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Celebrating Fine Design, Architecture, and Building

Take T wo Older homes get a stunning new life

November–December 2017

Meet This Year’s Picks For The New England Design Hall Of Fame

Display until December 25, 2017 nehomemag.com

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Grove bed, $1799 and nightstands, $1199 each; Bedding, $69-$199. 375 Newbury Street, Boston roomandboard.com

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Creative Approach Sophisticated Sensibility

DAHER INTERIOR DESIGN 224 CLARENDON AT NEWBURY

I BOSTON, MA 617.236.0355 I DAHERINTERIORDESIGN.COM

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WE BU I LD ON THAT EVERY DAY. Whatever the season, you’ll find us shingling rooftops with meticulous attention, painstakingly installing tile, carefully painting walls. We inspect each nail. We stare down every nut and bolt. We patiently examine electrical wires and woodwork. This is how we create quality. We pay attention to every step we take, on every house we build, every single day.

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www.kenvona.com waltham 781.890.5599 cape cod 508.564.4844

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KE N N E TH V ON A CONSTRUCTION

Right from the start.

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ĂŠditionspĂŠciale $4,990*

French Art de Vivre

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Littoral II. Dressed in fabrics designed by Kenzo Takada for Roche Bobois.

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Photo Michel Gibert, image for advertising purposes only. Special thanks: TASCHEN, Stone Sculpture museum of the Fondation Kubach-Wilmsen. *Edition Speciale prices valid in the USA until 12/31/17, offer not to be used in conjunction with any other offer. 1Conditions apply, contact store for details. 2Program available on select items, subject to availability.


Littoral II. *$4,990 instead of $6,665 until 12/31/17 for sofa as shown, 98.4"L. x 30.7"H. x 37"D. Price includes one 3/4 - seat sofa with 3 back cushions upholstered in plain Littoral fabric, 2 armrest cushions in patterned Hanawa fabric, 2 square toss cushions and 1 lumbar cushion in patterned Kame fabric. Wenge stained base. Other dimensions and elements available. Metallica console, cocktail table, end table and pedestral, design Luigi Gorgoni. Manufactured in Europe.

∙ Complimentary 3D Interior Design Service 1 ∙ Quick Ship program available 2

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www.roche-bobois.com

Date: September 27, 2017

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New England Home


3D RENDERING PROVIDED BY PIXATE CREATIVE

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r e s id e ntial co mme r cial inte r io r d e s ign

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Design begins here

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With curated collections of furniture, accessories, fine linens, tabletop, rugs and much more. The select resources you seek—known and new—in a single location. Introducing AmericasMart. Where global style trends and sourcing opportunities are yours to discover. Select showrooms open year round. The Atlanta International Gift & Home Furnishings Market ® JANUARY 9 −16, 2018

Design. Redefined. AmericasMart.com/Jan18 | 800.ATL.MART PHOTO: CARACOLE

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TO THE TRADE

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An Award-Winning Full Service Residential Interior Design Firm

2017 Gold PRISM Award for Best Living Area: Bath

Please call us at 617-236-2286 to arrange a consultation | 224 Clarendon Street, Boston

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Photography by Michael J. Lee Leslie Fine_SO17_2.00.v3.indd 3

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PHOTO: MICHAEL J. LEE

A PERFECT REFLECTION OF YOU. Your home should not only reflect your personal values, but take your breath away. Elms Interior Design collaborates closely to create an exceptional space that mirrors your lifestyle – and inspires you every day.

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535 ALBANY STREET, FOURTH FLOOR BOSTON, MA 02118 (617) 451.1555

www.ElmsID.com

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Morehouse MacDonald & Associates is currently designing custom homes in Greater Boston and Cape Cod, MA, Charleston and Kiawah, SC, as well as the islands of Nevis and St Kitts in the Caribbean. Morehouse MacDonald & Associates believes sophisticated design is more than a concept; it is a distinct expression of you. Isn’t it time you explore new territory?

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General Contractor: Four Seasons Real Estate Landscape Architect: Landscape Plan Studio Interior Design: Sterling Design Rendering: Design Distill

Morehouse MacDonald & Associates, Inc. Architects Custom Residential Architecture and Interior Design since 1958 781-861-9500 — morehousemacdonald.com

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Landscape Architecture & Construction TheMacDowellCompany.com

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All Aspects of Interior Design STOWE | BOSTON | Nantucket 2038 Mountain Road | Stowe, VT 05672 802.253.3770 | seldomsceneinteriors.com

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international design firm

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WATERTOWN & BEVERLY, MA

DESIGNERBATH.COM

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Designer Bath and Salem Plumbing Supply congratulates our

2017 OVERALL EXCELLENCE IN DESIGN WINNER, MARY MICHAEL O’HARE of MMO Designs

Learn more about our annual Designers SHINE contest at

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978.443.3638

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SINCE 1959

L a n d s c a p e A r c h i t e c t u r e | C on s t r u c t i on | E s tat e C a r e

Photo: Rick Mandelkorn

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In This Issue

November–December 2017 I Volume 13, Issue 2

124 Featured Homes:

102 Suburban Chic

102

A designer’s own Boston-area home proves that stylish decor and young children are not, after all, mutually exclusive. Text by Megan Fulweiler I Photography by John Gruen Produced by Stacy Kunstel

112 City Slick

An imaginative design plan is carried out with exquisite attention to the details, turning a featureless Boston condominium into a sophisticated stunner. Text by Bob Curley I Photography by Eric Roth Produced by Kyle Hoepner

124 Rise and Shine

With a bit of structural TLC and a fresh look inside, a venerable old colonial-style home near Boston adopts a youthful ambience. Text by Maria LaPiana I Photography by John Gruen I Produced by Karin Lidbeck Brent

134 On a Historical Note

Thanks to a designer’s practiced eye and deft hand, the interiors of an opulent nineteenth-century Back Bay home sing again. Text by Debra Judge Silber I Photography by Greg Premru I Produced by Karin Lidbeck Brent

134 On the cover: The original oversize windows usher light into a condominium in Boston’s Penmark Building revamped with a sleek, sophisticated design. Photograph by Eric Roth. To see more of this home, turn to page 112.

Special Event

148 New England Design Hall of Fame

Meet the class of 2017, the talented design professionals being inducted into the New England Design Hall of Fame. Text by Lisa H. Speidel November–December 2017 | New England Home  27

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In This Issue

November–December 2017 I Volume 13, Issue 2

196

171 Perspectives

Chic pieces for the desktop; designer Megan van der Kieft imagines a luxe powder room; Hardwood Design’s Bill Bivona on the ups and downs of building beautiful staircases; a trio of New England artisans doing special things with ceramics.

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182 Trade Notes

Noteworthy happenings in the New England design business.

30 From the Editor 41 Elements: Never a Dull Moment

As the season of shine, sparkle, and shimmer arrives, interiors glow brightly.

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Edited by Cheryl and Jeffrey Katz

52 Artistry: Beguiling Botanicals Ceramic artist Katherine Houston uses eighteenth-century techniques to craft exquisitely rendered porcelain fruits, flowers, and vegetables. Text By Regina Cole

58 Suburban Style: Generation Next

Given a makeover for a fresh, bright look, an old house proves to be the perfect place for a young family to make its new home. Text by Lisa H. Speidel I Photography by Michael J. Lee

66 Good Bones: Contemporary Classic

A new Vermont home takes its inspiration from a centuries-old farmhouse design. Text by Robert Kiener I Photography by Jim Westphalen

171

By Paula M. Bodah

186 Design Life

Our candid camera snaps recent gatherings that celebrate architecture and design. I By Lynda Simonton

192 Calendar

Special events for people who are passionate about design. By Lynda Simonton

196 New In The Showrooms

Unique, beautiful, and now appearing in New England shops and showrooms. By Lynda Simonton

200 Premier Properties

Notable homes on the market in New England. I By Maria LaPiana

210 Resources

A guide to the professionals and products in this issue’s features.

214 Advertiser Index 216 Sketch Pad

Drawing on the walls? It’s not a no-no when it results in the perfect staircase for a home.

74 In Detail: Curtain Call

New England’s best designers know that a custom window treatment crafted in a local drapery workroom can be the perfect finishing touch to a stylish home. Text by Regina Cole

82 “5 Under 40” Awards

A fun look back at our celebration in honor of the young winners of our 2017 “5 Under 40” Awards.

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Special Marketing Section:

Projects We Love

28  New England Home | November–December 2017

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MICHAEL J. LEE

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246 WALNUT STREET, SUITE 403 ;%0298786))879-8)  NEWTON, MA | 617-332-1009 2);8321%` ;;;.)22-*)64%091&3'31 JENNIFERPALUMBO.COM

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Editor’s Letter

Designers On The Hunt

M

y schedule over the past week (even as we have been scrambling to get this issue of the magazine off to press) has conspired to keep me far from my keyboard. As much as I’d like to complain, though, I really can’t. The offending commitments—including the Boston Design Center’s annual market days, an inaugural “taste and tour” of the brand-new Greenwich Design District in Connecticut, and a festive cocktail party where we announced this year’s inductees into the New England Design Hall of Fame (find out who they are starting on page 148)—weren’t things I’d have wanted to miss. But the crush did get me thinking about just how event-heavy a designer’s schedule could be, if she or he were determined to see everything, and just how interconnected the various segments of our EuroAmerican world are when it comes to high-style products for luxury home interiors. There is hardly a month of the year that doesn’t have its destination for intrepid folk intent on scoping out the newest of the new and the best of the best . . . and perhaps

For subscriptions call (800) 765-1225 or visit nehomemag.com See additional great content at:

30  New England Home | November–December 2017

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sneaking in a bit of vacation scenery along the way. January kicks things off with the KBIS kitchen and bath show and Las Vegas Market, along with Paris-based Maison & Objet; NY Now comes in February, followed in March by the Architectural Digest Design Show and Westweek at the Pacific Design Center in Los Angeles. April is time for High Point Market in North Carolina and Milan’s Salone del Mobile; in May you can hit the International Contemporary Furniture Fair and other Design Week events in New York City, plus Legends of the La Cienega Design Quarter in L.A. Design Miami follows in June. In August, it’s off to Las Vegas Market and NY Now again. September brings take two of Maison & Objet, plus Decorex in London. October means heading back to High Point. At the moment I can’t think of anything major in November (SOFA in Chicago?), December, or July—but then again, I’m reciting this list off the top of my head, and it doesn’t even include high-profile antiques and fine-art fairs like New York’s Winter Antiques Show or Art Basel, TEFAF Maastricht, and their younger New World siblings. I’m almost amazed that any interiors ever get finished, given the plethora of semi-compulsory stops designers have to make in their nomadic rounds. There are big-name brands you will see in common at most of these shows, naturally. But, at the same time, the curious visitor will find choice new producers just getting their start, and perhaps score that absolutely perfect piece a current client needs. Did you ever wonder how a certain sofa or carved mirror frame ended up in your living room? This kind of exhausting but productive social circuit might be the answer. —Kyle Hoepner

Find more at nehomemag.com

Our editors and a fascinating lineup of guest blog­gers share beautiful photography, design ideas, and advice every week on the New England Home Design Blog. The site also features ongoing content updates, where you’ll encounter house tours, interviews and commentary, before-and-after stories, and other special items for lovers of great home design.

Sign up for our Design Discoveries editorial ­e-newsletter and get weekly updates on luxury home style, including the latest products, upcoming events, and green ideas.

Portrait by Hornick/Rivlin Studio

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Photographer: Sean Litchfield

Architect & Interior Design: LDa Architecture & Interiors | Builder: Sea-Dar Construction | Woodwork: Herrick & White

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YEARS

ve o l y l p m i ! s o e d W what we SINCE 1977, WE HAVE BEEN FORTUNATE TO WORK WITH THE BEST ARCHITECTS, DESIGNERS AND BUILDERS IN THE BUSINESS. (You know who you are!)

- THANK YOU FOR CHOOSING HERRICK & WHITE -

S E RV I N G W O R L D W I D E L O C AT I O N S | W W W. H E R R I C K-W H I T E .CO M | (4 01) 6 5 8 - 0 4 4 0

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Editor-in-Chief Kyle Hoepner khoepner@nehomemag.com Homes Editor Stacy Kunstel skunstel@nehomemag.com Senior Editor Paula M. Bodah pbodah@nehomemag.com Creative Director Robert Lesser rlesser@nehomemag.com Market and Digital Editor Lynda Simonton lsimonton@nehomemag.com Copy Editor Lisa H. Speidel lspeidel@nehomemag.com Contributing Editors Cheryl and Jeffrey Katz candjkatz@nehomemag.com Karin Lidbeck Brent klidbeck@nehomemag.com Contributing Writers Fred Albert, Regina Cole, Bob Curley, Julie Dugdale, Megan Fulweiler, Robert Kiener, Maria LaPiana, Erin Marvin, Louis Postel, Nathaniel Reade, Debra Judge Silber, Lisa H. Speidel Contributing Photographers Trent Bell, Robert Benson, Tria Giovan, Sam Gray, John Gruen, Keller + Keller, Michael J. Lee, Richard Mandelkorn, Laura Moss, Michael Partenio, Greg Premru, Nat Rea, Eric Roth, Brian Vanden Brink, Jim Westphalen •

Editorial Submissions Designers, architects, builders, and homeowners are invited to submit projects for editorial consideration. For information about submitting projects, e-mail ­edit@nehomemag.com. Letters to the Editor We’d love to hear from you! Write to us at the above address, fax us at (617) 663-6377, or e-mail us at ­letters@nehomemag.com. Upcoming Events Are you planning an event that we can feature in our Calendar of Events? E-mail information to calendar@nehomemag.com, or mail to Calendar Editor, New England Home, 530 Harrison Ave., Suite 302, Boston, MA 02118. Parties We welcome photographs from design- or architecture-related parties. Send high-resolution photos with information about the party and the people pictured to lsimonton@nehomemag.com.

34  New England Home | November–December 2017

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Kevin Kevin Cradock Cradock Builders Builders

STERN McCAFFERTY Architecture Interiors STERN McCAFFERTY Architecture & &Interiors STERN McCAFFERTY Architecture & Interiors

Custom Building Building \ Renovation Custom Renovation \\ Millwork Millwork 617-524-2405 \\ cradockbuilders.com cradockbuilders.com \\ Boston, 617-524-2405 Boston,MA MA

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Interior Glass Door Solutions STACKING ROOM DIVIDER

SPACE SAVING CLOSET DOORS

Publisher Kathy Bush-Dutton kbushdutton@nehomemag.com Executive Sales Manager Jill Korff jkorff@nehomemag.com Sales Managers Roberta Thomas Mancuso rmancuso@nehomemag.com Kim Sansoucy ksansoucy@nehomemag.com Robin Schubel rschubel@nehomemag.com David Simone dsimone@nehomemag.com Marketing Designer Jared Ainscough jainscough@nehomemag.com Production Manager Glenn Sadin gsadin@nehomemag.com Marketing, Events, and Sales Executive Tess Woods twoods@nehomemag.com •

Subscriptions  To subscribe to New England Home ($19.95 for one year) or for customer service, call (800) 765-1225 or visit our website, nehomemag.com.

COLLABORATIVE AND PRIVATE WORK SPACES

Inspiring. Space Saving. Sustainable. Room Dividers Closet Doors Office Partitions Barn Doors Privacy Walls Swing Doors Suspended Systems

Advertising Information To receive information about advertising in New England Home, please contact us at (800) 609-5154, ext. 713, or info@nehomemag.com. Editorial and Advertising Office 530 Harrison Ave., Suite 302 Boston, MA 02118 (617) 938-3991, (800) 609-5154 •

New England Home Magazine, LLC

slidingdoorco.com

Managing Partners Adam Japko, Chris Legg Finance Manager Kiyomi DeBay kdebay@nehomemag.com

GET YOUR FREE CONSULTATION TODAY! 409 Harrison Avenue, Boston • 617-982-6700

Circulation Manager Kurt Coey Newsstand Manager Bob Moenster

36  New England Home | November–December 2017

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IT’S WHAT WE BUILD NEXT IT’S BUILD NEXT IT’SWHAT WHAT WE WE BUILD NEXT THAT MATTERS THAT MATTERS MATTERS THAT

By definition, an award that recognizes what’s been created during 45 years of collaboration with clients and design professionals focuses on the past. That past shows us how far we have By definition, an award that recognizes what’s been 45 years ofcollaboration collaboration By definition, an award that recognizes what’s been created during 45 might years of come together, and gives us acreated sense ofduring where we go. But the possibilities that lie ahead with clients and and design professionals focuses on the past. That pastshows showsusus how have with clients design professionals focuses on the past. That past how farfar wewe have are what truly motivate creativity and innovation. comecome together, and and gives us aussense ofof where thepossibilities possibilities that ahead together, gives a sense wherewe wemight might go. go. But But the that lielie ahead are what trulytruly motivate creativity and innovation. are what motivate and innovation. 45creativity years from now, what will be the measure of a builder’s success? Will it be the cumulative energy portfolio of work returns tosuccess? the grid?Will Theitratio of embodied energy to operational 45 years fromfrom now,now, what willwill be a the measure ofof a builder’s be the the cumulative 45 years what be the measure a builder’s success? Will it be cumulative energy? Good Jobs Certification across the supply chain? Or another metric that hasn’t yet energy a portfolio of work returns to the grid? The ratio ofofembodied energy to operational energy a portfolio of been work returns to the grid? The ratio embodied energy to operational conceived? energy? Good Jobs Certification across the supply chain? Or another metric that hasn’t yet energy? Good Jobs Certification across the supply chain? Or another metric that hasn’t yet been conceived? been conceived?

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The future our community invents will show us what is award-worthy and we look forward to pausing 2062 to reflect on the efforts that have made a difference. you to everyone The future our community inventsinwill show us what is award-worthy and we look forwardThank to The future our community invents will show us what is award-worthy and we look forward to who has been part of the journey so far. pausing in 2062 to reflect on the efforts that have made a difference. Thank you to everyone pausing 2062oftothe reflect on the who has beeninpart journey soefforts far. that have made a difference. Thank you to everyone who has been part of the journey so far.

thoughtforms-corp.com custom builders

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Custom Interiors, Fine Furnishings, Wall & Floor Coverings, Textiles, Hand Selected Art & Decor

Diana James, Living Swell Marblehead 34 C Atlantic Avenue, Marblehead MA

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781-990-5150

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Westphalen Photography

129 Kingston Street, Boston, MA | 617.542.6060 | mgaarchitects.com

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NEWENGLAND-2017-ERA_New_Layout 1 17-07-21 10:33 AM Page 1

The Downsview cabinetry collection is custom crafted in North America and available exclusively through select kitchen design showrooms For complete listing visit our website: www.downsviewkitchens.com

To experience the Collections visit one of our flagship showrooms DOWNSVIEW of BOSTON One Design Center Place - Suite 629, Boston, MA (857) 317-3320 www.downsviewofboston.com DOWNSVIEW of DANIA 1855 Griffin Road - Suite B212, Dania Beach, FL (954) 927-1100 www.downsviewofdania.com DOWNSVIEW of JUNO 12800 U.S. Highway 1 - Suite 100, Juno Beach, FL (561) 799-7700 www.downsviewofjuno.com DOWNSVIEW KITCHENS 2635 Rena Road, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada L4T 1G6 Telephone (905) 677-9354 Fax (905) 677-5776

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•Elements The Things That Make Great Spaces

Star Power

With references to the Big Bang theory and far-flung galaxies, the most celestial of chandeliers, Lobmeyr’s Met Series, was originally designed in 1966 by Hans Harald Rath for Lincoln Center’s Metropolitan Opera House.  | From a collection, ranging in price from $15,217–$203,475. E.R. Butler & Co., Boston, erbutler.com

Never a Dull Moment

Though fashion and furnishings have always shared a certain synergy, fashion has historically taken the lead in the style arena. If embroidery was seen on the catwalk during a particular season, chances were good that an embroidered toss cushion would appear in the home furnishings market six months later. But thanks to a more sophisticated approach

to home, coupled with the ability to choose from a global marketplace, the home market now keeps pace with its fashion sibling, stylish similarities occurring simultaneously. As the season of shine, sparkle, and shimmer arrives, interiors glow as brightly as a pair of gold lamé pants or diamond-encrusted earrings.

| edited by cheryl and jeffrey katz | November–December 2017 | New England Home  41

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1. Rose vermeil Crazy Straw. | $350. Tiffany & Co. Boston and Chestnut Hill, Mass., tiffany.com 2. Hammered Mattie bowl. | $298. Anthropologie, locations throughout New England, anthropologie.com 3. Shag Puff dressing chair. | $898. Anthropologie 4. Large Aorta vase. | $198. Jonathan Adler, Boston and Chestnut Hill, Mass., and Greenwich Conn., jonathanadler.com

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42  New England Home | November–December 2017

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©2017 California Closet Company, Inc. All rights reserved. Franchises independently owned and operated. CALIF*876OK

Create a new way to live in your space.

Reclaim old or unused spaces and experience the impact California Closets can have on your life! We can create a storage system custom designed for you and the way you live. Visit us online today to arrange for a complimentary in-home design consultation.

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Elements

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3 Shimmer and Shine

1. Like the perfect pendant paired with a little black dress, Schumacher’s trims add just the right amount of polish to the hem of a linen sofa or the edge of a toss cushion. | Gardner, $180/yd., Simpson, $214/yd., and Garbo, $160/yd., Schumacher, Boston, fschumacher.com 2. With a gleaming surface reminiscent of silver leaf but considerably more durable, the Talitha armoire from Jonathan Adler raises the glamour quotient of any room. | $4,500. Jonathan Adler, Boston and Chestnut Hill, Mass., and Greenwich Conn., jonathanadler.com 3. Haute couture from the Oberon collection from Samuel and Sons: the double tassel tieback in gold leaf. | $260. The Martin Group, Boston, samuelandsons.com 4. With no chance of unravelling, the sterling silver Ball of Yarn from Tiffany & Co. is a gleaming addition to any tabletop landscape. | $9,000. Tiffany & Co., Boston and Chestnut Hill, Mass., tiffany.com

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general contractor Gristmill Builders |landscape architect Wagner Hodgson | photography Nat Rea

www.flavinarchitects.com

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Elements

Never a Dull Moment

Metal Winners

1. Wallpapers from the Studio Zen Collection. | Taiyo in brass (A) or gold (B), $178/yd., and Izumi in copper (C) or gold (D), $356/yd. Brunschwig & Fils, Boston, brunschwig.com 2. Ironies Minion side table in polished brass. | $4,650. Studio 534, Boston, studio534.com 3. The Reform credenza with solid brass sheet panels and solid brass legs. | $6,500. Jonathan Adler, Boston and Chestnut Hill, Mass., and Greenwich Conn., jonathanadler.com

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Additions, Renovations and Custom Homes

Newton, MA • 617-969-1112 • www.HampdenDesign.com

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Elements

Never a Dull Moment

A Touch of Glamour

Come holiday time, the Katzes might wrap gifts in brown craft paper, which doesn’t stop them from adding the glitziest, shiniest, most sparkly bows they can find.

An assortment of ribbons to make a gift extra-special.  | $9–$46. Studio Carta, Brookline, Mass., shopangelaliguori.com

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Artistry

Beguiling Botanicals

Ceramic artist Katherine Houston uses eighteenth-century techniques to craft exquisitely rendered porcelain fruits, flowers, and vegetables. Houston pulls a small knot of • Katherine damp clay from a large wad and kneads it in

her hands as she talks about her artistic journey. “As a child in Columbus, Ohio, I drew and made pottery pinch pots. I majored in art history and fine art in college,” she says. “But I could not do abstract ­expressionism.” Or so she thought, anyway. As a college student, she recalls, “I sarcastically dashed off my idea of satire of the style, threw it away, and then was appalled when it won first prize in the student art show. My instructor had fished it out of the trash, and matted and framed the thing. I stopped doing art for twentyfive years.” She rolls the clay into a sphere, makes a little pinch pot, then picks up a wooden rolling pin and flattens it into a tissue-thin disk. “It’s white clay, mined in South Carolina, and it is supple and smooth like your grandmother’s kid glove,” she says. In Houston’s hands the disk becomes a leaf. She pinches the edges into ruffles, then gives the leaf a twist for natural torque. Fired,

then painted, re-fired, and painted again—a process repeated as many as a dozen times—the pale-gray clay leaf will transform into a pretty porcelain one. Porcelain is what brought Houston back to art. “My husband and I were traveling in London, and I walked into a shop to inquire about what I thought were eighteenth-century ceramic fruits in the window,” she recalls. Thus she discovered the porcelain sculpture of Anne Gordon, a twentieth-century blueblood British artist who made trompe l’oeil fruits, vegetables, leaves, cockatoos, and animals beloved by the cognoscenti, who

ABOVE: Tutti Frutti (2015), 13"H × 55"W × 7"D. BELOW: July Melon (2017), 6"H × 7"L × 5½"W; slice is 3½"H × 6½"L × 4"W.

| By Regina Cole | 52  New England Home | November–December 2017

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Photography by Amanda Breton

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Artistry

“I love doing this,” says Houston. “I wake up and can’t wait to get into the studio to see how the colors came out.”

used them to decorate mantels and dining tables. “When I realized that these fruits and veggies were new, I had an epiphany,” Houston says. “ ‘I want to do this!’ was all I could think of. “So I met Anne Gordon, who imperiously said, ‘I would like to be known as the School of EighteenthCentury Porcelain in the Twentieth Century, but you

need more than one person to have a school. You shall be my student, and I will be your mentor.’ We became great friends while I started my own porcelain sculpture studio here in Boston.” She says that she honors the spirit of Gordon, who died in 2007, by using only eighteenth-century colors in her sculptures. Her pieces depict fruits, vegetables, flowers, and a new line of what she calls Mirages: scenes worked into patterns that are designed to stand as display pieces. Mythology-inspired recent examples show Icarus tumbling to Earth and Persephone returning from the Underworld. From the smallest peapod to fifty-two-inch triptychs made up of a cornucopia of produce, each piece is painstakingly detailed and faithful to its natural coloration. “More subtle,” is Houston’s definition of eighteenth-century hues. “No cadmium, no neon colors.” She uses paint made in Dresden, Germany. Brushed on by hand in successive layers, with a firing between each layer, the colors become surprisingly

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Goodman, Neiman Marcus, Gump’s, Saks Fifth Avenue, and other upscale retailers. Her work found its way into Connecticut’s New Britain Museum of American Art and the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts, and she lectured at museums and art institutions all over the country. Her work was also commissioned by the State Department to serve as official gifts. “I hired staff, was running this big operation until, in 2001, I said, ‘I’ve had it,’ ” she says. “Now, I only do one-of-a-kind things, and I work on ­commission.” She sells her pieces from her Boston studio, on her website, and at annual shows in New York and Baltimore. Despite the scaled-back effort, she is in her studio six days a week. “I love doing this,” she says. “I wake up and can’t wait to get into the studio to see how the colors came out.”  EDITOR’S NOTE: To see more of Katherine Houston’s work, visit katherinehouston.com.

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complex. “Anne told me to only use seven colors,” she says, “but, in fact, I use 300. They are very intense colors, and on the finished piece, they will not bleach out, even in bright sunlight.” When she launched her porcelain sculpture career in the early 1980s, Houston saw immediate commercial success as her designs were sold by Bergdorf

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Suburban Style

Generation Next

Given a makeover for a fresh, bright look, an old house proves to be the perfect place for a young family to make its new home. new job at a Cambridge tech company • Asparked the D.C.-based couple’s house-hunting.

Commuting wasn’t an option with a newborn and a toddler, so with his wife, Kate, and the kids still in Washington, Kevin undertook the task of finding their new home. They had always gravitated toward older houses, so when a circa-1892 Colonial revival in a Boston suburb hit the market, he scheduled a viewing. “It had a presence about it,” he remembers. “It’s 125 years old. You could envision how families had lived there, raised kids there.” In fact, it turns out, “This was the house that always hosted the neighborhood holiday party,” says Kevin, “so everyone knows this house.” Kevin made an offer before Kate had even seen

it, and soon they had keys in hand—and neighbors eagerly asking them if they might continue the holiday tradition. The house was livable by all means, but, with its knob-and-tube wiring and thirty-five-year-old kitchen, it hadn’t been fully modernized. Two sets of stairs and a third floor that the previous owners had transformed into an apartment didn’t suit the couple’s needs either. They enlisted architect Kent Duckham to remove the back staircase, reconfigure and enlarge the kitchen, and return the third-floor apartment to a more functional space for a family. Self-described as “do-it-yourself types,” the two were at first resistant to hiring an interior designer. But with busy schedules and Kate still living in D.C., they had few options. A consultant by trade, Kate

LEFT: A Lucite console table and contemporary art set the tone in the foyer, signaling, “This is not an old house anymore,” says designer Elizabeth Benedict. RIGHT: In the dining room, Benedict paired a round table with captain’s chairs, and chose an elegant chandelier with a touch of crystal to lend a hint of formality without being too showy.

| TEXT BY Lisa H. Speidel | Photography by Michael J. Lee | 58  New England Home | November–December 2017

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Suburban Style

“I believe in cohesive design— blurring thresholds from room to room,” says Elizabeth Benedict. “We used shades of sage green, aqua, and beige, and were consistent in the entire house.”

CLOCKWISE FROM

TOP LEFT: Benedict incorporated a new family room into the kitchen—a comfortable place for the kids to lounge and play (in eyesight) while the parents cook. The Century sofa is a perfect fit for the living room’s bay window— petite, curved, and plush. The owners fell in love with the work of Waltham, Massachusetts-based artist John Thompson and commissioned this painting for the space above the fireplace.

composed a chart of area designers to facilitate the search, and designer Elizabeth Benedict quickly rose to the top. “On her website, she talked about having four kids and a dog,” remembers Kate. “When I called her, she was direct and down-to-earth.” The goal was a family-friendly house, and the top priority was an open kitchen with an adjacent cozy living space. “The new kitchen is laid out as a functional ‘L’ work area with a big island with plenty of seating,” says Duckham. “The refrigerator, ovens, and pantry are on the opposite wall to maximize openness.” Though Kate took a backseat on much of the design process, she had fallen hard for green Costa

Esmeralda granite countertops. “I wanted the granite paired with warm white and with Shaker-style cabinets,” she says. “I was pretty particular.” That color choice proved to be the jumping-off point for the home’s palette. “I believe in cohesive design—blurring thresholds from room to room,” says Benedict. “We used shades of sage green, aqua, and beige, and were consistent in the entire house.” Even the artwork, much of it sourced by Wellesleybased art consultant Libby Silvia, largely follows suit. Benedict refers to the design scheme as a “fresh take on tradition.” The furniture she chose skews transitional—pieces that complement an antique house but are contemporary enough for a modern family.

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Suburban Style

“Kate had her heart set on green kitchen countertops,” says Benedict, a hue that inspired the home’s palette. FACING PAGE, LEFT TO RIGHT: The designer used wallpaper in all of the smaller spaces for impact, including this Thibaut paper with a touch of metallic in the powder room. A cozy, upholstered bed from ­Bernhardt is the centerpiece of the master bedroom.

Kate fell hard for the green Costa Esmeralda granite countertops. “I wanted the granite paired with warm white and with Shaker-style cabinets. I was pretty particular.”

In the living room, Benedict created two sitting areas: statement-making benches from Gabby in front of the fireplace, and a curved sofa and wing chairs by the bay window. In keeping with the couple’s desire to incorporate the home’s history, the designer spruced up the original built-ins, painted the walnut-stained fireplace surround white, and even incorporated a baby grand piano that came with the house. The adjacent dining room, nearly a perfect square, called for a round table. “I loved the base of the Hickory White piece that we chose—again, leaning toward a transitional line—and it can accommodate over-scaled chairs,” says Benedict. A painterly Lee Jofa print on the captain’s chairs keeps the room from feeling too serious, as does the Schumacher print that mixes a floral with an animal print in the window treatments. The designer, a big proponent of wallpaper, incorporated it sparingly but purposefully in the vestibule, the powder room, the butler’s pantry, and the third-floor bathroom. An important directive from the

I don’t divide architecture, landscape and gardening; to me they are one. - Luis Barragan

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owners was that they wanted to spend wisely, on furnishings and fixtures they could take with them—just in case. “Our goal was to do things in a way that felt permanent,” says Kevin. “That said, the gravitational pull is D.C.—our parents, our family, Kate’s job.” This potential move, however, is years off. In the

meantime, they’ll enjoy what they and their talented team of pros have created. “It’s exactly what we wanted,” says Kate. “A rare gem!” And they’ll get to planning that neighborhood holiday party.  RESOURCES : For more information about this home, see page 210.

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Good Bones

Contemporary Classic

A new Vermont home takes its inspiration from a centuries-old farmhouse design. falling in love with and buying what • After the husband calls “easily one of the most

beautiful lots in Vermont,” this New York City–based couple explored every inch of its twenty acres of rolling meadow. They marveled at the Rochester property’s unobstructed views of the Green Mountains and—in the distance—the upper ski runs on Killington Peak. “We walked the land, hiked it, even picnicked all over it, trying to find the best location to site the second home we envisioned building,” says the husband.

Then they discovered photos of a simple but elegant farmhouse on the website of the Burlington, Vermont-based architectural firm TruexCullins, and called architect Lee Grutchfield to talk about designing something similar for them. “After meeting with them, it was clear we needed to expand the design rendering they first saw,” says Grutchfield. “We used that as a starting point and added more rooms and made other changes to help it respond to the site.” Builder Chris Nichols also walked the property and assisted with the home’s final siting. Once the clients saw Grutchfield’s proposals, they decided, as the husband explains, “To give Lee a free hand. We didn’t want to hamstring him and wanted to maximize his potential.” The result is a 3,500-square-foot, three-bedroom, modern take on the New England farmhouse vernacular. “It honors that iconic lineage with its clean lines and human-scaled forms and spaces,” Grutchfield explains. “But it also reflects contemporary

Set on a bucolic twenty-acre lot nestled into the Green Mountains, the three-bedroom contemporary home was inspired by traditional New England farmhouse design, but features a modern touch: walls of windows that invite the outside in and take full advantage of distant views.

| Text by Robert Kiener | Photography by Jim Westphalen | 66  New England Home | November–December 2017

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Good Bones

tastes in the way it looks out onto the landscape and blurs the boundaries between the interior and the exterior.” Bringing the outside in was one of the clients’ early wishes, and Grutchfield accomplished that in various ways. He chose an array of floor-to-ceiling double-pane windows with horizontal muntins that, as he says, “march across the front of the house” and look onto the distant vistas to the south. He also built in several different views to the outside in his floor plan, explaining that, “A big piece of this design is the way you look out from inside the house.”

An open porch design provides unobstructed visual access to the outside. “It was a great idea,” says the owner. “Because when you open the windows in the summer the entire house feels like a screened-in porch.” A pergola, or brise-soleil, off the master bedroom at the front of the house also provides a sun break without obscuring the views. To further help bring the outside in, Grutchfield made liberal use of natural materials throughout the interior, including Douglas fir joists, Vermont black slate on the mudroom floor, Adirondack buff stone and Pennsylvania bluestone for the fireplace, and spruce wall paneling. He exposed the secondstory’s floor joists as well as some structural beams,

The light-filled home is chockablock with windows, from smaller, traditionally inspired square models (above) to the great room’s modern floor-to-ceiling windows (above, right). RIGHT: The open-plan kitchen is set off from the rest of the first floor by bold colors on the cabinets and island, as well as a pair of bright yellow dining chairs.

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Interior Design by Nina Farmer Photography by Eric Roth

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Good Bones

To preserve the magnificent views from the master bedroom, the owners chose simple roll-up window blinds. FACING PAGE, LEFT TO

RIGHT: In the bathroom, barn sash windows afford privacy while letting in lots of light. An open porch design ensures that distant mountain vistas are not obstructed from inside the home.

as he explains, “To give a nod to the classic post and beam construction of older farmhouses. Also people invariably respond to being able to see the bones of the house. They don’t always need to be hidden.” The wife, who has a background in interior design, chose a muted color palette that reflects the home’s clean, fresh, bright feel. Most walls are

painted white, while the kitchen cupboards and island are blue-gray. “We didn’t want the interior to detract from or overwhelm the architecture of the house,” says the husband. “The whole idea was to balance the interior design with the home’s distinct architecture.” Grutchfield’s attention to detail is especially evi-

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dent on the home’s exterior. He used horizontal clapboard siding on the areas that have lower pitched roofs, and gave the taller spaces vertical board-andbatten siding. “They work together to make the house more interesting,” he says. A standing seam roof made of Galvalume, galvanized zinc and aluminum, is in the Vermont vernacular, but also pushes

the design a bit to the contemporary side. The owners report that every time they visit their second home they marvel at its blend of classic and modern. “It seems to fit right into both the landscape and the neighborhood,” says the husband. “We got the exact house we wanted. We feel right at home.”  RESOURCES : For more information about this home, see page 210.

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In Detail

Curtain Call

clockwise from top

New England’s best designers know window treatments crafted in a local drapery workroom can be the perfect finishing touch to a stylish home. Eliot Wright begins work on a • Whenever sheer curtain, he pulls a thread of the fabric.

“It’s an old dressmaker trick to ensure that the fabric is cut straight, exactly on the thread line,” he says. “That way, when they are done, you don’t have wobbly sheers.” Wright is describing just one of the countless details that distinguish the draperies made in his eponymous Boston workroom from their ready-made counterparts. As the owners of area workrooms attest, the dressmaker reference is apt. Ready-made curtains are to custom window treatments as massmarketed clothing is to couture creations from the ateliers of Balenciaga, Chanel, or Hermès. “When you buy draperies off the shelf, you are limited to a small selection of fabrics, colors, sizes,

and styles,” says Claire Federman, of Sewfine Custom Drapery Workroom. “Customization allows for unlimited numbers of choices.” Beyond selection, says Shaun Tyler Burgess of Tyler & Sash, custom work means an attention to detail that simply is not possible in a ready-made product. For instance, he says, “Ready-made curtains

left: Handwork is the key to top quality when it comes to custom draperies and pillows (this one is being made at Thread in Holliston, Massachusetts); Nantucket designer Kathleen Hay commissioned Sewfine Custom Drapery Workroom to create these striped beauties for a living room in a Boston highrise; edge treatments can be quite elaborate, as in this example of work done by the Eliot Wright Workroom for designer Michael Carter.

| Text By Regina Cole | 74  New England Home | November–December 2017

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Photos clockwise from top left: Courtesy of Thread; Jane Beiles; Kyle Hoepner

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In Detail

clockwise from top

left: A different edge

detail glimpsed at the Eliot Wright Workroom; Wright also crafted these ripplefold sheers to screen a waterfront view in Cohasset, Massachusetts; lofty Finelines drapes accentuate the architecture of a New York City apartment designed by the Boston firm Gauthier-Stacy; understated pinch pleats by Thread; something a bit more ornate from Eliot Wright.

come in standard lengths, which may not be right for your space.” The less visible elements of a window treatment can make the difference, and that’s what custom work offers, Federman says. “Consider your drapery’s linings, interlinings, or layers of lining: they can give a beautiful drape,” she explains. “If ready-made draperies are lined at all, it is with very thin fabric.” Custom work includes hand stitching, and even if you can’t see the stitching itself, the results are clear. “There is nothing like the look of a hand-rolled hem,” Federman says. “We hand stitch a lot,” echoes Ed Cavallo of Thread, a Holliston, Massachusetts, workroom he owns in conjunction with Marie Chaput. “A small, but important detail: we use cotton thread instead of nylon.” Cotton thread expands and contracts along

“Lots of people think they don’t need drapes,” says Karen Gilman. but “Even very simple panels in a tailored room can bring a world of difference.” 76  New England Home | November–December 2017

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with fabric as it reacts to changes in temperature and humidity or stretches over time, keeping seams smooth and free of puckers. The dressmaker details may be hidden, but subtle elements attest to the expertise of skilled workroom stitchers. “In custom window treatments, the fabric is turned in to the wall after the last pleat for a crisp, finished look. When you see that, you know it’s custom,” says Burgess. “You get hand-sewn pleats and coordinated edging and tape. Most of all, you get eyes on the fabric. We always have an inspection where we look for slubs, bits of sloppy dye, weaving irregularities, and other imperfections. We cut the fabric so that it is perfect.” This level of attention is one more plus offered by a custom drapery workroom. Karen Gilman of Finelines puts it this way: “When you call Finelines Photos clockwise from top left: Kyle Hoepner; Michael J. Lee; Sam Gray; courtesy of Thread; Kyle Hoepner

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In Detail From left to Right:

Draperies by Finelines in a Boston apartment designed by William Hodgins; a traditional French rolled hem at the Eliot Wright Workroom; Roman shades (such as these made by Tyler & Sash for designer Nina Farmer) also require exacting work to look their best.

Photos left to right: Michael J. Lee; Kyle Hoepner; Eric Roth

to make your window treatments, you get me, with all my experience and knowledge. You get my advice on how they should open and close, how to choose hardware, and you get our dedication to making all the details perfect.” Wright insists on visiting the room where his window treatments will be installed. “I do the measuring myself, and, when I visit, I can see how the draperies need to be adapted to the site. We will make a hem or a pleat that works with the fabric’s pattern, but that also suits the style of the home.” Just as clothing trends come and go, tastes in window coverings move in and out of style. Current fashion shows a move away from florals and toward stripes, says Gilman, and chintz is taking a back seat to linen. Wright adds that the balloon shades that were once popular have yielded to a less fussy look, such as the clean lines of a Roman shade. “Customized fabrics are also a big trend, like screen printing in custom colors,” Gilman notes, while Wright says, “Custom embroidery is a favorite thing. It’s not for the faint of pocketbook!” Hardware, too, has changed, Gilman says. “Rods have gotten smaller. One inch used to be standard; now it’s 5/8 inch. That does not sound very different, but it is.” Off-the-shelf hardware can look too clunky,

the experts agree. The right curtains address a variety of needs. “Draperies can enhance a window or a view, address issues of privacy, or prevent sun exposure,” says Federman. “Window treatments don’t have to block the view, but without them, even a beautiful home looks bare.” And while some homeowners and their designers are choosing to go window-treatment free, Gilman

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suggests a bit of fabric can only improve a space. “Lots of people think they don’t need drapes, but then they live in the room, and it’s too stark,” she says. “Even very simple panels in a tailored room bring a world of difference.” And, just as a couture dress will fit perfectly and bring out the best in its wearer, those simple panels, made just for the space, can make the room look and feel wonderful. 

Rhode Island

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CAMBRIDGE | CAPE & ISLANDS 617 621-1455 www.LDa-Architects.com

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he design community kicked off the fall season by celebrating the most promising young regional talent in residential architecture and design at New England Home’s eighth annual “5 Under 40” awards party. The guests of honor for the event were architect Maggie Mink of Marcus Gleysteen Architects and textile designer Ellisha Alexina of Ellisha Alexina, along with interior designers Kristina Crestin of Kristina Crestin Design, Erin Gates of Erin Gates Design and the blog Elements of Style, and Nina Farmer of Nina Farmer Interiors. More than 400 people gathered at Landry & Arcari Rugs and Carpeting’s Boston showroom and spilled out into the atrium at 333 Stuart Street to celebrate the

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| 1. Guests striking a pose at the Swoon Booth sponsored by Karastan | 2. The party filled the atrium outside the Landry & Arcari showroom | 3. Celebrity emcee Jenny Johnson, shown here with Maggie Mink, led the auction bidding | 4. Ellisha Alexina signs her rug for winning bidder Ryan Alcaidinho of Hutker Architects | 5. Enjoying the wooden puzzle favor crafted by Youngblood Builders  | 6. New England Home’s publisher Kathy Bush-Dutton  | 7. Mia Buchsbaum, director of Barakat’s Cambridge office, was happy to take donations for the charity | 8. Trophies designed and crafted by Woodmeister Master Builders

winners. Fantastical floral arrangements by The World of Marc Hall delighted guests as they sipped signature cocktails by Wiggly Bridge Distillery and local beer from ­Portico Brewing Company, while enjoying delicacies prepared by Davio’s restaurant. A photo booth was a popular spot as guests struck a pose with friends and colleagues. A highlight of the evening was a spirited auction of one-of-a-kind rugs designed by the “5 Under 40” winners and handcrafted by Landry & Arcari’s weavers. Local media celebrity Jenny Johnson was the emcee for the night, encouraging a friendly bidding war to raise funds to benefit Barakat, a Cambridge, Massachusetts-based charity that supports literacy and education for women and children in Afghanistan and Pakistan. The “5 Under 40” program has raised more than $150,000 since its inception. Party photos by Allan Dines

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| 1. New England Home’s editor-inchief Kyle Hoepner with honorees Erin Gates, Ellisha Alexina, Kristina Crestin, Maggie Mink, and Nina Farmer | 2. Rebecca Verner of Gregory Lombardi Design enjoys one of the floral creations by The World of Marc Hall | 3. Mally Skok of Mally Skok Design and Ted Goodnow of Woodmeister Master Builders | 4. Greg Sweeney of Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams with Calla Carignan from Bulthaup | 5. Bob Ernst of FBN Construction, Sarah Lawson of S + H Construction, and Steve Payne of Payne|Bouchier | 6. The bidding begins! | 7. Nancy Sorensen of Back Bay Shutter and Erin Gates | 8. Julie Bangert and Julia Vandal of Hutker Architects flank Ellisha Alexina | 9. Jim Youngblood of Youngblood Builders and Maggie Mink | 10. Honoree Nina Farmer with Gary Rousseau of Herrick & White | 11. Gregory Lombardi, Holly Charbonnier, Troy Sober, and Jason Harris of Gregory Lombardi Design flank winner Kristina ­Crestin | 12. Jeffrey Arcari, Ben Arcari Cook, Jerry Arcari, Julie Arcari, and Jay Arcari enjoying a moment in the Landry & Arcari Rugs and Carpeting showroom

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Projects We

Love Special Marketing Section

PLATEMARK DESIGN Curl Simitis architecture + design

Newton Kitchens & Design

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Projects We Love

Client Collaboration

What were the challenges faced in this project? Typically, I find that the most common challenge in all projects is to balance the goals and desires of the clients, while simultaneously maintaining the architectural and design capacities. Every project we take on is a work of art—distinct and unique in its own way—and it’s extremely important to keep the number-one priority encompassing that actuality. Being able to accurately and sufficiently get all of the mechanical and electrical systems into the existing building while achieving all of the

design goals was definitely a challenging aspect of this project because in addition, we were faced with the difficulty of working in a tight neighborhood in the Back Bay. There was a constant stream of city life that we had to maneuver around and accommodate. But, with proper planning and time management, completing the project was a success.

How is this project unique? One of the most exciting aspects for me in the work that I do is working one-onone with the clients to achieve the design goals that they’re looking for. It’s so much fun to bounce ideas off of each other, and

to hear design ideas that clients come to me with. Helping those goals come to life is even more rewarding and makes all the work worthwhile. Being a part of the transformation of this property and successfully transferring very unique designs from paper to reality made this project stand out from all others.

What do your clients appreciate the most about this project? My team behind me is exceptional. They’re poised, meticulous, and are able to efficiently get any project done under

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DOROTHY GRECo

any conditions. I think what my clients appreciated most about this project was how it was handled. There’s a constant flow of communication from president, to team, to clients, and we all are looking to achieve the same goal. The chemistry between every player is what allowed us to successfully complete this project. We are a company of highachieving and focused individuals who are both balanced and compassionate, and that makes the process of building dream homes enjoyable.

Steven Deering

Catamount Builders 472-A West Broadway Boston, MA 02127 (617) 315-7430 catamountbuilders.com Special Marketing Section  89

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Projects We Love

Trending in the Kitchen

How is this project unique? Every project that we work on allows us to be creative in different ways. Design aesthetics can range from traditional to contemporary, and the challenge is selecting products that meet the needs of both function and design.

What were the clients’ goals for this project? Clients want to create a space that will stand the test of time. Jenn-Air appliances incorporate the latest technology and cutting-edge designs without sacrificing quality. Keeping a client’s goal in mind is of utmost importance for the lifecycle of the project.

Did you break any “design rules” on this project? Many homeowners keep their kitchen looking fresh and vibrant by adding a pop of color to an accent wall or by selecting colorfully coordinated cookware and small appliances. Building on this trend, a pop of color in a non-traditional space such as the exterior door of a range or interior of a fridge is a fun and unexpected design detail. The dazzling Obsidian interior offered in some JennAir refrigerators illuminates food under LED lighting to showcase vibrant colors.

Why do you love this project? Whether you’re remodeling your entire

kitchen or looking to add a single upgrade, selecting products reflects your sense of style. Consider all the ways you can enhance your kitchen with these functional additions: • Warming drawers provide a great way to keep prepared food hot and fresh. • Steam ovens use steam to preserve nutrients in vegetables and tenderness in meats, and convection for evenly baked pastries and roasts. The versatility of steam and convection together creates a dish that’s tender inside and roasted or crisped outside. • Built-in coffee systems provide baristastyle coffee and free up counter space. Most models also provide instant hot water for teas, soups, and other hot dishes.

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Alia GoraL, Showroom Consultant, Burlington, MA

Burlington 85 Terrace Hall Ave (781) 202-0017

Manchester 293 Abby Road (603) 669-8100

Franklin 22 National Drive (508) 528-0006

Marlborough 405 Maple Street (508) 481-4221

Newton 56 Ramsdell Street (617) 630-0100 Portsmouth 126 Bridge Street (603) 436-3550

Lynn 400 Lynnway (781) 592-1200 Special Marketing Section  91

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Projects We Love

greg Premru

Spa-Like Oasis

How is this project unique? What I bring to each project is a unique flavor and vantage point combined with a specialized knowledge to achieve a balance that is essential for both function and style. All of my clients are different and I approach every situation from a different perspective to express individual tastes. This particular project, although I designed the master suite, focused primarily on the master bathroom and creating a spa-like oasis that my client could retreat to whenever she wanted. I wanted to create a bathroom for her that seamlessly integrated my vision, her style, and a space that is easy to use. By introducing lighting, different textures, and colors, the bathroom brought natural elements to life. My client loves red roses and the feeling of being surrounded by them. Adding the

natural wood benches, the vibrant red rose petal backsplash, and the greenery brings that touch and feel of nature to life by connecting both the indoors and the outdoors. The organic design that was created for her provides a spa-like feeling that is her own private retreat, and designed specifically for her.

What were the client’s goals for this project and how did you address them? My client’s goal was to have a retreat and spa-like bathroom were she could escape from any chaos and disharmony that life produces from day to day. I wanted to provide a specific look in her bathroom that was both beautiful and versatile. The use of Rosewood with angled walnut legs creates a beautiful double vanity. Decorated with baskets underneath, not

only provides my client with the extra storage space that she needs, but also enables me to add different texture. I specifically chose this material and look to give her the Asian-inspired modern theme that she wanted. A nine-foot floor mirror framed in Rosewood compliments the other natural elements in the room while hiding a TV from view until it’s turned on. An oversized shower has a wet side complete with every imaginable luxury amenity, and a dry area with a heated towel rack and a reclaimed wood bench adding that touch of nature. The windows in the shower allow extra natural light to shine through, providing my client with a clear visual to the outside from her bed. The bathroom design focused on a modern and sleek finish to give that luxurious feel that my client wanted.

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What were the challenges faced in this project? The biggest challenge I had for this project was making sure that I created a warm and intimate feel in very large space. The use of too much greenery and accessories would result in cluttering the environment. Creating a space that brought peace and serenity while keeping the design sleek and simplistic proved to be a challenge. Also challenging was the marriage of a sleek and simplistic design with the functionality of the space.

Was there an “ah-ha” moment? My “ah-ha” moment came to me in the middle of the project. One of the goals was to maximize the natural light as

much as possible. The existing mirrors in the bathroom were blocking not only the windows but also the natural light. Installing mirrors on sliding barn door hardware allowed the mirrors to be used while standing at the vanity and the ability to slide the mirrors away from the windows allowed natural light to flood the bathroom.

Why do you love this project? My client gave me the creative freedom to accurately express her needs, wants, and desires. In the end my client was very happy with her private retreat, and I was able to express my own creative vision.

Pierre Matta

Newton Kitchens & Design 244 Needham Street Newton, MA 02464 (617) 559-0003 newtonkd.com Special Marketing Section  93

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Projects We Love

greg Premru

Back Bay Pied-à-Terre Plus

What were your clients’ goals for the project, and how did you address them? The primary purpose of the project was to create a downtown residence for the husband, who works long hours and often needs to sleep in town. He wanted a comfortable, cozy, elegant place he could walk to and feel right at home. Functionality included cooking and dining, relaxing, TV, sleeping, and working, all within a compact, singular space. While the condo was primarily for the husband, it also needed to welcome the entire family: his wife and four kids for an occasional urban family getaway. Efficient use of space was paramount. The design must recognize the urban milieu, the big views, and have a modern feel while providing the warmth and coziness of the family’s main home.

What do your clients appreciate most about project? They have told me the place captures them! It is exactly the combination of elements they desired. They are athletic, travel, and are accomplished professionals. The space reflects their complex and rich lives. We succeeded through the use of vibrant and warm colors, diverse textures and materials, and especially the creation of special places within the larger space.

Andra Birkerts

Why do you love this project? I loved working in a downtown high rise with magnificent vistas. I was inspired by the vitality of the location and challenged by the cool urbanity to create a comfortable multi-use home. It’s always great to hear accolades from happy clients— but I love this project because it is at once sophisticated and friendly with an exciting vibe.

Andra Birkerts Design

47 Church Street Wellesley, MA 02482 (781) 235-7073 andrabdesign.com

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Projects We Love

Michael J. Lee

Saturated, Vivid Color

How was this project unique? Color! Saturated, vivid hues fill our client’s home and reflect their energy. The color palette springs from the three sons’ favorite colors: red, blue, and green. By balancing these colors with a neutral backdrop, different spaces within the home can take on a different character—invigorating or calming, quiet or social—depending on the lighting and time of day.

What do your clients appreciate most about this project? Our clients love how we were able to transform their daily interactions with each other. The previous first floor had a series of disjointed spaces that prevented

the family from feeling a sense of togetherness, even while occupying adjacent rooms. Our response was to foster connectivity by creating larger, more fluid, spaces.

What were challenges you faced with this project? While large, open rooms provide the space and flexibility modern families need, they can feel cavernous if not designed carefully. To address this, we used color and texture to define places within an overall space or to aesthetically divide one area from another.

Richard Curl, Matt Simitis, and Courtney Driver

Curl Simitis architecture + design Eastman Building 533 Main Street, #6 Melrose, MA 02176 (781) 620-2736 cs-ad.com Special Marketing Section  95

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Projects We Love

Eric Luciano

Grand, Yet Intimate

Was there any current or historic architecture that influenced this project? Design inspiration was drawn from the original architects of this late nineteenth century property that’s officially listed as a castle. Peabody & Stearns spoke a language that was unique, and their design sensibilities are evident in the many landmark buildings in Boston and beyond. Peabody & Stearns were instrumental in the design and implementation of a large part of theColumbian Exposition in 1893, where many notable engineers and architects showcased the latest innovations of the time. An example was the scaled model of the Eiffel Tower, and George Ferris displayed the first “Ferris Wheel” to the delight of all!

Were there any project challenges? Our project had fallen into serious disrepair in recent decades, so we had to rebuild much of the stone work in an era of diminishing expertise in old stone structures. Peabody & Stearns took a little more than a year to build, from scratch, what took an equal amount of time to skillfully restore while integrating modern flow and usage to include a fourstory elevator, an expansive kitchen, and many other amenities.

Gary Streck CRM, Inc. 47 Corey Rd. Brookline, MA 02445 (617) 512 0347 garystreck.com

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Projects We Love

Eric Roth

Family-Friendly Chic

What were the client’s goals for this project? The husband and wife love to entertain, and wanted the public spaces in their home to function better to accommodate guests, reflect a higher level of sophistication, and showcase their love for vibrant color, while still maintaining practicality and durability for their young children. We transformed their living room, foyer, dining room, and powder room into statement-making spaces that are welcoming and chic, as well as family-friendly.

What do your clients appreciate about this project? When the wife first called us, she asked for help with a stair runner. The project scope quickly evolved into a multi-room total transformation, and even a new color scheme for the home’s exterior. They love how their ‘new’ spaces flow together, and they are finding new reasons

to invite friends and family over to enjoy time together! But most of all, they appreciate that we carefully considered the family’s lifestyle, the husband and wife’s differing design tastes, and the presence of young children in the house.

Was there an “ah-ha” moment when working on this project? From the beginning, it was clear that client and designer were completely on the same wavelength, and the design direction unfolded very organically and intuitively. When we presented the proposed living room design scheme with its bold custom rug in emerald New Zealand wool and shimmery chartreuse nylon art silk (a better, more cleanable choice than viscose or silk), they instantly approved it, and we knew this was not only a one-of-a-kind project, but a truly special client-designer relationship, as well. They are already thinking about their next design projects to work on with us!

KELLY ROGERS

Kelly Rogers Interiors 9 Crofton Road Waban, MA 02468 (617) 233-3725 kellyrogersinteriors.com Special Marketing Section  97

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Projects We Love

Family First

Was there any historic design that influenced the project? The house is located in a historic town outside of Boston. The clients were relocating here with their five children, after a decade living in Bermuda. The house more than doubled in size through the design process, but the architecture was done so well that the house looks like it has always been there. The living room image we feature was actually where the original kitchen was situated, but no one would ever know.

Why do you love this project? This is a favorite project of mine as Kristin Paton Interiors was brought on at the very beginning of the endeavor. The clients were living in Bermuda during the construction phase. We were involved in all design decisions. We had weekly con-

struction meetings with the architects, Design Associates, and the builders, Kistler and Knapp, which I think helped create a more cohesive end result...and of course the clients were lovely!

What were the clients’ goals for this project and how did you address them? The house was very large in scale, and the clients did not want to make it too formal. They have five children and two dogs, and family life was most important. We were very thoughtful in the overall planning. We created a designated homework library, a family room that could still look grown up but was dog and family friendly, as well as a proper living room for adult time with a bit of silk velvet. I think we achieved their goals.

KRISTIN PATON

Kristin Paton Interiors 152 Mount Auburn Street Cambridge, MA 02138 (617) 491-9000 kristinpatoninteriors.com

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Projects We Love

How is this project unique?

Why do you love this project?

Maybe it’s the luck of the draw, but many projects don’t have as much natural sunlight flooding the space as this one. Uniquely enough, there wasn’t a need for window treatments, and anyone who knows me knows I adore dressing the windows with layers of fabric. Not here, not necessary.

The bones, as they say, needed nothing beyond our playful and exuberant embellishments. Often when we’re brought in to a project, a generous amount of theater à la smoke-and-mirrors is required to make up for architectural shortfalls, oversights, or deficiencies. Instead, we focused on the joy of decoration for maximum impact.

What architecture or design influenced this project? As one of the best and finest Queen Anne-style houses in Cambridge and exquisitely restored with its historical roots in mind, obeying these elements while creating a comfortable living space posed quite the challenge. And the result is a balance achieved throughout the living space.

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Dorothy Greco

Michael J. Lee

Classic and Comfortable

Craig Tevolitz

Was there an “ah-ha” moment when working on this project? Again and again, we tell clients that, in the end, it’s always beautiful. But projects take time, and there’s a lot in the middle that happens. These ah-ha moments are often when the final coat of paint dries and the room is empty of furnishings and quiet, and we look around and think, “Wow, what a difference.”

Platemark Design 45 Newbury Street, Suite 503 Boston, MA 02116 (617) 487-4475 platemark.com Special Marketing Section  99

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Projects We Love

Shelly Harrison

Design Risks and Rewards

How is this project unique? It’s rare that you find clients who want their home to so closely reflect the family’s character. A young household with three kids, they are playful and cool. So when it came time to design the millwork, choose the color of the flooring, and furnish the home, they were willing to take risks, break out of the “norm,” and really make it their own. The result is one of our favorite projects. Far from being a traditional home, clean lines rule, whimsy makes its way into almost every corner, and the result is a beautiful collaboration between client and designer.

What do your clients appreciate the most about this project? It’s a two-fold answer. With all of our clients, I hope what is appreciated most is the open line of communication. At Stanton Schwartz, we truly believe that every project is a partnership that takes

honest conversation, tweaking, and revisions in order to make it exactly what was envisioned. That’s what custom is, right?! In terms of the final product, we believe that compatibility with how our clients live is most appreciated. With young children, it couldn’t be a precious house, but that didn’t mean we had to sacrifice beauty. The marriage of form and function was very important during this process, and it’s one of the things of which we are most proud.

they became just a little bit more special. Similarly, with the light fixtures, we were able to create much more impact by hanging five fixtures as opposed to just one or two. Additionally, staggering the heights brings your eye to the soaring ceilings, emphasizing the beautiful craftsmanship that went into building this custom home. So it’s not always about breaking the rules, but allowing those design risks to create a space that is both special and unique.

Did you break any “design rules” when working on this project? It’s not that we broke any design rules, per se, but as people who love symmetry, it was nice to play with other ways to define visual balance. Take the shelving in the above photo: while they are visually weighted beautifully, we were able to adjust the spacing until

STANTON SCHWARTZ DESIGN

Stanton Schwartz Design Group 346 Congress Street Boston, MA 02210 (917) 697-6146 stantonschwartz.com

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BOSTON | 617.266.1710

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MARTHA’S VINEYARD | 508.939.9312

PATRICKAHEARN.COM

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White vases in an array of interesting shapes lighten the dark table and add a spark of freshness. FACING PAGE: Designer Phoebe Lovejoy Russell brought modern art and a contemporary light fixture into the airy dining room to balance traditional furnishings. The painting’s colors echo the room’s palette, while the candlesticks and striking chandelier are in step with Russell’s penchant for brass.

suburban chic

A designer’s own Boston-area home proves that stylish decor and young children are not, after all, mutually exclusive.

Text by Megan Fulweiler  | Photography by John Gruen  | Produced by Stacy Kunstel

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hoebe Lovejoy Russell’s 1920 colonial-style house was chock-full of charm. Situated in one of the leafy suburbs west of Boston, the dwelling was perfectly in tune with its period, from the slateshingled gambrel roof to the character-filled millwork that adorned the well-proportioned interior. On the down side, however, alterations by owners over the years had left the building in

Project Team Interior design: Phoebe Lovejoy Russell, Lovejoy Designs Architectural design: Olga St. Clair, SDS Architects Builder: Steve Fabrizio, Fabrizio Construction

ABOVE: Russell chose Benjamin Moore’s Swiss Coffee as the trim color for every room, giving the house a pleasing continuity. In the entry, the hue is the ideal partner for the wheat-toned chest. RIGHT: The cocoon-like living room opens to a sun-filled office beyond. FACING PAGE: Vibrant black-and-white chairs, contemporary sconces, and abstract art are fun contrasts to the living room’s understated heirloom sofa.

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need of some structural first aid. And for interior designer Russell, the place was far from functional for a modern family with two little boys. “It was very gracious,” says builder Steve Fabrizio, “but like any 100-year-old house, it had its challenges.” To bring the beauty up to today’s standards and get it ready for Russell to give it her artful stamp, nothing but a full-tilt renovation would do. Luckily

Fabrizio and architectural designer Olga St. Clair of SDS Architects—both of whom Russell has worked with on numerous successful projects—were ready to lend a hand. “Phoebe and I have different strengths,” St. Clair says. “She handles the softer side and works her incredible magic. I do the mechanical. It’s always a collaborative process.” In this case, to deal with what St. Clair (who has November–December 2017 | New England Home  105

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Comfort in the family room includes a cozy sectional and ottoman along with a feels-goodunderfoot Stark carpet. FACING PAGE: Decorative artist Pauline Curtiss, owner of Patina Designs in Lincoln, Massachusetts, devised the eye-catching office ceiling. “Due to the number of windows, that was the only surface we had to work with,” Russell explains. An engaging Neal Rantoul photograph hangs above the oak desk.

“G

ood organi­ zation is half the battle, so we devised an entire wall of storage. I can make toys disappear in minutes,” says Russell.

five kids of her own) labels “the realities of life,” the women launched a host of top-to-bottom enhancements, including a modernized floor plan with an improved entrance and a new mudroom, powder room, and laundry area, as well as an updated kitchen. The second-floor layout was completely revised for better circulation; baths were relocated, and a spacious master suite took shape. Now that the dust has cleared, no one would guess at the amount of scheming involved to get the airy new ambience. Visitors stepping into the entry

are focused instead on the graceful staircase with its freshly stained banister and herringbone runner. The raffia-clad chest that greets them is too comely with its nailhead trim to let on that it’s also there to provide storage. But, in fact, storage, says Russell, was a top priority. She points to the well-lived-in family room as a prime example. “This is where we hang out the most,” the designer explains. “Good organization is half the battle, so we devised an entire wall of storage. I can make toys disappear in minutes.” When the mountains of blocks and fleets of November–December 2017 | New England Home  107

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RIGHT: The kitchen’s marble surfaces sport a leathered finish, which translates to less maintenance. BELOW: Ann Sacks porcelain tiles make for a durable floor in the reworked back entry and hall. FACING PAGE: A small built-in desk of cerused oak adjacent to the sunny breakfast area ties in with the color of the Bungalow 5 dining chairs ringing the marble-topped table.

trucks are whisked away, the space is transformed. With its roomy sectional and generous vinyl-clad ottoman, it becomes a sophisticated spot for cocktails with friends. The smart open kitchen/family room plan allows Mom to keep the boys in sight when she’s cooking. Although the sink was moved to rest beneath the window, the existing island stayed put. Repainted Benjamin Moore’s misty gray Collingwood, it’s a better match for the dramatic veining in the marble counters and backsplash. New cabinets from Timeless Designs in Duxbury, Massachusetts, swallow everything from supplies to dinnerware. And a walnut-stained hardwood floor (“No red tones,” says Russell adamantly) adds warmth. Days begin with breakfast at the cool Saarinen table, above which

hangs a Ro Sham Beaux light crafted with antique brass chain. “I think it’s important to be consistent. All the fixtures are either satin or antique brass,” Russell says. In the living room, brass sconces watch over the mantel, the bar cart sports brass details, and brassframed Julian Chichester bookshelves keep photos and mementoes in order. Russell originally painted this room a creamy shade, but when the hue proved lackluster, she switched to chocolate brown. Against this rich backdrop, the zebra-upholstered Schumacher chairs with turned legs almost seem to dance. The adjacent office (once a sun porch) also flaunts some eye-catching brass. A white-painted light with a gleaming brass interior dangles like a jewel from the decoratively painted ceiling. So cheery is the sunny

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CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: Horn-andbone mirrors enliven the master bath’s Restoration Hardware vanity. A Ro Sham Beaux chandelier illuminates the master bedroom, where French doors open to a deck overlooking the pretty yard. Antique beds in the four-year-old’s bedroom belonged to Russell’s father. The nursery adheres to the home’s neutral theme with rattan shades and a wicker elephant for added texture.

“I

wanted our room to be feminine but not in an obvious way.” To that point, Russell deftly married a rattan bed with faux porcupine quill lamps and a beaded chandelier.

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office it’s difficult to imagine work getting done, but the cerused-oak desk and accompanying Klismos chair create a favorite niche, says Russell, on days when she toils at home. There’s brass in the dining room across the hall, as well. The talented designer contrasts a contemporary Lambert & Fils brass chandelier with a traditional table ringed with Chippendale-style chinoiserie chairs. The elegant-looking seats were gray before Russell painted them dark expresso. Their cushions are covered in vinyl—no worries over spills in this welcoming house. Even the kids’ rooms—as chic as they seem—are done up for the long run. The nursery, for instance, is pale gray, a neutral color that will suit any number of accoutrements from stuffed animals now to posters in the teen years. Maybe someday the whimsical bunny print (an Etsy find) will travel elsewhere, but surely not the Visual Comfort brass chandelier. To perfect the four-year-old’s oasis, St. Clair sealed up an awkward door that led to an adjoining room and added molding for interest. With its denim-blue walls, graphic carpet, and sunny-colored curtains, it’s

the most vibrant room in the house. “We wanted it to be fun,” says Russell. A playful Land of Nod ottoman and a brass giraffe almost as tall as the boy ensure it’s all that and more. And when the children are blissfully ensconced in their beds, the parents have a dreamy destination waiting for them. “I wanted our room to be feminine but not in an obvious way,” the designer says. To that point, she deftly married a rattan bed with faux porcupine quill lamps and a beaded chandelier. Striking silhouettes by Nikki Nye and Amy Flurry share a cozy corner along with biscuit-tufted arm chairs in a Pierre Frey fabric the color of robins’ eggs. The couple’s expanded bath, with its marble floor, is equally appealing. Metal-framed doors guard the subway-tiled shower, while a cerused-oak vanity holds towels and toiletries. Poke around the old house today and there’s not a corner Russell and St. Clair didn’t make better. Chic and efficient, but with its integrity intact, it’s a comfortable nest any young family would be happy to call home forever.  RESOURCES : For more information about this home, see page 210. November–December 2017 | New England Home  111

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Light pours into the living room from the original windows of what was once the Boston College High School auditorium, casting a warm glow on the hot-rolled steel used for the fireplace and mantel.

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City Slick An imaginative design plan is carried out with exquisite attention to the details, turning a featureless Boston condominium into a sophisticated stunner. Text by Bob Curley  |  Photography by Eric Roth  |  Produced by Kyle Hoepner November–December 2017 | New England Home  113

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RIGHT: The powder room features custom wallpaper with the text of an ancient Greek letter hand-illustrated by Brooklyn artist Katie Merz. BELOW: Japanese Shou-Sugi-Ban pyrography brings out the rich grain in the wood paneling surrounding the study, and a comfortable reading nook takes advantage of the deep wells of the original windows of the historic building. FACING PAGE: A large door masquerading as a wall when open, can be swung shut to block noise in the living room from reaching the rest of the home.

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he ambitious renovation of this Boston condo in a former school building fittingly uses a book-filled study as its “core curriculum,” but the glass-walled design of the central space is anything but stuffy. The Penmark building, in Boston’s South End neighborhood, once home to the Boston College High School, was converted to condominiums about a decade ago. Two side-by-side units were purchased by a couple who wanted to move back into the city after raising a family in suburban Andover, Massachusetts. On the plus side, the units were blessed with dramatic floor-to-ceiling windows. On the minus side, two units meant a lot of duplication (such as two kitchens and two separate HVAC systems). Also in the minus column: an uninspired design. “It was a sheetrock box,” says Boston-based architect Josh Slater. Soon enough it was an empty sheetrock box, with everything but the eighteen-foot windows removed to create a clean template for Slater, interior

Project Team Architecture: Josh Slater, Studio 3.0 Interior design: Greg Wilson, Warren Square Design Builder: Woodmeister Master Builders

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A free-floating staircase separates the kitchen from the magnificent, glass-walled study. Subtle shades of gray and brown on the island countertop and in the stools provide unity between the kitchen and the steel and wire railings of the stairway as well as with the softer interior of the woodpaneled bookshelves in the study.

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“From wood to steel to concrete and glass, the plan touched on all of our skill sets to execute this truly unique design,” says Woodmeister’s Sean Reynolds.

designer Greg Wilson, and Woodmeister Master Builders. Guidance from the client was voluminous—the wife “had this amazing clip file like I’ve never seen before,” recalls Wilson, and it was she who had the idea to create a centrally located study—but the professionals still had plenty of room for creativity. “It was a true collaboration requiring a lot of problem-solving and critical thinking, but we also had some poetic freedom from the client,” says Woodmeister’s Sean Reynolds. Only one of the original doors to the condo was retained, and it opens to a dramatic scene. The eye is drawn to the

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majestic living room window, a view enhanced by progressively taller ceilings from the foyer to the living room and to the window well itself, which extends up to the second floor. No less eye-catching is a fireplace, mantel, and shelves clad in unfinished, hot-rolled steel, an arresting example of the owners’ love of “materiality”—­ letting each element of the design stand on its own without adornment. Built by Woodmeister on Slater’s specifications, the structured boxes of the mantel are “a really amazing combination of textures, volume, height, and depth,” says Wilson. “I conceived it as a 3-D composition,”

Slater explains. “It’s functional art.” The cypress panels on the opposite wall are similarly unfinished, save for a treatment using the ancient Japanese Shou-Sugi-Ban method, which brings out the charcoaled grain of the wood. The wall opens to reveal storage space and a peek into the study and kitchen, a voyeuristic reveal that’s a tease of what’s to come just around the corner—the focal point of the home: a delightful study lined with cypress bookshelves on two sides and glass walls on the others. The staircase to the second floor separates the study from the kitchen. Rather than trying to disguise the steps, Slater’s

LEFT: A hidden panel in the study opens to reveal a computer work station, lacquered in the owner’s favorite orange hue. ABOVE: Defiant of the constraints of space, the staircase seems to pierce the glass wall of the study, integrating two disparate design elements while providing additional shelf space. The couch in the middle of the room can accommodate a pair of readers, head to foot.

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A collection of pendants hung at various heights descends from the twenty-two-foot ceiling to illuminate the dining room. The owner’s Colonial-style chairs are just unfussy enough to play well with the home’s crisp, modernistic design. FACING PAGE, TOP: Hidden appliances and the absence of cabinets around the range keep the kitchen uncluttered and in thematic harmony with the clean lines in the rest of the home. FACING PAGE, BOTTOM: Raw steel railings brace the painted wood stairs; the custom runner includes a ribbon of orange.

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design integrates them into the room with a matching set of box shelves, a touch that blurs the boundaries between rooms. The study, which Slater aptly describes as “a little jewel box,” appears quite open, but is surprisingly cozy and quiet, with a têteà-tête couch in the middle for curling up with a book or a friend. Behind a discreet door in the corner of the room is a small work station with a desk and shelves painted in bright orange gloss—a rare burst of color and sheen in the owner’s favorite hue, which is also found in pillows, a stair runner, and a few other accents throughout the home. “It’s meant to be its own little moment,” says Wilson of the workspace. Taken in harmony with the use of natural wood and glass in the study, it reflects a design ethos that’s “definitely modern, but with soft edges,” he explains. The glass walls of the study help retain a sense of openness throughout the home despite a relatively limited space (the condo’s two floors total about 2,500 square feet). Yet that can be changed at will with

the force of a single finger to swing shut an eight-by-seven-foot steel and glass door between the study hallway and the living room, exquisitely balanced on a pivot hinge. Total acoustic privacy—so the noise from the TV in the living room doesn’t filter into the rest of the dwelling—is achieved without blocking any of the light flowing from the living room windows. Given the home’s largely transparent boundaries, the kitchen design, by Donna Venegas and Meaghan Moynahan of Venegas and Company, is necessarily harmonious with the study and the living room: wood grain on the island and metallic paint on the cabinets echo finishes used elsewhere, but with just enough variation that they don’t seem repetitious. The standalone freezer and refrigerator are hidden behind cabinetry, and countertop clutter also disappears behind a swing-up door. “Josh asked us to design a highly functioning kitchen that doesn’t appear ‘kitcheny,’ ” says Venegas. “We’re often asked to do this. The more kitchens we design, the November–December 2017 | New England Home  121

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Guidance from the client was voluminous— the wife “had this amazing clip file like I’ve never seen before,” recalls Greg Wilson.

clearer it becomes that a kitchen is really a living room with appliances.” As with the fireplace in the living room, the white bronze cabinet pulls retain their natural patina. The copious millwork common in many kitchens is absent; there are no cabinets at all around the range, and backsplashes are placed only where practically necessary. A constellation of individually blown glass pendant lamps hangs over a walnut dinner table, designed by Slater and Wilson, set before another of the home’s dramatic windows. Up the floating staircase, the master bedroom likewise peers through the arched top of one of the external windows, this time sequestered behind a half-frosted glass wall with panes that can be opened for ventilation or shut to stop

noise floating up from the floor below. A compact but stylish master bath is highlighted by raised black hexagonal tiles in the shower—a tactile delight that also plays well with the light. By turns playful, industrial, Nordic, and even rustic, the home’s design elements work because they are integrated with a light touch and accented by small but significant flourishes that help unify the disparate rooms. “A lot of the details are deliberately quiet,” says Wilson. Beneath that subtlety, however, lies an exquisite and complex plan. “From wood to steel to concrete and glass, it touched on all of our skill sets to execute this truly unique design,” Reynolds says. “A lot of brain power went into it.”  RESOURCES : For more information about this home, see page 210.

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CLOCKWISE FROM FAR LEFT: A glassand-steel wall allows light, but not noise from downstairs, into the balcony-like master bedroom. The guest bedroom, too, takes advantage of a view through one of the tall exterior windows, whose finely arched peak is echoed in the opening with a glass railing frosted for privacy. In the master bath, textured black, hexagonal tile creates prisms with the light from fixtures that hide in the shower’s tray ceiling.

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Rise & Shine With a bit of structural TLC and a fresh look inside, a venerable old colonial-style home near Boston adopts a youthful ambience.

Text by Maria LaPiana  |  Photography by John Gruen  |  Produced by Karin Lidbeck Brent

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The classic home on a tight urban site was fully fenced and comfortable in its surroundings, with a “nice enclosed, landscaped feel,” says architect Robert Adams, but previous renovations hadn’t been kind to it, so he set about restoring its original beauty.

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ABOVE: An unusually wide and long entry was at once “very grand, and a challenge,” says interior designer Kristen Rivoli. The wood trim was painted to make the space more inviting, and a linen-texture wallpaper was installed. Rivoli chose not to fill the space with an entry table, to keep views intact. RIGHT: Rich wood paneling gives the living room its cozy feel. The homeowners had used the vast felt rug in their New York City apartment but, amazingly, it was a perfect fit here as well.

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he old house was down but not out. For starters, it was in very good company. It sat on a fully fenced lot in Cottage Farm, a designated historic xxxxxxxx district in Brookline, Massachusetts. The neighborhood boasts wide streets and sidewalks, a canopy of old-growth trees, and more than a few iconic residences.

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Project Team Architecture: Robert W. Adams, Robert W. Adams Architect Interior design: Kristen Rivoli, Kristen Rivoli Interior Design Builder: Brett Murphy, Murphy Construction Company Landscape design: Richard Kattman

The 5,000-square-foot colonial was “historically significant, with great bones,” says architect Robert Adams of Lexington. It was built in the early 1900s, in keeping with the vernacular architecture of Brookline, with a mix of stucco and wood shingle siding, a decorative asphalt shingle roof, shutters, a portico, and period windows. Over the years, however, an assortment of renovations had meddled with its authenticity and charm. It needed work. That the house was open and bright appealed to the new homeowners, who were relocating from New York City. They liked that the neighborhood has an urban feel to it. And although the couple appreciated

the home’s place in history, they entertain frequently and have two teenage sons, so they sought a fresh, casual, livable environment. Because they enjoy collecting art (the wife is an art historian), they wanted to be able to showcase their collection. Adams, along with interior designer Kristen Rivoli, got the memo. “Our goal was to bring the house back to its original glory,” says the architect. For her part, Rivoli set her sights on furnishing “fun, colorful, updated interiors with a laid-back, but elegant vibe.” The public spaces needed TLC, but first there was some heavy lifting to do: An exterior facelift, a November–December 2017 | New England Home  127

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gut renovation of the kitchen to create a kitchen/ eating area/pantry space, an overhaul of the firstand second-floor bathrooms, and the conversion of a sunroom into a family hub. Adams made an interesting discovery early on. “I felt the design was clearly well conceived, but that there were some pieces missing. I consulted the historic commission and learned the original architect had his drawings archived at the Peabody Essex Museum. We found out that some critical windows had been removed, so we had them replicated, which completely changed the character of the house for the better.” Once the home’s bones were set, Rivoli was ready to infuse its fresh new rooms with a heavy dose of what she calls “casual, urban chic.” “First, we had to make the home comfortable,” the designer says. “The homeowners are very informal people who like to use every room. Then there was the art. They have some really great pieces that deserve to be highlighted, but I wanted to make sure it was a home—and not a museum.” To that end, Rivoli relied on her clients’ sense of style and her talent for creating custom, contemporary spaces. “We wanted each room to have a distinctive, creative look but we didn’t want them to scream for attention and fight with one another,” she explains. Wherever possible, she reused the homeowners’ existing furniture, integrating new pieces throughout. Rivoli designed plush area rugs—influenced by

ABOVE: The dining room, with its graphic rug and X-based table, is an example of what the designer calls “casual, urban chic.” LEFT: A prized woodcut by Jim Dine was given a place of honor. FACING PAGE: The family room was previously used as a sunroom, and the homeowners admit they initially had no idea what to do with it. Rivoli suggested the transformation, and her clients love it.

“We wanted each room to have a distinctive, creative look but we didn’t want them to scream for attention and fight with one another,” say Kristen Rivoli

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RIGHT: A bump-out in the kitchen makes the perfect spot for a sheltered family hangout. The banquette makes the most of the compact space, and the chairs and table lend a modern note. BELOW: The kitchen countertops are striated Verde Bamboo granite. FACING PAGE: The kitchen was a complete redo. Custom cabinets were painted to brighten the space and provide contrast for the dark floor finish.

Craftsman and Prairie motifs—for the entry, dining room, family room, and master bedroom, a touch that elevates the spaces. “They really help to tie each room together and gave me an opportunity to add color and pattern,” she says. She chose what she calls an “updated, understated, urban” palette. “I kept it neutral in the family room because there is a fabulous view outside. In the rooms where the focus is more inward, we added more color and pattern. We kept the existing natural wood and lightened painted finishes to brighten the rooms,” she says. The home’s artful moments start at the front door. “The entry is very wide and long, but we didn’t want it to feel like a ‘pass through’ space,” says Rivoli. “We added benches, a side table, a console they had,

and a great mirror.” The view of the dining room from the entry was carefully framed. It’s one of the first rooms visible when the front door opens, and it’s on the path from the entryway to the kitchen and the rest of the house. “We wanted to make it colorful and striking in a modern sense,” says Rivoli. Abundant natural light spills in through a wall of windows onto dining chairs outfitted in a delicious cantaloupe hue that’s echoed in the graphic rug. “We reused the homeowners’ dining chairs and reupholstered them in a fresh fabric to work with the new color scheme,” the designer says. The new kitchen is clean-lined and modern, with perimeter cabinets made by a millworker from Vermont and an island crafted from wormy chestnut salvaged from southern barn roofs. The scene-stealer

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The scene-stealer in the kitchen may well be the highly striated countertops of Verde Bamboo granite that are often the first thing visitors comment on.

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In the generously scaled master bedroom, the designer confidently mixed a modern chevron wallcovering with the bold chinois drapes, and created a link between an old house and a modern mood with the graphic custom rug. The chairs add classic style and a pop of plum.

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in the kitchen may well be the highly striated countertops of Verde Bamboo granite that are often the first thing visitors comment on. An old, front-facing fireplace was converted to a raised corner gas fireplace that warms a banquette area, creating a cozy, informal dining space. At first, the homeowners wanted the heavily paneled living room painted over, but Rivoli and Adams

convinced them to highlight its beauty instead. A fabulous stitched-felt rug from their New York apartment plus a grasscloth wallcovering and new drapes and lighting complete the sophisticated look. The sizable master bedroom proved a challenge. “We wanted to bring down the scale of the room,” says Rivoli. A custom rug under the bed gives definition to the space. An accent wall covered in playful

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chevron-patterned paper keeps the chinois drapes from looking overly formal. The home’s original sunroom was transformed into a warm gathering space. “Because the ceiling was tilted and raised, I was able to use fun lanterns that really make the room stand out,” says Rivoli, pointing out the multi-faceted, frosted-glass fixtures. She ran a window seat around the perimeter of the

room and added colorful, ethnic-inspired pillows. “We really all love to hang out there; it’s so bright and comfortable,” says the wife. “We actually weren’t even sure how we were going to use that space. But we worked with Kristen to make it a family room, and now it’s the most popular space in the house—besides the kitchen of course!”  RESOURCES : For more information about this home, see page 210. November–December 2017 | New England Home  133

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On a Historical Note Thanks to a designer’s practiced eye and deft hand, the interiors of an opulent nineteenthcentury Back Bay home sing again.

Text by Debra Judge Silber

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White paint transforms the home’s beautiful but somber period woodwork. The beauty of the original mahogany can still be appreciated in the varnished newel post and stair rail, however. FACING PAGE: Designer Carolina Tress-Balsbaugh’s lighten-it-up approach is apparent the moment one crosses the threshold.

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A marble floor was removed in favor of a warmer floor of wood laid in a herringbone pattern. FACING PAGE: In the music room, simple furniture forms and subtle colors prevent the abundance of architectural detail from overwhelming the space.

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Project Team Interior design: Carolina Tress-Balsbaugh, Manuel de Santaren Builder: The Holland Companies Landscape design: Jacalyn Gould Landscape Architect

Any home built more than a century ago is likely to have a rich backstory, but the previous life of this stately Back Bay townhouse was more impressive than most. Designed by architects Arthur Rotch and George Thomas Tilden circa 1883 for the family of a prominent Boston businessman, the home—and specifically, its opulent music salon—was the original venue of a well-known classical concert series.

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The music room was just one of the features that attracted the twenty-first-century biotech entrepreneur and his wife to the old brick townhouse several years ago. Despite its conversion over the years to a school, offices, and back to a residence, the structure had been well maintained. Its main floor, in particular, retained exquisite nineteenth-century plaster and wood detailing. There was a garden in the back, parking underneath, and 13,000 square

feet of space on four floors—plenty of room, even for a family of seven. Nonetheless, “You needed a lot of imagination to see what it could become,” the homeowner recalls. While she loved the home’s period character, she says, she had no desire to live in a museum. “We were looking for a graceful balance between the old bones of the house and a more contemporary vibe that matches our aesthetic.” Remodeling a historic treasure to meet

FROM FAR LEFT: The remarkable ceiling architecture includes a domed skylight at the entry to the music room, arches encrusted with recessed medallions, and an elaborately detailed coffered ceiling with an oculus in the center. TressBalsbaugh selected shades of white, gray, and blue from Benjamin Moore, Farrow & Ball, and Sherwin Williams to subtly highlight the room’s rich details. Three separate crews were needed to handle the painting, says project manager Tim McGowan.

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BELOW: Many of the home’s most intricate and beautiful details, such as the original tile surround on the living room fireplace, pop against the fresh white background. RIGHT: In the stairwell, a portrait of the wife of the original owner peers from behind a cascade of contemporary light globes from John Pomp Studios. FACING PAGE: Tress-Balsbaugh and her client found inspiration for the living room in photos of the Paris apartments of well-known designers. “That juxtaposition of old and new was something I was really drawn to,” the homeowner says.

the needs of a modern family might seem daunting, but not to The Holland Companies, who were called in for the remodel. “Jobs like this are what we do every day,” says project manager Timothy McGowan. In this case, the job would involve a different approach on each of the home’s five levels. Only minor updates were needed on the lower level, which opened to the garden and included a large kitchen, nanny’s quarters, and parking area. The ground floor above it would remain largely unchanged structurally, but its wealth of period details demanded meticulous attention. Rooms on the second and third floors—including the master suite and family bedrooms—had to be reconfigured to meet the family’s needs. On the fourth floor, significant structural work was required to transform the boxed-up space into one that the whole family could enjoy together. Carolina Tress-Balsbaugh, senior designer and partner with Manuel de Santaren, remembers the

impression she got the first time she stepped through the front door. “I thought, my God—I feel like I’m in an old bank,” she says. The luxurious mahogany woodwork, marble floors, and elaborate plaster moldings that surrounded her were beautiful, but not, well, residential. Her first instinct: lighten it up. Taking a cue from the gracious Parisian apartments of designers like Valentino Garavani, TressBalsbaugh worked to balance the home’s Old-World embellishments with the crisp, transitional style furniture favored by her client. Applying paint as an editor might wield Wite-Out, Tress-Balsbaugh gave the dark woodwork of the entryway and foyer the light, feathery appearance of frosting on a cake. “It was a bit scary to do this,” she admits. “But when we finished it was just so perfect. It looked beautiful.” The music room—a special space for this musicloving family—was particularly elaborate. With intricate plasterwork, marble columns, an ornate November–December 2017 | New England Home  141

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Contemporary club chairs and a geometric rug bring the library into the twenty-first century. Rather than remove any of the room’s elaborate woodwork, the designer had it ebonized, allowing it to recede into the background. FACING PAGE: Designed by Tress-Balsbaugh, the Caesarstone-topped dining table creates a quiet focal point in an otherwise ornate room. The glitter of the original crystal chandelier is likewise subdued with a shade by Blanche Field.

coffered ceiling, and art glass windows, it barely needed furniture to make a statement. The blue and gold paint on the walls and the angels and clouds on the ceiling were, however, overwhelming. “The molding is so beautiful, all the detail is there,” Tress-Balsbaugh says. “Why gild the lily?” She toned down the room’s colors to three shades: white, pale gray, and light blue. To warm the space, she replaced the marble floor with oak stained espresso brown and laid in a herringbone pattern. She then introduced transitional pieces— including a duet of Gérard shelter-arm sofas and a quartet of barrel chairs by Christian Liaigre—that are easily slid aside for the occasional family concert. Two grand pianos, one a family heirloom, flank the fireplace at the far end of the room. The designer applied the same firm but respectful approach throughout the main floor. The living room’s riot of plasterwork on the walls and ceiling is subdued under three shades of white paint. Various lusters—matte, satin, and flat—enhance the slight variations in tone. Ebonized doors and dark wood floors anchor the room, as do furnishings—including a console designed by Tress-Balsbaugh and an angular coffee table from Christian Liaigre—that juxtapose dark against light. A similar give-and-take between light and dark occurs in the library, where Tress-Balsbaugh painted the dark ceiling white and called in Wayne Towle, a specialist in wood finishing and restoration, to ebonize the surrounding woodwork. A geometric cowhide carpet and a Sputnik lighting fixture relax the atmosphere considerably. Traditional and contemporary elements mix in the ornate oval dining room, where Tress-­Balsbaugh encircled a crystal chandelier with a sheer shade by Blanche Field. It lights a fifteen-foot-long dining table, designed by Tress-­ Balsbaugh, that features a walnut base and Caesarstone top. “She kind of pushed me on that,” says the client, who feared the table would appear heavy and cold. Instead, it turned out perfect. “It’s one of my favorite pieces of furniture,” she says. Balsbaugh completely rewrote the score on

AS SHE STEPPED THROUGH THE FRONT DOOR, SHE THOUGHT, “MY God—I feel like I’m in an old bank,” says Carolina TressBalsbaugh. beautiful, but not, well, residential. Her first instinct: lighten it up.

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the second floor. With the help of assistant Shelly ­Pascucci, she reconfigured the space to create a master suite with a luxurious bath, an exercise room, a sitting room/office, and his-and-her closets. Nearly the size of the bedroom, the wife’s closet features an island filled with storage drawers and topped with Turkish Carrara marble, as well as a storage wall equipped with a library ladder for reaching the highest shelves. The same contemporary vibe takes shape in the reconfigured fourth-floor family space. Here, TressBalsbaugh knocked down walls and added skylights to create a bright, open area where the family could gather to eat or to relax in front of the recessed widescreen TV. A sleek, functional kitchen features Arclinea cabinetry through Casa Design Living in Boston and incorporates a motorized dining surface that rises to counter height for casual gatherings. A few steps away, doors lead to a roof deck designed by landscape architect Jacalyn Gould. Built on two levels, the deck offers both a dining area and comfortable seating around a gas fire table. Boxwood hedging and sculptural urns complement the building’s traditional brownstone balustrade, but recede from view without competing with the expansive views of the city. And here, just as inside the house, the furnishings are right at home with the splendor that surrounds them.  RESOURCES : For more information about this home, see page 210.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: The streamlined contemporary kitchen on the fourth floor is adjacent to a comfortable media area and just steps away from the bi-level roof deck. The roof deck features discreet areas for dining, cooking, and lounging, all with spectacular views of the city. In the master bedroom, Koto wood panels and a leather Christian Liaigre bed create a decidedly contemporary edge. Nearby, the wife’s dressing room features custom closets and a marble-topped island; crystal chandeliers, refitted with shades from Blanche Field, were relocated from the hallway.

“We were looking for a graceful balance between the old bones of the house and a more contemporary vibe that matches our aesthetic,” says the homeowner. November–December 2017 | New England Home  145

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L a n d s ca p e Design

Dan Gordon

interior design

Meichi Peng

L a n d s ca p e Design

Janice Parker

A rc h i t e c t u r e

Michele S. Foster

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S p e c ia lt y

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THE Eleventh ANNUAL NEW ENGLAND DESIGN HALL OF FAME AWARDS AND GALA ®

Inductee portraits by bruce rogovin Text by lisa H. Speidel furniture and shoot location courtesy FDO Group

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2017 new england design hall of fame

Introduction ®

Every year we have the distinct honor of introducing our latest class of New England Design Hall of Fame inductees. And we do mean honor. Year in and year out (eleven and counting), the inductees to the Hall of Fame continue to raise the bar, elevating our already lofty expectations of good design. The people we celebrate this year join a small but venerable group of architects, interior designers, landscape designers, builders, and other professionals who have done their part to shape our surroundings and delight our senses. The 2017 class spans New England, from Portsmouth, Rhode Island, to Greenwich, Connecticut, to the greater Boston area. Their deep and diverse portfolios represent decades of experience. They are talented. They are passionate. They are ­philanthropic. So without further ado, allow us to welcome our newest inductees: architectural designer Michele S. Foster of Foster Associates; interior designer Meichi Peng of Meichi Peng Design Studio; landscape professionals Dan Gordon of Dan Gordon Landscape Architects and Janice Parker of Janice Parker Landscape Architects; and builder Thoughtforms, represented by company president Mark Doughty. It’s no secret that arriving at this final list is quite an undertaking. For accepting this challenge, we are indebted to our judges (and past winners) Bruce Beinfield

of Beinfield Architecture; Susan Stacy of Gauthier-Stacy; Gregory Lombardi of Gregory Lombardi Design; and Ken Vona of Kenneth Vona Construction, as well as Theodore (Ted) Landsmark, the director of the Dukakis Center for Urban and Regional Policy at Northeastern University and a board member of the Boston Planning & Development Agency. The process was moderated by New England Home’s editor-in-chief Kyle Hoepner, and the panel was generously hosted at the offices of Eck | MacNeely Architects in the South End of Boston. While a Hall of Fame Award is a bit like a lifetime achievement honor, make no mistake, this group is by no means done designing, creating, and building. We look forward to seeing the mountains they scale and the boundaries they push next.

Clockwise from top left:

The selection committee for the 2017 New England Design Hall of Fame inductees: Bruce Beinfield, Ted Landsmark, Ken Vona, Gregory Lombardi, and Susan Stacy. The judging was organized by Kyle Hoepner 152  New England Home | November–December 2017

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Contact Us to Find Out Why. #FBNBuilt 617-333-6800 | www.fbnconstruction.com

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2017 new england design hall of fame

Inductee Announcement Ceremony

As the grand finale of Boston Design Market and the kick-off to the inaugural Heading Home to Dinner design and dine event, more than 300 people gathered at the Boston Design Center to celebrate the 2017 inductees into the New England Design Hall of Fame. 1

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1. Kristen Rivoli of Kristen Rivoli Interior Design, New England Home’s Kathy Bush-Dutton, and Larissa Cook of FBN Construction | 2. Bob Ernst of FBN Construction with Joe Bertola of Bertola Custom Homes & Remodeling | 3. Susan Flaherty of Schumacher with Susan Stacy and Jim Gauthier of Gauthier-Stacy | 4. Kenneth Vona of Kenneth Vona Construction with Nicholas Vona and inductee Mark Doughty of Thoughtforms | 5. Danielle Jones and Patti Jones of Snow and Jones | 6. Dennis Duffy of Duffy Design Group with 2014 New England Design Hall of Fame inductee Christina Oliver of Oliver Interiors | 7. Guy Messier of Case Window and Door and Sarah Lawson of S + H Construction | 8. Becky Bratt of Kristin Paton Interiors, Karen Gilman of Finelines, and Kristin Paton and Courtney Aleksa of Kristin Paton Interiors | 9. New England Home’s Kyle Hoepner announcing this year’s honorees | 10. Danielle Ferrier of Heading Home, Mally Skok of Mally Skok Design, and Elizabeth Benedict of Elizabeth Home Decor & Design | 11. Frank Hodge of F.D. Hodge Interiors, Kasey Graham of Boehm Graham Interior Design, and Michael Nest of Blueprint Medicines | 12. Maria Mancino and Joseph DeChiaro of Romo  | 13. D. Scott Bell of Theo & Isabella Design Group and Gregory Lombardi of Gregory Lombardi Design

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Architecture 2017 new england design hall of fame

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Michele S. Foster

Twenty-two years ago, Michele Foster was a principal in a large Rhode Island-based architectural firm when she decided change would do her good. “I left that office with $5,000 in the bank and no registration, and thought, ‘what am I going to do now?’ ” In fact, it was just the impetus she needed to hang out her own shingle as an architectural designer. Foster takes this same solution-based approach to her designs, crediting her training at Parsons with cultivating a way of thinking and creating: “The education was more about how to solve problems; it doesn’t matter if it’s a building or a piece of furniture or an interior or a landscape, you just have to understand the issues surrounding the design.” Consider, for example, a small house she designed on a “dog-leg” site thought too awkward to build on. Her solution? Two overlapping shallow gable forms, one with a two-car garage and bedrooms above, the other with a living room, kitchen, and playroom. Or the seamless way she juxtaposed a modern working greenhouse (complete with an entertaining space and roof deck) with a historic shingle-style house. Foster Associates is small—just Foster, architect Chris Cote, and an intern—but its portfolio reads big. And Fos-

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ter’s sensibilities are well-defined: “Our work is modern,” she says. “I believe buildings can be influenced by the past, but they should be designed for your time.” It’s this clear vision that has won her accolades and respect from her peers. “From initial concept, to the design of the smallest details, her work is thoughtful and of a high quality,” says architect and New England Design Hall of Fame judge Bruce Beinfield. “The use of organic materials in her homes adds a warmth that is all too often missing in modern design.”

Photography by Warren Jagger

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Landscape Design 2017 new england design hall of fame

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Dan Gordon

Nurture or nature? In the case of landscape architect Dan ­Gordon, the latter certainly played a starring role in his career path. “I was fortunate to grow up around beautiful landscapes that inspire people,” he says. Gordon came of age in Brookline, Massachusetts, in a picturesque neighborhood designed by Frederick Law Olmstead, not too far from The Country Club, the Arnold Arboretum, and the Sargent Estate. “When you create a new suburb, it takes about fifty years for the trees to mature,” he says. “I didn’t realize it at the time, but the landscape of my neighborhood was at its prime.” After earning a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Design from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and a Master of Landscape Architecture from the Harvard Graduate School of Design, Gordon headed west. For three years he was the project manager for Rancho Santa Margarita in California, a 5,000-acre planned new town, before he returned home to take a position as lead designer for the Central Artery Tunnel Project—Central Area, where he was responsible for developing eight miles of streetscapes in downtown Boston. In 1996, Gordon struck out on his own with Dan Gordon Landscape Architects, focusing on residential projects. His work all considers two driving tenets: place

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and context. What are the site’s specs (the sun, the topography, the vegetation) and what is its character (Urban or rural? Turn-of-the-century or modern? What does the family want?) “Dan has a long career of successfully interpreting his clients’ goals into sensitive and understated landscapes,” says past winner and 2017 Hall of Fame judge Gregory Lombardi. “These thoughtful spaces never feel forced; instead they have a gracious, quiet feel that settles into the environment.” And that environment happens to be right in Gordon’s own childhood backyard.

Photography by Greg Premru

10/19/17 6:13 PM


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Landscape Design 2017 new england design hall of fame

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Janice Parker

“My very first memory is of a flower the size of my head,” says landscape architect Janice Parker. “It must have been a peony, I think, because they are huge and low to the ground, and I was probably only eighteen months old.” Born and raised in New York City, Parker always knew she wanted to work with nature and the natural world—and show others its beauty and depth. She started her Greenwich, Connecticutbased firm in 1984, working primarily on landscapes along Long Island Sound, in the Hamptons, and in New York City. Her portfolio runs the gamut from a small urban terrace to a 200acre horse farm, to helping plan the ­MillionTreesNYC program, a major citywide reforestation initiative. Sought out for her technical expertise and creative solutions to complex site conditions, she works wonders with forests, fields, farmland, formal gardens, and everything in between. Witness the infinity-edge pools that melt into

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the horizon, the outdoor kitchen that’s grander than the indoor one, the rolling orchard that’s as pretty with a blanket of snow as it is during peak pruning season. Always at the forefront of Parker’s creations is how people interact with the landscape. “I love the mix of formal and informal,” she says. “Where do we casually throw ourselves down on the grass? Where do we entertain? Where do we swim? You have to create these spaces. And mix them very fluidly. That’s the delta where you’ll find the magic.” It’s also how you know—after all the permitting, planning, design, and construction—that a landscape is a stunning success. “Nature is a great and honest critic of our work,” says Parker. “And when we get it all right, it’s our biggest ­supporter.” Photography by Neil Landino Jr.

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Interior Design 2017 new england design hall of fame

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Meichi Peng

From childhood, Meichi Peng wanted to be an artist. “But my parents are very business driven, so that idea got shut down,” she says. “ ‘You’re going to be starving,’ they said.” Peng reluctantly followed her brother to university in Taiwan, pursuing a degree in chemical engineering. Partway through, she wrote a letter to her parents outlining her dream: “I want to quit school, go to the U.S., and study design.” Surprisingly, they acquiesced, and in 1993 she boarded a flight bound for Boston. After an intensive three-month course to learn English, she enrolled in the interior design program at Wentworth Institute of Technology. Degree in hand, she logged a number of years at a large Boston-based interior architecture/design firm before striking out on her own in 2006. Peng’s design studio in Boston’s South End is purposefully small, only a half dozen people, and her aesthetic is clear. “We don’t do traditional work,” she says. “We’re definitely on the contemporary side. We’re known for clean lines, interior architectural detail, lighting, and millwork.” Her portfolio displays sleek urban lofts, airy modern kitchens, stunning marble baths, and showcases her deft hand with materials, texture, color, and layout. “Meichi’s work is clean and contemporary, as well as

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very comfortable and livable. Her spaces are warm and inviting,” says New England Design Hall of Fame judge and fellow interior designer Susan Stacy of GauthierStacy. “She appears to think very architecturally, creating lovely, thoughtfully designed spaces that are considerate of how people live in and enjoy their homes.” This talent has translated into not only a successful interior design studio, but Peng also dabbles in retail, selling unique home accents from her travels as well as her own line of high-end handbags.

Photography by Michael Partenio (top), Richard Mandelkorn

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Specialty 2017 new england design hall of fame

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Thoughtforms

The quick version of Mark Doughty’s impressive (and varied) bio includes everything from a gig as a stone mason to a stint at West Point to a season with a Dutch cycling team to a degree from the MIT Sloan School of Management to jobs in London and Chicago as a global strategy consultant. That was all before he met two of the men, Charles Barry and Andrew Goldstein, who started Thoughtforms back when Doughty was only four years old. Today, Doughty is president of Thoughtforms, a seventy-person general contracting firm renowned for its innovative approach to building and cutting-edge sustainability practices. “An architect once said to me that he thinks of us as the student-athletes, and the other guys more like the jocks,” says Doughty, explaining how Thoughtforms differs from its peers. Pioneers in green building, the company is known for constructing “tight homes”—houses that are efficient, healthy, and comfortable. And with this ethos comes a serious cool-factor ­(technically and aesthetically). Take, for example, Doughty’s own modern farmhouse: all-electric, it consumes 70 percent less energy than a code-built house and produced 48 percent more energy than it consumed

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in its first year. Careful construction, materials selection, and a state-of-the-art ventilation system equal a healthy indoor environment and minimal maintenance. Or consider the stunning oceanfront vacation home built using sustainable principles, including a photovoltaic solar array to provide power, a water supply heated by a solar hot water system, and windows and doors fabricated from low-E glass. So what does the future hold for Doughty and the forward-thinking Thoughtforms? Pushing the envelope further, of course. “An ongoing curiosity is part of the culture here,” he says. “We’re always asking, ‘how can we make it better?’ ”

Photography by Scott Frances (top), Alan Karchmer

10/20/17 10:32 AM


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•Perspectives New England Design Considered From Every Angle

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We spend way too much time at our desks for them not to be beautiful. These chic pieces will help you get the job done with style. 1. Notre Monde tile rectangular tray, Lekker Home | Boston, lekkerhome.com

| Liz Caan Interiors, Newton, Mass., lizcaaninteriors.com

2. Modern Whitman desk lamp by Thomas O’Brien, Visual Comfort, Cebula Design  | Newburyport, Mass., cebuladesign.com

6. Brass Elephant magnifying glass, Jonathan Adler | Boston and Chestnut Hill, Mass., jonathanadler.com

3. Russell + Hazel acrylic tape dispenser and stapler, The Container Store | various New England locations, containerstore.com

7. Waylande Gregory leopard dish, Patch NYC | Boston, patchnyc.com

4. Siros table lamp, Century | Boston Design Center, centuryfurniture.com

| edited by lynda Simonton |

5. Ampliar letter opener, ANNA by Rablabs 

8. John Derian Stone Slice desk cup, K. Colette | Portland, Maine, kcolette.com 9. Malachite lacquered boxes, Modern Relik | Waltham, Mass., modernrelik.com November–December 2017 | New England Home  171

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Perspectives

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Interior designer Megan van der Kieft has big ideas when it comes to designing a powder room. “My theory is that powder rooms are your opportunity to make a statement. Their small size makes homeowners more open to taking design risks and presents an opportunity to say, ‘This is who we are,’ ” she says. Color is a great tool for making an impression, van der Kieft says, and the Phillip Jeffries paper is a stand-out with its rich blue color with a hint of green. The movement of the tree branches along with the large scale creates a “wow factor.” The hemp-wrapped sconces and mirror with bird detailing further the natural theme, while the chunky, modern silhouette of the Waterworks sink provides contrast. A lovely fragrance via a diffuser is the final touch. | Megan van der Kieft, Margo Moore Interiors, Camden, Maine, (207) 236-4596, margomoore.com

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1. Formwork Lithic single pedestal sink, Waterworks, Boston Design Center, waterworks.com  | 2. Delaunay tile in polished Cloud Nine and Dolomite, New Ravenna, Distinctive Tile & Design, Portland and Kennebunk, Maine, distinctivetileanddesign.com | 3. Katy hemp sconce, Ro Sham Beaux, Margo Moore Interiors | 4. Opus low-profile lavatory faucet with crystal egg handles, ­Waterworks | 5. Blossom 6400 wallpaper in porcelain blue on marshmallow manila hemp, Phillip Jeffries, Boston Design Center, phillipjeffries.com | 6. Bamboo reed diffuser by Nest, Margo Moore Interiors | 7. Joelle mirror, Made Goods, Margo Moore Interiors

| edited by lynda simonton |  172  New England Home | November–December 2017

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Headshot by François Gagné

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Perspectives

Five Questions

Bill Bivona, of Hardwood Design, explains the challenges and rewards of designing and building staircases.

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Staircase making is a rather specialized trade; how did you get into it? I always wanted to be a furniture maker, but I soon discovered that, to make a living, I had to subsidize my furniture making with other projects, such as building kitchen cabinets. A client asked me to build a staircase, and I was attracted by the challenge.

Other orders for staircases followed and, although the first few projects were a huge learning curve, I realized that stairs were the way to go. We made a decision to just focus on stairs because there was a real need in the market. We have the space—20,000 square feet—the special tools, and a staff of twenty highly accomplished craftspeople. I like to tell the

| Interview by Robert Kiener | Photography by john soares | 174  New England Home | November–December 2017

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Perspectives:

Five Questions

story of driving up to a job site with a 1,500-pound circular stairway. Everyone stops to lend a hand. Typically, after we heave the stairs into the opening, all these other incredibly talented people slap us on the back and say, “I wish I could work with you guys because you do the most challenging part of the job.” There is a huge amount of respect for what we do among the woodworking trades.

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What are some recent trends in staircase design? There is a trend to use a lot of metal and glass, which we hate (laughs) because we are woodworkers. Kidding aside, it is a clean, sleek, contemporary trend we see a lot of demand for. To complete these projects, we work with glass contractors, metal fabricators, and metal finishers. These contemporary designs, which look very clean and simple, are ten times more difficult than the traditional wooden designs where you can make

up any irregularity with the trim. With contemporary staircases, if you are chasing an eighth of an inch in an object that goes two or three stories, it’s a real challenge to get it exactly right. Another trend we see is that clients are interested in being greener by using reclaimed lumber and more rustic-grade lumber in staircases.

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How has technology changed your industry? We used to get on our hands and knees and lay out a circular stair on a floor with sheets of plywood, using a big trammel points compass, straightedges, and flexible battens. Now we do everything on screen and toggle back and forth between different designs. The design part of the process is much easier and more efficient. Also, with AutoCAD you can send a schematic layout or a 3-D model to the client in an instant via email. We can also take our drawings or the models and convert them to Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machine language to cut and shape many of the pieces down to accuracies of 1/1000th of an inch.

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But craftsmanship is still a key part of building stairways? Definitely. Take, for example, the creation of wreathed, or curved, handrails. This is still an art. While a certain amount of cutting can be done on the CNC machine, wreathed handrails are largely laid out and hand carved from a solid block of wood. Our guys use pneumatic grinders and die grinders as they whittle away the wood. In effect they are sculptors. When you are gliding your hand along a continuous handrail, it really has to feel seamless, and there’s an art to achieving that.

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Are there any common misconceptions about staircase design and building? People see these opulent staircases in, say, an old Newport mansion, and they don’t think they can get these today because the craftsmanship or specialized skills don’t exist. But they do, and we are proof of that. We can duplicate the great majestic stairways of a century ago and, thanks to today’s materials, we can make them even more accurate and more durable. | Hardwood Design, Exeter, R.I., (401) 294-2235, hdistair.com

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176  New England Home | November–December 2017

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10/19/17 4:46 PM


Our customers choose Valor Fireplaces. Again and again.

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Perspectives

Local Assets

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From Earth to Art

In the hands of these ceramic artists, a lump of clay becomes something beautiful for the home.

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Clay is Adero Willard’s first love, but from her earliest art classes she was also drawn to textile design and painting. The three converge in her work. Willard coil-builds her pieces of red clay sourced near her Massachusetts studio. Before firing, she paints leather-hard pieces with two layers of glaze, white on top of black, then uses an X-Acto knife to score through the glaze, “drawing” her background pattern. With richly-hued glazes she adds simple designs— circles, vines, and petals. These uncomplicated elements yield results that are intricate and complex, she says. “It’s like a visual language.”   | Chicopee, Mass., aderowillard.com

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Don’t ask Boyan Moskov what he is trying to say with his art. “I have to do it. It cures me. But I’m not really good at talking about it,” says the native of Bulgaria who now lives in New Hampshire. That’s all right: his work speaks well enough for itself. Moskov’s sculptural pieces are

crafted from dark clay overlaid with layers of glaze and scored through with random designs. His glazes— predominantly reds and golds with a luster somewhere between matte and shiny—give the work an artifact-like look. At once simple and elegant, bold and strong, Moskov’s vessels make a pure artistic statement. | Contoocook, N.H., boyanstudio.com

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For Abigail and Eric Smallwood, crafting ceramics is a passion they hope to turn into a livelihood. Both hold down day jobs in industrial design, and devote nights and weekends to Myrth Ceramics. In their Boston-area studio, they create tableware and vessels in a pretty palette of muted hues inspired by New England’s natural beauty. They sell their wares on their website, at local farmers markets and craft fairs, and shops, including Winston Flowers, which offers Myrth Ceramics in its seven locations. | Allston, Mass., myrth.us

| By Paula M. Bodah |  178  New England Home | November–December 2017

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Images courtesy of the designers

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rogersandmarneybuilders.com - 508.428.6106

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oriental | contemporary | vintage | sisal | broadloom

www.BradfordsRugGallery.com 297 Forest Avenue Portland, ME p: 207.772.3843 | f: 207.773.2849

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BUILDING BEAUTIFUL LANDSCAPES SINCE 1976

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Trade Notes By Paula M. Bodah

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1) The Newport office of DiMauro Architects. 2) Vivienne Westwood and her rug for The Rug Company. 3) Cumar’s Crystal Agate from the new Linea Couture collection 4) Barbara Krakow and Andrew Witkin

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It’s a homecoming of sorts for Ron DiMauro. Eight years after he moved the office of Ronald F. DiMauro Architects from Newport to Jamestown, Rhode Island, he has returned, opening a second location on Bellevue Avenue. A name change, to DiMauro Architects, goes along with the expansion. The new space occupies a historic building overlooking Touro Park. While the Jamestown base opened up his business to clients along the southern Rhode Island coast, DiMauro says he’s happy to be able to offer his Newport clients a more convenient location.  I  Newport and Jamestown, R.I., dimauroarchitects.com

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The Rug Company is celebrating its twentieth anniversary by pulling out all the stops and introducing TRC20, a collection of handmade rugs by leading designers. The rugs, bold conceptions by Paul Smith, Alexander McQueen, Vivienne Westwood, Kelly Wearstler, and Suzanne Sharp, were debuted at the 2017 London Design Festival. They are a beautiful collaboration of artistry and craftsmanship, hand-woven with all-natural yarns.  I  Boston, therugcompany.com

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Time flies when you’re having fun, and for Cumar it’s been a quick twenty-five years. The company is celebrating a quarter-century in business by staying in growth mode, as owner Ivo Cubi continues to scour the world looking for beautiful stone. Among its newest offerings is the Linea Couture collection, a stunning line that includes semiprecious stones. The firm is also pleased to bring Paul Guitard, who has more than two decades of experience in the residential construction industry, on board as vice president of operations.  I  Everett, Mass., cumar.com

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The latest in products for the bath and kitchen that are both beautiful and smart are on display in the brand-new Designer Bath and Salem Plumbing Supply showroom in Watertown, Massachusetts. The

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7,000-square-foot space, the second showroom for the Beverly, Massachusetts-based company, was designed by the Boston architectural firm Bergmeyer Associates. Among its highlights are vignettes offering inspiration on how products might be used in the home, and an “Experience Room,” that shows off smart-tech features like showers with aromatherapy, chromotherapy, and music. New England Home was pleased to hold one of our popular networking parties in the new showroom. To share the fun and get a glimpse of the space, see Design Life, page 186.  I  Watertown and Beverly, Mass., designerbath.com

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After years of working together as partners at the Barbara Krakow Gallery on Boston’s Newbury Street, Barbara Krakow and Andrew Witkin have decided to celebrate their successful collaboration with a name change. The new Krakow Witkin Gallery will continue with what has worked so well: diverse, energetic, and educationally minded exhibitions that reflect their own complementary relationship. This fall features a solo show by Tara Donovan and a group show with works by Carl Andre, Eleanor Antin, Hanne Darboven, Gilbert & George, and Sherrie Levine.  I  Boston, krakowwitkingallery.com

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New Englanders have no excuse for not having a beautiful bath and kitchen, given the number of places we have for shopping for the best materials. Waterworks has moved and expanded its showroom in the Innovation & Design Building in Boston’s Seaport District. The new space, accessible from the outdoor promenade, offers 6,767 square feet of all things luxury for kitchen and bath, from sinks and tubs to lighting and surfaces to cabinetry and other furnishings. It also introduces Waterworks Kitchen, showcasing complete kitchen vignettes so clients can get design inspiration as well as product knowledge.  I  Boston, waterworks.com Vivienne Westwood Photo by Mary McCartney

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Trade Notes

Prospect Hill

Antiques & Home Furnishings Art Gallery

Modern classics from Manoir

I Add Style and Character To Your Home Custom Dining Tables & Furniture • Quality Antiques & Handcrafted Reproductions • Wicker & Outdoor Garden Furniture Lamps, Mirrors & Rugs • Simon Pearce Glassware P.O. Box 383 | 247 Prospect Hill Road | Georges Mills, NH 03751 Open Daily 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. or by appointment

603.763.9676 | www.prospecthillantiques.com

People on or near Cape Cod have a new option for finding everything they need to create a beautiful kitchen, now that White Wood Kitchens has opened a second location. In addition to its Sandwich site, the company has a state-of-the-art new showroom in East Falmouth that features fully functional kitchen vignettes and scads of materials samples, making it a one-stop-shopping experience for clients. The showroom also offers light fixtures from Lucía Lighting and Design in Lynn, Massachusetts.  I East Falmouth and Sandwich, Mass., whitewoodkitchen.com

I

Congratulations are in order for Sea-Dar Construction. The firm was recently honored by the City of Cambridge (Massachusetts) Historical Commission for its thoughtful renovation of the interior and foundation of an 1857 house on Cambridge’s Brattle Street. The project included elevating the house so the first level’s new floor would run continuously, with no thresholds, creating an expansive new deck, and adding brick veneer to the new concrete foundation.  I  Boston and Osterville, Mass., seadar.com

THE SHOWROOM THAT TAKES YOUR BREATH AWAY... WITH PRICES THAT LET YOU BREATHE

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Elizabeth Jones has lived in London, France, and New York, but her heart is in New England, so it only makes sense that she would make Boston home base for her new online home boutique, Manoir. Jones offers a collection of European-inspired furniture, accessories, and decorative items that have classic roots and a modern touch. In many instances, Jones works with skilled European artisans to design the handcrafted furniture. Accessories are sourced from around the globe, from France to Tibet.  I  Boston, manoirgroup.com 

184  New England Home | November–Decmber 2017

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H O W D O YO U C R E AT E A T I M E L E S S R U G ?

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The Tailormade Collection, woven from classic wools from Britain and New Zealand. Made in Fall River, Massachusetts.

What makes a Merida rug a timeless investment? We source only natural yarns that are durable, environmentally smart, and will deepen in character and color for years to come. Then we weave and hand-finish every rug to order. Visit our studio at the Boston Design Center for samples, inspiration, and hands-on expertise.

ONE DESIGN CENTER PLACE, SUITE 330, BOSTON, MA 02210 MERIDASTUDIO.COM (800) 345.2200

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10/3/17 1:55 PM


Design Life

edited by Lynda Simonton

Networking Event

Cape & Islands

New England Home Fall Networking Event at Designer Bath

New England Home celebrated its September–October issue with a lively evening of cocktails and connection at the new state-of-the-art Designer Bath showroom in Watertown, Massachusetts. Guests enjoyed posing for the camera in a luxurious tub, trying out the interactive showroom exhibits, and sampling hors d’oeuvres while the steel drum band Plum Island Pans entertained the crowd.

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| 1 . The Designer Bath team | 2. Christopher Pike, Keith Russell, and Jared Costa from Miele | 3. Eric Euell and Matt Payne of Garage Headquarters with New England Home’s Kim Sansoucy  | 4. Shalini Vattes and Jill Litner Kaplan of Jill Litner Kaplan Interiors  | 5. Marshall Morgan of Morgan Halperin Builders and Chelsea Blanchard of Blanchard Design Studio  | 6. Angie Deligiannides with Anna Orfanides of Anna O Design  | 7. Tricia and Pierre Matta of Newton Kitchens & Design  | 8. New England Home’s Kyle Hoepner and Kathy Bush-Dutton flank Jason Sevinor of Designer Bath  | 9. Katherine Nolan and Mike Tartamella of Patrick Ahearn Architect  | 10. Steve Brand of Wolfers Lighting with Jason Clairday of Designer Bath  | 11. John Speridakos of Cosmos Painting and Claire Federman of Sewfine Drapery Workroom with New England Home’s David Simone

186  New England Home | November–December 2017

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Photography by Allan Dines

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Michael j. Lee photography

I recommend Wayne Southworth and the team at MWI Fiber-Shield to all my clients whether it be one chair or rug or an entire home of newly installed furnishings. The final call to Fiber-Shield once the furniture is installed is a part of our design process. The service and follow up is fantastic and they truly care about making each of my clients feel comfortable. Ana Donohue Ana Donohue Interiors

MWI Fiber Shield

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Design Life ASID’s Sips of Summer

Adam Japko, managing partner of New England Home and founder of WineZag, helped guests take the stress out of entertaining by sharing world-class wine and food pairings at a special American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) event. In addition to enjoying the fine wine and tasty bites, guests toured the recently completed Ann Sacks Showroom in the Boston Design Center.

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Hutker Architects Taste of Summer

Hutker Architects hosted clients and colleagues in collaboration with local food producers at the Martha’s Vineyard Shipyard to celebrate and explore how a sense of place influences both the architectural style and the signature flavors of a geographical area. Everyone enjoyed locally sourced food from The Grey Barn and Farm, Cottage City Oysters, and Blue Crab Kitchen.

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| 1. Enjoying a summer evening 4 at the Martha’s Vineyard Shipyard  | 2. Mark Hutker, Julie Bangert, Scott McCullough, Weston Halkyard, and Nancy Swensson | 3. Dana Edelman and The PickPocket Bluegrass Band | 4. Susan Chapman, John Fodor, Joe Chapman, Sally Fodor, and Sean Dougherty  | 5. Michael Bernstein, Sara Bernstein, Holly Thomas, Liane Thomas, and Greg Ehrman

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| 1. Lily Barrett, Tamara Candage, and Meghan Carney | 2. Renee Albano | 3. New England Home’s Adam Japko   | 4. Angelo “Ivo” Cubi  | 5. Lily Barrett, Alicia Limoncelli, Elizabeth Skayne, and Michael Barnum 

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ASID’s Sips of Summer photography by Caitlin Cunningham Hutker Architects photos by Shelby Pollack

10/20/17 10:46 AM


Less house. More home.

Let the professionals at Moniques help you create your perfect kitchen or bath.

617-923-1167

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Design Life Junior League of Boston Show House Gala

Guests were happy to celebrate the successful launch of the Junior League of Boston’s 2017 Designer Show House. After touring the transformed William Flagg Homer House in Belmont, Massachusetts, everyone enjoyed an evening of merriment at the Belmont Town Hall. Interior designers D. Scott Bell and Susan Schaub of Theo & Isabella Design Group received the prestigious Pineapple Award for excellence in design.

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New England Home at the Ogunquit Playhouse 1

| 1. The show house designers take center stage. | 2. Leigh Anne Dempsey, Megan Siebert, and Stephanie Rossi  | 3. Kelly Rogers and Dianne Aucello | 4. Kim Macumber and Dibby Flint  | 5. Sean Cutting and Karen Page

New England Home hosted special guests at the iconic Ogunquit Playhouse for an evening of theater and socializing. The group enjoyed the Tony Award–winning musical Ragtime as well as food and drink under the tent on a beautiful summer night. 2

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| 1. Under the tent at the Ogunquit Playhouse  | 2. Peter and Lisa Alfe with Elizabeth and Charlie Malafaia | 3. Diana James, Bob Simonton, New England Home’s Lynda Simonton, and Marty Bloom | 4. Gary Rousseau, New England Home’s Kathy Bush-Dutton, and Chris Magliozzi  | 5. Mimi and Owen Kantor with New England Home’s David Simone Junior league of Boston Show House Gala photography by Sabrina Cole-Quinn Ogunquit Playhouse photos courtesy Ogunquit Playhouse

10/20/17 10:46 AM


CHIPWEBSTER.COM

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More than a Player Piano, the Disklavier Enspire is the ultimate home entertainment experience.

New England’s premiere home for Yamaha, BÜsendorfer, Estonia and Vintage Steinways. 579 Worcester Street | (Route 9 West) Natick, MA 01760 | 508.655.1117 www.falcettipianos.com

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Calendar

edited by lynda Simonton

2

1 1) Chef-created gingerbread houses are a festive and tasty addition to the 31st Annual Boston Christmas Festival 2) Support the School of the Museum of Fine Arts Boston and add to your collection at the SMFA Art Sale 3) Studios, galleries, and shops welcome browsers and buyers at New Hampshire’s statewide NH Open Doors 4) Top regional and national craftspeople display their work at the annual Fine Furnishings Show

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NOVEMBER Fine Furnishings Show November 3–5 Expect great things at the 22nd Annual Fine Furnishings Show–New England Region, where 80-plus well-respected regional and national craftspeople will fill every inch of the historic Pawtucket Armory Arts Center. I Friday 4 p.m.–8 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sunday 10 a.m.–5 p.m., $10, Pawtucket Armory Arts Center, Pawtucket, R.I., (401) 816-0963, finefurnishingsshows.com/Pawtucket 31st Annual Boston Christmas Festival November 3–5 The show features more than 300 craftspeople selling a wide variety of items perfect for holiday giftgiving or decorating. A highlight of the annual event is the chef-created gingerbread houses that are sold to benefit Housing Families, a charity dedicated to ending family homelessness. I Friday noon–7 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sunday 10 a.m.–5 p.m., $15, children under 14 free, Seaport World Trade Center, Boston, (617) 742-3973, bostonchristmasfestival.com NH Open Doors November 4–5 NH Open Doors is a statewide shopping and sightseeing event designed to appeal to all ages. Visit and shop the open studios of New Hampshire artisans and craftspeople, tour farms, orchards, and wineries, and peruse the many galleries and retail shops.  I nhopendoors.com

New England Design Hall of Fame Gala November 10

New England Home honors the careers of the region’s most esteemed design talent through the New England Design Hall of Fame. The annual gala, held in Boston’s iconic State Room, is a highlight of the fall social season for the design community. This year’s fête recognizes five new inductees for 2017. I 6:30 p.m. Boston, (617) 938-3991, ext. 713, nehomemag.com/hall-of-fame/about  I  see page 148

4 Christmas at the Fells November 4–12 Professional interior designers, floral artists, and volunteers transform the historic main house of The Fells for the holiday season. A highlight of the event is a charming boutique offering unique holiday gift ideas. The festivities kick off with a gala on November 3 to get you in the spirit of the season.  I Gala $100; boutique open weekends 10 a.m.–3 p.m. with tour ticket, weekdays 10 a.m.–4 p.m. with no tour ticket required. $23, $5 children. Newbury, N.H., (603) 763-4789, thefells.org ABX 2017 November 8–10 ArchitectureBoston Expo (ABX) is one of the largest architecture, design, and construction events in the United States. Fortunately for us, it’s located right here in New England. The three-day event features exhibitors and a wide variety of educational programs. Take the opportunity to learn and connect with others in the industry. I Visit website for conference and expo hours which vary daily. Boston Convention Center, abexpo.com SMFA Art Sale November 16–19 This annual art sale benefiting the School of the Museum of Fine Arts is a great opportunity to start an art collection or add to your existing one. Students, alumni, faculty, and affiliated artists donate their works to support the school. Come ready to purchase, or simply enjoy the work of the artists. The art rotates so there is something new every day. I 11 a.m.–9 p.m., School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, (617) 3693626, smfa.edu

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Designer: selDom scene interior Design AreA rug style: urbAn glAss in color sumer splAsh photogrApher: greg premru

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Calendar

The “cottages” are bedecked for Christmas at the Newport Mansions

A Family-Owned Family Owned Design A Design Firm Firm & & Retail Retail Boutique Boutique Designing for New England & Beyond 74 Elm St., Rt. 1 | Camden | 207.236.4596 | margomoore.com

Chandelier SM-Ch-906

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Christmas at the Newport Mansions November 18–January 1, 2018 Indulge in the splendor of the holiday season by touring three of Newport’s historic mansions bedecked for Christmas. The Breakers, the Elms, and Marble House will be decorated for the holidays. Highlights of the tour include gingerbread replicas of the mansions, Christmas trees, and a display of the Vanderbilt family’s New York Central Railroad model train. I The Breakers opens daily at 9 a.m., the Elms and Marble House open at 10 a.m. The last tour admission at all three houses is at 4 p.m., and the houses and grounds close at 5 p.m. Admission to all three houses, $30 for adults, $10 for children 6–17; closed Thanksgiving and Christmas with a 3 p.m. closing on December 24. The Preservation Society of Newport County, (401) 847-1000, newportmansions.org Portland’s Victoria Mansion November 24–January 7, 2018 Portland’s Victoria Mansion will open its doors so visitors can enjoy the historic home in its holiday splendor. This year, the mansion will be decorated from top to bottom by area designers in the theme Christmas in the City by the Sea. The annual event includes a gala on November 29. I Gala $60. Open daily 11:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m., Portland, Maine, (207) 772 4841, victoriamansion.org

DECEMBER

Authentic Designs West Rupert, Vermont 05776 • 800 844-9416 www.AuthenticDesigns.com

Concord Museum Holiday House Tour December 2 Get inspired to decorate your home for the holidays at the annual Concord Museum Holiday House Tour. This self-guided tour lets you explore some of the historic town’s most interesting homes. Each house is decorated for the season by a professional designer or florist. I 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Advance tickets $40 members, $45 nonmembers; day of tour tickets $45 members, $50 nonmembers. Concord, Mass., concordmuseum.org

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SoWa Winter Festival December 2–3 More than 100 local artisans, food trucks, carolers, and more will set the scene for this lively urban holiday festival housed in the iconic SoWa Power Station. I 540 Harrison Avenue, Boston, sowaboston.com

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE LANDSCAPE CONSTRUCTION DESIGN/BUILD PERMITTING AND LAND PLANNING

Art Providence Holiday Sale December 8–10 The Art Providence Holiday Show replaces the RISD Alumni & Student Holiday Sale. The show will feature more 200 artists— many of them Rhode Island School of Design alumni—from New England and beyond. I December 8 VIP Preview Night 5:30 p.m.–7 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sunday 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $100 for VIP Event, Rhode Island Convention Center, Providence, risdalumnisales.com Custom House Maritime Museum Holiday House Tour December 9 For more than 20 years, people have kicked off the holiday season at this annual holiday house tour in beautiful Newburyport. I Newburyport, Mass. Visit thechmm.org for details. Boston Society of Architects Gingerbread House Design Competition December 11–31 Boston-area architects flex their creative muscles with a new medium—gingerbread! Local firms create confections out of gingerbread that are put on display for all to enjoy at the BSA Space. This family-friendly event is sure to inspire gingerbread creativity at your home. The creations are auctioned off, with proceeds going to the Community Design Resource Center of Boston. I Monday– Friday 10 a.m.–6 p.m., weekends 10 a.m.–5 p.m., BSA Space, Boston, (617) 391-4000, architects.org CraftBoston Holiday December 14–17 Presented by The Society of Arts and Crafts, CraftBoston is the premier New England exhibition and sale of contemporary art, craft, and design. There will be 175 national and international artists showcasing unique and limited-edition work in furniture, jewelry, clothing, and home decor. Shop among the booths, and learn first-hand about their skill, training, and inspiration. The event kicks off with “Holidays & Highballs,” a gala preview and benefit, on December 14. I General admission $15, Friday and Saturday 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sunday 11 a.m.–5 p.m., Hynes Convention Center, Boston, (617) 266-1810, craftboston.org  EDITOR’S NOTE: Events are subject to change. Please confirm details with event organizer prior to your visit.

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1. Fabulous Fowl John Derian’s decoupage Turkey Dome may be just too chic to confine its use to Thanksgiving.  | Trove, Weston, Mass, troveboutique.com 2. Not so Simple Upon closer inspection, Studio Dunn’s seemingly uncomplicated Rockport chair reveals sophisticated angles and stepped and tapered legs that bridge the gap between contemporary and traditional styles. | Studio Dunn, Rumford, R.I., studiodunn.com 3. A Girl’s Best Friend Are diamonds on your doors as delightful as some bling on your finger? They may be when they look like these Baguette crystal knobs from Grandeur Hardware.  | Close to Home, South Burlington, Vt., closetohomevt.com

5 4. Old is New The Rue Irving dining table, designed by Boston’s own Patrick Planeta, represents the best in investment furnishings—a sophisticated take on the past with style that transcends decades. | Planeta Design Group for Keith Fritz, M-Geough, Boston Design Center, m-geough.com 5. Romantic Interest The Caterina sconce and Valentina hanging lamp, both by ITALAMP, designed by THDP and Simone Bretti, are named for Casanova’s mistresses and reflect the romance and allure of Venice.  | Casa Design Living, Boston, casadesignliving.com

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1. Golden Touch Add some glitter to your holiday tablescape with Michael Wainwright’s new Mezza Collection featuring glass and ceramics adorned with an artful swipe of gold. | Bloomingdale’s, Chestnut Hill, Mass., bloomingdales.com, michaelwainwright.com

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2. We Want Moor Moorish details such as interlacing lattice work, arches, and floral adornment, seen at the Castle of Sammezzano in Tuscany, sparked Alexa Hampton to design her latest creation—The Sammezzano—for Chesneys. | Brassworks Fine Home Details, Providence, R.I., and Boston Fine Home Details, Newton, Mass., finehomedetails.com

4. Design Cocktail Famed Montreal designers Richard Ouellette and Maxime Vandal blended inspiration from high fashion, extensive travel, and the Brunschwig & Fils archives to create Les Ensembliers for the iconic fabric brand. | Brunschwig & Fils, Boston Design Center, brunschwig.com

3. Standing Tall The ruggedly handsome Otto floor lamp by Sun Valley Bronze will shed light where you need it while making an understated style statement. | Needham Decorative Hardware, Needham, Mass., decorativelocks.com

5. Boiler Plate The industrial-chic Regulator series from Waterworks—which recalls boiler room controls from the 1920s—has been expanded to include components for the bath. | Waterworks, Boston Design Center, waterworks.com

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Premier Properties By maria L a piana

Georgian Gentility

Cape Cod Charmer

transition between old and new construction is seamless. On the first floor, the original wing features a formal entry, formal library, and living and dining rooms—each with a working fireplace. The new wing houses a Character-filled spectacular kitchen, an informal dining area, Craftsman a mudroom and powder room to the rear, and a full caterer’s pantry (with dishwasher, refrigerator, sink, microwave oven, and in-counter steamer). The second ROOMS: 9 floor holds a spacious master suite with 5 BEDROOMS 4 FULL BATHS three closets and a sitting area, and four Lovers of vintage homes often find themselves in 1 HALF BATH bright guest bedrooms, each with access a quandary: they’re drawn to historic properties for 3,755 SQ. FT. to a full bathroom. A romantic little a host of reasons—from authenticity to architectural $1,799,000 reading nook overlooks the landing. detail—but at the end of the day, they’d really rather Beyond hassle-free not live in the past. This beautifully restored gem living, this home offers in Osterville, Massachusetts, is, according to listing a prime location, too— agent Maggie Fearn, a “heritage home with none of city-style amenities the hassles.” The Federal-style house was built in 1829; in an elegant seaside even as bits and pieces were updated over the years, community. it had fallen into disrepair by the time the current Duly Noted: A owners purchased it in late 2007. They spearheaded a little history: the home major restoration and reconstruction project designed was built by schooto bring it into the twenty-first century. The original ner captain Shubael part of the house was completely refurbished, the rear demolished, and a brand new wing added on. The | Continued on page 208

Cape Cod Charmer

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LIVEBOLD

The location, the style, the feeling you get when you walk through the door every aspect of your home should be a reflection of who you are, where you’ve been, and the life you aspire to live. Your best life begins with a home that inspires you. m o t ta n d c h ace.co m Ea st S i d e of Provi d e nce | MLS # 1175 373 $ 1 , 2 5 0,000 | 4 01 .314.3000 BARRINGTON | CHARLESTOWN | EAST GREENWICH | NARRAGANSETT | PROVIDENCE | WATCH HILL Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated.

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W H E R E E XC E L L E NC E L I V E S

WESTON, MASSACHUSETTS This custom luxurious & sleek open concept smart home features 11-room, elevator, state-of-the art systems, Poggenpohl kitchen, screened porch, lush grounds and 3-car garage. $8,980,000

WESTON, MASSACHUSETTS Lifestyle compound on 3 acres with app. 11,000 sq. ft home, pool and pool house, tennis court and patio with fireplace with an easy commute to downtown Boston. $6,895,000

Represented by: Deborah M. Gordon & Carole Milott, Sales Associates D. 617.974.0404 | C. 617.721.0499

Represented by: Paige Yates, Sales Associate C. 617.733.9885

CHESTNUT HILL, MASSACHUSETTS Private, 1 + acre estate in Olde Chestnut Hill, accessed by private driveway features grand living spaces, well-appointed kitchen, impressive master suite, and English Boxwood Gardens. $6,850,000

BROOKLINE, MASSACHUSETTS Stately brick Colonial in Sargent Estates set on 1+ acres of landscaped grounds with pond views, renovated kitchen, conservatory, library, 6 bedrooms, and home theatre. $6,400,000

Represented by: Deborah M. Gordon, Sales Associate C. 617.974.0404

Represented by: Jayne Bennett Friedberg & Deborah M. Gordon, Sales Associates J. 617.899.2111 | D. 617.974.0404

WEST NEWTON HILL, MASSACHUSETTS Magnificent 1890 Victorian home offering timeless design 15 rooms, beamed ceiling, 5 fireplaces, gorgeous kitchen, 7 bedrooms, roof deck, wine room, and carriage house. $5,500,000

NEWTON, MASSACHUSETTS Renovated, historic home offering 7 bedrooms, rich architectural details, sleek chef’s kitchen, solarium, patio, 3rd floor, wine room, putting green, and 2-car garage. $4,495,000 Represented by: Allison Blank & Deborah M. Gordon, Sales Associates A. 617.851.2734 | D. 617.974.0404

Represented by: Maxine Burtman & Mitchel Bernstein, Sales Associates MB. 617.818.2447 | MB. 617.645.1360

COLDWELLBANKERLUXURY.COM

C O L D W E L L B A N K E R R ES I D E N T I A L B R O K E R AG E

The property information herein is derived from various sources that may include, but not be limited to, county records and the Multiple Listing Service, and it may include approximations. Although the information is believed to be accurate, it is not warranted and you should not rely upon it without personal verification. Real estate agents affiliated with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage are independent contractor agents and are not employees of the Company.Š2017 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Operated by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker, the Coldwell Banker logo, Coldwell Banker Global Luxury and the Coldwell Banker Global Luxury logo are service marks registered or pending registration owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. 182948NE_9/17

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W H E R E E XC E L L E NC E L I V E S

BROOKLINE, MASSACHUSETTS 2017 stunning gut renovation. A Gourmet kitchen which overlooks a terraced garden. 1st floor master or guest suite. 4 season sunroom with stone fireplace and glass Nanawall. $4,150,000

DOVER, MASSACHUSETTS Historic and distinctive 10+ acre Westerham Farm showcases a restored New England Colonial home, updated carriage house, 3-stall barn and tack room, 4-car garage, and pool. $3,800,000

Represented by: Jill Streck, Sales Associate C. 617.510.0771

Represented by: Paige Yates & Claire Callewaert, Sales Associates P. 617.733.9885 | C. 508.808.8234

BROOKLINE, MASSACHUSETTS Majestic Chateauesque style home, with spectacular carved wood detail, 7 bedrooms, rooftop green garden patio, 60 ft. stone terrace and heated driveway. $3,300,000 Represented by: Jill Streck, Sales Associate C. 617.510.0771

BROOKLINE, MASSACHUSETTS Fisher Hill! Stucco Colonial home on 20,000+ SF lot with original period details, marble foyer, living room with fireplace, sunken den, sunroom, 6+ bedrooms, and indoor pool. $3,200,000 Represented by: Deborah M. Gordon, Sales Associate C. 617.974.0404

WELLESLEY, MASSACHUSETTS Restored c.1886 residence offering 16 rooms, 7 bedrooms, 4.5 baths, chef’s kitchen, formal rooms, period details, in-law apartment, indoor pool, and English rose garden. $2,995,000

MARBLEHEAD, MASSACHUSETTS Marblehead Neck home with ocean views. Formal rooms, open kitchen/family room, 4+ bedrooms, den, 2 fireplaces, master suite, wrap around porch and beautiful grounds. $2,695,000

Represented by: Donna Scott, Premier Associate C. 781.254.1490

Represented by: Mary Stewart, Broker Associate & Heather Kaznoski, Sales Associate M. 781.820.5676 | H. 781.576.9288

COLDWELLBANKERLUXURY.COM

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NEWTON, MASSACHUSETTS Exquisite 2-year young home set on 17,540 corner lot with 11 rooms, 5 bedrooms, chef's kitchen, Brazilian teak floors, detailed moldings, solar panels, and 2-car garage. $2,549,000

PRIDES CROSSING, MASSACHUSETTS Chic custom designed home on 3.2 acres offers thoughtful floor plan, 3 en-suite bedrooms, chef's kitchen, flexible space above garage, plus deeded beach rights and mooring. $2,485,000

Represented by: Jamie Genser, Sales Associate C. 617.515.5152

Represented by: Scott Smith, Sales Associate C. 617.750.2793

WESTON, MASSACHUSETTS New 4,900 sq. ft. home set on a .92 acre lot with 10 rooms, hardwoods, 9 ft. ceilings, 4 bedrooms, chef’s kitchen/family room, patio, and 2-car garage. $2,250,000

NEW CASTLE, NEW HAMPSHIRE UNDER CONTRACT-Rare 1920s Tudor home set atop 1.5 acres with stunning views of the Piscataqua River, 100 ft. of shoreline, original details, 16 rooms, 5 bedrooms, and granite kitchen. $2,000,000

Represented by: Donna Scott, Premier Associate C. 781.254.1490

Represented by: Tanner Birr, Sales Associate C. 603.512.8511 | O. 603.334.1900

NATICK, MASSACHUSETTS Rare 1+ acre property with breathtaking Charles River views, 12 rooms, 3-season porch, 5 bedrooms, chef’s kitchen, home theatre, patio, deck, Koi pond, and antique barn. $1,695,000

DUXBURY, MASSACHUSETTS Rare, 19th century coastal architecture home offering 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, 11 ft. ceilings, updated kitchen and master bath, wrap-around porch, boathouse, plus deeded beach rights. $1,597,000

Represented by: Eda Mayer, Sales Associate C. 617.901.1535

Represented by: Chris Swem, Sales Associate C. 781.561.5163

C O L D W E L L B A N K E R R ES I D E N T I A L B R O K E R AG E The property information herein is derived from various sources that may include, but not be limited to, county records and the Multiple Listing Service, and it may include approximations. Although the information is believed to be accurate, it is not warranted and you should not rely upon it without personal verification. Real estate agents affiliated with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage are independent contractor agents and are not employees of the Company.©2017 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Operated by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker, the Coldwell Banker logo, Coldwell Banker Global Luxury and the Coldwell Banker Global Luxury logo are service marks registered or pending registration owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. 182948NE_9/17

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What it means to “Experience the J Barrett Difference”

Our Website Makes It Easy The J Barrett & Company website is your “go-to” when you are looking for a new home. Our site offers easy and concise searches for the most current listings throughout the North Shore and Massachusetts that includes weekly Open Houses and community information right on our homepage. Whether it’s a first-time home, ocean front residence, equestrian property or investment opportunity, the J Barrett & Company website has everything you are looking for.

www.jbarrettrealty.com www.nsmoves.com

Manchester Offered at $13,500,000 Unique Opportunity! Amazing 3-dwelling compound on 12.9 acres that overlooks ocean & abuts conservation land. Stunning contemporary home, 3-bedroom carriage house, buildable oceanfront lot.

Prides Crossing Offered at $6,200,000 Create a dream estate on North Shore’s Gold Coast. Stately turn-of-the-century summer home on 2.6 acres with sweeping views over Salem Sound. Renovate for old world charm or build new.

Marblehead Offered at $2,049,000 Majestic Italian Style Villa on Marblehead Neck seaside. Features quality workmanship, beautifully appointed rooms with exquisite details, luxurious master suite and finished lower level.

Beverly Cove Offered at $1,950,000 Fabulous 5,700 SF contemporary Colonial in private setting. Open floorplan with high ceilings. Spa pool & tennis court. Extensive interior/exterior renovations in 2017. Live your dream here?

Topsfield Offered at $1,299,000 Equestrian potential. 9+ acres of rolling fields, zoned residential/agricultural. C. 1820 country retreat with historical charm, 21st century amenities. Indoor heated pool, barn with stalls, 5-car garage.

Hamilton Offered at $1,282,500 Stunning 2002 custom Colonial on 1.9 acres near town, commuter rail. Gracious 4-bedroom, 4.5bath home for entertaining or intimate gatherings. Chef’s eat-in stainless kitchen, family room.

Holly Fabyan

The Lopes Bridge Group

Holly Fabyan

Francine Cecieta

“Experience the J Barrett Difference” isn’t just our motto – it’s our promise.

& C O M PA N Y

Find us on : JBarrettRealtyNorthShore

Cheryl Billings

Deb Evans & Alle Cutler

Prides Crossing 978.922.2700 • Marblehead 781.631.9800 • Beverly 978.922.3683 Manchester-by-the-Sea 978.526.8555 • Gloucester 978.282.1315 • Ipswich 978.356.3444

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The North Shore’s Premier Real Estate Agency

& C O M PA N Y

Marblehead Neck $5,250,000 Direct harbor-front property with shared dock. Fully renovated 1890 Gambrel estate. Original charm with fully upgraded features and systems. Beautifully landscaped grounds. 4-car garage.

Wehnam Offered at $4,500,000 The Ledges. Designed by prominent architect Harrie T. Lindeberg. Exquisite English Country Manor Estate on 14+ acres. Woods, manicured lawns, gardens. Lovingly renovated in recent years.

Boston Offered at $4,290,000 Elegant residence in Beacon Hill townhouse on the Common at Charles. Period details, quartersawn oak floors. Oval fireplaced living room, eatin chef’s kitchen. Fireplaced Master Suite.

Newton Offered at $1,950,000 Oak Hill Park. Architect-designed NEW Colonial. Open-concept custom kitchen with Viking appliances. 2-story gas fireplaced living room. 1st and 2nd floor bedroom suites. Finished basement.

Gloucester Offered at $1,890,000 Direct Riverfront Contemporary in sweet protected cove. Unique home has window walls, custom kitchen, amazing master suite.Waterside deck, dock and 180-degree views of the Annisquam River.

Ipswich Offered at $1,499,000 Views. Views. Views. Unique expanded Cedar Lindel house on 1.87 acres with 3 bedrooms, 3.5 baths. Granite kitchen. Decks, porches, garage stalls for 5 cars. Stone walls, sweeping back lawn.

Hamilton Offered at $1,095,000 This elegant and warm 4+ bedroom farmhouse presents stunning views and enviable privacy and acreage. A studio apartment and substantial 6+ stall barn/paddocks enhances the offering.

Manchester Offered at $995,000 Large 5 bedroom, 2.5 bath brick home on Dexter Pond. Sunken living room, formal dining room, granite kitchen. Screened porch, deck. Spectacular pond view. Lovely landscaping. Near town, beach.

Gloucester Offered at $899,000 Stunning grounds, water views. Contemporary Cape overlooks Goose Cove and Annisquam River. 3 bedrooms, 3 baths, modern kitchen, big yard. Artist’s studio. Deeded water access to Goose Cove.

The Cressy Team

Dan Bernal

Kristal Pooler

Emily McPherson

Kate Richard

J Barrett & Company, LLC supports the principles of both the Fair Housing and the Equal Opportunity Acts.

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Mimi Pruett

John Bos

e.d. dick group

Ann Olivo & Chris Moore

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Premier Properties

Continued from page 200 |

­ axter, and was later owned by a Union Army surgeon, B Dr. Thomas R. Clement. In the early 1900s, then-owner J.S. Twombly was the first to make substantial structural changes to the house, including the extension of two bays and construction of a portico. The house served for a time as a convent; pews from the chapel (now the library) are still stored in the basement. Contact: Maggie Fearn, Sotheby’s International Realty, Osterville Brokerage, Osterville, Mass., (508) 957-5517, 9eastbayroad.com, Property ID# 21710208

Georgian Gentility

It’s hard not to wax poetic about this picture-perfect property. Windfield (an appropriately lyrical name) is perfectly proportioned, with heart-stopping views and interiors that take your breath away. The antique-brick Georgian home was built in 1997; it sits on fifty-four acres in the Litchfield County town of Washington, Connecticut. The estate was designed for “genteel country living” by Fairfax & Sammons of New York and Palm Beach. The home is new, yet faithful to the period that inspired it. The architects were clearly influenced by classic Palladian design, as its influences are everywhere. Handmade brick, stone cornices, chimney caps, and finials were chosen for texture and authenticity. Boston ivy growing on the facade gives the impression the place is older than it is. At just over 4,000 square feet, the three-bedroom ROOMS: 7 residence is spacious, but not vast. There 3 BEDROOMS 3 FULL BATHS are architectural details worth noting 1 HALF BATH throughout. The living room, whose 4,112 SQ. FT. three sets of arched French doors open to $6,500,000 a terrace, features detailed millwork and dentil molding below an acanthus frieze. The elegant octagonal dining room is capped with a domed ceiling. Climb the grand staircase to an intimate den, a guest suite, or a landing with two windows for a perfect vantage point from which to view the parterre garden. Step up to a vestibule and the master suite clad in rich wood paneling; it has a fireplace, striking master bath, and windows on three sides framing the manicured property. Three more rooms on the lower level offer a variety of uses: home theater, gym, wine storage, art studio, or home office. Duly Noted: With its neat hedges and pristine pathways, the parterre garden courtyard is nothing short of magical. It’s been described as “landscape architecture elevated to an art form.” Trained boxwood, barberry,

and juniper are woven into a classic knot pattern that surrounds a limestone fountain with an architectdesigned armillary sundial at its center. Contact: Rick Distel, William Pitt Sotheby’s International Realty, Washington Depot, Conn., (646) 417-2720, windfieldct.com, MLS# 170010715

Character-filled Craftsman

The beauty of this iconic Craftsman home is truly in the details—but it has plenty of curb appeal, too. It was built in 1902 and sits on a 1.4-acre parcel in the Lexington, Massachusetts, neighborhood of Merriam Hill. Designed by noted architect Willard D. Brown for the Whiting family of Whiting Dairy Farm fame, the house has character worth noting both inside and out. It looks and feels like an inviting estate—sophisticated but not showy—with its wide front yard, circular drive, granite steps, and covered entry with natural bead-board ceiling. The home has been updated and renovated, its mechanicals upgraded, and a third-story master bedroom suite was added by a previous owner. There are seven bedrooms, so it’s suitable for a large family (or a small family with lots of guests). At one time, a family with twelve children lived there, according to listing agent Lester Savage. The interior features mahogany and oak trim, quarter-sawn oak and southern yellow-pine flooring, ROOMS: 11 bay windows, coffered ceilings, built-in 7 BEDROOMS cabinets with leaded glass, five fireplaces, 4 FULL BATHS 1 HALF BATH and original Grueby-tiled fireplace sur5,588 SQ. FT. rounds. The dining room opens to a lovely $2,985,000 semi-circular veranda that offers privacy and an extension of living space. A plus for an enterprising prospective homeowner: a preliminary plan has been submitted under the site sensitive development by-law for a second lot on the parcel. Duly Noted: Merriam Hill is one of several distinctive residential neighborhoods developed in Lexington in the late nineteenth century; it was an appealing location for professionals who worked in Boston. The pre-Revolutionary Merriam family owned much of the land, but when they subdivided, Matthew P. Merriam (no relation) purchased several lots and established the Merriam Shoe Factory there, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Many of Merriam Hill’s architect-designed homes are noteworthy examples of Queen Anne, Shingle-style, Colonial Revival, and English Revival architecture. Contact: Lester E. Savage, Century 21 Commonwealth, Lexington, (781) 504-6856, lexingtonre.com, MLS# 72194051 

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ART CRAFT DESIGN DEC 9&10 | 200 Artists RI Convention Center Presented by

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Statement of Ownership, Management, and Circulation   1. Publication Title: New England Home   2. Publication No.: 024-096   3. Filing Date: 9/08/2017   4. Issue Frequency: Bimonthly   5. No. of Issues Published Annually: 6   6. Annual Subscription Price: $19.95.   7. Complete Mailing Address of Known Office of Publication (not printer): 530 Harrison Ave., Ste. 302, Boston, MA 02210. Suffolk County. Contact Person: Kurt Coey, 720-351-1018.   8. Complete Mailing Address of Headquarters or General Business Office of Publisher (not printer): 530 Harrison Ave., Ste. 302, Boston, MA 02118.   9. Full Names and Complete Mailing Addresses of Publisher, Editor, and Managing Editor: Publisher: Kathy Bush-Dutton, 530 Harrison Ave., Ste. 302, Boston, MA 02118. Editor: Kyle Hoepner, 530 Harrison Ave., Ste. 302, Boston, MA 02118. Managing Editor: Paula Bodah, 530 Harrison Ave., Ste. 302, Boston, MA 02118. 10. Owner (If the publication is owned by a corporation, give the name and address of the corporation immediately followed by the names and addresses of all stockholders owning or holding 1 percent or more of the total amount of stock. If not owned by a corporation, give the names and addresses of the individual owners. If owned by a partnership or other unincorporated firm, give its name and address as well as those of each individual owner. If the publication is published by a nonprofit organization, give its name and address. New England Home, 530 Harrison Ave., Ste. 302, Boston, MA 02118. Known Bondholders, Mortgagees, and Other Security Holders Owning or Holding 1 Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages, or Other Securities: New England Home, 530 Harrison Ave., Ste. 302, Boston, MA 02118 12. Tax Status: For completion by nonprofit organizations authorized to mail at nonprofit rates. The purpose, function, and nonprofit status of this organization and the exempt status for federal income tax purposes: has not changed during preceding 12 months. 13. Publication Title: New England Home 14. Issue date for circulation data below: Sep/Oct 2017. 15. Extent and nature of circulation:   A. Total no. copies (Net Press Run): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 45,000. No. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 45,000.   B. Legitimate paid and/or requested distribution (by Mail and Outside the Mail):   1. Outside-county paid/requested mail subscriptions stated on PS Form 3541. (Include direct written request from recipient, telemarketing, and internet requests from recipient, paid subscriptions, including nominal rate subscriptions, employer requests, advertisers’ proof copies and exchange copies): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 20,211. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 21,297.   2. In-county paid/requested mail subscriptions stated on PS Form 3541. (Include direct written request from recipient, telemarketing, and internet requests from recipient, paid subscriptions including nominal rate subscriptions, employer requests, advertisers’ proof copies and exchange copies): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, not applicable. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, not applicable.   3. Sales through dealers and carriers, street vendors, counter sales, and other paid or requested distribution outside USPS: Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 3,151. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 3,054.   4. Requested copies distributed by other mail classes through the USPS (e.g. First-Class Mail): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, not applicable. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, not applicable.   C. Total paid and/or requested circulation (Sum of 15b (1), (2), (3), and (4): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 23,362. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 24,351.

  D. Non-requested distribution (By Mail and Outside the Mail):   1. Outside-county Non-requested Copies on PS Form 3541 (Include sample copies, requests over 3 years old, requests induced by a premium, bulk sales, and requests including association requests, names obtained from business directories, lists, and other sources): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 9,242 Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 8,126.   2. In-county non-requested copies on PS Form 3541 (Include sample copies, requests over 3 years old, requests induced by a premium, bulk sales and requests including association requests, names obtained from business directories, lists, and other sources): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, not applicable. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, not applicable.   3. Non-requested copies distributed through the USPS by Other Classes of Mail (e.g. First-Class Mail, Non-requestor Copies mailed in excess of 10% limit mailed at Standard Mail or Package Services Rates): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, not applicable. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, not applicable.   4. Non-requested copies distributed outside the mail (Include pickup stands, trade shows, showrooms and other sources): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 6,142 Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 6,722.   E. Total non-requested distribution (Sum of 15d (1), (2), (3) and (4): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 15,384. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 14,848.   F. Total distribution (Sum of 15c and e): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 38,746. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 31,199.   G. Copies not distributed (See Instructions to Publishers #4, page #3): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 6,254. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 5,801.   H. Total (sum of 15f and g): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 45,000. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 45,000.   I.  Percent paid and/or requested circulation (15C divided by f times 100): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 60%. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 62%. 16. Electronic Copy Circulation. Requested and paid electronic copies: Average no. copies each issue nearest to filing date: N/A, Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date: N/A Total requested and paid print copies (line 15f) + requested /paid electronic copies (line 16a) Average no. copies each issue nearest to filing date: N/A, Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date: N/A Total requested copy distribution (line 15f) + requested /paid electronic copies (line 16a) Average no. copies each issue nearest to filing date: N/A, Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date: N/A Percent paid and/or requested circulation (both print & electronic copies) (16b divided by 16c x 100) Average no. copies each issue nearest to filing date: N/A, Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date: N/A I certify that all 50% of all my distributed copies (electronic and print) are legitimate requests or paid copies. 17. Publication of Statement of Ownership for a Requester Publication is required and will be printed in the Nov/Dec 2017 issue of this publication. I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who omits material or information on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil sanctions (including civil penalties).

November–December 2017 | New England Home  209

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Resources

A guide to the products and professionals in this issue’s featured homes

SUBURBAN STYLE: GENERATION NEXT PAGES 58–63

Architecture: Kent Duckham, Duckham Architecture & Interiors, Needham, Mass., (617) 422-0952, kentduckham.com Interior design: Elizabeth Benedict, Elizabeth Home Decor & Design, Chestnut Hill, Mass., (617) 965-0069, elizabethhomedecor.com Cabinetry: Masiero Woodworks, Hudson, Mass., (978) 562-3788, masierowoodworks.com Art consultant: Libby Silvia, Artstyle, Wellesley, Mass., (781) 856-4629, libbysilviaartstyle.com Page 58: Console table from Safavieh Couture, safavieh.com; painting by John Schuyler through Libby Silvia/Artstyle, dining table from Hickory White, hickorywhite.com; side chairs from Bernhardt, bernhardt.com, in Duralee fabric, duralee. com; captain’s chairs from Bernhardt, with Lee Jofa fabric, leejofa.com; chandelier and lamps from Currey & Company, curreyco.com; buffet from Bernhardt; painting above buffet by John Vinton, johnvintonart.com; drapery fabric from Schumacher, fschumacher.com. Page 59: Sofa from Century, centuryfurniture. com, with fabric by Sunbrella, sunbrella.com; Century swivel chairs, with Kravet fabric, kravet. com; Dash & Albert rug, annieselke.com; ottoman from Vanguard Furniture, vanguardfurniture.com; side tables from Universal, universalfurniture.com; lamps by Jana Bek Design, janabek.com; lounge chair, cocktail table, and three-tier table from Baker, bakerfurniture.com; wing chairs from Hickory Chair, hickorychair.com; sofa and bar cart from Century, benches from Gabby Home, gabbyhome.com, with Sanderson fabric, sanderson-uk.com; drapery fabric by Robert Allen, robertallendesign.com. Page 62: Lighting from Robert Abbey, robertabbey. biz; counter stools from Ballard Designs, ballarddesigns.com, with fabric from Kravet. Page 63: Powder room wallpaper by Thibaut, thibautdesign.com; master bed from Bernhardt, with fabric from Kravet; drapery fabric by Kravet; nightstands from Worlds Away, worlds-away.com; bench from Universal, with Osbourne & Little fabric, osborneandlittle.com; dresser from Bungalow 5, bungalow5.com. 

GOOD BONES: CONTEMPORARY CLASSIC PAGES 66–71

Architecture: Lee Grutchfield, TruexCullins, Burlington, Vt., (802) 488-8250, truexcullins.com Builder: Chris Nichols, CG Nichols Builders, Quechee, Vt., (802) 369-6003, cgnicholsbuilders.com

SUBURBAN CHIC PAGES 102–111

Architecture: Olga St. Clair,

SDS Architects, Brookline, Mass., (617) 721-0640 Interior design: Phoebe Lovejoy Russell, Lovejoy Interiors, Allston, Mass., (617) 987-0097, lovejoydesigns.net Builder: Fabrizio Construction, Duxbury, Mass., (781) 934-7934, fabrizioconstruction.com Pages 102–103: Dining table from Mr. Brown,

mrbrownhome.com; artwork from Zoe Bios Creative, zoebioscreative.com; chandelier from Lambert et Fils, lambertetfils.com. Pages 104–105: Cabinet from Palecek, palecek.com; table lamp from Visual Comfort, visualcomfortlightinglights.com; Swiss Coffee trim color from Benjamin Moore, benjaminmoore. com; living room bar cart from Made Goods, madegoods.com; chairs from Schumacher, fschumacher.com; bookcases from Julian Chichester, julianchichester.com; sconces from Urban Electric, urbanelectric.com. Page 106: Hanging light from Visual Comfort; desk chair from Mr. and Mrs. Howard for Sherrill Furniture, sherrillfurniture.com; cabinet from Noir, noirfurniture.com; decorative ceiling painted by Pauline Curtiss, Patina Designs, patina-designs. com; photograph above desk by Neal Rantoul, nealrantoul.com. Page 107: Family room sectional and ottoman from CR Laine, crlaine.com; carpet from Stark, stark.com. Pages 108–109: Lights from Ro Sham Beaux, ro-sham-beaux.com; counter stools from Bungalow 5, bungalow5.com; Saarinen table from Design Within Reach, dwr.com; cabinets from Timeless Designs, timelessdesignsinc.com; hallway counter skirt fabric from CC Milano, cec-milano.com; surface mounted light from Arteriors, arteriors.com; porcelain floor tiles from Ann Sacks, annsacks.com. Pages 110–111: Master bath mirrors from Bojay, bojayinc.com; vanity from Restoration Hardware, restorationhardware.com; sconces from Visual Comfort; ceiling light from Circa Lighting, circalighting.com; child’s room ottoman from Land of Nod, landofnod.com; ceiling light from Brendan Ravenhill, brendanravenhill.com; nursery art from Etsy, etsy.com; carpet from Stark; brass chandelier from Visual Comfort; master bed from Red Egg, redegg.com; mirror from Worlds Away, worlds-away.com; chandelier from Ro Sham Beaux; art by Nikki Nye and Amy Flurry, Paper Cut Project, paper-cut-project.com.

CITY SLICK PAGES 112–123

Architecture: Josh Slater, Studio 3.0, Boston, (617) 650-2652, studio3zero.com Interior design: Greg Wilson and Marcia Smith, Warren Square Design, Boston, (617) 262-5814 Builder: Woodmeister Master Builders, Holden, Mass., (800) 221-0075, woodmeister.com Interior millwork: Woodmeister Master Builders Kitchen design: Venegas and Company, Boston, (617) 439-8800, venegasandcompany.com

Lighting design: Julie Rose, Julie Rose

Lighting Design, Pawtucket, R.I., (617) 515-1423

Audio/Video design: Sounds Good, Waltham, Mass.,

(781) 890-8700, soundsgoodboston.com

Drapery workroom: Paula Bevacqua, Design B,

Saugus, Mass., (781) 231-7400, design.net

Interior plants and flowers: Winston Flowers, Chest-

nut Hill, Mass., (617) 244-7873, winstonflowers.com Art installation: Adrian Van Stolk, Jameson & Thompson Fine Art, Boston, (617) 524-1805, jamesandthompson.com Pages 112–114: Fireplace wall and millwork by

Woodmeister Master Builders; fireplace from Spark Modern Fires, sparkfires.com; sofa designed by Greg Wilson and manufactured by Kravet, kravet. com, with Nobilis fabric from Webster & Company, webstercompany.com; sofa pillows from Pierre Frey, pierrefrey.com, Osborne & Little, osborneandlittle.com, and Galbraith & Paul, galbraithandpaul.com; coffee table designed by Greg Wilson, fabricated by Art Applications, artapplications.com; Ironies armchairs, ironies. com from Studio 534, s5boston.com, with leather upholstery from Holly Hunt, hollyhunt.com, through Webster & Company; armchair pillow fabrics by Calvin Klein through Kravet; floor lamp from Marset through Lusso, lussoweb.com; area rug designed by Greg Wilson, fabricated by Merida, meridastudio. com; wooden bowls above fireplace from Hermès, hermes.com; oak flooring by Carlisle, wideplankflooring.com; all wall colors by Benjamin Moore, benjaminmoore.com. Page 115: Perennials bench cushion and pillows, perennialsfabrics.com, through Studio 534; side table from Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams, mgbwhome.com; powder room wallpaper by Jim Hood, Hood Design, hooddesign.com, with Glyph art by Katie Merz, katiemerz.com, manufactured by Flavor Paper, flavorpaper.com; vanity designed by Greg Wilson, fabricated by Venegas and Company; countertop by TBR Marble & Granite, tbrmarblegranite.com; faucet and towel bar from Frank Webb Home, frankwebb.com; mirror from RH Modern, rhmodern.com; sconce by Aerin Lauder for Visual Comfort, visualcomfortlightinglights.com. Pages 116–119: A. Rudin sofa, arudin.com, through M-Geough, m-geough.com, with Pierre Frey fabric; pillows from Romo, romo.com; wooden bowls from Hermès; pouf from ICON Group, icongroupinc.com; bulletin board from Forbo, forbo.com; stair runner designed by Greg Wilson and manufactured by Merida. Page 120: Dining table designed by Josh Slater and Greg Wilson and fabricated by Jamie Cumming, Loki Furniture, lokifurniture.com; light pendants by John Pomp through Studio 534; hand-glass vases on table from Winston Flowers, winstonflowers.com. Page 121: Kitchen millwork by Venegas and Company; countertops by TBR Marble & Granite; tile backsplash from Ann Sacks, annsacks.com; counter stools from Cherner Chair Company, chernerchair.com; faucet by Dornbracht from Frank Webb Home, frankwebb.com. Pages 122–123: Bed from RH Modern; bench from Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams; side tables from Room and Board, roomandboard.com; table lamps by Aerin Lauder for Visual Comfort; blanket from Hermès; area rug designed by Greg Wilson, manufactured by Merida; steel-and-glass walls by Crittal Windows, crittall-windows.com; second bedroom chaise, table, rug, and blanket from RH

210  New England Home | November–December 2017

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Teen, rhteen.com; master bath tile from Stone Source, stonesource.com; fixtures and bench from Waterworks, waterworks.com.

RISE & SHINE PAGES 124–133

Architecture: Robert W. Adams, Robert Adams Architect, Lexington, Mass., (781) 861-1386, robertwadamsarchitect. com Interior design: Kristen Rivoli, Kristen Rivoli Interior Design, Winchester, Mass., (781) 729-0405, kr-id.com Builder: Brett Murphy, Murphy Construction Company, Newburyport, Mass., (978) 465-0381, murphyconstructioncompany.com Structural engineer: John Looney, JML Engineering, Winchester, Mass., (781) 756-0300, jmlengineering.net Landscape design: Richard Kattman, Kattman Corporation, Holliston, Mass., (508) 893-6232, crichardkattman.com Cabinetmaker: Bruce Swift, Swift Cabinet Company, Bristol, Maine, (207) 563-7674 Decorative painter: Lynda Stephens, Lynda Stephens Custom Painting, Swampscott, Mass., (781) 5985051 Pages 126–127: Entry rug by Kristen Rivoli Interior

Design; mirror from BDDW, bddw.com; bench fabric from Schumacher, fschumacher.com; side table from Arteriors, arteriors.com; entry and living room lights from Visual Comfort, visualcomfortlightinglights. com Page 128: Light fixtures from Visual Comfort; pillow fabrics from Mally Skok Design, mallyskokdesign.com, Martyn Lawrence Bullard, martynlawrencebullard.com, and Schumacher; poufs from West Elm, westelm.com; sectional fabric from Kravet, kravet.com; rug by Kristen Rivoli Interior Design. Page 129: Chair fabric by Romo, romo.com; rug by Kristen Rivoli Interior Design; sconces from Urban Electric, urbanelectric.com. Page 130: Breakfast room Saarinen chairs from Knoll, knoll.com; lights from Louis Poulsen lights, louispoulsen.com; wallpaper from Galbraith & Paul, galbraithandpaul.com, through Studio 534, s5boston.com; roman shade fabric from Schumacher. Page 131: Stools from the Cherner Chair Company, chernerchair.com; lights from Urban Electric. Pages 132–133: Custom bed by Kristen Rivoli Interior Design with Casamance fabric, casamance. com; sconces from Visual Comfort; wallpaper by Martyn Lawrence Bullard through Schumacher; Mary MacDonald Collection drapes from Schumacher; rug designed by Kristen Rivoli Interior Design.

ON A HISTORICAL NOTE PAGES 134–145 Interior design:

Carolina Tress-Balsbaugh, partner and senior interior designer, Manuel De Santaren, Boston,

(617) 330-6998, manueldesantaren.com Builder: The Holland Companies, Boston, (617) 556-2900, thehollandcompanies.com Cabinetmakers: Trickett Woodworks, Auburn, N.H., (603) 647-6991, trickettwoodworks.com, and William Bray Cabinetmaker, York, Maine, (207) 451-7041 Kitchen design: Carolina Tress-Balsbaugh and Casa Design Living, Boston, (617) 654-2974, casadesignliving.com Woodwork refinishing: Wayne Towle Master Finishing and Restoration, Needham, Mass., (791) 449-1313, waynetowle.com Landscape design: Jacalyn Gould Landscape Architect, Wellesley, Mass., (781) 235-2776, jacalyngould.com Page 134: Ya-Ta Hey pendent from Urban Electric,

urbanelectric.com; benches from Carole Gratale, carolegratale.com. Page 135: Evolved steel glass-top table by Timothy Schreiber through the Wexler Gallery, wexlergallery. com; stair runner and area rug from Studio Four NYC, studiofournyc.com; globe pendants in stairwell by John Pomp Studios, johnpomp.com. Pages 136–139: Larger coffee table designed by Carolina Tress-Balsbaugh; sofas designed by Carolina Tress-Balsbaugh and fabricated by Decore Upholstering, decoreupholstering.com; Mattaliano Baril swivel chairs from Webster & Company, webstercompany.com; smaller Crispin coffee table by Douglas Jennings for Bright Furniture, thebrightgroup.com; pendant lights from Urban Electric; Skylight dome color by Farrow and Ball, farrow-ball.com; Navajo White trim and window casing color by Benjamin Moore, benjaminmoore. com; White Dove coffers and rosette color by Benjamin Moore; Crushed Ice ceiling color by Sherwin Williams, sherwinwilliams.com; Repose Gray wall color by Sherwin Williams. Pages 140–141: Murano crystal and opaline glass chandelier from Jean-Marc Fray Antiques, jeanmarcfray.com; Cathare coffee table and Infante lounge chair from Christian Liaigre, christian-liaigre.us/ en/; Guild sofa by Holly Hunt, hollyhunt.com; Athena lamp from Webster & Company; rug from Studio Four; console designed by Carolina Tress-Balsbaugh, fabricated by Masterpiece Woodworks, masterpiecewoodworks.com. Page 142: Gérard sofas from Dessin Fournir, dessinfournir.com; club chairs by Christian Liaigre; rug by Kyle Bunting, kylebunting.com; Edina sconces from Urban Electric; Suede Lounge wallpaper by Phillip Jeffries, phillipjeffries.com. Page 143: Custom table designed by Carolina Tress-Balsbaugh, fabricated by Masterpiece Woodworks; Gosha quilted side chairs from Bright Furniture; drum chandelier from Blanche P. Field, blanchefield.com. Pages 144–145: Arclinea cabinetry through Casa Design; Blizzard island surface from Caesarstone, caesarstoneus.com; chairs from JANUS et Cie, janusetcie.com; Globus pendant lights from Urban Electric; Saarinen breakfast table from Design Within Reach, dwr.com; dressing room closet designed by Carolina Tress-Balsbaugh and Classic Closets, classicclosets.net; fabricated by William Bray Cabinetmaker; ladder from Alaco Ladder Company, alacoladder.com; drum shades from Blanch P. Field; bed by Christian Liaigre; bench from J. Alexander Furniture, jalexanderfurniture.com; nightstands by Masterpiece Woodworking; Thomas Pheasant table lamps from Baker, bakerfurniture.com; linens from Muse Bespoke, muse-bespoke.com. 

212  New England Home | November–December 2017

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Ad Index

A guide to the products and professionals in this issue’s featured homes A.J. Rose Carpets & Flooring 77 AmericasMart Atlanta 8–9 Andra Birkerts Design 94 Art Providence Holiday Show 209 Audio Video Design 197 Authentic Designs 194 Back Bay Shutter Co., Inc. 85 Boston Stone Restoration 199 Bradford’s Rug Gallery 180 C.H. Newton Builders, Inc. 161 California Closets 43 Capello Design 73 Catamount Builders 88–89 Cataumet Sawmill 213 Chip Webster Architecture 191 Coldwell Banker Previews International 203–205 Colony Rug Company, Inc. 193 Concord Museum 215 Cosentino N.A. 175 CraftBoston 202 Crown Point Cabinetry 65 Cumar, Inc. 159 Curl Simitus Architecture & Design 95 Cutting Edge Homes 180 Cypress Design 197 Daher Interior Design 1 Dan Gordon Landscape Architects 183 Davis Frame Company 193 db Landscaping 195 DiMauro Architects 34 Dover Rug & Home 150–151 Downsview Kitchens 40 Elms Interior Design 12–13 Estes–Twombly Architects 55 Fagan Door 211 Falcetti Pianos 191 FBN Construction Co., LLC 153, back cover Ferguson 90–91 Fine Furnishings Shows Providence 215 Finelines 86

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Flavin Architects 45 Frank Webb Home 169 Garage Headquarters 79 Gary Streck CRM, Inc. 96 Hampden Design+Construction 47 Herrick & White Architectural Millwork 32–33 The Inspired Bath 26 J Barrett & Company Real Estate 206–207 Jamestown LP/Boston Design Center 31 Janine Dowling Design, Inc. 170 Jeff Soderbergh Custom Sustainable Furnishings 176 Jennifer Palumbo, Inc. 29 JW Construction, Inc. 72 Kelly Rogers Interiors 97 Kenneth Vona Construction, Inc. 2–3 Kevin Cradock Builders, Inc. 35 Kistler and Knapp Builders, Inc. 67

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Local Flow Logistics 195 M–Geough Company, Inc. 56 The MacDowell Company Inc. 18–19 Margo Moore Interiors 194 Marvin Windows & Doors 57 Matthew Cunningham Landscape Design, LLC 157 Merida 185 MGa | Marcus Gleysteen Architects 39 Modern Metal Solutions 213 Moniques Bath Showroom 189 Morehouse MacDonald & Associates, Inc. 16–17 Mott & Chace Sotheby’s International Realty 201 Mougalian Rugs 199 MWI Fiber–Shield 187 Newton Kitchens & Design 92–93 Paragon Landscape Construction 166 Patrick Ahearn Architect, LLC 101 Pellettieri Associates, Inc. 14–15 Phil Mastroianni Corp 181 Platemark Design 99 Polhemus Savery DaSilva Architects Builders 61 Prospect Hill Antiques 184 Roche Bobois 4–5 Rogers and Marney 179 Room & Board inside front cover Roomscapes Luxury Design Center 173 The Rug Company 163 Runtal North America, Inc. 53 S+H Construction 167 Salem Plumbing Supply Designer Bath 22–23 Sea–Dar Construction 50 Seldom Scene Interiors 20–21 Seven Tide 146–147 Sewfine Drapery Workroom 59 Shope Reno Wharton 64 The Sliding Door Company 36 Snow and Jones 155 Somerset Home 55 Splash Kitchen and Bath Showroom 184 Stanton Schwartz Design Group 100 Studio A Design 51 Sudbury Design Group, Inc. 24–25 Surroundings 78 Systems Design & Integration, Inc. 211 Thoughtforms 37 Thread 168 TMS Architects 6–7 Tyler & Sash 69 Ugol Woodworks, LLC 71 Upstate Door, Inc. 70 Valor Fireplaces 177 Wayne Towle Master Finishing & Restoration 49 Wolfers 165 Youngblood Builders, Inc. inside back cover ZEN Associates, Inc. 62–63

Kitchen Views at National Lumber 75 Kristin Paton Interiors 98 Landry & Arcari Rugs and Carpeting 83 LDa Architecture & Interiors 80 LeBlanc Jones Landscape Architects, Inc. 81 Leslie Fine Interiors, Inc. 10–11 Living Swell 38

New England Home, November–December 2017, Volume 13, Number 2 © 2017 by New England Home Magazine, LLC. All rights reserved. Permission to reprint or quote excerpts granted by written request only. New England Home (USPS 024-096) is published 6 times a year (JAN, MAR, MAY, JULY, SEP, NOV) by New England Home Magazine, LLC, 530 Harrison Ave, Ste 302, Boston, MA 02118, (617) 938-3991. Periodical postage paid at Boston, MA, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to New England Home, PO Box 5034, Brentwood, TN 37024. For change of address include old address as well as new address with both zip codes. Allow four to six weeks for change of address to become effective. Please include current mailing label when writing about your subscription.

214  New England Home | November–December 2017

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The Concord Museum’s Guild of Volunteers presents

7 th Annual

Holiday House Tour Saturday, December 2 in historic Concord, Massachusetts Enjoy a tour of beautiful homes professionally decorated in the holiday spirit Information & Reservations: www.concordmuseum.org Sponsored by

Kistler KKB & Knapp Builders Inc.

Special thanks to our media sponsors:

A 22 nn n ua d l!

Nov. 3-5, 2017 Pawtucket Armory Arts Center 172 Exchange St. • Pawtucket, RI Free Parking Fri. 4-8 • Sat. 10-6 • Sun. 10-5 Adults: $10

Annual shows offering American made, handcrafted furniture & accessories.

• Local, regional, national & student exhibitors! • New, returning & collaborating artists & craftsmen! • Best in Show Awards, many new pieces making their debut!

www.FineFurnishingsShows.com Bring this ad or show on your smart phone for VIP 1/2 PRICE ADMISSION for up to 4 adults

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Sketch Pad

Design Ideas in the Making

in my wildest dreams” is an • “Never expression commonly used to describe

something that has a real wow ­factor. It’s a phrase I have in the back of my mind every time I begin work on a house for one of my clients. For me, a true dream home begins with a breathtaking foyer. A grand staircase surrounded by statement lighting, just the right crown moldings, and artisan flooring will offer, instantly, the perfect first impression. Whether your preferred style is traditional, modern, or transitional, a foyer’s details should express how your wildest dreams have been transformed into reality. Including a beautiful custom ironwork stair

railing is critical for making that first impression. That’s why I spend so much time and care creating just the right look for my railings, whether traditional or contemporary. Sketches sometimes happen in advance, but just as often I find myself in the space as it’s being built, drawing right on the walls to make sure the proportions are perfect. Shown here are the finished results from two recent projects—both quite different but equally right for their purpose. | Cindy Stumpo, C. Stumpo Management & Development, Newton, Massachusetts, (617) 964-5440, cstumpodevelopment.com

216  New England Home | November–December 2017

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Courtesy C. Stumpo Management & Development

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  LUXURY RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION, RENOVATIONS AND HISTORIC RESTORATIONS Building and restoring noteworthy homes of all sizes with intense focus on quality of construction, craftsmanship and materials.

Newton, MA 3 tel: 617.964.9900 3 www.YoungbloodBuilders.com

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Why Do Contractors Always...? Why Do Contractors Never...?

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Contact Us with Your Questions We’re Happy to Help!

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617.333.6800 | fbnconstruction.com

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New England Home November December 2017  

Take Two

New England Home November December 2017  

Take Two