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CHICO’S FREE NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY VOLUME 43, ISSUE 8 THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2019 WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM

NEWS Down the rabbit hole to the stories mainstream media ignored

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TIME TO TAX?

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WATER WORRIES

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HAUNTING THE BLUE ROOM


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CN&R

INSIDE

Vol. 43, Issue 8 • October 17, 2019 OPINION

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Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Second & Flume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES

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Downstroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

HEALTHLINES

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Appointment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

GREENWAYS EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS

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15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

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23 COVER STORY

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ARTS & CULTURE

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Music feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Chow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

REAL ESTATE

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CLASSIFIEDS

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ON THE COVER: ILLUSTRATION BY ANSON STEVENS-BOLLEN DESIGN BY MARIA RATINOVA

Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Melissa Daugherty Managing Editor Meredith J. Cooper Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Staff Writers Andre Byik, Ashiah Scharaga Calendar Editor Neesa Sonoquie Contributors Robin Bacior, Alastair Bland, Michelle Camy, Vic Cantu, Josh Cozine, Nate Daly, Charles Finlay, Bob Grimm, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Ken Smith, Robert Speer, Wendy Stewart, Evan Tuchinsky, Carey Wilson Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Creative Services Manager Elisabeth Bayard-Arthur Ad Designers Naisi Thomas, Cathy Arnold Publications Designers Katelynn Mitrano, Nikki Exerjian Director of Sales and Advertising Jamie DeGarmo Advertising Services Coordinator Ruth Alderson Senior Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Laura Golino Advertising Consultants Adam Lew, Jordon Vernau Office Assistant Jennifer Osa Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Matt Daugherty Distribution Staff Ken Gates, Vickie Haselton, Jennifer Jenkins, Bob Meads, Larry Smith, Courtney Tilton, Placido Torres, Bill Unger, Richard Utter, Jim Williams, David Wyles

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Director of Dollars & Sense Debbie Mantoan Nuts & Bolts Ninja Norma Huerta Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Hansen Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins N&R Publications Editor Debbie Arrington N&R Publications Associate Editor Derek McDow N&R Publications Writers Allen Pierleoni, Thea Rood, Anne Stokes N&R Publications Editorial Assistant Nisa Smith Marketing & Publications Lead Consultant Elizabeth Morabito Marketing & Publications Consultants Julia Ballantyne, Greta Beekhuis, Steve Caruso, Joseph Engle, Sherri Heller, Rod Malloy, Celeste Worden Art of Information Director Serene Lusano 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 892-1111 Website newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext 2224 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events cnrcalendar@newsreview.com Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Want to Advertise? Fax (530) 892-1111 or cnradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (530) 894-2300, press 2 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to CN&R? chisubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: Opinions expressed in CN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons, or other portions of the paper. CN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to cnrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. CN&R is printed at PressWorks Ink on recycled newsprint. Circulation of CN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. CN&R is a member of Chico Chamber of Commerce, Oroville Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Chico Business Association, CNPA, AAN and AWN.

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OPINION

Send guest comments, 340 words maximum, to gc@newsreview.com or to 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

EDITORIAL

Where are the tax haters? As expected, after years of various Chico leaders tip-

toeing around the idea, the City Council voted to move forward on a plan to lean on taxpayers to shore up the coffers. That decision came during the panel’s regular Tuesday meeting and yielded few comments from the public, all of whom voiced support (see Ashiah Scharaga’s report on page 9). The CN&R was surprised by the response—or lack thereof—but maybe we shouldn’t be. Let’s reflect: For the better part of a decade—spurred by cuts to city services amid the Great Recession—local business leaders have been brainstorming a way for the city to generate additional revenues to pay for things like public safety and infrastructure repairs and improvements. The idea of a sales tax increase has grown increasingly popular with that generally conservative bloc. The Chico Chamber of Commerce last year threw its support behind a “revenue measure.” At the time, a half-cent increase was being floated (see “Time to tax,” Newslines, Feb. 1, 2018). Evidently, the thought is that a 1 cent hike is palatable today. Our jaws dropped a few years ago as we watched members of the now-defunct Chico Tea Party lobby a conservative City Council to put such a measure on the

ballot. Their biggest gripe: the city’s badly degraded roadways and other public rights-of-way. They were shouting into the wind back then, though. The conservative council wouldn’t touch a tax hike with a 10-foot pole. But the political winds have since changed, and the city management behind the scenes—mainly conservatives, interestingly—are now working with public officials who aren’t tax-averse. Indeed, several of those on the now-liberal council campaigned on the idea of raising revenues thusly. But here’s the rub, as pointed out by Councilman Sean Morgan, one of the two remaining conservatives on the panel. Should the public approve such a measure at the polls on a simple majority vote, the revenues would be dumped into the general fund and could be spent on virtually anything based on the whims of the council. Earmarking the funds for specific services— say, public safety, infrastructure and parks—requires approval by a two-thirds margin. What’s to say it won’t go toward the city’s crushing pension obligations, critics will argue. We’ll look forward to more conversations on these and other potential sticking points as the council takes the steps needed to place the measure on the 2020 ballot. That’s assuming the public doesn’t believe it’s a foregone conclusion. Ω

GUEST COMMENT

A silent spring is coming Icontamination all man’s assaults upon the environment is the of air, earth, rivers, and sea with

n 1962 Rachel Carson wrote, “The most alarming of

dangerous and even lethal materials.” Here we are 57 years later and scientific research details that 300-400 million tons of heavy metals, solvents and other toxins are dumped into the world’s waters every year. In fact, one refusetruck’s worth of plastic is dumped into the sea every minute. The Amazon rainforest absorbs by about 2 billion metric tons of carbon Roger S. Beadle dioxide, studies suggest. However, The author, a Chico land grabs and government corrupresident, is a tion are fueling deforestation, Chico State alum further threatening the survival of and former small-business the planet. For example, recent data owner. from Brazilian satellites indicated that about three football fields’ worth of Amazonian trees fell every minute last month. Much debate on climate change revolves around the future well-being of humans while ignoring the impact on other species of birds, bees, insects, mammals and

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marine life. The planet’s biodiversity and ecosystem are the “connection of dots” of the interactive existence of all life. The expansion of human habitation and crop production also contributes to the looming extinction of any number of living species: Scientists report that the number of birds in the United States and Canada has declined by 3 billion, or 29 percent, over the past halfcentury; grassland species alone have suffered a loss of 717 million birds, most likely decimated by modern agriculture and development. The honeybee’s population declined an estimated 40 percent between April 2017 and April 2018. Domesticated honeybees are essential to the production of over 70 percent of global crops; therefore their demise threatens human existence. The health of our oceans is imperiled by warming waters and human neglect: By 2050, new plastics will consume 20 percent of all oil production; yet just 5 percent of plastics are recycled effectively, while 40 percent end up in landfills and a third in fragile ecosystems such as the world’s oceans. Time for us to grow up and pay attention to these and many other crises that will make life as we know it unsustainable. □

SECOND & FLUME by Melissa Daugherty m e l i s s a d @ n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

POTUS & the press Less than six months on the job as CN&R editor-in-chief, I got my first death threat. It was written on an editorial clipped out of this paper that called into question the justification for local police using lethal force on a teenager driving a stolen car. My former boss, Robert Speer, happened to swing by the office a few days after I received that piece of hate mail, so I asked him to check it out. I’ll never forget the stunned look on his face as he read the vulgarity-laced messages calling for me to die. I asked him how many times he’d received death threats. Speer’s answer: never. Not once in his more than 40 years as a journalist. As implied above, it’s not the only threat I’ve received during my tenure. Speaking truth to power tends to piss people off. I was reminded of this particular ugly chapter in my work life this week following news about a video in which President Trump’s head is superimposed on a movie character who slaughters people in a church. In this case, the setting is the “Church of Fake News” and the victims are Trump critics and members of the media. It was played last week at one of the president’s hotels during a pro-Trump conference, though organizers say the video wasn’t produced by the group, according to a story published Sunday in The New York Times. The White House denounced the video the next day and said the president would review it. Trump’s reaction: silence. Despite issuing 36 tweets throughout the day, many attacking his political foes, the president of United States failed to condemn the violent video. As his detractors have pointed out, he even tweeted for his followers to vote for former Press Secretary Sean Spicer, who’s competing on Dancing With the Stars. But let’s not pretend like this was unexpected. Trump has spent virtually his entire presidency referring to the press as “fake news” and “the enemy of the people.” Nothing has stopped him—not even the slaying of five employees at a Maryland newspaper just last year. Indeed, the president doesn’t care if journalists are killed. He’s happy to be the “friend” of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman—the man responsible for the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, who’d been critical of the royal family. Trump hates the media because he’s afraid of the reporting on his troubled administration, including the criminal activity of his closest supporters, and his acquiescence to dictators. He’s worried about the evidence showing he’s committed impeachable offenses. Like other demagogues, his defense includes attacking the free press. Perhaps most troubling to Trump is the recent Fox News poll revealing that a majority of Americans favor him being thrown out of office. This gives me a glimmer of hope that people are waking up to the fact that this president has made all of us less safe and that journalists play an integral role in getting to the truth. Time will tell. As for that aforementioned CN&R editorial questioning the local police shooting, though we were alone in that assessment at the time, a federal appeals court years later came to that conclusion, too. Eventually, the city of Chico settled a wrongful death lawsuit for nearly $1 million.

Melissa Daugherty is editor of the CN&R


LETTERS

Send email to cnrletters@newsreview.com

Trump’s risky decisions Re “Forever marred by 45” (Editorial, Oct. 10): Nothing is more dangerous to a nation and the world than a leader who is determined to exercise power, yet hasn’t the knowledge or the inclination to learn the job. President Trump began undermining the Iran agreement negotiated by President Obama and Secretary of State John Kerry, which had effectively stopped Iran’s nuclear program. U.S. allies had all been in accord with the agreement. Trump’s withdrawal caused a destabilization in the region, which has continued to the present. Iran’s attack on Saudi oil installations affects us all. Trump’s abandonment of the Kurds in Syria is the direct result of a phone call from Recep Tayyip Erdoǧan, Turkey’s right-wing leader. Most of Trump’s cabinet and former advisers opposed the abandonment of our Kurdish allies in the fight against ISIS. It took eight long years for President Obama to restore Bush’s

fractured economy, and to stabilize the Middle East after Bush’s senseless invasion of Iraq. When will we learn to elect leaders who have our nation’s welfare and the world’s stability at heart? Robert Woods Forest Ranch

Don’t you love these Johnny-comelately so-called leaders? It took Bernie Sanders four months to endorse Hillary Clinton after losing the 2016 Democratic Party primary to her, and only then after some severe arm-twisting by President Obama. Fast-forward to July 25, 2019. The current occupant of the Oval Office did an Academy Awardwinning impression of Bernie when he called former stand-up comedian Volodymyr Zelensky to supposedly congratulate him on being elected as president of Ukraine, three full months after the day Zelensky had been elected on April 21, 2019. This alibi came after Trump had admitted to arms for dirt on live TV that even his “poorly educated” supporters

have to be scratching their heads over. When Trump recently ordered U.S. ground troops to cut and run in Syria, stabbing our Kurdish allies in the back to appease his beloved strongmen dictator sidekicks, Bashar al-Assad, Recep Tayyip Erdoǧan and Vladimir Putin, he lowered the bar even by his standards. How long will America tolerate this kind of intolerance? Ray Estes Redding

Three on PG&E  Say you perform so atrociously in your job that your decisions cost billions and cause dozens of deaths. Your work bankrupts business, stiffing creditors and customers shamelessly. Would you be rewarded with paydays in the millions? Bonuses? Stock awards? Of course not. But that’s how PG&E, a semi-public regulated LETTERS c o n t i n u e d

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LETTERS c o n t i n u e d f r o m pa g e 5

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monopoly, has been handled forever. This is not just about poor management at PG&E, either. A supine California Public Utilities Commission, the relevant “regulatory” agency, is also responsible. CPUC has ignored astonishing failings for decades. How far back was the Erin Brockovich scandal? PG&E represents the enrichment of a small group of insiders at the expense of the poor, the powerless, and the public in general. PG&E’s executive salary chart includes multiple officers earning millions yearly. The CEO most responsible for the Camp Fire retired just before the bankruptcy with a severance package worth $2.5 million, atop millions in salary. This is wrong. Norman Beecher Chico

Dear PG&E, get your act together. This is no solution. It wreaks havoc for you to turn off power every time it gets windy. You need to bury your electric lines. You have marked many thousands of trees for destruction. How much will that cost? How much is it costing you for all of the lawsuits over your inept management? Your equipment has caused at least 17 of the last 21 major fires. It would ultimately be much cheaper for you to just bury your lines. Make your executives go without their obscenely excessive bonuses, and quit paying dividends to your stockholders, until you do what you are actually supposed to be doing. Your job is to provide safe and reliable equipment, and to provide power to your customers. Do your job. Paula Woods Forest Ranch

PG&E has gone too far! How dare they shut off millions of people’s lives, businesses, government and schools for some measly 40 mph winds. Is their equipment so bad it breaks under such silly conditions? Gov. Gavin Newsom said it perfectly, “This is not a climate change story as much as a story about greed and mismanagement over the course of decades. Neglect, a desire to advance not public safety but profits.” PG&E is greedy and has been for the last 40 years. They waste millions on advertising, trying to make us think they are the good guys. Ha! They spend millions on huge salaries and bonuses, yet do not keep the electricity on, because their

equipment is ancient and decrepit. But I’m sure all their overpaid employees and rich stockholders can afford expensive generators, so they can live comfortably, while we suffer! Pat Johnston Red Bluff

Unsustainable population Re “More voting thoughts” (Letters, by Catherine Cottle, Oct. 10): In the last issue of the CN&R, a letter writer mentioned the “over 200 million people in the U.S.” At roughly 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most overpopulated country after China and India. Of our 327 million, roughly 47 million are immigrants. In 2017, their children numbered 17.1 million, totaling 61.6 million U.S. immigrants. The U.S. has a greater immigrant count than any country, roughly 1 in 5 residents. Environmentalism’s purpose is sustainability—systems in equilibrium. There is no sustainability with increasing population. The main cause of overpopulation is unfettered immigration. Pew Research examined U.S. immigration trends: “If no immigrants had entered the country after 1965, when the U.S. population numbered 193 million, the nation’s population still would have grown—to 252 million people by 2015.” Better than 327 million. Each nation is responsible for its population. Gaylord Nelson, father of Earth Day, stated that “it’s phony to say, ‘I’m for the environment but not for limiting immigration.’” Joseph Abbott Chico

How many words? Re “CN&R grab bag” (Second & Flume, by Melissa Daugherty, Oct. 3): I’m one of those. This letter of confession speaks to memory loss that led me to forget CN&R’s annual warning about its Fiction 59 contest. The caution cites that past entries have been disqualified because they were not exactly 59 words. I awoke late at night suddenly realizing my three entries were exactly 56 each. There, that’s 59 words. Danny Wilson More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past cn&r articles.


STREETALK

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I actually don’t think so. I believe he still has quite a bit of support, and I think he might even be able to get re-elected, to be honest.

Matthew Davis food industry supervisor

I would hope so. I feel like it’s a little late in the term, but I hope he gets what he deserves.

Michael Swindle student

We’ve got a whole year until the 2020 election. Anything can happen between now and then, and scandals can be forgotten, even a potential impeachment. So, I can’t say he’s going down just yet.

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public notice

leaf pickup

STaRTS novembeR 1, 2019 anD enDS JanuaRY 1, 2020

ciTY of chico ReSiDenTS ShoulD noT... BLOCK bicycle lanes, driveways, or storm drains. DEPOSIT branches, limbs, trees, or other debris for pickup (LEAVES ONLY). This program is not available to residents living on privately-owned streets or in unincorporated areas.

Property owners and landscape companies who service commercial and multifamily properties are NOT ALLOWED to place leaves in city streets. PLEASE CONTACT THE CITY FOR OTHER LEAF DISPOSAL OPTIONS. City of Chico: 894-4205 Monday - Friday, 8am-5pm RightofWayMaintenance@chicoca.gov www.ci.chico.ca.us O c t O b e r 1 7, 2 0 1 9

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NEWSLINES DOWNSTROKE PG&E CLAIM DEADLINE NEARS

Wildfire victims who believe they have a claim against PG&E for property damage, personal injury, wrongful death or other losses stemming from Northern California fires—including the Camp Fire—that happened before the company’s Jan. 29 bankruptcy filing must submit a proof-of-claim form by 5 p.m. Monday (Oct. 21). Forms can be submitted online, by mail or in person. Visit pgewildfireinfo.com or call 844-627-5328 for more information. Cal Fire determined equipment owned by PG&E sparked the Camp Fire, which ravaged Butte County. The utility filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection as it faced billions of dollars in potential wildfire liabilities.

The twilight zones

SYRINGE PROGRAM APPROVED

The Northern Valley Harm Reduction Coalition is now able to launch syringe access services in Chico. The California Department of Public Health’s Office of AIDS approved the organization’s application on Monday (Oct. 14). In addition to meeting state requirements, the letter states that NVHRC received approval because “conditions exist for the rapid spread of HIV, viral hepatitis, or other bloodborne diseases in Butte County.” Of note, NVHRC worked with CDPH to address the concerns of local law enforcement, and its new plan limits the location of its services, which will be offered on Sundays, 9-11 a.m., and highlights its syringe litter cleanup efforts, including a hotline and online reporting form. The program will be certified for two years but can be renewed. Check nvhrc.com for updated info.

LIFELINE FOR THE RIDGE

Gov. Gavin Newsom on Saturday (Oct. 12) approved a bill that would allow Adventist Health to operate a freestanding emergency department at the site of Feather River Hospital in Paradise. Senate Bill 156, which was authored by Sen. Jim Nielsen (pictured), would permit emergency services at the site for up to six years provided certain requirements are met, including 24/7 service, appropriate nurse-to-patient staffing levels and compliance with emergency department regulations. “The destruction experienced by this community is a unique situation that calls for a unique response,” Newsom wrote in a signing letter, adding that the bill also would provide time to evaluate the hospital’s long-term plans. A spokeswoman for Adventist Health told the CN&R the organization is “thrilled” at the bill’s approval, adding that it is the “first step of many steps to follow.” 8

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This is what it’s like to live through a PG&E blackout

Nmoving outpost in a quiet corner of Grass Valley, around desert-colored tents, mobile

early 80 people crowded into a makeshift

toilets, standing spotlights, buzzing generators and parked emergency vehicles. At a glance, the camp—surrounded by a scattering story and of pine trees under a photo by blue, cloudless sky— Scott Thomas Anderson could have been mistaken for a forward operatsc o t ta @ ing base in Afghanistan. n ew srev i ew. c o m Of course, there was an obvious difference between a military base and this “resource center,” hastily erected by PG&E after the embattled utility giant cut off electricity to hundreds of thousands of customers last week: No one signed up for this. PG&E has steadfastly defended its biggest-ever power shut-off, saying that widespread, red flag conditions—similar to those when the deadly Tubbs and Camp fires ignited in 2017 and 2018, respectively— made the shut-off across the Sierra foothills and Bay Area last week necessary to prevent an errant electrical spark from starting the next wildfire that could destroy communities and put PG&E out of business. Across the state, more than 700,000

customers were affected by the shut-off, which impacted more than 2 million people, according to the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC). Here in Butte County, approximately 30,000 people lost power for anywhere from a few hours to days. As with the two previous instances when PG&E has activated its Public Safety Power Shutoff program, isolated seniors, disabled residents and those with medical conditions became even more vulnerable. The execution of the shut-off has been widely criticized, from Gov. Gavin Newsom down to people like those in Grass Valley’s enclave, one of 28 safety zones PG&E set up to help people it put in the dark. Poorly advertised and relying on a borrowed—and quickly overwhelmed—Wi-Fi network of the nearby Sierra College satellite campus, the resource center functioned as a sort of survivalist speakeasy with unhappy customers. People stewed in over-air-conditioned tents, many sharing a conviction that Nevada County only experienced moderate winds for a few hours on Oct. 9—and for that, every rhythm of daily life had been disrupted. “They’re acting like we’ve never had wind before this year,” fumed Richard Calkins, a 16-year Grass Valley resident. “Dry conditions shouldn’t be an issue if

their equipment is up to code. … The bottom line is, there’s a lot of people here who want to know if we’re being punished because PG&E is losing its lawsuit. What’s the real motivation?” Before the week was out, many others, including the governor, were asking similar questions. Fictional comparisons abound for what it was like on that first powerless sunrise in places like Nevada County. For anyone with plumbing powered by well pumps, the dystopian vibe was like Cormac McCarthy’s novel The Road. Tourists who wanted to experience the Gold Rush-era saloons and Victorian architecture wandered Nevada City’s empty Main Street in an eerie silence reminiscent of The Twilight Zone. And early commuters driving to Sacramento might be excused for thinking of any number of disaster movies, with Highway 49 backed up for miles due to traffic signals going dark in north Auburn. Economist Michael Wara of the Stanford

Woods Institute for the Environment announced on social media that he’d used a special disruption calculator created by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to estimate what the blackout could cost


Nevada City’s historic Main Street falls into complete darkness at sunset for the third night in a row on Oct. 10.

California’s overall economy: $2.5 billion. The timing of the blackouts has fueled criticism. Just one day before the utility giant pulled the plug, a federal judge handling PG&E’s bankruptcy case ruled that its creditors, along with wildfire victims, can propose an alternative plan for the company to regain solvency, one that would prioritize recovering their losses over shareholder profits. PG&E’s stock plummeted on the news. The next day, the company sent much of Northern California into darkness. “The PG&E Blackout con is all about threatening the judge in the PG&E bankruptcy case,” energy commentator Greg Palast wrote in an open letter. “The victims have joined with the bondholders to eliminate the equity of the stockholders who deserve nothing. … Hopefully the judge will not be intimidated.” Newsom stopped short of that accusation, but made it clear he believed that PG&E was more responsible for the shutoff than weather conditions. “This is not a climate change story as much as a story about greed and mismanagement over the course of decades,” Newsom told reporters. “Neglect—a desire to advance not public safety but profits.” PG&E CEO Bill Johnson replied in a statement, saying the company had followed its hazard mitigation plan as approved by the CPUC. “We appreciate the significant impact that turning off power for safety has on our customers and the state,” he said. “While we recognize this was a hardship for millions of people throughout Northern and Central California, we made that decision to keep customers and communities safe. That was the right decision.” The CPUC came on strongly following the shut-offs, however, and called an emergency meeting with PG&E executives for Friday (Oct. 18) to discuss what it saw as major flaws in executing the plan. “Failures in execution, combined with the magnitude of this [Public Safety Power Shutoff] event, created an unacceptable situation that should never be repeated,” CPUC President Marybel Batjer said in a press release after ordering PG&E take immediate corrective measures. “The scope, scale, complexity, and overall impact to people’s lives, businesses, and the economy of this action cannot be understated.” Ω Meredith J. Cooper contributed to this report.

Revenue seekers Council putting sales tax measure before voters, ramping up pursuit of commercial air service While Chicoans believe the city is doing a good job

when it comes to fire and disaster management efforts and quality of police services, they don’t think the City Council is managing taxpayer dollars well. This finding was presented on Tuesday (Oct. 15) as part of a survey of 400 Chicoans conducted by consultant EMC Research. The main goal was to get a sense of whether voters would be in favor of a 1 percent sales tax increase. It garnered overwhelming support: 70 percent said they would vote yes in order to fund police, firefighters, roadway maintenance and Bidwell Park upkeep. But this paradoxical finding, in particular, gave Mayor Randall Stone pause, and he recited it aloud to confirm it with consultant Jessica Polsky. Councilwoman Ann Schwab asked Polsky to elaborate: Is this because people don’t trust government in general? Polsky replied that anecdotally it’s typical to see voters responding less favorably about management of taxpayer dollars. In communities where there is significant pessimism or a demand for change, those responses tend to be more negative, she added, even if services are rated good overall. The council saw a clear path forward based on the survey results, directing city staff to prepare a ballot measure and enlist a strategy consultant to help with education and outreach. It would require a majority vote to change the current sales tax rate from 7.25 percent to 8.25 percent. If such a measure passes, the city estimates bringing in an additional $18 million

per year to the general fund. Other than voter support, another selling point for the council was a bleak fiveyear projection outlined by Assistant City Manager Chris Constantin. Rising costs and slowing economic growth, he said, likely will lead to emergency reductions in city services and staffing to avoid a deficit. Though the council unanimously decided to put the issue in front of the voters (sans Councilman Scott Huber, who was absent), conservative council members Kasey Reynolds and Sean Morgan advocated for a special sales tax measure, which requires a two-thirds vote but would allow for stipulations on how the revenue can be spent. “The public doesn’t trust us,” Morgan said. “I don’t necessarily trust those dollars to go where we say we’re going to put them unless we can absolutely earmark them, at which case then I say, look, let’s move ahead.”

SIFT ER Averse to purging Americans have a hard time letting go. Cleaning and restoration service company ServiceMaster of Lakeshore—a Chicagobased independent franchise—conducted a survey of 7,000 households and found that almost $50 billion worth of goods are going to waste in our homes. In California, each household hangs on to about $380 worth of clutter. Nationwide, respondents said the hardest items to throw out are clothing (28 percent), outdated tech (24 percent), furniture (18 percent), books (16 percent) and movies (12 percent). The tendency to hoard affects relation-

ships: 22 percent of couples acknowledged household clutter has caused arguments. Safety also is a concern. Nearly half of Californians (49 percent) said their unused goods are creating a fire hazard. And, when Golden State residents do dispose of things, a quarter of them admitted to illegally dumping. Nationally, only 39 percent recycle electronic waste, an environmental hazard that contaminates landfills.

Councilman Karl Ory says re-establishing commercial air service is critical to buoying the city’s economy and creating more jobs, especially post-Camp Fire. PHOTO BY ASHIAH SCHARAGA

Also on Tuesday, City Public Works Director of

Engineering Brendan Ottoboni reported that 40 percent of the city’s roadways are in poor or very poor condition, meaning they are at or near a state of complete failure and need to be fully reconstructed. The findings come from the 2019 update of the city’s pavement management program. For example, Ottoboni showed a photo of Rio Lindo Avenue that looks like a checkerboard from patchwork repairs. Since 2016, when the program was last updated, the city’s roads degraded significantly, Ottoboni said. Approximately $6.5 million is needed over the next five years just to maintain the status quo—business as usual, with a budget of $1 million per year, won’t cut it. “Our check engine light’s on,” he said. “And as time goes by and we continue at this budgetary pace, we expect that [conditions] will continue to degrade.” That night, the City Council also decided to take a more aggressive approach to pursuing commercial air service. City staff has been working on getting commercial service re-established locally since hiring an airport manager in 2016. Currently, a significant hurdle is establishing a revenue guarantee fund, which provides relief to airlines under specific terms should they come on board and experience financial loss. The council voted to direct staff to create the fund and designate someone who will focus on raising the $1 million minimum needed. The city applied for a $500,000 NEWSLINES C O N T I N U E D

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NOTICE TO CITY OF CHICO RESIDENTS OPPORTUNITY TO SERVE ON CLIMATE ACTION COMMISSION The City of Chico is seeking applications from volunteers to serve on the newly created Climate Action Commission. The deadline for submitting applications to serve on this commission is Friday, November 1, 2019. Applicants must be residents of the City of Chico and qualified voters (18 years or older). The Commission is comprised of seven members, three of whom must have experience in climate action related activities, social/community services, energy, economics, transportation, or business. The Climate Action Commission will provide recommendations to the Council for adoption, a comprehensive climate action plan, monitor and recommend updates based on quantified metrics to measure and evaluate reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and community benefits. The Commission will meet on the second Thursday of the month at 6 pm. Initial appointments will be staggered with four positions ending in 2020 and three ending in 2022.

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Applications are available on the City’s website at www.ci.chico.ca.us and from the City Clerk’s Office, 411 Main Street, 3rd Floor, Chico. Please call 896-7250 if you have any questions. ALL APPLICATIONS MUST BE RECEIVED IN THE CITY CLERK’S OFFICE BY 5:00 P.M, Friday, November 1, 2019.

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grant through the U.S. Department of Transportation and should know in November if it is chosen. It received a letter of support from SkyWest, which serviced Chico before leaving in 2014. Ory, who brought the issue forward, said re-establishing service is critical to buoying the city’s economy and creating more jobs, especially post-Camp Fire. “Access is the key for us to thrive,” he added. The city also will send advocacy letters to several organizations, including to: the Butte County Association of Governments, asking it to support state and federal funding for public bus service to Sacramento; the state rail service, asking it to consider San Joaquin train service between Sacramento and Oroville as an economic necessity post-Camp Fire; and the Shasta Regional Transportation Agency, to integrate its statefunded electric bus system to the Sacramento International Airport with Chico’s system. The vote fell 5-1, with Morgan against and Huber absent. Morgan said he supported some initiatives but was mostly hesitant, calling commercial air service “a pipe dream” that the city is going to “spend a lot of time and energy chasing.” A couple of Chicoans also were against the proposal, but for different reasons: climate impacts. Patrick Newman and Mary Kay Benson told the council it was headed in the wrong direction. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, aircraft travel accounts for 9 percent of all transportationrelated greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. Schwab supported Ory’s convictions. “In order for us to be successful economically, we have to be tied to the rest of the state. Since we can’t move over to [Interstate 5], we have to think of other ways to do that,” she said. “I think we need to get serious about identifying funding for some type of flying service out of Chico.” —AshiAh schArAgA ash ia h s@ newsr ev iew.c o m


A worker douses potentially contaminated soil in Paradise, 11 months after the Camp Fire.

Winding down

PHOTO BY ANNE WERNIKOFF/CALMATTERS

CalRecycle nears end of Camp Fire debris cleanup

As California braces for peak fire season, the

most extensive post-fire cleanup it has ever taken on is nearly complete. Crews have hauled off more than 3.6 million tons of debris in Butte County—twice what was removed from the World Trade Center site after the attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, in New York City. The painstaking and expensive cleanup process—more than $1 billion in public money spent so far from an allocated $1.75 billion—has been necessary not just to allow residents to rebuild and schools and businesses to reopen, but also to make the burn scar environmentally safe. Potential dangers still lurk for those who are resuming their lives in the area and, more acutely, for the hundreds of workers who have been sifting through the fire remnants, sorting and removing charred hulks of cars, mobile homes, melted metal and tons of dirt. The state Division of Occupational Safety and Health enforces requirements for workers to wear safety gear, lending an otherworldly aspect to the region, About this story: especially in Paradise: It is an abridged version The already-barren of the original, published landscape is teeming by CalMatters.org, an with people in white independent public journalism venture covering protective suits and California state politics booties, wearing hard and government. hats and breathing through respirators. If it seems like overkill, it’s not. “Think about all the things in a house,” said David Hornung, who oversaw the Occupational Safety and Health’s response to the Tubbs Fire that ravaged Santa Rosa in October 2017. “There are televisions, electronics, dishwashers; it’s really complex.” Computers and other electronics contain lead,

mercury, arsenic and other dangerous chemicals. “Then you have plastics and composite material,” which may release hydrochloric acid, sulfur dioxide and heavy metals when burned. “You get a real complex mixture of chemicals.” Debris cleanup is free to residents who register with local authorities, on a first-come, first-served basis. Generally, however, work on schools and public buildings has taken priority. The state hires specialized companies to do the work. The Camp Fire was caused by utility equipment owned by PG&E, which has agreed to pay billions in damage claims. Some residents have chosen to pay for cleanup work themselves or use their homeowners’ insurance, potentially affording them a faster turnaround. Temporary fencing around town is plastered with phone numbers of cleanup companies advertising their availability. CalRecycle officials say they are unaware of another state or country that operates a similarly extensive post-wildfire environmental cleanup. The program has evolved since 2007, in the wake of a huge firestorm across Southern California, into a sophisticated machine involving numerous state agencies,

led by the Office of Emergency Services and CalRecycle, which have devised a step-bystep protocol. Pauline Totten, who supervises fire debris

removal projects for CalRecycle, has been on the Butte County job since January. Her hard hat is speckled with decals commemorating work on previous fires, but the scope of this cleanup is unprecedented, she said. “Normally we have one contractor. On this we have three,” she said. As many as 3,000 workers took part in the project, officials said. After nine months, the work is winding down, with 99 percent of the sites cleared. On a recent day, crews were tackling the last of the major debris areas. Totten watched as machines scraped layers of soil and plopped their loads into lines of dump trucks idling along the town’s main drag. A worker trained a powerful hose on the piles of dirt to keep the dust down. Work is performed parcel by parcel, in prescribed phases. First, the state Department of Toxic Substances Control removes such hazardous waste as propane tanks and asbestos, commonly found in older buildings. Other state agencies collect air samples. Although much of the town literally disap-

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peared in a column of smoke, some material ended up in the soil. Before wholesale dirt removal took place, a contractor collected soil samples at different depths from 187 locations and analyzed them to establish what was likely to have been in the ground before the fire and to determine the extent of removal needed. Under Totten’s supervision, crews are beginning their assessment of what was once a sprawling mobile-home park. Someone scrawled addresses on the asphalt in front of the gutted homes to help identify them. The state requires extensive mapping of sites before cleanup can begin: “Measure and record foundation, structures, debris, utility infrastructure and property-specific hazards,” the guidelines say. At the mobile-home park, a technician sketched several chimneys on his drawing of the site; the chimneys, a common post-fire hazard, will be knocked over by heavy equipment. An air monitor was strapped to the technician’s waist. Totten said her crews convene on the ground only after state workers have swept the area: Inspectors left behind a white X on burned-out vehicles from which they removed batteries, which contain dangerous chemicals. Next will come crews that sort metals to be trucked to recycling facilities. Other debris is taken to designated landfills. There has been so much waste that some facilities have waivers allowing them to accept more than their usual storage limits, officials said. When the site is ready for the final step, it will be leveled and, if necessary, erosion control measures will be taken. Totten said the work is demanding, but she never forgets that “debris” means something more precious to those who lived there. “I look at this and see that this was someone’s home,” she said, gesturing around the mobile home park, strewn with mangled bicycles and rusted cars. “My grandmother could have lived here.” —JULIE CART

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HEALTHLINES A new report on prescription drug prices shows pharmaceutical companies are hiking prices—particularly for generics—to wholesalers. PHOTO BY JULIA SUDNITSKAYA/ISTOCK

Drug dealings

The national debate over exorbitant prescrip-

California’s new transparency law reveals steep rise in wholesale medication prices by

Barbara Feder Ostrov and Harriet Blair Rowan

Dtransparency California’s groundbreaking drug price law, passed in 2017. Now, rugmakers fought hard against

state health officials have released their first report on the price hikes those drug companies sought to shield. Pharmaceutical companies raised the “wholesale acquisition cost” of their drugs— the list price for wholesalers without discounts or rebates—by a median of 25.8 percent from 2017 through the first quarter of 2019, according to the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development. (The median is a value at the midpoint of data distribution.) Generic drugs saw the largest median increase of 37.6 percent during that time. By

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comparison, the annual inflation rate during the period was 2 percent. Several drugs stood out for far heftier price increases: The cost of a generic liquid version of Prozac, for example, rose from $9 to $69 in just the first quarter of 2019, an increase of 667 percent. Guanfacine, a generic medication for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), on the market since 2010, rose more than 200 percent in the first quarter of 2019 to $87 for 100 2 mg pills. Amneal Pharmaceuticals, which makes Guanfacine, cited “manufacturing costs” and “market conditions” as reasons for the price hike. “Even at a time when there is a microscope on this industry, they’re going ahead with drug price increases for hundreds of drugs well above the rate of inflation,” said Anthony Wright, executive director of the California advocacy group Health Access.

tion drug prices—and how to relieve them—was supposed to take center stage in recent weeks, as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi released a plan to negotiate prices for as many as 250 name-brand drugs, including high-priced insulin, for Medicare beneficiaries. Another plan under consideration in the Senate would set a maximum out-of-pocket cost for prescription drugs for Medicare patients and penalize drug companies if prices rose faster than inflation. President Donald Trump has highlighted drug prices as an issue in his re-election campaign. But lawmakers’ efforts to hammer out legislation are likely to be overshadowed, for now, by presidential impeachment proceedings. In Nevada, health officials in early October fined companies $17 million for failing to comply with the state’s twoyear-old transparency law requiring diabetes drug manufacturers to disclose detailed financial and pricing information. California’s new drug law requires companies to report drug price increases quarterly. Only companies that met certain standards—they raised the price of a drug within the first quarter and the price had risen by at least 16 percent since January 2017—had to submit data. The companies that met the standards were required to provide pricing data for the previous five years. In its initial report, the state focused its analysis on drug-

pricing trends for about 1,000 products from January 2017 through March 2019. California’s transparency law also requires drugmakers to state why they are raising prices. Over time, that information, in addition to cost disclosures, could create “one of the more comprehensive and official drug databases on prices that we have nationwide,” Wright said. “That, in itself, is progress, so that we can get better information on the rationale for drug price increases.” But the data does not reflect discounts and rebates for insurers and pharmacy benefit managers and bears little resemblance to what consumers actually pay, said Priscilla VanderVeer, a spokeswoman for the trade group Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America. The group filed a lawsuit seeking to overturn the California legislation that has not yet been resolved. “If transparency legislation only looks at one part of the pharmaceutical supply chain, without getting into the various middlemen like insurers and pharmacy benefit managers that ultimately determine what patients have to pay at the pharmacy HEALTHLINES C O N T I N U E D

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APPOINTMENT

Walks for causes This Saturday (Oct. 19) brings two opportunities for community gathering for a great cause. Chico’s Out of the Darkness suicide awareness and prevention organization is hosting its 10th annual

Out of the Darkness Chico Walk to Fight Suicide. The event starts at City Plaza at 9 a.m. and follows an easy 2- to 3-mile

walk around town. Registration is free and donations are accepted. Visit afsp. org/chico for more info. Also, the North Valley Freedom Foundation will be hosting a Walk for Freedom at 10 a.m. at Children’s Playground to bring awareness to the issue of slavery around the globe.


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~ ATTENTION ~ SEEKING WITNESSES Re: Skyway House, Inc. A civil complaint has been filed against Skyway House, Inc., the former operator of an alcohol and drug abuse recovery facility in Chico, relating to a program participant being sexually exploited by an employee. If you or someone you know has information regarding sexual relationships between Skyway House, Inc. employees and participants in the facility’s recovery programs between 2010 and 2014, please contact:

LAW OFFICE OF JOSEPH M. EARLEY III (530) 876-1111

FOR DENTURES WITH EXTRACTIONS ONLY 14

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HEALTHLINES

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It was produced by Kaiser Health News, which publishes California Healthline, an editorially independent service of the California Health Care Foundation.

WEEKLY DOSE

How to prepare when your power goes off As the winds pick up this fall, rolling blackouts may occur across various areas of the state, including parts of Chico. There are certain precautions that you can take so that you and your family remain safe and comfortable. Preparation is key, but an emergency supply kit is a necessity. Pack enough supplies to last a week, including, but not limited to: nonperishable food, drinking water, tools and utensils, duct tape, a flashlight, a radio and extra batteries, a first-aid kit, a cellphone charger, medication, eyeglasses/contacts, toiletries, blankets and clothes, pet food, activities for kids and copies of important documents. Every family has different needs—just make sure to refresh your kit once a year. And don’t forget to take a trip to the bank for cash and to fill up on gas—ATMs, credit card machines and gas pumps may be down. Visit pge.com for more detailed advice, including food safety and utility shut-off.

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an author of the study. “Maybe cost of production is going up,” he said. “Maybe there’s a drug shortage, or some competitors got eliminated. This reporting of [wholesale acquisition cost] data doesn’t really tell us which of these stories is true.” For now, California’s new data is not likely to be of much help to consumers, Pan said. But he said it might help state officials in their bid to overhaul the way the state purchases drugs for 13 million people served by Medi-Cal, the state’s Medicaid program for low-income residents. Gov. Gavin Newsom’s controversial plan to have the state, rather than individual Medi-Cal managed-care plans, negotiate directly with drugmakers would save the state an estimated $393 million a year by 2023, according to the administration. Ω

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counter, it won’t help patients access or afford their medicines,” VanderVeer said in an email. State Sen. Richard Pan (D-Sacramento), a pediatrician who chairs the Senate health committee, agrees—up to a point. “Transparency always has value,” Pan said. But policymakers need more data on how much insurers and consumers are spending on prescription drugs, he said. And he wonders why the price of generic drugs, including those with plenty of competition, rose at higher rates. His concerns were echoed by University of Southern California policy researchers, who recently published a study that concluded most state-level drug-transparency laws are “insufficient” to reveal the true transaction prices for prescription drugs, or where in the distribution system excessive profits lie. “The question is, why are these prices going up? Typically, there are competing stories for that,” said Neeraj Sood, vice dean of USC’s School of Public Policy and

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GREEN GREENWAYS Ed McLaughlin, left, and Rich McGowan, members of the Agricultural Groundwater Users of Butte County, are pursuing the creation of a water district in the Vina sub-basin.

Treading water

Chico-based environmental group concerned about domestic wells as farmers propose new groundwater district story and photo by

Andre Byik

an dreb@ n ewsrev iew. com

CagoCounty Farm Bureau about four years with a message: The 2014 passage of ounty water officials went to the Butte

the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA)—a sweeping regulatory program intended to curb overuse of the state’s aquifers—will prove crucial to farmers dependent on groundwater, and it was time to get organized. Rich McGowan, who sits on the farm bureau’s board of directors, told the CN&R that the county’s agricultural groundwater users—primarily growers of almonds, walnuts, pistachios and other tree crops—had been unorganized at the time, working individually or in splintered groups in contrast to the county’s more organized surface water users. “It became apparent,” McGowan said, “that it was critically important that somehow we formed some sort of vehicle in order to represent ourselves.” Since that meeting, the Agricultural Groundwater Users of Butte County (AGUBC)—a nonprofit organization of which McGowan is president—has been formed, and its membership has been pursuing plans to create a new water district in the county’s unincorporated northwest region, where growers depend on wells and agriculture produc-

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tion totaled nearly $300 million in 2017. But since the introduction of the proposed Tuscan Water District at a public meeting in Durham in late September and then a county Water Commission meeting earlier this month, the proposal has been met with a flow of concerns. Some have criticized the speed at which AGUBC is pursuing the plan, raising questions regarding the organization’s motives and whether the public has had enough opportunity to provide input. Others have questioned possible long-term environmental effects of the proposed water district. “Some groundwater-dependent farmers— in conversations with the county—believe that it is in their best interest to form a district so that they feel they could have a voice in the management of the groundwater basin, all being driven by [SGMA],” said Barbara Vlamis, executive director of AquAlliance, a Chico-based water advocacy group. Her nonprofit’s concern, she added, is that the workings of a water district may “inadvertently” undermine the health of the basin that AGUBC says it wants to protect. Jim Brobeck, water policy analyst for AquAlliance, said AGUBC may not have the public’s best interests in mind. The priority of farmers, Brobeck said, is to make sure they have water in their wells, not to protect the shallowest portion of an aquifer. Water purveyors, he said, like to “exercise” aquifers and may well do so to the point where the public suffers. “I think they need more comprehensive

advice, legal advice and historical advice, [about] how these things play out over the decades,” Brobeck said. “This is why we want this to be surfaced. We want to have public opinions on this so that we fully reveal the full ramifications of how this could play out.” The proposed Tuscan Water District, which would comprise about 97,000 acres from the Tehama County line south to the northern border of the Western Canal Water District in the Durham area, would establish a local body that represents the interests of landowners—both agriculture and domestic—in the district’s borders, McGowan said. It also would be a water purveyor, bringing surface water to an area where it’s currently unavailable, and work with the county to sustain the basin. The district would be a landowner-voting body with taxing powers. Its formation requires review by the Butte Local Agency Formation Commission (LAFCo). An application to begin the process has not yet been submitted. Paul Gosselin, the county’s director of water

and resource conservation, explained groundwater levels declined slightly in the county over the last two decades, including in the Vina “sub-basin,” which is part of the larger Sacramento Valley groundwater basin and where the Tuscan Water District is proposed. Following the passage of SGMA, which requires local groundwater sustainability agencies to develop and implement management

plans to stop groundwater overdraft and reach basin “sustainability” by the early 2040s, growers took notice. Local management plans are due to the state by January 2022. “The growers got kind of aware that they’re 88 percent of the groundwater demand in the Vina sub-basin, and they knew balancing the basin—either you do two things,” Gosselin said. “You either reduce pumping or you improve recharge, [meaning] putting more water in the basin. So what they continually wanted to do was have a lot more control about how to achieve sustainability.” An option long talked about has been better management of surface water locally. Gosselin said an entity such as the proposed Tuscan Water District could enter purchase agreements with other local districts that may have a surplus of surface water during wet years. The district could then supply that surface water to its customers, avoiding overpumping and allowing the basin to recharge and recover. Gosselin said the proposed water district would not have water rights, and it would not transfer water out of the area. County ordinance prohibits use of locally-extracted groundwater outside the county without a permit, and the Vina Groundwater Sustainability Agency on Thursday (Oct. 10) directed its committee to develop enforceable rules limiting out-of-basin water transfers. The county has not taken a position on the district, and the Water Commission will hear more information about the proposal at its meeting Nov. 6. But Gosselin said such an entity could address an identified need. “The need generally to find ways to have available surface water be used in groundwater-dependent areas to reduce the demand on the basin is a good thing,” he said, adding, “It’s a matter of getting the right agency to actually be able to take surface water from others during wet years and distribute it to landowners and have it integrated into their irrigation systems.” McGowan addressed the concern regarding domestic wells going dry, saying local standards will be set under SGMA to prevent agricultural overpumping of groundwater. That will benefit domestic users, he said. Further, the AGUBC has been exploring establishing a water district for the last two years, attending SGMA, groundwater sustainability agency and other local water meetings. McGowan noted the Board of Supervisors adopted a resolution in October 2017 recognizing the group’s interest in creating a water district while resolving to work with the group along the way. That’s been happening, he said. “We’ve been very open, and one of the points I want to make is that the thrust of this has come from the county and the state,” he said. “They want local representation, and we didn’t have any.” □


EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS PHOTO BY JOSH COZINE

15 MINUTES

THE GOODS

Familiar faces

Labor of love

by

Meredith J. Cooper meredithc@newsreview.com

Vianey Martinez has been baking her whole life. Growing up in a Nicaraguan and Mexican household in Daly City, she was raised on Latin comfort food, her mother teaching her how to cook tortillas, cookies and cakes from a young age. Over the years, she would become a medical assistant and a reproductive specialist for different areas of the health care industry, but she never stopped baking. This summer, Martinez decided to take her kitchen skills to the next level, getting her business license and starting up Filbert Avenue Baking Co. Since then, she’s stopped working in health care and started selling her goods at local coffee shops, community events and setting up outside her house, along with taking custom orders online. For more information, contact Martinez on her Filbert Avenue Baking Co. Facebook page, or on instagram @citygirlcountrycarbs.

Was there any specific inspiration that made you decide to start your own business? When I was in health care, I’d always bake for a lot of friends. We relied a lot on treats and cake and carbs and caffeine, and so I started doing it more and more. You know that moment when everyone says “Do what makes you happy”? Well, this does make me happy, so I just decided, “What the hey,” I’m gonna give it a go at doing what makes me happy.

How do you operate right now? It’s still very small right now. It’s just a tiny little home operation and I only very recently got the confidence to meander outside my front door. I’m at Blackbird Cafe on Mondays from 4-7 p.m. selling vegan, non-GMO tortillas, but that’s a very recent venture and they’re not sure if it’s going to be year-round. Right now it’s basically by appointment only. I take custom orders online [through social media] and deliver them.

I got a sweet note the other day from a reader who shared a story of her recent visit to Red Bluff with great excitement. She was pleasantly surprised, she said, to see Ikkyu Japanese Restaurant had opened up there. “My husband and I were thrilled to find Ikkyu—our favorite Paradise restaurant—and enjoy their delicious Japanese food,” Rae Lee writes. “The owners and staff are familiar faces, wearing impressive Paradise Camp Fire Strong T-shirts.” According to Ikkyu’s Facebook page, the restaurant celebrated its seventh anniversary last month and the owners, Momo and Shige Kojima, seem to be doing pretty well after losing their business and two homes to the Camp Fire. They hope to someday rebuild in Paradise, but until then, visit them in Red Bluff at 645 Antelope Blvd., Ste. 4.

What’s on the menu? I’m still finishing the menu, but the things I can say are confidently on the menu are homemade tortillas, chewy chocolate chip cookies and an ode to my Mexican cookies I grew up with, galletas grageas—sugar cookies rolled in sprinkles, and madeto-order cakes.

Any sort of risks involved? You have to be respectful with food. Your kitchen has to be a sacred space—you’re always running a real risk when you cook for people. I also never thought I’d be at this point where I would just literally leave something I loved so, so, so much in [health care], and change is scary. But leaving doesn’t always have to mean you weren’t happy, you just gotta grow.

What are future business plans? I applied to the farmers’ market and I’m waiting to hear back, but the goal is to never stop doing this. If I got to a point where I could do this full-time, absolutely I would. —JOSH COZINE

WAIT, THERE’S MORE I got word last week that Mamma Celeste’s Gastropub & Pizzeria, which also lost its home on the Skyway last November, just signed a 20-year lease on a spot in Sparks, Nev. I (sadly) never made it to the Paradise location, but it was my go-to pizza joint in Chico while it was here. I’m sorry to see it go so far away—planned opening is next May—but hey, we can all still enjoy some great, familiar food and faces when we travel now. So, there is a silver lining. As owner Jim Flanagan says on Facebook, “On Nov 8th, 2018, [our] dream was interrupted, but not destroyed.” Amen. OPEN ON THE RIDGE It’s not all news of businesses leaving town around here. No, I heard recently that Izzy’s Burgers & BBQ reopened at 13915 S. Park Drive in Magalia earlier this month. Also, Mountain Mike’s is back in biz in the Kmart shopping center in Paradise. And a new eatery, Nic’s, recently opened up shop in the former Wine Room space on the Skyway. The photos and early reviews seem promising—the place was even open during the blackout last week, offering $1 coffees and ports for plugging in electronics. Right on!

LIE BACK, RELAX In honor of Veterans Day Nov. 11, True Rest Float Spa is offering free floats for vets and active-duty military (in fact, the veteran-owned business does so on the 11th of every month). I haven’t tried it yet, but a friend of mine who served in Afghanistan swears by this place—both the deprivation tanks and the service. Bonus for civilians: For every float you buy between Monday (Oct. 21) and Nov. 11, a vet will get one free. NOW IN CHICO Ace Hardware announced last week that it’s holding its grand opening on Saturday (Oct. 18), from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at its new home on East Avenue (next to Raley’s in the old Orchard Supply Hardware space). I want to be excited, but here’s the thing: It’s an out-of-state company that opened up a hardware store literally across the street from recently opened, locally owned True Value Hardware. Naturally, Ace will employ local folks, which is good, but it just kind of stinks to do so in such close proximity to a local business. As always, shop local, people!

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b y Pa u l Ro s e n b e r g

The top

stories mainstream media overlooked in 2019

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very year, Project Censored scours the landscape for the most important stories that mainstream corporate media somehow missed, and every year the task seems to get a bit stranger. Or “curiouser and curiouser,” as suggested in the subtitle of this year’s volume, Censored 2020: Through the Looking Glass, which includes the full list of the top 25 censored stories and much, much more about the never-ending struggle to bring vitally important hidden truths to light.

About this story:

To learn more about Project Censored, including reading the expanded list of 25 underreported stories or purchasing the book, visit projectcensored.org. Paul Rosenberg is senior editor at Random Lengths News.

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In the forward, “Down the Rabbit Hole of ‘Media Literacy’ by Decree,” Sharyl Attkisson, an Emmy Award-winning investigative journalist, highlights the absurdity of “so many well-organized, well-funded efforts to root out so-called ‘fake news,’” which—as we’ll see below—have significantly impacted the kinds of journalists and outlets who have historically produced the stories that make Project Censored’s list in the first place. “The self-appointed curators, often wielding proprietary algorithms, summarily dispense with facts and ideas that they determine to be false—or maybe just dangerous to their agendas,” Attkisson writes. “Thanks to them, we will hardly have to do any of our own thinking. They’ll take care of it for us.” Does that seem hyperbolic? Well, read on, dear reader. In Project Censored’s No. 2 story this year, you’ll discover Facebook partnering with a NATO-sponsored think tank to “monitor for misinformation and foreign interference.” It’s a think tank whose funders include the U.S. military, the United Arab Emirates, weapons contractors and oil companies. And whose board includes Henry Kissinger, the world’s most famous alleged war criminal. Who better to tell you whom to believe? Or better yet, decide whom you’ll never even hear from?

In the beginning, Project Censored’s founder, Carl Jensen, was partly motivated by the way the early reporting on the Watergate scandal didn’t cross over from being a crime story to a political story until after the 1972 election coverage. It wasn’t censorship in the classic sense practiced by church and state since time immemorial, but it was an example of something even more insidious, because no clearcut act of censorship or all-powerful censor was needed to produce the same result of a public left in the dark. Jensen defined censorship as “the suppression of information, whether purposeful or not, by any method—including bias, omission, underreporting or self-censorship— that prevents the public from fully knowing what is happening in its society.” The most obvious way to start fighting it was to highlight the suppressed information in the form of the stories that didn’t get widely told. Thus, Project Censored and its annual list of censored stories was born. Jensen’s conception of censorship may be light years away from how most media figures think of things. But while introducing this year’s list of stories, the volume’s co-editor, Andy Lee Roth, quotes media legend Walter Lippmann echoing the same sensitivity in his 1920 book Liberty and the News: “whether one aspect of the news or another appears in the center or at


the periphery makes all the difference in the world.” But Project Censored was never just about the individual stories; it was about the patterns of marginalization and suppression that could be seen through the lens of connecting them. In his introduction, Roth says, “identifying these unifying themes is one significant way to gauge the systemic blind spots, third rails, and ‘no go’ zones in corporate news coverage.” Patterns overlap and they don’t just connect issues and problems that those in power would rather neglect. They also connect people, communities and potential solutions, which those in power would rather see stay disconnected. So don’t just read the following as a list of stories “out there.” Read it as an opportunity to connect.

DOJ’s secret FISA rules targeting journalists The federal government can secretly monitor American journalists under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, or FISA, which allows invasive spying and operates outside the traditional court system, according to two 2015 memos from then-Attorney General Eric Holder. The memos were obtained by the Knight First Amendment Institute at Columbia University and the Freedom of the Press Foundation through an ongoing Freedom of Information Act lawsuit. This was reported on by The Intercept, whose parent company provides funding for both organizations, but was virtually ignored by corporate media. The secret rules “apply to media entities or journalists who are thought to be agents of a foreign government, or, in some cases, are of interest under the broader standard that they possess foreign intelligence information,” The Intercept reported. Project Censored cited three “concerning” questions the memos raise. First, how many times have FISA court orders been used to target journalists, and are any currently under investigation?

Second, why did the Justice Department keep these rules secret when it updated its “media guidelines” in 2015? And, third, is the Justice Department using FISA court orders—along with the FBI’s similar rules for targeting journalists with National Security Letters (NSLs)—to “get around the stricter ‘media guidelines’”? The corporate media virtually ignored these revelations when they occurred. The subsequent media interest in FISA warrants targeting Trump campaign adviser Carter Page “has done nothing at all to raise awareness of the threats posed by FISA warrants that target journalists and news organizations,” Project Censored observed. They ended with a quote from Ramya Krishnan, staff attorney at the Knight First Amendment Institute, summarizing the stakes: “National security surveillance authorities confer extraordinary powers. The government’s failure to share more information about them damages journalists’ ability to protect their sources, and jeopardizes the newsgathering process.”

Facebook partnerships and U.S. foreign policy In the name of fighting “fake news” to protect American democracy from “foreign influences,” Facebook formed a set of partnerships with three expert foreign influencers in 2018, augmenting its bias toward censorship of left/progressive voices. In May 2018, Facebook announced its partnership with the Atlantic Council, a NATOsponsored D.C. think tank to “monitor for misinformation and foreign interference.” “It’s funded by the U.S. Department of State and the U.S. Navy, Army and Air Force, along with NATO, various foreign powers and major Western corporations, including weapons contractors and oil companies, (including Chevron, ExxonMobil, Royal Dutch Shell),” noted Adam Johnson, writing for the media watch group Fairness & Accuracy

in Reporting (or FAIR). It went on to note that the major news outlets covering the story said nothing about any of the above conflicts of interest. In September, Facebook announced it also would partner with two Cold War-era U.S. governmentfunded propaganda organizations: the National Democratic Institute and the International Republican Institute. In October 2018, Jonathan Sigrist, writing for Global Research, described one of the greatest Facebook account and page purges in its troubled history: “559 pages and 251 personal accounts were instantly removed from the platform. ... This is but one of similar yet smaller purges that have been unfolding in front of our eyes over the last year, all in the name of fighting ‘fake news’ and so-called ‘Russian propaganda.’”

Proposed creation of largest protected area on Earth When news of unprecedented wildfires in the Amazon grabbed headlines in late August, most Americans were ill-prepared to understand the story, in part because of systemic exclusion of indigenous voices and viewpoints, highlighted in Project Censored’s No. 3 story—the proposed creation of an Amazonian protected zone the size of Mexico, presented to the United Nations Conference on Biodiversity in November 2018. The proposal, which Jonathan Watts, writing for The Guardian, described as “a 200m-hectare

sanctuary for people, wildlife and climate stability that would stretch across borders from the Andes to the Atlantic,” was advanced by an alliance of some 500 indigenous groups from nine countries, known as COICA, the Coordinator of the Indigenous Organizations of the Amazon River Basin, who called it “a sacred corridor of life and culture.” “We have come from the forest and we worry about what is happening,” declared Tuntiak Katan, vice president of COICA, as quoted in The Guardian. “This space is the world’s last great sanctuary for biodiversity. It is there because we are there. Other places have been destroyed.” The Guardian went on to note: The organisation does not recognise national boundaries, which were put in place by colonial settlers and their descendants without the consent of indigenous people who have lived in the Amazon for millennia.

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Katan said the group was willing to talk to anyone who was ready to protect not just biodiversity but the territorial rights of forest communities. In contrast, The Guardian explained: Colombia previously outlined a similar triple-A (Andes, Amazon and Atlantic) protection project that it planned to put forward with the support of Ecuador at next month’s climate talks. But the election of new rightwing leaders in Colombia and Brazil has thrown into doubt what would have been a major contribution by South American nations to reduce emissions.

Billions of additional emissions from U.S. oil and gas industry Three months after the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change warned that we have just 12 years to limit catastrophic climate change, Oil Change International released a report that went virtually ignored, warning that the United States was headed in exactly the wrong direction. The report, Drilling Towards Disaster, warned that rather than cutting down carbon emissions, as required to avert catastrophe, the United States under Donald Trump was dramatically increasing fossil fuel production, with the country on target to account for 60 percent of increased carbon emissions worldwide by 2030, expanding extraction at least four times more than any other country. References to the report “have been limited to independent media outlets,” Project Censored noted. “Corporate news outlets have not reported on the report’s release or its findings, including its prediction of 120 billion tons of new carbon pollution or its five-point checklist to overhaul fossil fuel production in the U.S.”

Modern slavery in the U.S. and globally An estimated 403,000 people in the United States were living in conditions of “modern slavery” in 2016, according to the 2018 Global Slavery Index, or GSI, about 1 percent of the global total. The GSI defines “modern slavery” broadly to include forced labor and forced marriage. Because forced marriage accounts for

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15 million people, more than a third of the global total, it’s not surprising that females form a majority of the victims (71 percent). The highest levels were found in North Korea, where an estimated 2.6 million people—10 percent of the population—are victims of modern slavery. The GSI is produced by the Walk Free Foundation, whose founder, Andrew Forrest, called the U.S. figure “a truly staggering statistic, [which] is only possible through a tolerance of exploitation.” “Walk Free’s methodology includes extrapolation using national surveys, databases of information of those who were assisted in trafficking cases, and reports from other agencies like the U.N.’s International Labour Organization,” explained The Guardian, to compile its figures. There are problems with this, according to others working in the field, The Guardian noted. There’s no universal legal definition, and tabulation difficulties abound. But the GSI addresses this as an issue for governments to work on and offers specific proposals. “The GSI noted that forced labor occurred ‘in many contexts’ in the U.S., including in agriculture, among traveling sales crews, and—as recent legal cases against GEO Group Inc. have revealed—as the result of compulsory prison labor in privately owned and operated detention facilities contracted by the Department of Homeland Security,” Project Censored noted. Newly restrictive immigration policies have further increased the vulnerability of undocumented people and migrants to modern slavery.

Criminalized for self-defense On Jan. 7, outgoing Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam granted clemency to Cyntoia Brown, who had been sentenced to life in prison in 2004, at age 16, for killing a man who bought her for sex and raped her. Brown’s case gained prominence via the support of A-list celebrities and Haslam cited

“the extraordinary steps Ms. Brown has taken to rebuild her life.” But despite public impressions, Brown’s case was far from unique. “There are thousands of Cyntoia Browns in prison,” organizer Mariame Kaba, cofounder of Survived and Punished, told Democracy Now! the next day. “We should really pay attention to the fact that we should be fighting for all of those to be free,” Kaba said. “When you look at women’s prisons, the overwhelming majority, up to 90 percent of the people in there, have had histories of sexual and physical violence prior to ending up in prison.” “In contrast to the spate of news coverage from establishment outlets, which focused on Brown’s biography and the details of her case,” Project Censored wrote, “independent news organizations, including The Guardian, Democracy Now!, Rolling Stone and Mother Jones, stood out for reporting that cases like Brown’s are all too common.” Later in January, Kellie Murphy’s Rolling Stone story quoted Alisa Bierria, another Survived and Punished co-founder, and highlighted several other cases prominent in alternative media coverage. In May, Mother Jones reported on the legislative progress that Survived and Punished and its allies had achieved in advancing state and federal legislation.

“Corporate news organizations provided considerable coverage of Cyntoia Brown’s clemency,” Project Censored noted. “However, many of these reports treated Brown’s case in isolation, emphasizing her biography or the advocacy on her behalf by celebrities such as Rihanna, Drake, LeBron James, and Kim Kardashian West.” It went on to cite examples from The New York Times and NBC News that did take a broader view, but failed to focus on sex trafficking or sexual violence.

Flawed sexual assault investigations at immigrant children’s shelters “Over the past six months, ProPublica has gathered hundreds of police reports detailing allegations of sexual assaults in immigrant children’s shelters,” the news outlet reported in November 2018. “[The shelters] have received $4.5 billion for housing and other services since the surge of unaccompanied minors from Central America in 2014 [and the reports reveal that] both staff and other residents sometimes acted as predators.” “Again and again, the reports show, the


police were quickly—and with little investigation—closing the cases, often within days, or even hours,” ProPublica stated. In the case of a 13-year-old from Honduras named Alex that was used to highlight systemic problems, the police investigation lasted 72 minutes and resulted in a three-sentence report. There was surveillance video footage showing two older teenagers grabbing him, throwing him to the floor and dragging him into a bedroom. But ProPublica reported, “An examination of Alex’s case shows that almost every agency charged with helping Alex—with finding out the full extent of what happened in that room—had instead failed him.” “Because immigrant children in detention are frequently moved, even when an investigator wanted to pursue a case, the child could be moved out of the investigating agency’s jurisdiction in just a few weeks, often without warning,” Project Censored noted. “When children are released, parents or relatives may be reluctant to seek justice, avoiding contact with law enforcement because they are undocumented or living with someone who is.”

U.S. women face prison for miscarriages “There has to be some form of punishment” for women who have abortions, candidate Donald Trump said in early 2016, which led to a wave of denials from anti-abortion activists and politicians, who claimed it was not their position. These women were victims, too, they argued: That had always been their position. But that wasn’t true, as Rewire News reported at the time. Women were already in prison, not for abortions, but for miscarriages alleged to be covert abortions. And that could become much more widespread due to actions taken by the Trump administration, according to a 2019 Ms. Magazine blog post by Naomi Randolph on the 46th anniversary of the Roe v. Wade decision, especially if the decision is overturned. “Pregnant women could face a higher risk of criminal charges for miscarriages or stillbirths, due to lawmakers in numerous states enacting laws that recognize fetuses as people, separate from the mother,” Project Censored explained, adding: One example that Randolph provided is in Alabama, where voters recently passed a measure that “endows [fetuses] with ‘personhood’ rights for the first time, potentially making any action that impacts a fetus a

criminal behavior with potential for prosecution.” Collectively, these laws have resulted in hundreds of American women facing prosecution for the outcome of their pregnancies. In fact, a 2015 joint ProPublica/AL.com investigation found that “at least 479 new and expecting mothers have been prosecuted across Alabama since 2006,” under an earlier child endangerment law, passed with methlab explosions in mind, which the “personhood movement” got repurposed to target stillbirths, miscarriages and suspected self-abortions.

Big Pharma ignores developing countries’ needs “The world’s biggest pharmaceutical firms have failed to develop two-thirds of the 139 urgently needed treatments in developing countries,” Julia Kollewe reported for The Guardian in November 2018, according to a report by Access to Medicine Foundation, which “found that most firms focus on infectious diseases such as HIV/Aids, malaria and tuberculosis but had failed to focus on other serious ailments. ... In particular, the foundation called for an infants’ vaccine for cholera and a single-dose oral cure for syphilis.” It’s not all bad news. “The foundation’s report also highlighted 45 best and innovative practices that could ‘help raise the level of standard practice’ and ‘achieve greater access to medicine,’” Project Censored noted. “The report highlights examples such as the development of a child-friendly chewable tablet for roundworm and whipworm, which infect an estimated 795 million people,” The Guardian reported. “Johnson & Johnson has pledged to donate 200 [million] doses a year until 2020.” The possibilities underscore why attention is vital. Attention makes a difference, Project Censored pointed out:

In an effort to mobilize investors to pressure pharmaceutical companies to make more medicines available to developing countries, the foundation presented the findings of its reports to 81 global investors at events in London, New York and Tokyo. As of April 2019, Access to Medicine reported that, since the release of the 2018 Access to Medicine Index in November 2018, 90 major investors had pledged support of its research and signed its investor statement. But attention has been sorely lacking in the corporate media. “With the exception of a November 2018 article by Reuters, news of Access to Medicine Index’s findings appear to have gone unreported in the corporate press,” Project Censored concluded.

Pentagon to surveil social media to predict protests

into predicting mass population behavior, “specifically the outbreak of conflict, terrorism, and civil unrest,” especially in the wake of the Arab Spring, via a program known as “Embers.” But such attention wasn’t solely focused abroad, Ahmed noted, calling attention to a U.S. Army-backed study on civil unrest within the U.S. homeland titled “Social Network Structure as a Predictor of Social Behavior: The Case of Protest in the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election.” Ahmed discussed two specific patents which contribute to “a sophisticated technology suite capable of locating the “home” position of users to within 10 kilometers for millions of Twitter accounts, and predicting thousands of incidents of civil unrest from micro-blogging streams on Tumblr.” Project Censored made no mention of any coverage of this story by the corporate media. Ω

“The United States government is accelerating efforts to monitor social media to preempt major anti-government protests in the U.S.,” Nafeez Ahmed reported for Motherboard in October 2018, drawing on “scientific research, official government documents, and patent filings.” Specifically, “The social media posts of American citizens who don’t like President Donald Trump are the focus of the latest U.S. military-funded research,” which in turn “is part of a wider effort by the Trump administration to consolidate the U.S. military’s role and influence on domestic intelligence.” The Pentagon had previously funded Big Data research

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Arts &Culture Just

four short strings Ukulele master Jake Shimabukuro is just getting started

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onolulu native Jake Shimabukuro has had a ukulele in his hands ever since he was 4 years old and capable of pressing the strings down on his own. As he mastered the instrument, he spent his 20s performing solo and with bands in Hawaii, making a name for himself in his home state as well as Japan. Then, at the age of 30, thanks to a YouTube by video of an extraordinary Bill Forman instrument-defying performance of The Beatles’ “While My Guitar Preview: Gently Weeps” that went Chico Performances viral (15 million-plus presents Jake views), the rest of the Shimabukuro world found out about Saturday, Oct. 19, him and he’s since gone 7:30 p.m.. Tickets: $15-$35 on to become the most recognizable ukulele Laxson player alive. Auditorium Chico State And he’s still only 898-6333 42 years old, putting out chicoperform new albums (14 solo ances.com releases so far) and touring—currently in support of his most recent, The Greatest Day (2018). “The types of venues we’re playing on this tour are all over the map,” Shimabukuro said in a phone interview. “Sometimes we’ll be playing dinner jazz clubs, sometimes they’ll be outdoor festivals, and then sometimes we’re playing in a symphonic hall.” To accommodate the range of performance spaces, Shimabukuro is joined for many shows by bassist Nolan Verner and guitarist Dave Preston (for the Chico stop he will be solo, however), as well as an array of effects pedals, which Shimabukuro and Preston have traded back and forth.

“There are pedals that work really well for guitar players, but sometimes don’t work so good for the ukulele, because you’re dealing with acoustic nylon strings and a piezo pickup,” Shimabukuro said. “We’re always turning each other on to different things. The very first pedal I bought was in high school; it was a Boss and it … had delay settings on it. That led me down the rabbit hole, and now, about 1,000 pedals later, here I am.” The Greatest Day came after Shimabukuro’s first all-original album, Nashville Sessions (2016), and he said it started out with a couple of off-the-cuff Nashville recordings that weren’t originally intended to turn into a full album. From that, however, came a 12-track double-vinyl release (six originals and six covers). The album includes an updated 12 1/2-minute version of “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” (as a CD bonus track), as well as another Beatles tune, “Eleanor Rigby.” The band is obviously a big influence on Shimabukuro, but his path to the Fab Four wasn’t a straight one. “I didn’t learn about The Beatles through The Beatles,” he said. “My dad had a couple of [jazz guitarist] Charlie Byrd’s albums and they were some of my favorite recordings. I’d listen to them all the time as a kid. And he covered a lot of Beatles songs, right? But I had no idea that they were

Beatles tunes, so all the way up until I was a teenager, I thought songs like ‘Let It Be,’ ‘Here, There and Everywhere’ and ‘Yesterday’ were all Charlie Byrd originals. I remember just thinking like, ‘Charlie Byrd, man, he writes great melody lines!’ And I remember the first time I heard The Beatles’ version of ‘Yesterday,’ I was like, “Oh, someone wrote lyrics to this song.” The Greatest Day’s covers are wide-ranging—from Leonard Cohen’s “Hallelujah” to New Order’s “Bizarre Love Triangle”—and there are more on the way. Shimabukuro has already recorded tracks for an upcoming duets album. In the can are collaborations with Willie Nelson, Asleep at the Wheel frontman Ray Benson and Michael McDonald. “Of course, all of Michael McDonald’s recordings sound great,” Shimabukuro said, “but to hear that voice with just my little ukulele behind it, it’s something else, man. I was just smiling ear to ear. “I feel so fortunate for all the opportunities that I’ve had in the last 20 years,” he said. “It just kind of blows me away and so I’m very thankful. I just love playing—it’s my passion—and I just hope to keep going.” Ω

THIS WEEK 17

THU

Special Events BYRON HURT: Activist, lecturer, writer and award-winning documentary filmmaker speaks on important issues such as “locker room talk” and toxic masculinity and the impact it makes in communities. Thu, 10/17, 4pm. Bell Memorial Union Auditorium, Chico State.

CLIMATE CRISIS SPEAKER SERIES: This month’s theme for the League of Women Voters series is Possibilities for Change in Butte County, featuring author John Mitchell, Steve Geiger of GRID Alternatives, and Lee Altier, professor of agriculture, Chico State. Thu, 10/17, 7pm. Free. Gateway Science Museum, 701 E. Lassen Ave., Unit 116. (510) 388-5363. my.lwv.org

Music GAELIC STORM: California Celtic band performs traditional Irish tunes and originals with a rock flavor. Thu, 10/17, 8:30pm. $20. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

Theater THE ADDAMS FAMILY: Hilarious offbeat musical based on the beloved 1960s television series. Thu, 10/17, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheater company.com

THE HAUNTING OF HILL HOUSE: A re-imagining of Shirley Jackson’s perfect work of suspense and terror. Thu, 10/17, 7:30pm. $15-$18. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. 895-3749. blueroomtheatre.com

MACBETH: New local theater group Legacy Stage presents classic

BYRON HURT

Tonight, Oct. 17 Bell Memorial Union Auditorium PHOTO COURTESY OF JAKE SHIMABUKURO

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SEE THURSDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS


FINE ARTS ON NEXT PAGE THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW

Thursday-Sunday, Oct. 17-20 Harlen Adams Theatre

to the issue of slavery around the globe. Sat 10/19, 10am. Children’s Park, Downtown Chico.

SEE THURSDAY-SUNDAY, THEATER

Special Events

Music Shakespeare play in a nontraditional format. Performance will take place at night in Lower Bidwell Park, beginning in Cedar Grove and then traveling to several different locations. Runs through Nov. 2. Thu, 10/17, 7:30pm. $25. Cedar Grove, Bidwell Park. legacystage.org

THE BIDWELLS: Local Chico couple sings songs from the heart for Sunday brunch. Sat, 10/19, 11am. La Salles, 229 Broadway St. JAKE SHIMABUKURO: Modern ukulele master and YouTube sensation performs songs from his album The Greatest Day. Sat, 10/19, 7:30pm. $15-$35. Laxson Auditorium, Chico State. 898-6333. chicoperformances.com

THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW: Cult classic musical that follows newly engaged sweethearts who get stuck in a storm and find themselves at the doorstep of a creepy mansion. Thu, 10/17, 7:30pm. $8-$20. Harlen Adams Theatre, Chico State. csuchico.edu/soa

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FRI

Special Events CHICO MALL FAMILY MOVIE NIGHT: Enjoy the Tim Burton classic Beetlejuice, near Dick’s Sporting Goods. Fri, 10/18, 7pm. Chico Mall, 1950 E. 20th St.

COMEDY NIGHT: Featuring Oakland comic Tristan Johnson and a great lineup of locals and outof-towners. Hosted by Phil From Chico. Fri, 10/18, 8:30pm. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

SATURDAY PRESENTATION SERIES: Machelle Conn, lead docent of the Oroville Docents Organization, gives talk on the rewards of volunteering. Fri, 10/18, 10am. Bolt’s Antique Tool Museum, 1650 Broderick St., Oroville.

VOLUNTEER FRIDAYS: Join in picking up litter and pulling weeds. For more info call Shane at 896-7831. Fri, 10/18, 9am. Bidwell Park.

Theater THE HAUNTING OF HILL HOUSE: See Thursday. Fri, 10/18, 7:30pm. $15-$18. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. 895-3749. blueroomtheatre. com

MACBETH: See Thursday. Fri, 10/18, 7:30pm. $25. Cedar Grove, Bidwell Park. legacystage.org

THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW: See Thursday. Fri, 10/18, 7:30pm. $8-$20. Harlen Adams Theatre, Chico State. csuchico.edu/soa

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SAT

Special Events AUTUMN FEST: Pony cart rides, craft and food fair, house tours and fall activities for kids. Plus tons of pumpkins available for sale. Sat 10/19, 10am. $5. Patrick Ranch Museum, 10381 Midway, Durham.

BEER TASTING AND BBQ: Benefit for Handi-Riders Therapeutic Horseback Riding, which was

Theater THE ADDAMS FAMILY: See Thursday. Fri, 10/18, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany.com

SINGLE, FRESH, WET & WILD HOP HARVEST FESTIVAL Saturday, Oct. 19 Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.

SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

displaced by the Camp Fire. Enjoy beer from Secret Trail and four courses of barbecue. For more info or to purchase a ticket call 342-7002. Sat 10/19, 1pm. $40. Country Village, 966 Kovak Court.

CHICO AND THE RACE FOR THE WEST: Graduate student Jeremy Markley discusses Chico and Northern California history with a focus on the Maidu peoples and colonists conflicting interests and how that shaped the state. Sat 10/19, 10am. $5. Chico History Museum, 141 Salem St.

GHOULS NIGHT OUT: Halloween-themed drag show featuring your favorite performers. Sat, 10/19, 10pm. $8. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

OPEN STUDIOS TOUR: Chico Art Center presents the annual tour of local artist studios and galleries over two weekends. Featuring more than 60 artists in all. Tour guides available at the center for $10. Sat, 10/19, 10am5pm. $20-$25. Chico Art Center, 450 Orange St., Ste. 6, 895-8726. chicoartcenter.com

20

SUN

THE ADDAMS FAMILY: See Thursday. Sat, 10/19, 7:30pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercom pany.com

THE HAUNTING OF HILL HOUSE: See Thursday. Sat, 10/19, 7:30pm. $15-$18. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. 895-3749. blueroomtheatre. com

MACBETH: See Thursday. Sat, 10/19, 7:30pm. $25. Cedar Grove, Bidwell Park. legacystage.org

AUTUMN FEST: See Saturday. Sun, 10/20, 10am. $5. Patrick Ranch Museum, 10381 Midway, Durham.

DRAG STORYBOOK HOUR: Kid-friendly reading with local queens and kings sharing stories about self expression, diversity and being yourself. Sun, 10/20, 12pm. Free. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave. 893-3336.

“LOVE IS” SHOWCASE: Benefit for Catalyst Domestic Violence Services featuring baked goods, drinks and live music from Chico musicians, including Kyle Williams, Katie Barrett and more. Sun, 10/20, 1:30pm. $15. Chico Women’s Club. 343-7711.

OPEN STUDIOS TOUR: See Saturday. Sun, 10/20, 10am-5pm. $20-$25. Chico Art Center, 450 Orange St., Ste. 6, 895-8726. chicoartcenter. com

TRICKS & TREATS: A hauntingly good time with your favorite improv crew. BYOB Sun, 10/20, 7pm. Chico Live Improv Comedy, 561 E. Lindo Ave.

THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW: See Thursday. Sat, 10/19, 2pm and 7:30pm. $8-$20. Harlen Adams Theatre, Chico State. 898-5152. csuchico. edu/soa

THIS WEEK CONTINUED ON PAGE 24

EDITOR’S PICK

OUT OF THE DARKNESS: Join the effort to raise awareness and funds that allow the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP) to invest in new research, create educational programs, advocate for public policy and support survivors of suicide loss. Sat 10/19, 9am. City Plaza, downtown Chico. afsp.org

SHADOW BOX EXHIBIT: Come to Blackbird for the reception, look at Zack Elstein’s shadow boxes, listen to Ken the Revelator. Sat, 10/19, 6pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

SINGLE, FRESH, WET & WILD HOP HARVEST FESTIVAL: Annual celebration of the fall hop harvest featuring the greatest breweries from all over the country and more than 100 beers, hop-talks, food trucks, and live music from American-roots rock band Leroy from the North. Sat 10/19, 3pm. $30-$55. Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., 1075 E. 20th St. sier ranevada.com

VOLUNTEER SATURDAYS: Volunteers meet at the Woodland entrance parking lot (across from 977 Woodland Ave.) in Lower Bidwell Park. Activities include litter pick-up and removal of invasive vegetation. Call Shane at 624-1102 for more info. Sat 10/19, 12pm. Bidwell Park.

WALK FOR FREEDOM: North Valley Freedom Foundation hosts walk to bring awareness

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www. newsreview.com/calendar, or email the CN&R calendar editor at cnrcalendar@newsreview.com. Deadline for print listings is Wednesday, 5 p.m., one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

WHOLE LOTTA LOVE Catalyst Domestic Violence Services has been providing crisis intervention services for victims of domestic violence and their children in Butte County for 30-plus years. Help spread the love and raise some funds for this invaluable resource in our community and have some fun while you’re at it. In honor of Domestic Violence Awareness Month, Chico Women’s Club will be hosting the fifth annual “Love Is” Showcase benefit on Sunday (Oct. 20). The event will feature baked goods and drinks and a fantastic lineup of local musicians—including Katie Barrett (pictured), The Bidwells, Webster Moore, Kyle Williams and more—singing their favorite love songs. O C T O B E R 1 7, 2 0 1 9

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THEATRICAL QUALITY COSTUMES

THIS WEEK CONTINUED FROM PAGE 23

Music CHAMBER MUSIC – PRANKSTERS AND LEGENDS: Terrie Baune (concertmaster for North State Symphony) and friends celebrate Beethoven and other groundbreaking composers. Sun, 10/20, 2pm. $34. Zingg Recital Hall, Chico State. 898-6333. northstatesymphony.org

WE OFFER • 4000 sq.ft of theatrical quality costumes (no cheap bagged costumes) • 10 day rental special for early halloween reservations • personalized customer service

THE HOLLY TAYLOR TRIO: Longtime local vocal-

530-894-1346 ALTER EGO

JAZZ AT SCOTTY’S: The Miami Rogue Roosters jazz up the patio at Scotty’s. Sun, 10/20, 12pm. Scotty’s Landing, 12609 River Road.

2260 A PARK AVE.

FINE ARTS

ist backed by Joshua Hegg on piano and Ethan Swett on bass for brunch. Sun, 10/20, 11am. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

C O S T U M E S

WEST WIND: Live music accompanies brunch. Sun, 10/20, 11am. Almendra Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway Road, Durham.

Theater THE ADDAMS FAMILY: See Thurday. Sun, 10/20, 2pm. $16-$22. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Road, Ste. F. chicotheatercompany. com

THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW: See Thursday. Sun, 10/20, 2pm. $8-$20. Harlen Adams Theatre,

THE WORLD EVADES US: SURVEYING COMPOSITE MEANINGS OF PLACE

Chico State. 898-5152. csuchico.edu/soa

21

MON

Shows through Nov. 10 1078 Gallery

Special Events

SEE ART

BIRDS OF PANAMA: Avid birder and traveler Ted Beedy presents talk on his recent birding

and photography tour of Panama. Mon, 10/21, 6:30pm. Free. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E. Eighth St. 519-4724.

FARM STAND: Fun farmers’ market featuring local growers, plant starts, homemade

bakery goods and medicinal herbs. Mon, 10/21, 4pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

23

WED

Special Events CHICO COMMUNITY SCHOLARSHIP ASSOCIATION FUNDRAISER: Annual event features appetizers, no-host bar, raffle and prizes. Proceeds provide college scholarships for local graduating high school seniors. For tickets visit chicoscholarships.org. Wed, 10/23, 5pm. Beatniks Coffee House & Breakfast Joint, 1387 E. Eighth St.

FIBER ARTS NIGHT OUT: Bring your own knitting, crocheting, hand sewing, cross-stitch, embroidery or other fiber project and work on it in the company of other hand-crafters. Wed, 10/23, 4pm. Butte County Library, 1108 Sherman Ave.

HUMANS IN SPACE: PAST, PRESENT & FUTURE: NASA astronaut Stephen Robinson will share his outer space experiences and discuss where humans go from here as they venture to the next frontier. Wed, 10/23, 7:30pm. Gateway Science Museum, 625 Esplanade.

Music SHADES OF BUBLE: Three-man tribute to the music of Michael Buble. Wed, 10/23, 7:30pm. $30. Oroville State Theatre, 1489 Myers St., Oroville. 354-6202. orovillecon certassociation.org

Art 1078 GALLERY: The World Evades Us – Surveying Composite Meanings of Place, inspired by Chico’s natural and built landscapes, artists Melanie Treuhaft, Tammy LePham and Shanna Sordahl bring together light, architecture and sound to construct an immersive installation. Reception Friday, Oct. 18, 6-8pm, panel discussion Saturday, Nov. 2, 5pm. Through 11/10. 1710 Park Ave. 1078gallery.org

BLACKBIRD: Shadow Box Exhibit, creepy boxes by Zack Elstein. Reception Sat, 10/19, 6pm. 1431 Park Ave.

BUTTE COLLEGE ART GALLERY: Cognitive Dissonance, collection of colorful, whimsical and funky wall hangings and figures by Sacramento artist and professor Linda Gelfman. All are repurposed wool sweaters and socks she finds at thrift stores and yard sales and turns into art. Closing reception Oct. 24 , 4-6 pm. Through 10/24. 3536 Campus Drive, ARTS Building.

CHICO ART CENTER: Open Studios, one work by each of the artists on this year’s tour. Stop by and see the art an buy a $12 guide to all participating studios. Through Oct. 27. 450 Orange St., Ste. 6, 895-8726. chico artcenter.com

DOWNTOWN CHICO: Art & Wine Walk, monthlong art event featuring work by local artists at local businesses. Through 10/31. Downtown Chico.

HEALING ART GALLERY AT ENLOE CANCER CENTER: Art by Connie G. Adams, Enloe Cancer Center Healing Art Gallery featuring Northern California artists whose lives have been touched by cancer showcases series of watercolor paintings by breast cancer survivor. Through 10/18. 265 Cohasset Road.

NAKED LOUNGE: Facade, featured artists Emily

FOR MORE MUSIC, SEE NIGHTLIFE ON PAGE 26

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Jara, Kelsey Fernandes, Martin Townsend and Val Thomas. Through 10/27. 118 W. Second St.

ORLAND ART CENTER: Two Powerful Points of View, exhibit featuring work by artists Valerie Payne and Chuck Prudhomme. Reception Friday, Oct. 24, 3-7pm. Through 11/23. 732 Fourth St., Orland.

PROVISIONS GALLERY: The Art of Absolute Ama, artist exhibition at gallery located inside the downtown Upper Park Clothing store. Through 10/31. 122 W. Third St.

THE TURNER: 3rd Story Prints with Prose, prints alongside Chico State students’ flash-fiction works inspired by the museum’s collection. Exhibition talk Thursday, Oct. 17, 5:30 p.m. in the Zingg Recital Hall, reception to follow at the museum. Through 12/14. 400 W. First St. theturner.org

MONCA: Points of Departure and fiber/ DIMENSIONS, an exhibit of 18 artists using fiber and mixed media. Through 11/3. $5. 900 Esplanade. monca.org

Museums CHICO CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: Featuring tons of cool stuff for kids to explore. Check the website for hours and admission information. Through 8/3. $7-$9. 325 Main St. chicochildrensmuseum.org.

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Before and Beyond the Moon, interactive multimedia exhibition celebrates the human and technological achievements needed to reach the moon and envisions a future Mars landing. Through 12/15. 625 Esplanade.

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Unbroken Traditions Basketweavers of the Meadows-Baker Families in Northern California, exhibition represents the culmination of one year of research and collaboration between Mountain Maidu weavers, other tribal experts, museums studies students, faculty and curators. Through 5/15. Chico State.


SCENE In the house with (clockwise from center) Brett Edwards, Leesa Palmer, Rob Wilson, Steve Swim, Amber Miller and Samantha Shaner. Photo by Joe hilsee

terror inside A richly designed, well-acted adaptation of classic ghost story

Tof aisVictorian-era immaculately set in the mode mansion. Sepia

he stage at the Blue Room Theatre

tones are dramatically accented by the deep scarlet of a diamondby tuck velvet Carey Wilson upholstery on an elegant armchair near the front of the stage. Eerie Review: the haunting of but enchanting hill house shows music floats thursday-saturday, through the 7:30 p.m., through room. Every oct. 19. tickets: $15 horizontal sur(thursdays payface is bedecked what-you-can, $5 with bric-aminimum) brac and curios and figurines Blue Room Theatre 139 W. First st. and books and 895-3749 decanters of blueroomtheatre.com intoxicating fluids, and every vertical surface supports a painting. Beneath a marble arch, ghostly flames ascend the chimney of a grand fireplace. Amber Miller’s gorgeously realized set is impressive in its detailed execution. And it’s the perfect setting for the theater’s current production of Shirley Jackson’s classic 1959 ghost story, The Haunting of Hill House, directed by Joe Hilsee, who co-adapted the story with assistant director Miller. Obviously a labor of love for Miller, who according to Hilsee’s director’s notes has been visual-

izing a local adaptation for “about 10 years,” the current production also draws on “one of her favorite movies,” the 1963 cinematic version of the book, The Haunting, starring Julie Harris, for inspiration. And, this being a Blue Room original, in the spirit of postmodern absurdity that the theater has embraced and embodied since its inception, there are elements of humor and references to current pop-culture that elevate both the eerieness and goofiness of the source material. In updating the story, Miller and Hilsee have created an anachronistic framing device that has Carrie Sanderson (played by Stephanie Ditty), in the present day, on the verge of opening the allegedly haunted mansion to paranormal researcher Dr. Monatague (Rob Wilson), so he and his team can conduct experiments to determine if the haunting is “real.” To convince her of the validity of his quest, he gives Carrie a diary written by former inhabitant of the house Eleanor Vance (Miller), whose ghostly presence allegedly still haunts the residence. Assisting in the negotiations is “the Lawyer” (Hilsee). Complicating the chronological challenges of the narrative is the entrance of Theodora (Samantha Shaner), a glamorous dipsomaniac who is (apparently) along to assist with the research, but whose main

interest and purpose is to supply a giddy sense of aloof but pointed humor to the proceedings. Enabling her enthusiasm for intoxicants is Luke Sanderson (Steve Swim), a man always ready to fetch a crate of alcohol and mix drinks for all, including the doctor’s elegant wife, Mrs. Montague (Leesa Palmer) and her attendant/gigolo, Arthur (Brett Edwards). Miller has given each character moments to shine, and the impressive cast of some of Chico’s finest players makes each vignette within the play sparkle with humor and a glimmer of supernatural horror. Thus, house mistress Mrs. Dudley’s (Mary McCluskey) admonitions to never leave the house after dark is both a running joke and a foreshadowing of spooky doings. When Carrie retires to a comfy reading chair upstage to read the diary that Dr. Montague has given her, the action of the play regarding Eleanor’s breakdown and possible entrance into the afterlife is drawn onto the main stage and played out as a projection of her imagination. This deliberate layering of multiple timeframes and points of view made me appreciate the dramaturgy alongside the artistry of the players. However, it also made me feel like I’d viewed all the exquisitely crafted pieces of a puzzle that never quite all fit together, but nonetheless could be appreciated as a kind of lovely shattered tableau. Ω o c t o b e r 1 7, 2 0 1 9

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Sunday, Oct. 20 Senator Theater

GOOD DOG: Retro-rural

roots music by local band of ringers— Gordy Ohliger, Pamela Kather, John Glick and Mark Springer. Thu, 10/17, 7pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

See SUNDAY

JEFF PERSHING: Guitarist/songwriter performs a variety of jam, funk and rock on the patio. Thu, 10/17, 6pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

17tHUrSDAY

THUMPIN’ THURSDAY ROCK ’N’ BLUES JAM: Hosted by the Loco-Motive Band plus special guests. All musicians and music enthusiasts welcome. Thu, 10/17, 7pm. Studio Inn Lounge, 2582 Esplanade.

CHICO UNPLUGGED FALL 2019: Singer/ songwriter competition, signups for contestants start at 6pm sharp. Thu, 10/17, 6pm. Madison Bear Garden, 316 W. Second St.

TOM BLODGET AND THE KITES: Local band performs an eclectic playlist of originals and ’60s/early ’70s pop rock. Thu, 10/17, 6:30pm. Farm Star Pizza, 2359 Esplanade.

DIGGIN DIRT: Seven-piece reggae rock band from Humboldt County. Funk band Big Sticky Mess opens. Thu, 10/17, 9pm. $12-$15. Lost On Main, 319 Main St.

18FrIDAY

EYES LIKE LANTERNS: Local four-piece indie folk-rock band performs with special guests. Thu, 10/17, 8pm. Argus Bar + Patio, 212 W. Second St.

GAELIC STORM: California Celtic band performs traditional Irish tunes and originals with a rock flavor. Thu, 10/17, 8:30pm. $20. Feather Falls

ATOMIC PUNKS: A tribute to early Van

Halen. Fri, 10/18, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

BENNY BASSET: Live music. Fri, 10/18,

6pm. Almendra Winery & Distillery, 9275 Midway, Durham.

boNUS SUMMer

BORGORE: Popular EDM DJ performs

ROBERT KARCH TRIO: Jazz, blues and

COMEDY NIGHT: Featuring Oakland

SOUL POSSE: Your favorite rock ’n’

for the 18 and older crowd. Fri, 10/18, 8pm. $15. El Rey Theater, 230 W. Second St. elreychico.com

comic Tristan Johnson and a great lineup of locals and out-of-towners. Hosted by Phil From Chico. Fri, 10/18, 8:30pm. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

DREADFUL CHILDREN: Punk rock band from Seattle performs. Horrible, the Michael Beach Band, and Shadow Figures share the bill. Fri, 10/18, 8pm. $7. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

HAYSTAK: Hick-hop artist performs. Tone-Z from Gangstagrass shares the bill. Fri, 10/18, 9pm. $15-$50. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

KYLE WILLIAMS: Soulful singer

shares stories and songs. Fri, 10/18, 8pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville. theex changeoroville.com

MOSSY CREEK: Local veteran bluegrass band plays originals and favorites with a whole lot of harmony. Fri, 10/18, 7pm. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

OPEN MIC: Bring an instrument. Acoustic/electric guitar and drum set available to use. Sign up at 7:30pm. All ages welcome until 10pm. Fri, 10/18, 8pm. $1. Down Lo, 319 Main St.

Portland-based rock band Summer Cannibals (pictured) is slaying stages across the country in support of its new record, Can’t Tell Me No, filled with loud, catchy, lyricdriven music dense with fuzzy guitars and kick-ass drums. Catch them this Saturday (Oct. 19) at the Naked Lounge with locals False Face and Redding hip-hop artist Calvin Black. You will not be disappointed.

pop standards in a relaxing atmosphere. Fri, 10/18, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St. roll hits from local five-piece cover band. Fri, 10/18, 6pm. Purple Line Urban Winery, 760 Safford St., Oroville.

SOUTH 65: Rockabilly and coun-

try hits in the lounge. Fri, 10/18, 8:30pm. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

THEORY OF A DEADMAN: Canadian rock band tours new album, Spirit Animal opens. Fri, 10/18, 8pm. $25. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St. jmaxproduc tions.net

TYLER DEVOLL: Local singer/songwriter performs for happy hour. Fri, 10/18, 4pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

19SAtUrDAY

BRAD PETERSEN: Local Americana/

country artist performs. Sat, 10/19, 8pm. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

CAMERON FORD: All ages show featuring new music by local eclectic singer/songwriter, plus guitarist Tatton White. Sat, 10/19, 8pm. $7-$12. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

CATALYST BENEFIT SHOW: All proceeds

DETROIT LEGENDS!: Seven-piece band

go to Catalyst, lineup includes Elysium, Like Roses, DirtyBoiz, and Mechanical Goldfish. All ages. Sat, 10/19, 7pm. $5. Ike’s Place, 648 W. Fifth St.

performs the biggest hits from Motown with special tributes to Stevie Wonder, Tina Turner, Gladys Knight and Aretha Franklin. Sat, 10/19, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

COLLIE BUDDZ: Reggae artist from Bermuda performs, Jamaican world music artist Keznamdi and local band Triple Tree share the bill. Sat, 10/19, 9pm. $20-$25. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St. jmaxproduc tions.net

ERIN HALEY TRIO: Chill tunes,

dinner and drinks. Sat, 10/19, 6:30pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

Preorder NoW!

TickeTs $25 Oroville State Theater • Fri, Nov. 8, 7-9PM • www.orovillestatetheatre.com State Theater, Red Bluff • Thurs, Nov. 14, 7- 9PM • www.brownpapertickets.com EL Rey Theater, Chico • Sat, Nov. 23, 7- 9PM • www.elreychico.com 26

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o c t o b e r 1 7, 2 0 1 9

All first place winners of CN&R’s Best of receive a plaque for fRee

YeLAWoLF

Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Drive, Oroville.

tHUrSDAY 10/17—WeDNeSDAY 10/23

CN&R will NeveR CoNtaCt a meRChaNt to puRChase a Best of plaque

NIGHTLIFE


CINDER WELL

Monday, Oct. 21 Blackbird SEE MONDAY

THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 22 Falls Casino & Lodge, 3 Alverda Dr., Oroville. featherfallscasino.com

ROCKTOBERFEST: Eighties rockers Blackout Betty perform with special guests. Sat, 10/19, 9pm. Tackle Box, 379 E. Park Ave.

SHADOW BOX EXHIBIT: Come to Blackbird, look at shadow boxes,

listen to Ken the Revelator. Sat, 10/19, 6pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

STONING GIANTS: Rock, blues and funk

band for late night happy hour. Sat, 10/19, 10pm. La Salles, 229 Broadway St.

SUMMER CANNIBALS: Portland-based THE EXPENDABLES: Genre-bending reggae rock band from Santa Cruz performs. Sat, 10/19, 6pm. $18. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 E. 20th St. sierranevada.com

GHOULS NIGHT OUT: Halloween-themed drag show featuring your favorite performers. Sat, 10/19, 10pm. $8. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

JOSH EAGLE: Live music, beer,

food. Sat, 10/19, 8pm. The Exchange, 1975 Montgomery St., Oroville.

KELLY TWINS DUELING PIANOS: Chico’s Jon and Chris Kelly bring you an all-request music soiree in the lounge. Sat, 10/19, 8:30pm. Feather

indie band performs, hip-hop artist Calvin Black from Redding and local band False Face open the show. Sat, 10/19, 8pm. Naked Lounge, 118 W. Second St.

20SUNDAY

MOOD SWING, WITH SPECIAL GUESTS: Joe Craven and Jimmy Grant join local musicians Robert and Pam Laughlin for a little swing and gypsy jazz. Sun, 10/20, 7:30pm. $15. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St.

OPEN MIC COMEDY NIGHT: Working on a bit? See if it’s a hit or heckle-worthy, and enjoy cheap beer specials. Signups start at 8pm. Sun, 10/20,

9pm. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave. maltesebarchico.com

YELAWOLF: American rapper, singer, and songwriter signed to Eminem’s label brings his GhettoCowboy tour to town. The Outfit, TX and Baddwolf share the bill. Sun, 10/20, 8pm. $25. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St. jmax productions.net

21MONDAY

BART BUDWIG: Oregon-based singer/ songwriter and string band. Guitar/ banjo duo The Hackles and local folk pair The Bidwells share the bill. Mon, 10/21, 6pm. Unwined Kitchen & Bar, 980 Mangrove Ave.

CINDER WELL: Doomy folk project from singer/songwriter/multi-instrumentalist Amelia Baker. Local musicians Ryan Davidson and Uni & Her Ukelele open the show. All ages. Mon, 10/21, 7pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

THIRD MONDAY JAZZ JAM: House band tribute to featured artist, followed by open jam. Mon, 10/21, 7:30pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

22TUESDAY

Tijuana Donkey Punch & Your Mom. Tue, 10/22, 7pm. $10. Lost On Main, 319 Main St.

TUESDAY TRIVIA: Show what you

know and win prizes. Tue, 10/22, 6:30pm. Secret Trail Brewing Company, 132 Meyers St., Ste. 120.

23WEDNESDAY

JOHN SEID, LARRY PETERSON, STEVE COOK: Easy dinnertime tunes. Wed, 10/23, 6pm. Izakaya Ichiban, 2000 Notre Dame Blvd.

OPEN MIC: Come on down strut your stuff. Andan from the Channel 66 band hosts. Wed, 10/23, 7pm. Apollo School of Music, 936 Mangrove Ave.

OPEN POETRY READING: Poetry and spoken word hosted by Bob the

Poet and Travis Rowdy. Wed, 10/23, 5:30pm. Blackbird, 1431 Park Ave.

SHADES OF BUBLE: Three-man tribute

to the music of Michael Buble. Wed, 10/23, 7:30pm. $30. Oroville State Theatre, 1489 Myers St., Oroville.

VASAS: Psych-pop rockers from Sac plus locals Thin Air and Little Black Cloud. Wed, 10/23, 8pm. $5. The Maltese, 1600 Park Ave.

THE BIDWELLS: Sweet voices and

savory guitar stylings from local duo. Wed, 10/23, 6pm. Diamond Steakhouse, 220 W. Fourth St.

DANCE NIGHT: Four lady DJs with large vinyl collections select a fresh slice of wax every Wednesday for your boogie-ing pleasure. Wed, 10/23, 10pm. $1. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.

EMMA GARRAHY & WILL HARTMAN: Local duo playing covers of popular songs and a few originals from a wide range of genres. Wed, 10/23, 6pm. The Allies Pub (behind Bank of America building), 426 Broadway, Ste. 130.

LIGHTEN UP

We are in the midst of a comedy renaissance and Chico has been doing its part with a steady lineup of comedy festivals, stand-up nights, improv, and big names visiting the area. Downtown stand-by Duffy’s Tavern will be in the mix with Comedy Night this Friday (Oct. 19), featuring a

stellar line-up of local and outof-town comics and hosted by local funny guy Phil from Chico. Oakland’s Tristan Johnson headlines.

JAM SESSION: Informal night of improvised music. All musicians and genres are welcome. House band until 8, open jam after. Wed, 10/23, 7:30pm. Tender Loving Coffee, 365 E. Sixth St.

DRI: Legendary punk band performs with support from Intent and

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REEL WORLD FILM SHORTS Reviewers: Bob Grimm, Juan-Carlos Selznick and Neesa Sonoquie.

Opening this week Aquarela

B

reaking Bad, one of the greatest TV series of all time, ended six years ago. Since then, creator Vince Gilligan has served up a nice extension of the show via Better Call Saul, which just finished filming its fifth season. Saul is a prequel by (an origin story of the resourceful Bob Grimm lawyer played by Bob Odenkirk), so the Breaking Bad timeline bg r i mm @newsrev iew.c om came to a stop with the show. (Note: If you haven’t watched the series, stay away from the movie—and this review—until you have, lest you risk spoiling most of the good stuff from the original.) El Camino: A So, what happened to Jesse Breaking Bad Pinkman (Aaron Paul) after Walter Movie Starring Aaron Paul White (Bryan Cranston) liberated and Jesse Plemons. him from captivity at that Aryan Directed by Vince Brotherhood compound? When Gilligan. Netflix. last we saw Jesse, he looked like John the Baptist as he sped off into the night, laugh-crying hysterically. El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie dropped last Friday on Netflix (and on a few big screens), and the film picks up where the series left off, with Jesse as “a person of interest” in the aftermath of Walter’s machine-gun assault on the compound, and still very much in need of a shave and shower. It’s great to see Paul back in his wheelhouse as Jesse, even if the character has become a bit dour after the hell of being held prisoner in a hole in the ground. The character’s screen time during his captivity on the TV show was limited as the story, logically, focused primarily on Walter’s last days.

Maleficent: Mistress of Evil

Jexi

In mid-’90s New York City, two adult sisters (Hanna Utt and Jen Tullock) discover that the mother (Judith Light) who they thought died when they were young is actually alive and starring in a TV soap opera. Also starring Mandy Patinkin and Alec Baldwin. Pageant Theatre. Not rated.

Jay and Silent Bob Reboot

4

El Camino gives Gilligan and Paul a chance to explore some previously unseen, strange adventures Jesse had with his captor, the quietly evil Todd (Jesse Plemons). Plemons actually plays a big part in this movie, and thankfully so because he’s just a creepy badass as Todd, a seemingly sensitive, low-key man with a psycho streak that poses all kinds of threats to Jesse’s well-being. Other recurring characters include Mike (Jonathan Banks), who makes an appearance in flashback (his character having been dispensed by Walter in the original show). Meanwhile, Skinny Pete (Charles Baker) and Badger (Matt Jones), Jesse’s pals/cohorts in meth dealing, show up early to provide comic and other relief. And perhaps most notably, the late Robert Forster, who died the same day El Camino was released, returns as Ed the vacuum salesman, who— for a premium price—offers other helpful services on the side. El Camino fits right in with the Breaking Bad universe, like two episodes that were hidden in a secret vault for six years. It offers a redemptive conclusion for Jesse, a more poetic sendoff, if you will, than him screaming into the darkness. While I think this might be the last we see of “future Jesse,” chances are high that “past Jesse” might appear again, maybe somewhere within the Better Call Saul timeline. I’m sure Gilligan has a few more stories for the character up his sleeve. Ω

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Fair

Good

Very Good

Excellent

It Chapter Two

Director Kevin Smith revisits/reboots the highlights from his movie-making career in this sequel (of sorts) to Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back, plus Clerks, Mallrats, Chasing Amy and more. One showing: Oct. 17, 7 p.m. (double feature with Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back). Cinemark. Rated R.

Before You Know It

Breaking Bad returns with feature-length follow-up

2

If you look at this sequel as a standalone, it’s a big mess. The movie picks up 27 years after the first part, with the grownup Losers Club—played by Bill Hader (Richie), Jessica Chastain (Beverly) and James McAvoy (Bill), among others—being called back to their hometown where a rematch with the morphing Pennywise the clown is in order. That’s it for the plot. The adults split up, suffer some individual horrors at the hands of Pennywise (Bill Skarsgard), then wind up back together for the finale. After a solid start, the performers just run from set piece to set piece, setting the table for some CGI scares mixed with the occasional practical effects. Even at nearly three hours, this movie comes off as rushed and haphazard. Despite this, Hader rules as Richie in the same way Finn Wolfhard ruled the character in the first one. He’s funny, he’s aces at looking scared, and he can handle the heavy drama. He and Skarsgard make chunks of this movie worth watching. It Chapter Two drags the overall grade for both movies together to somewhere around a B-minus. Cinemark 14. Rated R —B.G.

“An eco-documentary on water in the age of climate change,” with Earth’s most precious and powerful resource as the subject—in the form of waterfalls, hurricanes, crumbling icebergs, frozen lakes and massive ocean waves. Pageant Theatre. Rated PG.

redemption, yo!

hustle money from Wall Street clients who frequent the club. Inspired by a true-life 2015 story that appeared in New York magazine. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

In this sequel to Maleficent (2014), Angelina Jolie reprises her role as the evil fairy, and Elle Fanning is back as her goddaughter, Princess Aurora (aka Sleeping Beauty), and the two are at odds with one another thanks to outside forces intent on sowing discord between humans and fairies. Cinemark, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Zombieland: Double Tap

Woody Harrelson, Emma Stone, Jesse Eisenberg and Abigail Breslin return as the rag-tag zombie-killing crew in this film set 10 years after the events of the 2009 original, this time facing an enhanced breed of superzombies. Cinemark, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

Now playing Abominable

A computer-animated feature about a teen girl who finds a Yeti on her roof and helps her new friend find his way back to his home at Mr. Everest. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

The Addams Family

The creepy family made famous in the 1960s television series gets the CGI animation treatment. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

Downton Abbey

The popular British television show comes to the big screen, with the familiar cast of characters being visited at their English country house by the king and queen. Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

Gemini Man

Ang Lee (Brokeback Mountain, Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon) directs Will Smith as an aging hitman who is tracked down by a cloned version of his younger self. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Hustlers

Constance Wu, Jennifer Lopez, Julia Stiles and Cardi B star as a crew of strippers who

When a young tech-addicted loser starts to come out of his shell thanks to advice from Jexi, the voice in his smartphone, the A.I. life coach starts to sabotage his love life. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas. Rated R.

2

Joker

Joker, the latest take on DC Comics’ Clown Prince of Crime, will go down as one of 2019’s big missed opportunities. Director/co-screenwriter Todd Phillips apparently had the green light to do whatever he wanted with the character’s story, and he also landed the perfect lead (Joaquin Phoenix) for the title role. This was a chance to tell a fresh, dark origin story from the Joker’s point of view. Phillips blew it. Phoenix, on the other hand, did not. He is otherworldly good as Arthur Fleck, a severely troubled clown and wannabe standup comic (and mama’s boy) with a condition that causes him to laugh uncontrollably at inappropriate moments. He physically and mentally disappears into the part—to the point where you may become concerned for the actor’s well-being. He accomplishes this in a film that has a major identity crisis. It’s trying to do something new (mostly via the use of extreme violence), while also riffing on something old (Frank Miller’s The Dark Knight Returns, as well as various other comic book and cinematic influences). What’s delivered is a muddy, predictable and ultimately unoriginal film. Rated R —B.G.

Judy

Renée Zellweger stars as actress/singer Judy Garland in this biopic centered on a six-week run of shows in London toward the end of her tragically short life. Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG-13.

Linda Ronstadt: The Sound of My Voice Documentary on the life and career of legendary singer Linda Ronstadt, one of the most recognizable voices in the history of recorded music. Pageant Theatre. Rated PG-13.


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W going to be a witch. I fantasized about the day my Hogwarts acceptance letter would arrive. My dad

hen I was 7 years old, I’d made my mind up: I was

took me to midnight Harry Potter book releases as J.K. Rowling unveiled more of her magical world, and we always got two copies so we could devour story and photo by them simultaneously. Ashiah Scharaga It’s no surprise, then, that when a co-worker told me that Chico as h i a h s@ newsrev i ew.c om Princess Parties, a local characterbased entertainment company, was Fantasy parties hosting a Hogwarts Dinner Theater Visit chicoprincess event at Chico Catering Co. (on partiesllc.com or call Sept. 20), I snatched up two tickets 809-1666 for as quick as a seeker who’d just information on upcoming Chico spotted the golden snitch. My Princess Parties boyfriend’s daughter, Kenzie, had events. just finished the series and was the perfect first mate. As we arrived at the restaurant (Chico Catering Co. doubles as The Foodie Cafe), we were buzzing with excitement. Kenzie and I took turns pointing out our fellow housemates decked out in robes and other magical accoutrements (she’s a Ravenclaw and I’m a Hufflepuff). As we checked in with the prefects, the enchanting theme from The Sorcerer’s Stone film played. We were escorted to our table on the patio—passing a portrait of Hogwarts and the house banners—where we sat with two other giddy witches. The night started with a round of butterbeer—I appreciated that the nonalcoholic butterscotch-flavored drink was slightly sweet and fizzy with a whimsical dollop of whipped cream on top. We made a toast with our newfound friends and then talked about all things Harry Potter, from the seminal books to fan-inspired videos and songs. Harry Potter and Hermione Granger apparated shortly after, and explained that dark forces were at work and they were on a quest to find the three pieces

of the elder wand and destroy it (following the plot from the last Deathly Hallows film). But, of course, they were going to need our help: Kenzie and I whipped out our wands and practiced some spells with the group. It was precious watching the kiddos’ excitement throughout the night. They were thrilled any time Harry and Hermione reappeared to share their adventures and entertain, and the pair were dynamic and fun to watch. They visited each table throughout the night and encouraged friendly competition between the Hogwarts houses by asking Harry Potter trivia questions. Kenzie was elated when she earned her housemates points by correctly answering, “Who were the Marauders?” (answer: Harry’s dad’s Gryffindor crew), and received a nod of approval from Hermione. As for our meal, it was delicious and creative. For our first course, we enjoyed a gillyweed salad (a spring mix garnished with blackberries and almonds) and bread. Dinner was a British pastie (with a choice of chicken or beef) that was excellent—the crust was flaky and buttery but not greasy, and the beef was juicy and flavorful. It was a good thing we purchased tickets weeks in advance, as the event sold out quickly. Chico Princess Parties already has more themed dinners with Chico Catering Co. on the horizon, including an already sold-out Hogwarts night (Oct. 19) and The Grinch Takes Over Who-Ville, a holiday buffet breakfast on Dec. 1. The only downside of our evening: As soon as we got our dessert (which included a scrumptious “Platform 9 3/4” cookie), we felt we had to either wolf it down or take it to go. Those attending the adult session after ours had lined up, and the characters ushered us along. But Harry and Hermione stuck around to take pictures, and we were reminded not to hop on our broomsticks if we’d had too much butterbeer, getting one last chuckle in before departing. I’d call it a fun-filled Harry Potterthemed night and a much-needed magical infusion for this city of Muggles. Ω

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Art is in seAsOn Cool air, sunshine, maybe a coffee in hand (or a flask in pocket)—this fall weekend is shaping up to be an ideal one for art-walkin’ or art-bikin’, so it’s a good thing that every place in town has an art show. Seriously, is there any standing structure in Chico not showing art this weekend? In addition to the current exhibits at local galleries and museums (see Fine Arts, page 24) there is: • open studios Tour, with more than 60 local artists opening their spaces to the public on Saturday and Sunday (Oct. 19-20 and Oct. 26-27). This is the 30th edition of the Chico art Center’s annual fundraiser, and you can pick up a tour map there while also checking out examples from all the participating artists at the gallery’s month-long accompanying exhibit. • Fall open studios at Chico state, today (Oct. 17, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.). The department of art and art History has Art by Lynn Smyth (Open Studios Tour) opened the studios, galleries and labs in both ayres Hall and the arts & Humanities Building to show off the works of the school’s BFA and MFA students. • Butte College arts open studios art Tour (and Create space grand opening), Saturday and Sunday (Oct. 19-20, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.). Faculty and student art will be on display and tours of the new maker space will be given. • art & Wine Walk: The art is still there on display at 30 downtown Chico businesses (but I think the wine was just for the kick-off party earlier this month). Info on participating establishments at the downtown Chico Business association’s Art & Wine Walk page at downtownchico.com • arts dEVo’s arts pick: Two local purveyors of the macabre arts join forces this Saturday (Oct. 19, 6 p.m.) for a party at Blackbird. It’s a reception for Zak Elstein’s latest exhibit, featuring 17 of his shadow boxes filled with death and spooky lights, and a performance by Ken the Revelator (aka Ken smith) and his own shadowy atmospheric explorations on theremin and other noisemaking devices. check the credits Chico homegirl Mallory schwartz is a producer, as in movie producer, as in the person in charge of getting a film made. And it’s not some film-student project; Schwartz is the producer for legit independent film Before your Know it, which screened at sundance this year, was released in the U.S. this summer, and is coming to Chico’s Pageant Theatre this Friday (Oct. 18). The film stars Judith Light, Alec Baldwin and Mallory Schwartz Mandy Patinkin and tells the story of a couple of adult women (Hannah Pearl Utt and Jen Tullock) who find out that the mom (Light) they thought died when they were young is actually alive and starring in a TV soap opera. Schwartz was born and raised in Chico, was active in community theater and did hip-hop dance with Full Force dance Co. (now synthesis dance Co.). She graduated from Pleasant Valley High school in 2008 and headed out to new york University, where she got her bachelor’s in Film & TV Production from the Tisch school of the arts. Before she landed her first feature-length production credit, she worked at saturday night Live, was director of development for Baldwin’s El dorado Pictures, and produced the Baldwin-hosted Match Game and The alec Baldwin show on ABC. Meet Schwartz in person and pepper her with questions at the Pageant’s opening-night showing (7 p.m.), where she’lll be on hand for a post-film Q&A.


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The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of September 30 - October 4, 2019 The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

3 Catalina Point Rd 4305 Rancho Rd 3051 Burnap Ave 3043 Ceanothus Ave 4 Piedmont Cir 2912b Jolyn Way 322 Legacy Ln 1564 East Ave 1445 Half Dome Way 2163 La Rocco Dr 55 Losse Way 292 E 1st Ave 1430 Heather Cir 2141 Notre Dame Blvd 2809 Ceanothus Ave 9 Sun Circle Ct 2462 England St 4 Hemming Ln 1408 Spruce Ave 1463 Eaton Rd 907 Oak Lawn Ave 2782 Keith Hopkins Pl

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$700,000 $551,000 $510,000 $500,000 $465,000 $418,500 $400,000 $395,000 $392,500 $371,000 $370,000 $356,500 $333,000 $325,000 $320,000 $311,000 $308,000 $302,000 $299,000 $290,000 $290,000 $275,000

3/3 3/2 3/2 4/3 3/3 4/3 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 2/1 3/1 4/2 3/3 3/2 3/3 3/3 2/1 3/2 3/2 3/2

SQ. FT.

2577 1740 1118 2020 2212 2096 1684 1125 1703 1482 1311 1258 1099 1522 1571 1205 1197 1606 864 1248 1188 1221

ADDRESS

1409 Palm Ave 722 Wayne Ln 330 W 18th St 14442 Carnegie Rd 6104 Dana Cir 6132 Guilford Cir 6493 Barat Ct 4961 Beckwourth Ct 107 Buck Run Dr 1272 Biggs Ave 3815 Oro Bangor Hwy 31 Southview Dr 2260 Quartz Ave 1117 Butte Ave 5755 Via Pacana 3160 Columbia Ave 5660 Brookview Way 460 Likens Ln 1490 Freestone Ct 1490 Tobie Ln 1710 Bandtail Ln 5461 Mays Ln

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

Chico Chico Chico Magalia Magalia Magalia Magalia Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise

$269,000 $211,000 $199,000 $295,000 $244,000 $235,000 $150,000 $425,000 $300,000 $266,500 $265,000 $240,909 $225,000 $217,000 $180,000 $170,000 $507,000 $502,500 $365,000 $350,000 $335,000 $312,000

2/1 4/1 2/1 3/2 2/2 2/2 2/2 2/3 4/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 2/2 3/2 2/1 3/1 4/3 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 3/2 O c t O ber 17, 2019

SQ. FT.

732 1144 616 1738 1264 1105 1250 2423 1464 1584 1150 1152 1344 1099 952 1008 2583 2201 1553 1690 2230 1622

CN&R

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE DARLING BEE at 8995 Troxel Road Chico, CA 95928. AMANDA WYLIE DARLING 8995 Troxel Road Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: AMANDA DARLING Dated: September 18, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001068 Published: September 26, October 3,10,17, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BBMP WEALTH MANAGEMENT AND INSURANCE SERVICES at 1074 East Ave Ste. K3 Chico, CA 95926. MICHAEL BELLOTTI 26 Striped Moss Ct Roseville, CA 95678. CHRISTOPHER BODNEY 9 Hidden Grove Ct Chico, CA 95926. SCOTT MARCUS 11000 E Woodbridge Rd Acamp, CA 95220. MATTHEW PATTERSON 9488 Skye Court Granite Bay, CA 95746. This business is conducted by Copartners. Signed: CHRISTOPHER BODNEY Dated: August 29, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001002 Published: September 26, October 3,10,17, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO ECSTATIC DANCE COLLECTIVE at 1988 Wild Oak Lane Chico, CA 95928. MARY EWING 222 W. Sacramento Ave Chico, CA 95973. EVELYN LAWSON 2107 Shoshone Chico, CA 95926. GLEN ORCUTT 1988 Wild Oak Lane Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Unincorporated Association. Signed: GLEN ORCUTT Dated: September 9, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001038 Published: September 26, October 3,10,17, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MATA CLOTHING at 617 Hayfork Creek Terrace Chico, CA 95973. EDUARDO MATA 617 Hayfork Creek Terrace Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: EDUARDO MATA Dated: September 20, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001076 Published: September 26, October 3,10,17, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DELPHINE at 180 Pauletah Place Chico, CA 95973. JENNIFER CRANE 180 Pauletah Place Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JENNIFER CRANE Dated: September 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001045 Published: September 26, October 3,10,17, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as HALEY MUSIC THERAPY, THE MUSIC INITIATIVE at 138 West 22nd Street Chico, CA 95928. HALEY MUSIC THERAPY 138 West 22nd Street Chico, CA 95928. ERIN HALEY 2 Aldrin Court Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: ERIN HALEY, PRESIDENT Dated: September 12, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001047 Published: September 26, October 3,10,17, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name WILDFLOWER SALON at 2995 Esplanade Ste 101 Chico, CA 95973. BRIELYN LEDFORD 28 Lawnwood Drive Chico, CA 95926. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: BRIELYN LEDFORD Dated: August 26, 2019 FBN Number: 2016-0000616 Published: October 3,10,17,24, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PHANTASM JEWELRY at 13450 Oak Ranch Lane Chico, CA 95973-9274. AUBREY CHRISMAN 13450 Oak Ranch Lane Chico, CA 95973-9274. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: AUBREY CHRISMAN Dated: September 16, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001057 Published: October 3,10,17,24, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PEDROS GARDEN at 13109 Jordan Hill Rd Concow, CA 95965. NATHAN CACERES 13109 Jordan Hill Rd Concow, CA 95965. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: NATHAN CACERES Dated: August 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001012 Published: October 3,10,17,24, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SIERRA WATER UTILITY at 2618 Navarro Dr Chico, CA 95973. MICHAEL BUTLER 2618 Navarro Dr Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: MICHAEL D. BUTLER Dated: September 24, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001089 Published: October 3,10,17,24, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BIDWELL REAL ESTATE, BIDWELL REALTY, CENTURY 21 BIDWELL REALTY at 5263 Royal Oaks Dr Oroville, CA 95966. BIDWELL REALTY, INC 5 Mt Hope Court Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JAMES M. GUDERIAN, PRESIDENT Dated: September 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001087 Published: October 3,10,17,24, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BIDWELL REAL ESTATE, BIDWELL REALTY, CENTURY 21 BIDWELL REALTY at 5 Skyline Blvd Oroville, CA 95966. BIDWELL REALTY, INC 5 Mt Hope Court Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JAMES M. GUDERIAN, PRESIDENT Dated: September 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001086 Published: October 3,10,17,24, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as THE REDWOOD SANDWICH COMPANY at 1354 East Ave Ste U Chico, CA

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95926. BENJAMIN BRACKEN 6904 Dean Place Paradise, CA 95969. KAITLYN BRACKEN 6904 Dean Place. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: KAITLYN BRACKEN Dated: August 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001008 Published: October 3,10,17,24, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as WATER TANGO at 1272 Arch Way Chico, CA 95973. SALVATORE VETRANO 1272 Arch Way Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: SALVATORE VETRANO Dated: September 30, 2019 FBN NUmber: 2019-0001107 Published: October 3,10,17,24, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SERA HOSTING SERVICES at 4644 Wilder Drive Chico, CA 95928. STEPHEN E WILDER II 4644 Wilder Drive Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: STEPHEN E. WILDER II Dated: September 25, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001092 Published: October 3,10,17,24, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CLEAR REFLECTIONS OF CHICO at 1612 Sherman Ave Chico, CA 95926. RICHARD J. WEMETTE 1612 Sherman Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RICHARD J WEMETTE Dated: August 13, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0000957 Published: October 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATMENT The following persons are doing business as OAK RIDGE CONSTRUCTION at 11128 Midway Suite A Chico, CA 95928. OAK RIDGE ENTERPRISE, INC. 11128 Midway Suite A Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: SHAWN MACNEILL, PRESIDENT Dated: September 19, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001075 Published: October 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as EYE OF JADE at 1238 Mangrove Ave Chico, CA 95926. BENJAMIN LUCAS 11576 Dairy Rd Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: BEN LUCAS Dated: October 2, 2019

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FBN Number: 2019-0001121 Published: October 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as AGRA MARKETING GROUP, AGRA SERVICES at 60 Declaration Drive, Suite A Chico, CA 95973. AGRA TRADING, LLC 60 Declaration Drive, Suite A Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: NICHOLAS B. CARTWRIGHT Dated: October 2, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001116 Published: October 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SUNNY DAY FARMS at 8010 Reservoir Road Oroville, CA 95966. MARY ANN BARR 8010 Reservoir Road Oroville, CA 95966. LORRAINE M DAY 8010 Reservoir Road Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: LORRAINE M. DAY Dated: September 25, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001095 Published: October 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO AQUAJETS, CHICO AREA SWIM ASSOCIATION, CHICO MASTERS at 3156 Canyon Oaks Ter Chico, CA 95928. CHICO AREA SWIM ASSOCIATION 1675 Park View Lane Chico, CA 95926. This busines is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: VERONICA COATES, TREASURER Dated: October 2, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001118 Published: October 10,17,24,31, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DELICIOUS TWIST at 1940 Feather River Blvd Oroville, CA 95965. A J HAGGARD 1 Sevillano Ct Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Indivdual. Signed: A.J. HAGGARD Dated: October 2, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001120 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitous business name DELICIOUS TWIST at 390 Purple Rocks Lane Oroville, CA 95966. LEANNA IRENE BROMLEY 390 Purple Rocks Lane Oroville, CA 95966. This business was conducted by an Individual. Signed: LEANNA BROMLEY Dated: October 2, 2019 FBN Number: 2017-0001549 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2019


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BARRON PLASTERING at 5576 Pentz Rd Paradise, CA 95969. JAIME BARRON 5576 Pentz Rd Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an Indivdual. Signed: JAIME BARRON Dated: October 7, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001146 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SILVERIZED TREE SERVICE at 1702 Spruce Ave Chico, CA 95926. JEFF M SILVER II 1702 Spruce Ave Chico, CA 95926. MANDY M SILVER 1702 Spruce Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: JEFF SILVER II Dated: September 23, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001084 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as WIKIPOUCH at 1124 Almond Vista Ct Chico, CA 95926. INFECTION PREVENTION PRODUCTS, INC. 1124 Almond Vista Ct Chico, CA 95926. This busines is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: KENT M. COLLINS, EVP Dated: October 8, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001151 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as JUNK KING CHICO at 13242 Grass Valley Ave Ste 22 Grass Valley, CA 95945. PGE LYMATH LLC 6025 Happy Pines Dr Foresthill, CA 95631. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: PEGGY LYMATH, CO-PRESIDENT Dated: September 30, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001101 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PACIFIC NORTH CONSULTING at 1033 Park Avenue Chico, CA 95928. RODNEY W LACEY 1033 Park Avenue Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: RODNEY LACEY Dated: October 9, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001163 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MI TAQUITO GRILL at 3005 Esplanade Chico, CA

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95973. JOVITO HERNANDEZ 27 Baltar Loop 1 Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed: JOVITO HERNANDEZ Dated: October 14, 2019 FBN Number: 2019-0001173 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2019

NOTICES NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Pursuant to CA Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units contain clothes, furniture, boxes, etc. 278SS MICHAEL CASSIDY 6x10 (Personal items, Containers, Misc.) 284SS MICHAEL CASSIDY 6x10 (Boxes, Containers, Misc.) 519CC GERRARD WHITE 5x12 (Furniture, Boxes, Misc.) 520CC GERRARD WHITE 11x7 (Furniture, Boxes, Misc.) 073SS BRANDY RAMSEY 5x5 (Boxes, Camping gear, Large cases) 222SS GLENN D MICHAELS 4x5 (Boxes, Bags, Totes) 435CC RANDLE KENTA 5x10 (Boxes, Bags) 395CC1 PATRICK D BOOTH 6x12 (Boxes, Tires, Totes) 219SS CARBY CANDANCE 6x15 (Tools, Bags, Boxes, Furniture) 330CC DANIELLE CREWS 7x12 (Tubs, Toys, Playhouse) 173SS DOLORES DAVENPORT 7x12 (Totes, Boxes, Furniture) 072CC DOLORES DAVENPORT 6x9 (Totes, Boxes) Contents to be sold to the highest bidder on: Saturday October 26, 2019 Beginning at 1:00PM Sale to be held at: Bidwell Self Storage, 65 Heritage Lane, Chico, CA 95926. (530) 893-2109 Published: October 10,17, 2019

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to the California Self-Storage Self-Service Act, Section 21700-21716 of the Business & Professions Code, the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said stored property. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding at the location where the said property has been stored. GRIDLEY SELF STORAGE 1264 Highway 99 Gridley, CA 95948 Butte County, State of California Unit No. #B023 - JENNIFER BETTENCOURT - Tag number 6273263 Items: Miscellaneous household items, Boxes, Yard tools, furniture dolly Lien sale on-line Storagretreasures.com Oct 25 Nov 1st noon. Date: Saturday, November 1, 2019 final bid at noon Successful bidders must present a valid form of identification and be prepared to pay cash for purchased items. All items are sold “as is” and must be removed at the time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event that a settlement is reached between the owner and tenant. Go to Gridley Self Storage at 1264 Highway 99 in Gridley, CA to pick up items. Published: October 17,24, 2019

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to the California Self-Storage Self-Service Act, Section 21700-21716 of the Business & Professions Code, the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said stored property. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding at the location where the said property has been stored. G&D SELF STORAGE 2687 Highway 99 Biggs, CA 95948 Butte County, State of California Unit No. #A15 - LISA TAYLOR Tag number 6273264 Items: Miscellaneous boxes, tent, vaccuum Lien sale on-line Storagretreasures.com Oct 25 Nov 1st noon. Date: Saturday, November 1, 2019 final bid at noon Successful bidders must present a valid form of identification and be prepared to pay cash for purchased items. All items are sold “as is” and must be removed at the time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event that a settlement is reached between the owner and tenant. Go to Gridley Self Storage at 1264 Highway 99 in Gridley, CA to pick up items. Published: October 17,24, 2019

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to the California Self-Storage Self-Service Act, Section 21700-21716 of the Business & Professions Code, the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said stored property. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding at the location where the said property has been stored. DISCOUNT SELF STORAGE 5100 Clark Road Paradise, CA 95969 Butte County, State of California Unit No. #C37 - DOUGLAS PACINI - Tag number 6273288 Items: Miscellaneous items, Boxes, tires, fishing poles, tools Unit No. #C09 - STEPHANIE SAENZ - Tag number 6273289 Items: Miscellaneous items, Boxes, Bike Lien sale on-line Storagretreasures.com from Oct 25 - Nov 1st noon. Date: Saturday, November 1, 2019 final bid by noon Successful bidders must present a valid form of identification and be prepared to pay cash for purchased items. All items are sold “as is” and must be removed at the time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event that a settlement is reached between the owner and tenant. Go to Discount Storage in Paradise, CA to pick up items. Published: October 17,24, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner LONNIE JERAMIAH JUNGERS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: LONNIE JERAMIAH JUNGERS Proposed name: LONNIE KENNETH HOWLAND THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name this Legal Notice continues

should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 20, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: September 17, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02738 Published: September 26, October 3,10,17, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ROSEMARY AMANDA BELAK filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ROSEMARY AMANDA BELAK Proposed name: ROSEMARY OCHOA MEDELLIN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 6, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: September 18, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02708 Published: September 26, October 3,10,17, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner VANESSA MARIE PULLEY filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: VANESSA MARIE PULLEY Proposed name: VANNESSA MARIE GRAMPS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no this Legal Notice continues

written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 6, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: September 12, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02724 Published: September 26, October 3,10,17, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner PATRICK STUART HUTLER filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: PATRICK STUART HUTLER Proposed name: PATRICK STEWART HARVEY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 13, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: September 19, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02799 Published: October 3,10,17,24, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner DEBORAH RENEE BENNETT filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: DEBORAH RENEE BENNETT Proposed name: JESSI LEE RAMONE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 6, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA this Legal Notice continues

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For the week oF DAte, 2019 ARIES (March 21-April 19): “We can’t

change anything until we get some fresh ideas, until we begin to see things differently,” wrote Aries psychologist James Hillman. I agree. And that’s very good news for you. In my view, you are more attracted to and excited by fresh ideas than any other sign of the zodiac. That’s why you have the potential to become master initiators of transformation. One of my favorite types of plot twists in your life story occurs when you seek out fresh ideas and initiate transformations not only in your own behalf, but also for those you care about. I bet the coming weeks will bring at least one of those plot twists.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Meta-

phorically speaking, you are now crossing a bridge. Behind you is the intriguing past; in front of you, the even more intriguing future. You can still decide to return to where you came from. Or else you could pick up your pace and race ahead at twice the speed. You might even make the choice to linger on the bridge for a while; to survey the vast vistas that are visible and contemplate more leisurely the transition you’re making. Only you know what’s best for you, of course. But if you asked me, I’d be in favor of lingering on the bridge for a while.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): As I write

this, I’m sitting in a café near two women at another table. One sports a gold cashmere headscarf and pentagram necklace. The other wears a dark blue pantsuit and a silver broach that’s the glyph for Gemini the Twins. The woman wearing the headscarf shuffles a deck of Tarot cards and asks the woman wearing the pantsuit what she’d like to find out during the divination she is about to receive. “I would very much like you to tell me what I really really want,” she says with a chuckle. “I’m sure that once I find out that big secret, I’ll be able to accomplish wonders.” I hope you will be on a similar mission in the coming weeks. Do whatever it takes to get very clear about what you want most.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Ancient

Greek philosopher Socrates was meandering through an Athenian marketplace, gazing at the appealing and expensive items for sale. “How many things there are in this world that I do not want,” he exclaimed with satisfaction. I recommend you cultivate that liberated attitude. Now is a perfect time to celebrate the fact that there are countless treasures and pleasures you don’t need in order to be charmed and cheerful about your life. For extra credit, add this nuance from Henry David Thoreau: People are rich in proportion to the number of things they can afford to let alone.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I invite you to try

this exercise. Imagine that one springtime you grow a garden filled with flowers that rabbits like to nibble: petunias, marigolds, gazanias and pansies. This place’s only purpose is to give gifts to a wild, sweet part of nature. It’s blithely impractical. You do it for your own senseless, secret joy. It appeals to the dreamy lover of life in you. Got all that? Now, in accordance with current astrological omens, I suggest you actually try to fulfill a fantasy comparable to that one in the coming weeks.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): My Virgo

friend Lola got a text message from her Scorpio buddy Tanya. “Why don’t you come over and chill with me and my demons? It’ll be entertaining, I promise! My inner jerks are howlingly funny tonight.” Here’s what Lola texted back: “Thanks but no thanks, sweetie. I’ve been making big breakthroughs with my own demons—giving them the attention they crave without caving in to their outrageous demands— and for now I need to work on stabilizing our new relationship. I can’t risk bringing extra demons into the mix.” I suspect this is an accurate description of what could be happening for you.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In ancient holy texts from India, soma was said to be a

by rob brezsny drink that enhanced awareness and alertness. According to modern scholars, it may have been a blend of poppy, ephedra and cannabis. In Norse mythology, the beverage called the Mead of Suttungr conferred poetic inspiration and the ability to solve any riddle. One of its ingredients was honey. In Slavic folklore, raskovnik is an herb with the magic power to unlock what’s locked and uncover hidden treasures. It’s not a four-leaf clover, but resembles it. I invite you to fantasize about using these three marvels. To do so will enhance your imagination, thereby boosting the cosmic forces that will be working in your favor to enhance your awareness, confer inspiration, solve riddles, unlock what’s locked, and find hidden treasures.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Inven-

tor Buckminster Fuller (1895-1983) was a visionary genius in numerous fields, including architecture, design, engineering and futurism. In the course of earning 40 honorary doctorates, he traveled widely. It was his custom to wear three watches, each set to a different time: one to the zone where he currently was, another to where he had recently departed and a third to where he would journey next. “I know that I am not a category,” he wrote. “I am not a thing—a noun. I seem to be a verb.” I recommend his approach to you in the coming weeks. Be a verb! Allow your identity to be fluid, your plans adjustable, your ideas subject to constant revision.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

“Art is good for my soul precisely because it reminds me that we have souls in the first place,” said actress Tilda Swinton. How about you? What reminds you that you have a soul in the first place? Beloved animals? Favorite music? A stroll amidst natural wonders? Unpredictable, fascinating sexual experiences? The vivid and mysterious dreams you have at night? Whatever stimuli bring you into visceral communion with your soul, I urge you to seek them out in abundance. It’s Soul-Cherishing and Soul-Enhancing Time for you.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

The coming weeks will be a favorable time to arrange a series of high-level meetings between your body, mind and soul. You might even consider staging an extravagant conference-like festival and festival-like conference. The astrological omens suggest that your body, mind and soul are now primed to reveal choice secrets and tips to each other. They are all more willing and eager than usual to come up with productive new synergies that will enable each to function with more panache and effectiveness.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “I

believe in inhabiting contradictions,” writes Aquarian author and activist Angela Davis. “I believe in making contradictions productive, not in having to choose one side or the other side. As opposed to choosing either or choosing both.” I think her approach will work well for you in the coming weeks. It’s not just that the contradictions will be tolerable; they will be downright fertile, generous and beneficent. So welcome them; honor them; allow them to bless you with their tricky opportunities and unexpected solutions.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Piscean

pianist Frédéric Chopin (1801-1849) was a poetic genius whose music was full of sweetness and grace. “Without equal in his generation,” said more than one critic. Today, more than 170 years after his death, his work remains popular. Recently an Italian sound designer named Remo De Vico created an original new Chopin piece that featured all 21 of the master’s piano nocturnes being played simultaneously. (You can hear it at tinyurl.com/NewChopin.) As you might imagine, it’s a gorgeous mess, too crammed with notes to truly be enjoyable, but interesting nevertheless. I’ll counsel you to avoid a similar fate in the coming weeks. It’s fine to be extravagant and expansive and mulitfaceted; just don’t overdo it.

www.RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888. o c t o b e r 1 7, 2 0 1 9

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ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JUDITH ANNE BEDBURY filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JUDITH ANNE BEDBURY Proposed name: JUDITH ANNE JOHNSTON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: December 4, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: October 3, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02877 Published: October 10,17,24,31, 2019

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner this Legal Notice continues

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ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MARY ANN SLYH filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MARY ANN SLYH Proposed name: MARY ANN DRENNAN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: December 4, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: October 2, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02965 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2019

SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO RESPONDENT NATHAN TYLER YOUNG You have been sued by petitioner: CATHRYN DENISE YOUNG You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter, phone this Legal Notice continues

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call, or court appearance will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. For legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. Get help finding a lawyer at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courts.ca.gov/selfhelp) at the California Legal Services website (www.lawhelpca.org), or by contacting your local county bar association. FEE WAIVER: If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. The court may order you to pay back all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for you or the other party. The name and address of the court are: Superior Court Of California County of Butte Chico - North Butte County Courthouse 1775 Concord Avenue Chico, CA 95928 The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are: CATHRYN DENISE YOUNG 1591 Hawthorne Ave Chico, CA 95926 Signed: KIMBERLY FLENER Dated: August 12, 2019 Case Number: 19FL01426 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2019

PETITION

appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: CARL B. LEVERENZ Law Offices of Leverenz & Finn (530) 895-1621 Case Number: 19PR00338 Published: October 10,17,24, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE JANET HOPE STOTT To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JANET HOPE STOTT A Petition for Probate has been filed by: CHERYL FLETCHER in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: CHERYL FLETCHER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: November 5, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE PAMELA JEAN OATES To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: PAMELA JEAN OATES A Petition for Probate has been filed by: DONA OATES in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: DONA OATES be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: November 12, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: 10 Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance

this Legal Notice continues

this Legal Notice continues

may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: CLARA YANG, ATTORNEY AT LAW 2810 Coloma St., Ste. A Placerville, CA 95667 (530) 621-3624 Case Number: 19PR00434 Published: October 10,17,24, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE ARVEL RUSSELL ROGERS To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: ARVEL RUSSELL ROGERS A Petition for Probate has been filed by: GLEN EATON in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: GLEN EATON be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: November 19, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: Probate Room: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your this Legal Notice continues

claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: MARK JOHNSON 2531 Forest Ave Ste 100 Chico, CA 95928 (530) 345-6801 Dated: October 3, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00451 Published: October 17,24,31, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE FRED E. TRASK, JR. To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: FRED E. TRASK, JR. A Petition for Probate has been filed by: DANIELLE L. KLEIN in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: DANIELLE L. KLEIN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: November 5, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: C-10 Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the this Legal Notice continues

decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: RAOUL J. LECLERC P.O. Drawer 111 Oroville, CA 95965 (530) 533-5661 Dated: October 8, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00457 Published: October 17,24,31, 2019

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE VIVIENNE MARGARET RICH, also know as VIVIENNE M. RICH To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: VIVIENNE MARGARET RICH, also known as VIVIENNE M. RICH A Petition for Probate has been filed by: DENNIS LEE RICH in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. The Petition for Probate requests that: DENNIS LEE RICH be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: November 19, 2019 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept: TBA Room: Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte this Legal Notice continues

1775 Concord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: YVONNE A. ASCHER 444 Pearl Street, Suite A1 Monterey, CA 93940 (831) 641-9019 Dated: October 9, 2019 Case Number: 19PR00456 Published: October 17,24,31, 2019

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ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner WENDY JO MORROW filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: WENDY JO MORROW Proposed name: WENDY JO GEBICKE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 20, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: September 27, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02906 Published: October 10,17,24,31, 2019

KENNETH CHARLES REEVES II filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: KENNETH CHARLES REEVES II Proposed name: KENNETH CHARLES DAGAMA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 13, 2019 Time: 9:00 AM Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: September 17, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02730 Published: October 17,24,31, November 7, 2019

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Room: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 1775 Concord Ave Chico, CA 95928 Signed: TAMARA L. MOSBARGER Dated: September 5, 2019 Case Number: 19CV02654 Published: October 10,17,24,31, 2019


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