacious,’ the new standard in large, round slicing tomatoes that roll off the vines, and ‘Zesty’ zinnias that create kaleidoscopes of sensuous semi-double blooms,” Ball wrote. “Rounding out our bevy of innovations, ‘Silky Sweet’ revolutionizes the humble turnip with lovely, crisp, moist, lightly sweet orbs of delight. You’ve never dreamed of turnips— you’re about to start.” Such hyperbole is standard for seed catalogs. (I never thought of biting into a raw turnip like an apple, as Ball recommends with

26

CN&R

January 23, 2020

Silky Sweet.) But the new varieties follow gardeners’ desire for bigger and better. Other recent Burpee introductions also follow that trend, including Meatball, a gigantic eggplant that mimics the texture of beef (think of it as “fresh, home-grown, vine-ripened meat,” the catalog boasts) and Jaws, a sweet corn with ginormous 12-inch ears (“Caution: You’re going to need a bigger pot!”). What if you’re a city gardener without room to grow oversized crops? As our yards have shrunk, so have some vegetables. The most popular are itty-bitty pumpkins (such as Burpee’s Bumpkin, Gooligan and Hooligan) and “personal watermelons,” just big enough for one or two servings (such as Piccolo mini-seedless). Gardeners want veggies that taste great and flowers that smell like they came out of Grandma’s backyard, preferably without the use of chemicals. That’s why heirlooms have been such a hit. The selection of possibilities just keeps growing. For example, Baker Creek’s 2020 Whole Seed Catalog is its biggest in 22 years with 452 pages. Baker Creek (rareseeds.com) offers more than 1,200 varieties of heirloom seeds and sends its catalog to more than 1 million organic gardeners

Hopi Black-Dye sunflower. Photo courtesy of Baker heirloom seeds/ rareseeds.com

nationwide. Among its new oldies for 2020: Hopi Black-Dye sunflower, Death Spiral hot pepper, Bloody Mary nasturtium, Amazing Grey poppy and Queen of Malinalco golden tomatillo. Names go a long way in selling these new introductions. Take this assortment of new varieties from David Austin Roses (davidaustinroses.com), the hybridizer of English-style roses. With evocative names, these shrub roses are known for their amazing scent and bloomfilled bushes. For 2020, Austin Roses is introducing three roses with literary ties: Emily Brontë, Tottering-by-Gently and The Mill on the Floss. A golden apricot bloom with 100 petals, the first is named for the beloved writer of Wuthering Heights. A whimsical wildflower-like yellow rose, Tottering-by-Gently gets its name from a long-running cartoon in Country Life, the quintessential British magazine. Reminiscent of big pink cabbage-style Victorian roses, The Mill on the Floss is named for an 1860 novel by George Eliot. In the 2020 garden, everything old is indeed new again. Ω

new year, new noise In addition to The Empty Gate’s excellent Grand Mal hyped in these pages last week (hear/buy it at emptygate.bandcamp.com), there are a couple more new local releases that have dropped this month. Newish punk quartet shadow Figures released its debut EP, Tony Morale, on drummer Josh indar’s shut Up Records (shutuprecords.bandcamp. com/music). Hot track: the bouncy, melodic and snotty “Shallow Graves.” And young psych-metal band Kratom will celebrate its new album, Zykodelyk, with a release party this Saturday (Jan. 25) at the naked Lounge. a year on the traiLs Mr. and Mrs. DEVO have made a pact to spend as much time on the trails in 2020 as possible. To that end, Santa left a copy of sierra Club’s Hiking Butte County under the tree ($11.95 at Mountain sports), and in addition to adventures farther afield, we are going to earnestly try and hit most of the “35 great hikes in and around Butte County” by next holiday season. So far, we’ve ticked off a couple of our regular Bidwell Park paths, as well as Gray Lodge Wildlife area in Gridley. (Go now and see the tens of thousands of snow geese before they move on!) A good complement to a few of the trails in Hiking Butte County is the new The Trees of Bidwell Park, by Roger Lederer and Carol Burr. The two retired Chico state professors (of biological sciences and English, respectively) have crafted a lovely guide to the park’s Gymnosperms and Angiosperms—with drawings of whole trees as well as individual leaves, flowers and seeds to help identify them. Available for $19.95 from stansbury Publishing at heidelberggraphics.com, as well as local bookstores and amazon.com.


REAL ESTATE

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The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of January 6 - 10, 2020 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home.

166 Lazy S Ln

Chico

$880,000

4/3

3044

2096 Vallombrosa Ave

Chico

$345,000

3/3

2174

3925 Aruba Ct

Chico

$869,000

4/3

2813

5 Roxanne Ct

Chico

$344,500

3/2

1281

808 Arbutus Ave

Chico

$868,000

4/4

4179

1552 Arch Way

Chico

$333,000

3/2

1301

816 Whispering Winds Ln

Chico

$750,000

3/3

2612

1381 Lucy Way

Chico

$320,000

3/2

1126

5 Laguna Ct

Chico

$725,000

4/3

2934

1443 Heather Cir

Chico

$310,000

3/1

1125

875 Westgate Ct

Chico

$650,000

4/3

3345

19 Benton Ave

Chico

$305,000

3/2

1236

329 Denali Dr

Chico

$510,000

3/2

1966

1029 Windsor Way

Chico

$300,000

3/2

1233

356 Picholine Way

Chico

$505,000

3/3

2167

1646 Broadway St

Chico

$117,500

2/1

932

70 Cinder Cone Loop

Chico

$500,000

3/2

1960

11311 Winding Way

Clipper Mills

$198,000

4/2

1728

1395 Huggins Ave

Chico

$475,000

4/3

2586

9413 Corbett Ct

Durham

$425,000

2/2

1216

3227 Grayeagle Ct

Chico

$465,000

3/2

1774

248 E Evans Reimer Rd

Gridley

$300,000

4/2

1400

3480 Bamboo Orchard Dr

Chico

$458,000

3/2

1909

1175 Vermont St

Gridley

$220,000

3/2

1008

1014 Lori Dr

Chico

$436,000

3/2

1828

4380 Tao Way

Oroville

$510,000

3/2

1465

3192 Sawyers Bar Ln

Chico

$420,000

4/3

2541

6347 Oro Bangor Hwy

Oroville

$450,000

3/3

1960

2887 Pin Oak Ln

Chico

$385,000

3/3

1564

930 Butte Ave

Oroville

$195,000

4/2

1319

452 Palisades Dr

Chico

$375,000

3/2

1632

3479 Stauss Ave

Oroville

$152,500

3/1

1035

1586 Filbert Ave

Chico

$375,000

4/2

1595

270 Dustin Ln

Palermo

$120,000

1/1

661

2726 White Ave

Chico

$369,000

6/4

2112

5809 Acorn Ridge Dr

Paradise

$625,000

3/3

2571

2214 Moyer Way

Chico

$363,000

3/2

1357

4285 Pentz Rd

Paradise

$420,000

3/2

1350

30 Sunland Dr

Chico

$345,000

3/2

1785

1255 Richvale Hwy

Richvale

$315,000

3/2

2246

January 23, 2020

CN&R

27


REAL ESTATE TATE

CLASSIFIEDS Call for a quote. (530) 894-2300 ext. 2

For more information about advertising in our Real estate section, call us at

a Married Couple. Signed: GILBERTO VALLADARES ORTIZ Dated: December 19, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001419 Published: January 2,19,16,23, 2020

Phone hours: M-F 9am-5pm. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. *Nominal fee for

(530) 894-2300

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as MI JALISCO at 1002 W 5th Street Chico, CA 95928. KARLA CAZARES DELGADO 3156 Esplanade Spc 272 Chico, CA 95973. GILBERTO VALLADORES ORTIZ 3156 Esplanade Spc 272 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by this Legal Notice continues

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CONNIE’S CONSULTING at 223 Estates Dr Chico, CA 95928. CONNIE MICHELE SANSEVERINO 223 Estates Dr Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CONNIE MICHELE SANSEVERINO Dated: December 4, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001358 Published: January 9,16,23,30, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ZEPEDAS TRUCKING at 1684 Vista Verde Ave Chico, CA 95928. ULISES JESUS ZEPEDA 1684 Vista Verde Ave Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: ULISES ZEPEDA Dated: December 10, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001374 Published: January 9,16,23,30, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as GOTEE ENTERPRISES at 13647 Nimshew Rd Magalia, CA 95954. TROY WILMES 13647 Nimshew Rd Magalia, CA 95954. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TROY WILMES Dated: January 3, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000014 Published: January 16,23,30, February 6, 2020 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO BUSINESS CONSULTANTS at 18 Baja Court Chico, CA 95928. CHRISTINE A BIEBERLY 18 Baja Court Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CHCRISTINE A BIEBERLY Dated: January 8, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000027 Published: January 16,23,30, February 6, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MAP MAN COMPANY, MMC at 75 Riverview Terrace Oroville, CA 95965. TREVOR JOHN MORGAN 75 Riverview Terrace Oroville, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: TREVOR J. MORGAN Dated: January 7, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000025 Published: January 16,23,30, February 6, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as LUCENA PARTNERS at 105 Broadway Chico, CA 95928. this Legal Notice continues

MARC C LUCENA 4216 Anjou Ct. Chico, CA 95973. MATTHEW LUCENA 762 Sierra View Way Chico, CA 95928. STEVEN S LUCENA 9339 Larose Court Durham, CA 95938. SYLVESTER LUCENA 9583 Sunsup Lane Durham, CA 95938. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: SYLVESTER LUCENA Dated: December 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001393 Published: January 16,23,30, February 6, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BUTTE APPLIANCE REPAIR at 3055 9th Street Biggs, CA 95917. JEREMY LOGSDON 3055 9th Street Biggs, CA 95917. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JEREMY LOGSDON Dated: January 2, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000008 Published: January 16,23,30, February 6, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as NEXUS OROVILLE at 2075 Baldwin Ave #6 Oroville, CA 95965. WORK TRAINING CENTER FOR THE HANDICAPPED, INC. 2255 Fair Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: RENEE FRIEMOTH, PROJECT COORD. COMPLIANCE OFFICER Dated: January 7, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000024 Published: January 16,23,30, February 6, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as KZFR at 341 Broadway Street #411 Chico, CA 95928. GOLDEN VALLEY COMMUNITY BROADCASTERS 341 Broadway Street #411 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: RICK ANDERSON, GEN MGR. Dated: January 17, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000064 Published: January 23,30, February 6,13, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as NOOMI SKIN CARE at 1731 Esplanade Suite 7 Chico, CA 95926. CARLA LAI WOODARD 115 Hampshire Dr Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CARLA WOODARD Dated: January 16, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000057 Published: January 23,30, February 6,13, 2020 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as MOMMAS CATTLE COMPANY at 840 Hengst Drive Chico, CA 95928. JACOB LEE MORROW 840 Hengst Drive Chico, CA 95928. KENNA LEANNE OPAL MORROW 840 Hengst Drive Chico, CA 95928. this Legal Notice continues

This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: KENNA LEANNE OPAL MORROW Dated: January 2, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000001 Published: January 23,30, February 6,13, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as NORTH VALLEY TREE SERVICE at 3882 Esplanade Chico, CA 95973. NORTH VALLEY ARBOR MANAGEMENT, INC. 1100 Fortress St Ste 2 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: LEAH WILLS, TREASURER Dated: December 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001394 Published: January 23,30, February 6,13, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name NORTH VALLEY TREE SERVICE at 3882 Esplanade Chico, CA 95973. FIRESTORM WILDLAND FIRE SUPPRESSION INCORPORATED 1100 Fortress St., Ste 2 Chico, CA 95973. This business was conducted by a Corporation. Signed: LEAH WILLS, TREASURER Dated: December 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2017-0000855 Published: January 23,30, February 6,13, 2020 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ABOUT TREES at 1100 Fortess St Ste 2 Chico, CA. NORTH VALLEY ARBOR MANAGEMENT, INC. 1100 Fortress St Ste 2 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: LEAH WILLS, TREASURER Dated: December 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001388 Published: January 23,30, February 6,13, 2020 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name ABOUT TREES at 1100 Fortress St. Ste. 2 Chico, CA 95973. FIRESTORM WILDLAND FIRE SUPPRESSION INC. 1100 Fortress St. Ste. 2 Chico, CA 95973. This business was conducted by a Corporation. Signed: LEAH WILLS, TREASURER Dated: December 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2015-0001289 Published: January 23,30, February 6,13, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BUTTE CREDIT BUREAU at 310 Flume Street Chico, CA 95928. BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU INC 310 Flume Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JOSEPH SELBY, PRESIDENT Dated: January 16, 2020 this Legal Notice continues


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY FBN Number: 2020-0000058 Published: January 23,30, February 6,13, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LIGHTSPEED COURIER CHICO, QUICKSILVER COURIER SERVICE at 2196 Ruskin St Unit 1 Chico, CA 95926. JORDAN MICHAEL ADAMS 2196 Ruskin St Unit 1 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JORDAN M. ADAMS Dated: December 26, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001430 Published: January 23,30, February 6,13, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as FOSTERS FREEZE at 646 Pearson Rd. Paradise, CA 95969. CHUL YOUNG KIM 745 Paigewood Dr #34 Orland, CA 95963. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: CHUL Y KIM Dated: December 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001442 Published: January 23,30, February 6,13, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LEVEL UP, NOR CAL YOGA at 830 Broadway Chico, CA 95928. KAMELA LOESER 600 Parkwood Drive Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: KAMELA LOESER Dated: January 10, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000042 Published: January 23,30, February 6,13, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ALLFIGHTSTICKS at 2393 Durham Dayton Hwy Durham, CA 95938. PCI COMPUTER SERVICES, INC 225 Main St Suite R Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: AARON HALL, CEO Dated: December 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001443 Published: January 23,30, February 6,13, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PARADISE RISING BREAD COMPANY at 6165 Burke Lane Paradise, CA 95969. JOLENE MARIE MOODY 6165 Burke Lane Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOLENE MARIE MOODY Dated: December 31, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001445 Published: January 23,30, February 6,13, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as RIDGE LASERWORKS at 137 1/2 W 21st Street Chico, CA 95928. JEREMY F KEPLEY 137 1/2 W 21st Street Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by this Legal Notice continues

an Individual. Signed: JEREMY F KEPLEY Dated: January 17, 2020 FBN Number: 2020-0000071 Published: January 23,30, February 6,13, 2020

NOTICES ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner LA NETTE CAROL THOMPSON filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: LA NETTE CAROL THOMPSON Proposed name: LANETTE CAROL SIX THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: February 5, 2020 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: BARBARA L. ROBERTS Dated: December 19, 2019 Case Number: 19CV03765 Published: January 2,9,16,23, 2020

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MARINA DAHLIA CALDERON filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MARINA DAHLIA CALDERON Proposed name: MARINA DAHLIA ESQUIVEL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: February 26, 2020 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: January 6, 2020 Case Number: 20CV00015 Published: January 16,23,30, February 6, 2020

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JAMIE LEE TUCKER filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: this Legal Notice continues

AUTUMN LANAE HENDERSON Proposed name: AUTUMN LANAE TUCKER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: February 19, 2020 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: December 27, 2019 Case Number: 19CV03791 Published: January 16,23,30, February 6, 2020

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JESSICA VERA WOOLDRIDGE filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JESSICA VERA WOOLDRIDGE Proposed name: JESSICA VERA MAIN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 4, 2020 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: January 3, 2020 Case Number: 20CV00005 Published: January 16,23,30, February 6, 2020 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner DANNY LEE DELL filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: DANNY LEE DELL Proposed name: DANNY LEE HOGAN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, this Legal Notice continues

the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 11, 2020 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: January 15, 2020 Case Number: 20CV00116 Published: January 23,30, February 6,13, 2020

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner HAZEL HALBERT filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: CRUZ LAWRENCE MATZEN JULZ EDEN MATZEN Proposed name: CRUZ MATZEN HALBERT JULZ EDEN HALBERT THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 4, 2020 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: January 9, 2020 Case Number: 20CV00045 Published: January 23,30, February 6,13, 2020

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JAY DEAN SMITH filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JAY DEAN SMITH Proposed name: JASON DEAN SMITH THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 11, 2020 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: January 13, 2020 Case Number: 20CV00066 Published: January 23,30, February 6,13, 2020

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ASHLEIGH TRICHELL MOORE Proposed name: ASHTON TRICHELL PEASE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 4, 2020 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: January 10, 2020 Case Number: 20CV00076 Published: January 23,30, February 6,13, 2020

SUMMONS

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ARIES (March 21-April 19): German

writer Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (17491832) declared that English writer Lord Byron (1788-1824) was the greatest genius of the 19th century. Here’s an interesting coincidence: Byron regarded Goethe as the greatest genius of the 19th century. I bring this to your attention in the hope that it will inspire you to create a similar dynamic in your own life during the coming months. As much as possible, surround yourself with people whom you think are wonderful and interesting and enlivening—and who think you are wonderful and interesting and enlivening.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Taurus-

born Johannes Brahms (1833-1897) was a renowned German composer who lived most of his life in Germany and Austria. He became so famous and well-respected that England’s Cambridge University offered him an honorary degree if he would visit the campus. But Brahms was too timid to risk crossing the English Channel by boat. (There were no airplanes and Chunnel in those days.) He declined the award. I beg you not to do anything even remotely like that in the coming weeks. Please summon the gumption necessary to claim and gather in all you deserve.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): According

to my analysis of the astrological omens, the coming weeks will be one of those rare times when you can safely engage with influences that might normally rattle you. You’ll be protected as you wander into the unknown and explore edgy mysteries. Your intuition will be highly reliable if you make bold attempts to solve dilemmas that have previously confounded and frustrated you. If you’ve been waiting for the perfect moment to get a bit wild and exploratory, this is it.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): J.M.W.

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: MONICA IBARRA AKA MONICA BONILLA YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: BUTTE COUNTY CREDIT BUREAU A CORP NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center this Legal Notice continues

For the week oF January 23, 2020

Turner (1775-1851) is regarded as one of England’s greatest painters. He’s best known for his luminous and imaginative landscapes. His experimental use of light and color influenced the Impressionist painters who came after him. But the weird thing is that after his death, many of his works were lost for decades. In 1939, a famed art historian found more than 100 of them rolled up like tarpaulins in the basement of an art museum. Let’s apply this event as a metaphor for what’s ahead in your life. I suspect that buried or lost elements of your past will soon be rediscovered and restored. I bet it will be fun and illuminating!

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In my early adult

life, I lived below the poverty line for many years. How did that impact me? Here’s one example: I didn’t own a mattress from ages 23 to 39, but rather slept on a two-inch thick foam pad that lay directly on the floor. I’m doing better now, thank you. But my early experiences ensured that I would forever have profound empathy for people who don’t have much money. I hope this will serve as inspiration for you. The next seven weeks will be the Empathy Building Season for you. The cosmos will reward you if you build your ability to appreciate and understand the pains and joys of other humans. Your compassion will be tonic for both your mental and physical health.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Ancient Greek

author Theophrastus was a scientist before the concept of “scientist” existed. His writings on botany were influential for hundreds of years after his death. But some of his ideas would be considered unscientific today. For example, he believed that flute music could heal sciatica and epilepsy. No modern research suggests that the charms of the flute can literally cure physical ailments like those. But there is a great deal of evidence that music can help relieve pain, reduce anxiety, reduce the side effects of drugs, assist in physical therapy, and even make you smarter. And my reading of the current astrological omens suggests that the therapeutic effects of music will be especially dramatic for you during the next three weeks.

by rob brezsny LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Learning

to love is difficult, and we pay dearly for it,” wrote the serious and somber author Fyodor Dostoevsky. “It takes hard work and a long apprenticeship,” he added. All that’s true, I think. To hone our ability to express tenderness and warmth, even when we’re not at our best, is the most demanding task on Earth. It requires more courage than that of a soldier in the frenzy of battle, as much imagination as a poet and diligence equal to that of an architect supervising the construction of a massive suspension bridge. And yet on the other hand—contrary to what Dostoevsky believed—sometimes love is mostly fun and inspiring and entertaining and educational. I suspect that the coming weeks will be one of those phases for you.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): How well

do you nurture yourself? How diligent are you in providing yourself with the sustenance that ensures your body, mind and soul will thrive? Are you imaginative in the ways that you keep yourself excited about life? Do you take strong measures to avoid getting attached to mediocre pleasures, even as you consistently hone your focus on the desires that lead you to joy and deep satisfaction? The coming weeks will be an excellent time for you to meditate on these questions.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Seven books of the Old Testament refer to a magical place called Ophir. It was a source of exotic finery and soulful treasures such as gold, peacocks, jewels, frankincense and precious sandalwood. One problem: No one, not even a biblical scholar, has ever figured out where it was. Zimbabwe? India? Tunisia? Its location is still unknown. I am bringing this to your attention because I suspect that in 2020 there’ll be a good chance you’ll discover and gain access to your own metaphorical Ophir: a fount of interesting, evocative resources. For best results, be primed and eager to offer your own skills and riches in exchange for what this fount can provide to you.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Capricorn filmmaker Steven Soderbergh says it’s crucial for us to have a well-developed story about who we are and what we’re doing with our lives. It’s so important, he believes, that it should be the trigger that flings us out of bed every morning. We’ve got to make our story so vivid and interesting that it continually motivates us in every little thing we do. Soderbergh’s counsel is always good to keep in mind, of course, but it will be even more so for you in the coming months. Why? Because your story will be expanding and deepening, and you’ll need to make the necessary adjustments in how you tell your story to yourself.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I’m a

big fan of self-editing. For example, every horoscope I write evolves over the course of at least three drafts. For each book I’ve published, I have written but then thrown away hundreds of pages that I ultimately deemed weren’t good enough to be a part of the finished text. And yet now and then, I have created a poem or song in one rapid swoop. My artistic artifact is exactly right the first time it flows out of me, with no further tinkering needed. I suspect you’re now entering a phase like that. I’m reminded of poet Allen Ginsberg’s operative principle: “first thought, best thought.”

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Who don’t

you want to be? Where don’t you want to go? What experiences are not necessary in your drive to become the person you were born to be? I encourage you to ask yourself questions like those in the coming weeks. You’re entering a phase when you can create long-term good fortune for yourself by knowing what you don’t like and don’t need and don’t require. Explore the positive effects of refusal. Wield the power of saying no so as to liberate yourself from all that’s irrelevant, uninteresting, trivial and unhealthy.

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888. January 23, 2020

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(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 LIMITED CIVIL CASE The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: JOSEPH L SELBY (#249546) Law Office of Ferris & Selby 2607 Forest Avenue Ste 130 Chico, CA 95928. (530) 366-4290 Dated: May 22, 2019 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Case Number: 19CV01561 Published: January 23,30, February 6,13, 2020

PETITION NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE ADELAIDE M. HARDT, also known as ADELAIDE MONA HARDT, ADELAIDE HARDT To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: ADELAIDE M. HARDT, ADELAIDE MONA HARDT, ADELAIDE HARDT A Petition for Probate has been filed by: DANNY HARDT in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: DANNY HARDT be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: January 28, 2020 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. this Legal Notice continues

30

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Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL 466 Vallombrosa Ave. Chico, CA 95926 (530) 893-2882 Dated: December 30, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00570 Published: January 9,16,23, 2020

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE ALICE L. SANDOVAL To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: CHRISTOPHER SANDOVAL AND MARY “LUCY” SANDOVAL A Petition for Probate has been filed by: Estate of ALICE L. SANDOVAL in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: CHRISTOPHER SANDOVAL, MARY “LUCY” SANDOVAL be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: Feb. 4, 2020 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBA Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, this Legal Notice continues

January 23, 2020

you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: CHRISTOPHER SANDOVAL, MARY “LUCY” SANDOVAL P.O. Box 584 Gridley, CA 95948 Dated: January 6, 2020 Case Number: 19PR00574 Published: January 9,16,23, 2020

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE TITUS F JOHNSTON To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: TITUS F JOHNSTON A Petition for Probate has been filed by: TIMOTHY JOHNSTON in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: TIMOTHY JOHNSTON be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: February 4, 2020 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBD Room: TBD Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice this Legal Notice continues

(form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: TIMOTHY JOHNSTON 29288 Gateway Dr Lake Elsinore, CA 92530 Dated: November 14, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00518 Published: January 16,23,30, 2020

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE PATRICK M. FLYNN aka PATRICK FLYNN To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: PATRICK M. FLYNN aka PATRICK FLYNN A Petition for Probate has been filed by: DIANNE JOAQUIN in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: DIANNE JOAQUIN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: February 18, 2020 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, this Legal Notice continues

you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: JOHN C. SCHALLER 1458 Esplanade Chico, CA 95926 (530) 893-8891 Dated: January 8, 2020 Case Number: 20PR00003 Published: January 16,23,30, 2020

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE WALTER SHANER, aka WALTER L. SHANER, aka LARRY SHANER To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: WALTER SHANER, aka WALTER L. SHANER, aka LARRY SHANER, deceased A Petition for Probate has been filed by: Estate of JONATHAN SHANER in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: JOHNATHAN SHANER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: February 11, 2020 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBA Room: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, this Legal Notice continues

you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: JONATHAN SHANER 266 E 7th Ave Chico, CA 95926 Case Number: 20PR00013 Published: January 16,23,30, 2020

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE LOIS A. SCHMIDT To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: LOIS A. SCHMIDT A Petition for Probate has been filed by: LINDA R. THOMPSON in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: LINDA R. THOMPSON be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: February 11, 2020 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: C-10 Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition this Legal Notice continues

or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: RAOUL J. LECLERC P.O. Drawer 111 Oroville, CA 95965 (530) 533-5661 Dated: January 13, 2020 Case Number: 20PR00015 Published: January 23,30, February 6, 2020

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE GEORGE H. POPE, also known as GEORGE HENRY POPE, GEORGE POPE To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: GEORGE H. POPE, also known as GEORGE HENRY POPE, GEORGE POPE A Petition for Probate has been filed by: RICHARD HOWARD in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: RICHARD HOWARD be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: February 11, 2020 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: NICOLE R. PLOTTEL this Legal Notice continues

466 Vallombrosa Ave. Chico, CA 95926 (530) 893-2882 Dated: January 15, 2020 Case Number: 20PR00018 Published: January 23,30, February 6, 2020

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE SUE ELLEN CLEMENTS, aka SUE E. CLEMENTS, aka SUE CLEMENTS To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: SUE ELLEN CLEMENTS, aka SUE E. CLEMENTS, aka SUE CLEMENTS A Petition for Probate has been filed by: JONATHON PHILLIPS in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: JONATHON PHILLIPS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: February 11, 2020 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: CLAYTON B. ANDERSON 20 Independence Circle Chico, CA 95973 (530) 342-6144 Dated: January 13, 2020 Case Number: 20PR00014 Published: January 23,30, February 6, 2020


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