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Celebrating Fine Design, Architecture, and Building

The Past Made New Older Homes Reworked For Today’s Families

January–February 2018

Display until March 5, 2018 nehomemag.com

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general contractor Brookes + Hill Custom Builders | landscape architect Stephen Stimson Associates | photography Nat Rea

www.flavinarchitects.com

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Make it a striking year.

Photo: Fran Parente

Ashe + Leandro for Merida, a collection of handwoven sisal and suede rugs.

Nothing brings a room together like a one-of-a-kind rug. Whether you’re looking to make a statement or set a timeless foundation, Merida can help you create a rug of striking originality and beauty. Visit our studio for our newest collections, textile expertise, and fresh inspiration for a beautiful 2018.

ONE DESIGN CENTER PLACE, SUITE 330, BOSTON, MA 02210 MERIDASTUDIO.COM (800) 345.2200

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CONNECT@MERIDASTUDIO.COM

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Private Residence Project, Cotuit, MA

CUSTOM B U I LD I NG

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WORK DAYS. We’re like the post office when it comes to building. “ Neither snow nor rain...” Well, you know the saying. So, while you’re in your home or office turning up the heat this winter, we’re outside building houses. Because if we promise a house will be finished by summer, it would take

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KE N N E TH V ON A CONSTRUCTION

Right from the start.

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Photography by Michael J. Lee

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Photography by Michael J. Lee

An AwArd-winning FuLL ServiCe reSidentiAL interior deSign FirM

2017 Gold PRISM Award for Best Living Area: Bath

Please call us at 617-236-2286 to arrange a consultation | 224 Clarendon Street, Boston

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In This Issue

January–February 2018 I Volume 13, Issue 3

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128 Featured Homes:

98 Industrial Chic

An old wharf building on Boston Harbor makes the perfect setting for a duo who appreciate history but live very much in the present. Text by James McCown I Photography by Eric Roth I Produced by Kyle Hoepner

108 No Place Like Home

A few architectural changes and a cosmetic makeover entice a couple to fall in love with their house all over again. Text by Debra Judge Silber I Photography by Michael J. Lee I Styled by Karin Lidbeck Brent

118 All in Good Time

A family’s thoughtful approach to remodeling ensures that their Boston brownstone will suit their tastes and needs for years to come. Text by Megan Fulweiler I Photography by Eric Roth I Produced by Stacy Kunstel

128 Mountain Makeover

A Vermont ski house sheds its 1980s skin in favor of a contemporary, yet classic, look. Text by Robert Kiener I Exterior photography by Les Jörgensen I Interior photography by Michael Partenio I Produced by Stacy Kunstel

On the cover: Designer Kristine Irving gave a Victorian-era brownstone in Boston a contemporary look by layering a variety of textures in a neutral palette with bold dashes of color. Photography by Eric Roth. To see more of this home, turn to page 118. January–February 2018 | New England Home  13

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In This Issue

139 Perspectives

January–February 2018 I Volume 13, Issue 3

Welcoming door knobs; a sophisticated lounge imagined by designer Duncan Hughes; Pierre Matta dishes about the latest in kitchen design; new mustread books from the design world; layers of texture and pattern enrich a Massachusetts dining room.

150 Trade Notes

Noteworthy happenings in the New England design business. By Paula M. Bodah

152 Design Life

Our candid camera snaps recent gatherings that celebrate architecture and design. By Lynda Simonton

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161 Calendar

Special events for people who are passionate about design. By Lynda Simonton

18 From the Editor 25 Elements: Graphic Standards The techniques of graphic design bring harmony to the bath. Edited by Cheryl and Jeffrey Katz

36 Artistry: Rare Gems

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Antique jewelry and natural history inspire the ethereal, shimmery, almost fantastical sculptures of Timothy Horn. By Robert Kiener

42 Rooms We Love: The Reawakening

The 2017 Junior League of Boston Show House proves, once again, that New England’s designers are a talented lot. By Paula M. Bodah

50 Special Spaces: Mix and Match

139 Special Event:

66 New England Design Hall of Fame Gala

A recap of our celebration in honor of the 2017 inductees into the New England Design Hall of Fame.

162 New In The Showrooms

Unique, beautiful, and now appearing in New England shops and showrooms. By Lynda Simonton

166 Premier Properties

Notable homes on the market in New England. By Maria LaPiana

172 Resources

A guide to the professionals and products in this issue’s features.

175 Advertiser Index 176 Sketch Pad

A long, curving banquette stretching across a bank of wide casement windows connects a kitchen to the outdoors and makes a gracious spot for relaxing or entertaining.

A bold design approach results in the harmonious union of a classic Craftsman home and its sleek, modern addition. Text by Text by Louis Postel I Exterior photography by Richard Mandelkorn  I Interior photography by Shelly Harrison

58 In Detail: Let There Be Lights Far from being a luxury, professional lighting designers can enhance every home and, in the long run, make good financial sense. By Regina Cole

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Special Marketing Section:

Portfolio of Fine Architecture

14  New England Home | January–February 2018

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Westphalen Photography

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Editor’s Letter

New Styles In Old Places

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n ongoing pleasure for me, as our team prospects continually for more homes to feature in the magazine, has been to see an ever-increasing visual diversity and a constantly rising level of design interest in the projects we come across. I don’t mean to imply that any of the work we’ve shown in the past was somehow inferior; it’s just that, as time goes on, New England seems to acquire a greater range of noteworthy designers and custom builders and architects and landscapers and craftspeople. Established figures are for the most part still going strong, but they are being joined by energetic younger colleagues and by other professionals who have moved in from beyond our region’s borders to help keep the cornucopia of talent brimming over. In part it’s a matter of lucky timing. New England Home’s founding in 2005 happened to coincide with (or was perhaps a part of ) a general upsurge of interest in home design in our society. Decorating magazines have a long history in the U.S., of course—Hearst’s House Beautiful, for one, has been publishing since 1896—but I don’t think we’ve ever before seen anything quite like the cur-

For subscriptions call (800) 765-1225 or visit nehomemag.com See additional great content at:

18  New England Home | January–February 2018

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rent proliferation of books, websites, blogs, television programs, and entire cable channels dedicated to residential design. Interested readers of previous decades certainly followed the work people like Sister Parish or Billy Baldwin did for their well-heeled clientele. But a vast audience spending hours weekly taking in the likes of Property Brothers and Fixer Upper, or streaming old episodes of Million Dollar Decorators? That’s new. The thought of tackling serious custom home building or remodeling—and especially the idea of hiring a full team of professionals to do it for you— has now found a general place in the public imagination. And, true to our culture’s Anglo-American mercantile roots, growing demand is sure to generate a supply of enterprising folk eager to fulfill it. Another ongoing pleasure has been watching New England’s design professionals explore a wider array of styles while still engaging in clever ways with our built past. I love the sophistication with which our designers adapt eighteenth- and nineteenth-century structures to contemporary needs, capitalizing on the finest qualities of both eras. Case in point: “Industrial Chic,” on page 98, shows what can be done in one of the old brick-and-beam wharf buildings along Boston’s waterfront, with nods not only to the property’s original marine past, but also to a previous round of updates in the 1970s, when much of the area was first reshaped for residential use. Or consider the distinctly livable rooms installed in this year’s Junior League of Boston Designer Show House (see page 42), which in Victorian times was a favored haunt of painter Winslow Homer. So even if it is, historically, the oldest part of the United States, you might still say that there is a new New England for each new year. —Kyle Hoepner

Find more at nehomemag.com

Our editors and a fascinating lineup of guest blog­gers share beautiful photography, design ideas, and advice every week on the New England Home Design Blog. The site also features ongoing content updates, where you’ll encounter house tours, interviews and commentary, before-and-after stories, and other special items for lovers of great home design.

Sign up for our Design Discoveries editorial ­e-newsletter and get weekly updates on luxury home style, including the latest products, upcoming events, and green ideas.

Portrait by Hornick/Rivlin Studio

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Editor-in-Chief Kyle Hoepner khoepner@nehomemag.com Homes Editor Stacy Kunstel skunstel@nehomemag.com Senior Editor Paula M. Bodah pbodah@nehomemag.com Creative Director Robert Lesser rlesser@nehomemag.com Market and Digital Editor Lynda Simonton lsimonton@nehomemag.com Copy Editor Lisa H. Speidel lspeidel@nehomemag.com Contributing Editors Cheryl and Jeffrey Katz candjkatz@nehomemag.com Karin Lidbeck Brent klidbeck@nehomemag.com Contributing Writers Fred Albert, Regina Cole, Bob Curley, Julie Dugdale, Megan Fulweiler, Robert Kiener, Maria LaPiana, Erin Marvin, Louis Postel, Nathaniel Reade, Debra Judge Silber, Lisa H. Speidel Contributing Photographers Trent Bell, Robert Benson, Tria Giovan, Sam Gray, John Gruen, Keller + Keller, Michael J. Lee, Richard Mandelkorn, Laura Moss, Michael Partenio, Greg Premru, Nat Rea, Eric Roth, Brian Vanden Brink, Jim Westphalen •

Editorial Submissions Designers, architects, builders, and homeowners are invited to submit projects for editorial consideration. For information about submitting projects, e-mail ­edit@nehomemag.com. Letters to the Editor We’d love to hear from you! Write to us at the above address, fax us at (617) 663-6377, or e-mail us at ­letters@nehomemag.com. Upcoming Events Are you planning an event that we can feature in our Calendar of Events? E-mail information to calendar@nehomemag.com, or mail to Calendar Editor, New England Home, 530 Harrison Ave., Suite 302, Boston, MA 02118. Parties We welcome photographs from design- or architecture-related parties. Send high-resolution photos with information about the party and the people pictured to lsimonton@nehomemag.com.

20  New England Home | January–February 2018

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22  New England Home | January–February 2018

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Photo: Michael Lefebvre

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•Elements The Things That Make Great Spaces

A beautiful bath, like good graphic design, is balanced, precise, and sophisticated in its simplicity. A long soak is the perfect antidote to the noise that surrounds us.  | Photo from The Perfect Bath, by Barbara Sallick

Graphic Standards

Structure, clarity, and shape, along with a compelling palette, are techniques often employed by graphic designers, those artists and craftspeople whose work helps organize and give meaning to the visual world. When considering the bath, take the lead from graphic designers. Focus on items where the message is clear: this is where harmony reigns supreme.

| edited by cheryl and jeffrey katz | January–February 2018 | New England Home  25

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Elements

Graphic Standards

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2 Besides the bedroom, the bath is the place where we begin and end the day. Reason enough to pay attention to every detail.

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1. Kallista’s Taper by Bjarke Ingels bath faucet. $2,393. | The Granite Group, Manchester and Concord, N.H., and Kohler Signature Store, Burlington and Natick, Mass., kallista.com 2. A freestanding tub from Wetstyle’s Ove Collection. $6,450. | Moniques Bath Showroom, Watertown, Mass., moniquesbathshowroom.com 3. Florence/Carrara wallpaper from the Fabulous Faux Collection by Martyn Lawrence Bullard for Schumacher. $174/yd. | Schumacher, Boston, fschumacher.com

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4. The Canaan wastebasket from Jonathan Adler. $98. | Jonathan Adler, Boston and Chestnut Hill, Mass., jonathanadler.com 5. Lacava’s Aquamedia wall-mounted porcelain lavatory, $540, and Kubista polished chrome single-hole faucet, $580. | Spritzo, Worcester, Mass., Providence, R.I., and Saco, Maine, splashspritzo.com 6. Stormy Gray honed travertine for the walls and floors. 12” x 24”. $26.42/sq. ft. | Stone Source, Boston, stonesource.com

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Elements

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Graphic Standards 2

Clean and strong, a black and white palette acts as a unifying element in baths both large and small.

1. Villa Nova’s Etta Onyx and Kirkby Design’s Domino Pyramid Monochrome wallpapers. | Romo, Boston Design Center, romo.com

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2. From fashion designer Jason Wu for Brizo, the single-handle freestanding tub filler, $1,770, and 3. fluted trash can, $140. | Splash, Newton, Mass., splashspritzo.com 4. From West Third Brand, Lone Wolf and Band of Outlaws soaps. $20 each. | Sault, Boston, saultne.com 5. From Wetstyle, the aptly named Cube Collection tub, $6,000. | Moniques Bath Showroom

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Interior Design: Kristen Rivoli Interior Design | Woodwork: Herrick & White Interior Design: Kristen Rivoli Interior Design | Woodwork: Herrick & White

Photographer: Greg Premru Photographer: Greg Premru

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Elements

Graphic Standards

2 1 Though designing the bath can be a challenge—from choosing the right size tub to deciding on the most comfortable faucet handles—the choices are many.

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1. Ribbed cotton-linen terry bath towels, $48 each, and 2. Newbury bath stool, $275. | Restoration Hardware, Boston, restorationhardware.com 3. Chesterfield freestanding rectangular tub, $12,080, and 4. .25 low profile lavatory faucet with metal cross handles, $1,042. | Waterworks, Boston Design Center, waterworks.com 5. Graphic field tiles from Kelly Wearstler’s Gem ($20/sq. ft) and Maven ($90/sq. ft.) collections. | Ann Sacks, Boston Design Center, annsacks.com

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Elements

Graphic Standards 2 1

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It’s often the smallest room in the house, but the bath still demands to be an extension of one’s personal style. 1. Lugarno high-profile widespread faucet and handles, $795. | Restoration Hardware 2. Alden single pedestal sink, $665. | Waterworks 3. Pharmacy bath cabinet, $1,475.  | Restoration Hardware 4. White glass 2″ × 2″ tiles laid in a running bond (style 207MSGLSND22), $38/per 12″ × 12″ sheet. | DiscoverTile, Boston Design Center, discovertile.com 5. Classic Victorian clawfoot tub with cross handles, $4,975 | Restoration Hardware

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Over the years, the Katzes have built a large reference library at their studio. When designing a bath, they often refer to The Perfect Bath, by Barbara Sallick (Rizzoli, $55).

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P h otograp h y b y E le v in S tudios

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Custom Interiors, Fine Furnishings, Wall & Floor Coverings, Textiles, Hand Selected Art & Decor

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Artistry

ABOVE: Gorgonia 16 (2017), nickel-plated bronze, mirrored blown glass, 48"H × 72"W. below: Spunk (boy germs) (2002), cast lead crystal, nickel-plated bronze, Easter egg foil, mirrored blown glass 54¼"H × 19¾"W.

Rare Gems

Antique jewelry and natural history inspire the ethereal, shimmery, almost fantastical sculptures of Timothy Horn. There’s a good reason that many • people have described Timothy

Horn’s sculptural work as “jewel-like.” As the much-traveled, Australian-born artist explains from his new studio in Province­ town, Massachusetts, “Much of my work has been inspired by antique jewelry, especially pieces from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.” He points to classic works from collections as disparate as the court of Louis XVI to the Medicis to Moroccan royalty as inspirations for what one critic has called his “post-modern riff on jewelry.” Says Horn, “There’s something so beautiful about those historical pieces that resonates within me.” Horn also uses nineteenth-century studies of natural forms such as coral, lichen, and seaweed as starting points for his art, but he delights in, as he puts it, “re-contextualizing” the things that inspire him by altering their scale and

materials. He might transform a small, ornate seventeenth-century pendant into a shimmering, three-foot-high wall hanging of glass, bronze, and lead crystal. Or he may enlarge and reimagine a gemencrusted hair ornament from the 1700s into a four-and-a-half-foot-long hanging sculpture. “I like to take something and look at it through a different lens,” he says. His recent series of wall sculptures, Gorgonia (Latin for a genus of soft coral), is a prime example. Inspired by the natural beauty of a sea fan, he has fashioned a series of eight-foot-tall sculptures out of nickel-plated bronze from which he hangs teardrop-shaped globes of mirrored blown glass. “These pieces are hybrids: at once jewel-like but also crusty,” he explains. “It’s all about taking things out of context and putting them into my own context.” Horn is as skilled a technician as he is a creative artist. As one writer has noted,

| By Robert Kiener | 36  New England Home | January–February 2018

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Top: Courtesy of P.P.O.W. Gallery; bottom: David Stroud

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Artistry

“These pieces are hybrids: at once jewel-like but also crusty,” says Horn. “It’s all about taking things out of context and putting them into my own context.”

“Horn’s work conveys fantasy and ornament but is underpinned by craftsmanship and concept.” He has mastered several disciplines, including glass blowing, goldsmithing, metalworking, and more. A graduate of Australia’s Victorian College of the Arts and Australian National University, Horn also received an MFA in sculpture from the Massachusetts College of Art and Design. His work has

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been exhibited at Pittsburgh’s Andy Warhol Museum, the National Gallery of Australia, Brisbane’s Gallery of Modern Art, and other venues, and is included in numerous international museums as well as in private collections around the world. As a self-professed “gypsy” who has lived in— in addition to his native Australia—Switzerland, Boston, Cape Cod, New Mexico, Los Angeles, and Vermont, Horn says he finds inspiration everywhere he resides. While studying sculpture in Boston, he discovered Harvard’s internationally acclaimed Glass Flowers collection, created by father and son glass artisans Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka in the late 1880s and early 1900s. He spent hours admiring and sketching these glass representations, which include natural objects such as jellyfish, sea slugs, and anemones. Eventually, many of those lifelike models inspired his own large-scale works. While in Florence, Italy, in the mid-1990s, he spotted a poster that featured a picture of a seventeenth-century pendant depicting a mermaid holding an hourglass and a scepter. He pulled out his ever-present notebook and hurriedly made a sketch of it. As he recalls, “It spoke to me, and several years later, I began incorporating it into many of my large, jewelry-inspired pieces. You never know what will inspire work.” Horn produces work for shows and galleries, but also enjoys the chance to undertake a private comPhaedra courtesy Dior, Cordelia image courtesy PPOW Gallery

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BELOW: Phaedra (2010), nickel-plated bronze, mirrored blown glass, 70″H × 27″W × 9″D. FACING PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP right:

White Death (2010), crystallized rock sugar, 24"H × 18"W; Orbe (1992), cast aluminum, 26″diameter; Mother-Load (2008), crystallized rock sugar, steel, plywood, shellac, 6′H × 9′6″W; Self Portrait as Peter the Great (2010), collaboration with Julie Heffernan, oil on canvas, nickel-plated bronze, 28”H × 20”W; Cordelia (2009), mirrored blown glass, nickel-plated bronze, 28″H × 11″W.

Dior showroom, New York City.

mission. He recently visited the home of a Boston art collector and created a piece especially for a space she showed him in her art-filled Beacon Street home overlooking the Charles River. “Timothy’s work is one-of-a kind, unique,” she says. “Everyone who sees the piece he did for us, a sculpture in his Gorgonia series, comments on it, asks about it, and reads something different into it. That’s the mark of a true artist.” Hard at work in his Provincetown studio, creating another coral-inspired sculpture for next year’s Adelaide Biennial of Australian Art, Horn confesses that he may be about to close a chapter in his nature-inspired work. “I think I’m turning a corner,” he says. What’s next? “No idea,” he says, “but I love being back on the Cape. There’s so much to inspire me here.” Watch this space.  EDITOR’S NOTE: Timothy Horn is represented by

P.P.O.W. Gallery, New York City, ppowgallery.com. To see more of his work, visit timothyhorn.net

Interior Design: Kathleen Hay Designs Photo by: Jane Beiles Photography

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Rooms We Love

The Reawakening

Wunderkammer Design partners Susan Schaub and D. Scott Bell, of Theo & Isabella Design Group, took their inspiration for this congenial space from the wunderkammer popular in Renaissance-period homes—a space, also called a cabinet of curiosities, for displaying relics, art, antiquities, and other objects from one’s travels. The duo brought a worldly feel to the room with a Moroccan rug in a neutral tone that brightens the oak woodwork and brick fireplace. Polished Venetian plaster and pale sofas in a transitional style also lighten the mood. Oyster-shell chandeliers and an eclectic collection of furniture, art, and natural curiosities lend just the exotic touch a welltraveled Renaissance man (or woman) would have loved.

The 2017 Junior League of Boston Show House proves, once again, that New England’s designers are a talented lot. Flagg Homer’s gracious • William Italianate-French Second Empire villa,

built in 1853, narrowly escaped an early demise. When a real estate developer bought it in 1927 with the intention of demolishing it to build seven houses on the property, neighbors intervened and persuaded the Belmont (Massachusetts) Woman’s Club to save the elegant old home. Today, the house is still the club’s headquarters, and this year it was the site of the Junior League of Boston’s Designer Show House. New England’s top designers redecorated more than twenty of its spaces, indoors and out. Although we can’t, alas, show every beautiful result, here are a few of our favorites. RESOURCES : For more information about these rooms, see page 172.

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Rooms We Love

The Oval Dining Room

It’s all about drama in the dining room. The oval shape and tall windows called for an out-of-the-ordinary treatment, thought Mally Skok. So she painted the walls a rich brown shade that makes a theatrical contrast with the white crown molding and ceiling. The windows are a per-

The Parlor The idea for the parlor’s palette, which designer Elizabeth Benedict describes as “lush green pastures giving way to the lilac glow of summer sunsets,” came to her when she learned that the rural landscape that once surrounded the house influenced much of the early work of artist Winslow Homer, a nephew of William Flagg Homer. With its sporty plaid wallpaper and feminine floral fabrics, dressy fireplace and contemporary cocktail table, ornate chandelier and streamlined stools, the setting strikes a pretty balance of formality and ease.

fect backdrop for Botanica, the fresh, pretty addition to Skok’s own line of fabrics. Unexpected juxtapositions— a geometric-patterned rug opposite the ornate ceiling medallion, a Victorian table surrounded by midcentury modern chairs—keep the feeling hip and contemporary.

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Parlor photography by Michael J. Lee Dining Room photography by Sarah Winchester

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Rooms We Love

Charlotte’s Closet Perched at the top of the William Flagg Homer house, this bedroom has all the necessary ingredients for a private sanctuary, including a grand fireplace for cozy nights and big windows to usher in the morning sun. Designer Robin Gannon used paint, wallpaper, and fabrics in her current favorite color—vivid peacock blue—softened with pale hues of blush and gray, then added sumptuous fabrics and bold accents to create an aerie of a most inviting nature.

Classic Elegance Bath The luminous copper tub is the showstopper in this gentleman’s bath designed by Vivian Robins. In fact, it was the designer’s starting point for the spa-like oasis. The tub is tucked up against a curving wall clad in cathedralshaped glass tiles that gleam like moon

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glow, heightening the moody elegance of the space. Robins introduced details—a wallpaper that calls to mind timeworn plaster, a light fixture that blends present-day and Victorian influences—that make this bath feel perfectly suited to the history of the house. 

Closet photography by Michael J. Lee Bath photography by Sabrina Cole Quinn Photography

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Special Spaces

Mix and Match

A bold design approach results in the harmonious union of a classic Craftsman home and its sleek, modern addition. if we lived in a world of and instead • What of but?

That’s the world in which Adolfo Perez, architect, and Nathalie Ducrest, designer, created this Brookline, Massachusetts, addition. What is essentially a large new living room called for these two professionals to resolve any number of seemingly irreconcilable contradictions. Though they had never worked together before, they found themselves flowing with the ands while moving right past the buts that can trip up others. For example, the 1,200-square-foot addition has a fresh, optimistic, modern exterior that is in sync with the stucco-clad Craftsman-style main house and the zealously guarded historic district in which it finds itself. The interior has minimalistic lines, making it easy to maintain, and organic shapes and

ABOVE: Surrounding the addition, bluestone terraces and fiberglass seating envisioned by landscape firm Gregory Lombardi Design combine clean, geometrical forms with organic juxtapositions—thus restating the architectural and interior design goals of the building itself. LEFT: A steel-and-concrete console in the entrance plays off the rigorousness of the sinteredstone walls and corten steel door frame. 

| Text by Louis Postel | Exterior photography by Richard Mandelkorn | | Interior photography by Shelly Harrison  | 50  New England Home | January–February 2018

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Integrity of design. Respect for craftsmanship. Reinterpreting New England’s rich architectural heritage for today’s living —and for the people who admire its timeless spirit.

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Special Spaces

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ceramic floors are a warm counterpoint to the Neolith walls. Stairs lead to the main house off the entry as seen from the playroom; note the oversized, asymmetrical coat pegs by Tveit & Tornøe of Norway. A chenille sectional makes a playful sitting arrangement in the living room. The designers created a custom vanity for the bath that echoes the offbeat geometry of the entry console.

rhythmic patterns animating it throughout. The new space has custom foosball, billiards, and ping-pong tables for action-packed fun and a quiet spot given to reflection. It’s inviting for a teen sleepover, and it’s an easy place for adults to entertain. “Ultimately, it feels both intimate and large, which is what the owners wanted perhaps most of all,” says Ducrest. The clients asked for a modern look inside and out. European in background, they were comfortable with the idea of a contemporary addition side by side with their traditional house. Not so the local preservation committee, which gave Perez a list of historically appropriate materials. Two of those materials caught his eye: steel windows and copper siding. He pushed both toward more oxidation rather than less, for an eventual rich, rust-proof patina. Cladding the flat roof in copper, however, would

have been exorbitant, he says. His solution was a green roof, on which a grid of twelve-by-twelve-inch trays grows carpets of sedum and other plants. To stay consistent with the industrial look of the outside, Perez’s clients wanted concrete interior walls. That gave the architect pause. Concrete must be thick—about ten inches—and is hard to detail and prone to cracking. But the clients remained firm. It was up to Perez to find the and: the sturdy, industrial look of concrete, attractively detailed, and easy to

“We templated every sheet of Neolith, ­sending them to the manufacturer in Spain. This took some time,” says Nathalie Ducrest.

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Adolfo Perez designed the variablesized circle lights that dance across the playroom ceiling. With a ping-pong table, foosball, a billiards table, and plenty of comfortable seating, the expansive space is a favorite gathering place.

maintain. High-tech came to the rescue in the form of Neolith, half-inch-thick, five-by-ten-foot sheets of manmade stone. “We templated every sheet, sending them to the manufacturer in Spain. This took some time,” recalls Ducrest. The steel-clad door to enter the addition (or what

Ducrest amiably calls the “copper box”) from the outside sits to the right at the end of a J-shaped loop around the main house that terminates at the garage. Just inside the door, framed by walls of Neolith, is a console Ducrest commissioned from the French sculptor Mathilde Penicaud. The console’s

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Special Spaces A custom billiard table in a matte lacquer matches the concrete-lookalike walls; its organic shape appears to float, softening the straight lines of the upper play area. A sliding barn door opens to the playroom for entertaining, or closes it off for privacy. FACING PAGE: Tiered terraces offer plenty of spots for outdoor gathering, while a radial array of corten steel plates defines the dramatic fire pit.

steel surface and concrete base complement Perez’s minimalist materials, while also breaking up the formal geometry of the entry with a kind of syncopated rhythm. Ducrest elaborated on this theme with Perez’s custom-made lighting circles that not only move up and down but dance from one area to the next, tying spaces together. Warmth comes from the wood-look ceramic floors Perez and Ducrest chose.

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From the entry, veering left in a clockwise loop, you go through Perez’s 750-foot gut renovation of the main house basement: first the garage stairs and entry, proceeding to a new mudroom, laundry room, bath, and playroom. Down a step from the playroom, on a lower grade, is the living room, featuring a three-sided fireplace and an iconic bubble chair for meditation. In the center, Ducrest placed an On the

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Rocks chenille-covered sofa by Edra, chosen because she could “play around with the sections like a big puzzle” and create a spot to observe all the action in the round. From the bubble chair and fireplace, the view looks out on an outdoor kitchen to the far left, the upper terrace straight in front, a fire pit to the right, and the lower terrace beyond the sliding doors of

RESOURCES : For more information about this home, see page 172.

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the sitting room, all skillfully arranged by landscape architecture firm Gregory Lombardi Design. One more turn in this clockwise loop leads back to the entrance. This marks the end of the tour of a copper-clad world that feels both straight-lined and organic, modern and traditional, large and intimate. Well designed and beautiful. 

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In Detail

Let There Be Lights

Far from being a luxury, professional lighting designers can enhance every home and, in the long run, make good financial sense. upon a time, every room in the house • Once was built with the workings for a light fixture

smack in the center of the ceiling. If extra lighting was needed, floor lamps, table lamps, and undercabinet fluorescents did the trick. Recessed ceiling lights made their appearance in the 1950s, sparking a bit of a revolution in illuminating homes. Nowadays, the revolution is in full swing, and it’s the rare homeowner—or builder, interior designer, or architect, for that matter—who has the bandwidth to keep up with the ever-changing and increasingly higher-tech lighting options. Enter the certified lighting designer, a relatively new sort of professional that is quickly becoming recognized as a crucial part of the residential design team. Lana Nathe, of Boston’s Light Insight Design Studio, says that while certified independent lighting designers are still fairly rare (“There are only about 4,000 of us in the world,” she notes), they have a growing influence. “We impact projects quite substantially and, if we get involved early in the building or remodeling process, we can save a great deal of time and money while we make the home beautiful

ABOVE: Recessed ceiling lights and under-mount lights illuminate tasks in the kitchen, while hanging fixtures set the mood in the sitting and dining areas in Wolfers Lighting’s plan for a great room. LEFT: Doreen Le May Madden played off the spare architecture of a home designed by Marcus Gleysteen, with path lighting of embedded LED lights to create a sense of rhythm. The built-in console at the top of the stairs also has an inset uplight.

| Text by By Regina Cole | 58  New England Home | January–February 2018

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In Detail

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: The wood ceiling of an old Berkshires farmhouse, designed by LDa Architecture & Interiors with interior design by Weena and Spook, precluded recessed lighting, so Lana Nathe suspended small, unobtrusive modern fixtures. Because glossy surfaces could have caused “hot spots” in this Weston, Massachusetts, house designed by Stern McCafferty, Sladen Feinstein relied primarily on indirect cove lighting and frosted bulbs to soften glare from the square downlights. Nathe’s plan for a suburban Boston landscape by Site Creative is a masterful blend of ambient and practical, including downlights in the stair railing. Le May Madden made a California living room glow by giving the ceiling coffers a gold and amber finish and rimming the upper edges with tiny lights.

and the lighting disappear,” she says. Doreen Le May Madden, owner of Lux Lighting Design, says people should understand that there is a difference between a lighting sales person and a professional lighting designer. “I am a professional consultant, not trying to sell product for a particular line or showroom. I deal with everyone on a project, and I prepare all drawings for lights and controls.” Le May Madden explains that certified independent lighting designers undergo a rigorous testing process administered by the National Council on Qualifications for the Lighting Professions, which includes requirements for working in the field as well

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as certification updates every three years. “I go to two conferences every year to update myself on the technology and the psychological and physiological aspects of light,” she says. So how can a certified lighting designer help? Take something as seemingly simple as the ubiquitous LED. “All LEDs are not equal,” Le May Madden cautions. Each generation of LED bulbs offers new options, in quality of light output, color, and dimmability. “There are specific dimmers for specific fixtures. You can ruin a fixture by using the wrong dimmer.” Lighting designers are also aware of new products that might not yet be widely available, she adds. “We

Photography clockwise from top left: Greg Premru, courtesy Stern McCafferty Architecture + Interiors, Greg Premru, Doreen Le May Madden/ Lux Lighting Design, Inc.

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In Detail

LEFT: Custom fixtures mimic the gas lanterns and torches of yesteryear in this old castle home in Gloucester, Massachusetts, but the house is fully outfitted with smart home technology, Le May ­Madden says. ABOVE: Well-placed lighting can turn any niche into a design statement. BELOW: Wood floors, ceilings, and cabinetry have low reflective value, so Sladen Feinstein used a combination of direct and indirect lighting to brighten a historic Boston house renovated by architect Scott Slarsky.

can pull those new products into a project, so the homeowner isn’t buying old technology.” Some lighting designers, while certified, do work for showrooms, including Susan Arnold of Wolfers Lighting. “Lighting design isn’t about picking out fixtures,” Arnold says. “Individual fixtures are like jewelry: the accents you can switch out.” Instead, she explains, “We talk about all aspects of the lighting, including how to get light on the steps so that it’s safe, how and where to install recessed lights, and where to put the dimmers and switches.”

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There’s an emotional, as well as practical, aspect to lighting, too, Arnold says. “I worked on one kitchen that was very elaborate. The task lighting was under-cabinet light with a high-quality CRI [color rendering index] and a lot of light, so that the color of the food would be true and very bright.” At the same time, the homeowners wanted to be able to change the mood to match the occasion, so Arnold installed an RGBW LED tape light—a technology that uses red, green, blue, and white subpixels—so they could play with the lighting color. Certified lighting designers are technology specialists, but they are also experts in the complicated and evolving field of lighting psychology and physiology. “We still don’t have all the information on what the new lighting technology does to our health,” Nathe says. “I have a client who is sensitive to blue light. Anyone with epilepsy can’t have flickering light.” Says Le May Madden, “I have been in the industry for twenty-five years, and I believe that we are still in the infancy of lighting science.” For a client whose eyes could not tolerate direct light, she devised a plan that relied on indirect and reflected light. Another client did not want sconces, chandeliers, or recessed ceiling lights. “I integrated the lighting into the structure, in the stairway steps and baseboards, through slots in the Photography clockwise from top left: Doreen Le May Madden/ Lux Lighting Design, Inc. (2), Peter Vanderwarker

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ceilings and walls, hidden in molding to shine up onto to the ceiling,” she says. “The building itself was the light source; that’s why some people will call me a lighting architect.” For older clients, Le May Madden says, it’s important to have crisp, white light for daytime tasks, while evening lighting should be warm because white or bluish lights can disrupt sleep patterns. Tuneable lighting technology means some fixtures can even switch between white and warmer light, Le May Madden says. And colored light is an increasingly large part of her work, as clients ask for chromatherapy schemes for a spa-like master bath or a soothing meditation room. Julie Rose, a principal at Sladen Feinstein Integrated Lighting, points out that the lighting designers in her office all have architecture and design backgrounds, a career path shared by Nathe and Le May Madden. “It helps a lot that we understand the building process,” Rose says. Her firm specializes in corporate buildings and multi-level residential towers. “The lighting requirements for corporate spaces are more performancebased, while residential spaces are more atmospheric and multi-faceted,” Rose says. “We draw on the recommendations of the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America, which spells out specs for all kinds of places and situations.” All the designers agree that their work should never be an afterthought. “I suggest to people that, once they have their permits, they come and talk to me about the lighting,” says Arnold. “People often don’t understand the value and cost savings if you develop [a plan] from the beginning.” “The designer Celeste Cooper has said that you should get what goes into the walls and ceilings right the first time,” Le May Madden adds. “We may be an added expense, but we save money in the long run.”  The Particulars Light Insight Design Studio, Boston, (617) 268-1122, light-insightdesign.com Lux Lighting Design, Belmont, Mass., (617) 484-6400, luxld.com Sladen Feinstein Integrated Lighting, Boston, (617) 267-9500, sladenfeinstein.com Wolfers Lighting, Waltham, (781) 890-5995, wolfers.com

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2017 new england design hall of fame

The Joy of Celebration! scene at Boston’s • The State Room was set with

dramatic views of the Boston skyline and lavish decor created by Winston Flowers as New England’s residential design community came together for the eleventh annual New England Design Hall of Fame gala. Following a spirited cocktail hour, complete with signature cocktails and a photo booth, guests settled in for dinner, and the awards ceremony kicked off with a presentation of the 2017 New England Design Hall of Fame Scholarship Fund, which was accepted by Richard Sheridan of the University of Rhode Island’s Department of Landscape Architecture. Our homes editor, Stacy Kunstel, was emcee for the night, and the cheers were raucous as she shared the work of the inductees and presented awards crafted by Simon Pearce. This year we honored Michele S. Foster, Foster Associates; Meichi Peng, Meichi Peng Design Studio; Dan Gordon, Dan Gordon Landscape Architects; Janice Parker, Janice Parker Landscape Architects; and Thoughtforms builders, represented by president Mark Doughty.

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1. The 2017 inductees: Mark Doughty (representing Thoughtforms), Michele S. Foster, Janice Parker, Meichi Peng, and Dan Gordon | 2. Mahmud and Hasan Jafri of Dover Rug & Home | 3. The Snow and Jones team huddling in the photo booth | 4. Emcee Stacy Kunstel handing inductee Dan Gordon his award | 5. Mike Resteghini of F.H. Perry Builder, Beezee Honan of Designer Bath, and Jim Foscaldo of F.H. Perry Builder | 6. The FBN Construction table | 7. Lisa Tharp and Alexandra MacMillan of Lisa Tharp Design | 8. Devin Hefferon, Ryan Wampler, Matthew Cunningham, and Will Gardner of Matthew Cunningham Landscape Design with Michael Wasser of Gregory Lombardi Landscape Design.

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Photography: Michael J. Lee

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2017 new england design hall of fame ®

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| 1. One of the many beautiful table concepts sponsored by Frank Webb Home | 2. The Ferguson team | 3. The Seven Tide team  | 4. Josh Steinwand of Studio 534 and Bill Trifone of Bill Trifone Interiors | 5. Sarah Lawson and Doug Hanna of S+H Construction | 6. Charles Gadbois of Wellen Construction, Kristen Rivoli of Kristen Rivoli Interior Design, and Ken Bertram of Herrick & White Architectural Woodworkers | 7. Taylor McCarthy and Joeiny Muttini of California Closets | 8. 2017 judge Ted Landsmark with New England Home’s Kyle Hoepner | 9. Robin Mays of The Rug Company, Colleen Higgins of Gensler, Mary McDonald and Stacey Marino Puopolo of The Rug Company

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Thank You to Our Sponsors

s i lv e r S p o n s o r S

Gold SponsorS

Decor Sponsor

c o c k ta i l Sponsor

h o s p i ta l i t y Sponsor

gallery Sponsor

photography Sponsor

bespoke Sponsor

COMING SOON

bronze SponsorS

event Planning Pa r t n e r

e v e n t Pa r t n e r

d e c o r Pa r t n e r

a w a r ds P a r t n e r

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Experience the best Today’s discerning homeowners, interior designers, architects and builders select Wolfers, New England’s premier lighting, motorized shade and complete smart home integration company as their go-to resource. Experience the difference – from our selection of the most sought-after lighting brands, such as Hubbardton Forge, to the latest in LED technology – and work with our expert consultants, who will help bring your ideas to light.

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Make an appointment today or stop by one of our showrooms.

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www.wolfers.com Waltham 1339 Main St. | 781.890.5995

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Kevin Cradock Builders

Group Helios Design Group Bottom Left: Narin Narin Oun Oun Photography Photography

Custom Building \ Renovation \ Millwork 617-524-2405 \ cradockbuilders.com \ Boston, MA

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Portfolio of Fine Architecture

Patrick Ahearn Architect, LLC

Jan Gleysteen Architects

Rob Bramhall Architects

SPECIAL MARKETING SECTION

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Portfolio of Fine Architecture

Charles R. Myer & Partners, Ltd.

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rafting fine homes for more than 30 years, the firm of Charles R. Myer & Partners prides itself on being a team of creative designers who listen carefully to their clients to render enduring and tailored contextual design. The award-winning residential work ranges from contemporary design to historic preservation, and from LEED-certified houses to uninsulated summer cabins and writing studios in the woods. The work is historically based in New England, although the firm has

completed projects in New York, Florida, and California. The work often requires careful management of stringent regulatory approvals as well as overcoming engineering challenges. In addition to working closely with a wide range of consultants, engineers, and interior designers, the firm prides itself on collaborating with skilled general contractors to realize each client’s vision. This ranges from careful attention to craft and detail to assisting in maintaining budgets and schedules. All this is accomplished with the goal of creating homes that delight and bring joy.

C H A R L E S R . M y er

Charles R. Myer & Partners, Ltd. 875 Main Street Cambridge, MA 02139 (617) 876-9062 charlesmyer.com Special Marketing Section 73

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Portfolio of Fine Architecture

DiMauro Architects

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H

ere at DiMauro Architects, we are proud to be part of a team that brings more than 75 years of combined experience in the architecture and building industry. Our passion is designing homes that reflect the spirit of your family. We understand that building or renovating a home is a big undertaking, so we go above and beyond to ensure that the entire process is inspiring and fun. Our design process begins by looking to Mother Nature. By listening to
the land, we maximize the beautiful views, take advantage of the seasonal winds, design along the sun’s path, and much more. Our

designs will enhance the way you experience your entire property, as well as the comfort and security you feel within those spaces. We place a high value on the iterative process—we continually analyze and refine our proportions and details—so that our homes reflect a seemingly effortless cohesion with a dash (or two!) of informality and happy coincidence. We bring this same level of detail to the inside by connecting interior spaces, designing custom built-ins, and flooding the interiors with as much natural light as possible. We have offices in Newport and Jamestown, Rhode Island, to better serve you throughout New England. We would love to welcome you to our family.

Ron DiMauro

65 Bellevue Avenue, Newport, RI 02840 (401) 619-7870 11 Howland Avenue, Jamestown, RI 02835 (401) 423-3400 dimauroarchitects.com Special Marketing Section 75

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Portfolio of Fine Architecture

Hutker Architects

Brian Vanden Brink

Eric Roth

Peter Vanderwarker

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Peter Vanderwarker

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or more than 30 years, the team at Hutker Architects has been helping families and individuals create one-of-a-kind homes in New England. Our process begins with listening. We work together to create a program of indoor and outdoor spaces that will best support the way you live, work, and play. We begin each project by learning about the particulars of the site and the priorities of the individuals who will live in the house. From there, we establish desired life patterns and work to create spaces that make the most of a home’s unique location while creating spaces that support

and anticipate our clients’ lives today and in the future. Having designed more than 300 houses along the New England shore and beyond, we are committed to the principle “build once, well,” looking to the historic architecture of the region as inspiration for original, contemporary design. Our team of 49 professionals shares a passion for this place and a belief that houses are the most important structures people occupy. We continue to be inspired by the unique challenge of creating a place that feels like “home” for each client. Whether designing a primary residence or a summer retreat, we strive to create inviting, adaptable houses that are well suited for today, but will be enjoyed for generations.

MARK HUTKER

Hutker Architects, Inc. 533 Palmer Avenue Falmouth, MA 02540 (508) 540-0048 hutkerarchitects.com Special Marketing Section 77

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Portfolio of Fine Architecture

Jan Gleysteen Architects

Richard Mandelkorn

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J

an Gleysteen Architects practices in the suburbs of Boston, designing fine custom homes, additions, and renovations. As residential designers, they understand the personal nature of designing a home. Drawing on years of experience and one-onone collaboration with clients, they strive to create elegant, functional, personalized solutions for each client. With extensive experience in custom residential design, JGA is committed to an architecture that is both elegant in design and responsive to their clients’ needs. Their unique blend of traditional and modern designs is the result of careful study and years of experience.

The firm’s work has been recognized both locally and nationally. Most recently the firm received a 2017 Best in American Living Award, was named Best of Boston Home for 2018, and named Best of Houzz for the fifth consecutive year. Other accolades include the Boston Globe’s “Home of the Year,” the ICAA’s prestigious Bulfinch Award, and multiple PRISM and Dream Home Awards. Their work has been featured in several publications, including the AIA’s Houses for All Regions: CRAN Residential Collection. The firm offers a full range of architectural services from their office in Wellesley, Massachusetts, assisting homeowners from Maine to Cape Cod.

JAN GLEYSTEEN

JGA Jan Gleysteen Architects 888 Worcester Street Wellesley, MA 02482 (781) 431-0080 jangleysteeninc.com

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Portfolio of Fine Architecture

Mayer + Associates

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ayer + Associates is an architecture and design firm founded on trust and integrity and the belief that it is through personal relationships that we find truly creative solutions. We know that asking the right questions is the single most important step in finding the right answer. We work with our clients to help them discover their own vision. It is our job to both inspire and be inspired

by them and together to discover the possibilities. Our clients understand the value good design brings to any project. We work together to find extraordinary solutions to ordinary problems. We get to do this together with respect and passion and talent. It is a process where we discover as much about each other as we do about the project. “Alan’s designs are more than elegant lines representing some idealized notion of architecture. They are the product of a creative relationship that builds spaces for real people.”

A L A N M AY E R

Mayer + Associates 1647 Beacon Street, Suite 1 Waban, MA 02468 (617) 916-0774 ajmarchitects.com Special Marketing Section 81

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Portfolio of Fine Architecture

Meyer & Meyer Architecture and Interiors

damianos photography

Peter Vanderwarker

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featured in architectural digest. landscape by pressley associates; christian phillips photography.

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ur work is like no other, because our homes are uniquely designed for clients who want a personal and inspiring place to live. Our homes share timeless elegance and harmony with their sites. We have no preconceived style that dictates our approach, only ones best suited to the site and the preferences of the owners. Clients come to us because they appreciate and aspire to a high level of design. Customizing interesting floorplans, using quality materials, and incorporating specialty details throughout the home are our trademarks, with styles ranging

from classical to modern. Collaborating with our clients is essential to developing awardwinning homes of distinction. Our job is to successfully take clients through the excitement of the design process, offering options and creating solutions. Clients can follow their home’s development through expressive, hand-drawn renderings. John I. Meyer, Jr., AIA LEED AP, artistically renders his visions of the architectural work to ensure that clients fully understand the outcome. These hand-drafted records become treasured keepsakes. For more than 35 years we have offered a full suite of architectural and interior design services, coordinating every aspect of

designing and building beautiful homes. Projects of any scope, whether a renovation, addition, or a completely new build, deserve the same approach—clever, responsible design work. We place the highest priority on client satisfaction. Our homes are designed to be cherished for generations and to last for centuries.

396 Commonwealth Avenue Boston, MA 02215 (617) 266-0555 meyerandmeyerarchitects.com Special Marketing Section 83

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Portfolio of Fine Architecture

Patrick Ahearn Architect, LLC

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type and location; however, his prestige most notably stems from his endeavors to preserve the historic Edgartown Village on Martha’s Vineyard, Mass. Having renovated or built more than 160 houses and public buildings in Edgartown Village, Patrick is celebrated for significantly enhancing the overall streetscape and public realm while esteeming the aesthetic and history of the locale. Through the years, the industry has recognized Patrick with many awards and honors, including his advancement into the Fellowship of the American Institute of Architects, being the selected architect for the HGTV Dream Home 2015, earning five Bulfinch Awards, and more.

PAT R I C K A H E A R N

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ne of the industry’s true visionaries, Patrick Ahearn, FAIA, continues to enrich and elevate New England’s architectural landscape by bringing history to life through his fascination with—and expertise in— historically motivated architecture. Whether designing custom homes based on historical precedent or restoring/renovating period homes to incorporate modern flourishes, every project is rooted in its site, is scaled to its surroundings, and looks and feels as though it has stood the test of time. Patrick’s 44 years of experience allows him to be versatile in project

Patrick Ahearn Architect, LLC 160 Commonwealth Avenue Boston, MA 02116 (617) 266-1710 patrickahearn.com Special Marketing Section 85

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Portfolio of Fine Architecture

Paul Weber Architect

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he architectural firm of Paul Weber Architect, based in Newport, Rhode Island, offers a full scope of architectural and master planning services in
an established, diverse, and designoriented practice. Our portfolio includes residential and commercial architecture, golf clubhouses, unique projects for private clubs, hotels, schools, additions and renovations to historic structures, and adaptive reuse of existing buildings. Working in a variety of styles, our work seeks to realize the vision of our client’s program with creative solutions appropriate to context, climate, and budget. Our extensive

experience with residential and commercial projects in coastal zones enables us to maximize the opportunities each site offers. We believe that every successful project is built on good relationships. For us, the process is always a
unique balance of collaboration and coordination, poetry and pragmatism, empathy and aesthetics—and knowing when to lean in, and, more important, when to listen. At Paul Weber Architect, we ensure that our clients’ visions and objectives are respected and appreciated. We help them to understand and participate in the decisions that direct and define their desired outcome. Our goal is to create the finest structure possible and to exceed our clients’ expectations.

PA U L F. W E B E R

Paul Weber Architect 449 Thames Street Suite 202 Newport, RI 02840 (401) 849-3390 pfwarchitect.com Special Marketing Section 87

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Portfolio of Fine Architecture

Polhemus Savery DaSilva Architects Builders

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olhemus Savery DaSilva Architects Builders (PSD) has spent more than two decades designing and building beautiful custom homes throughout New England. As a fully integrated design, construction, and management firm for new construction and renovations, PSD collaborates closely with clients to create timeless and characterful homes that work for the way each client lives now, are adaptable for the future, and remain beloved for generations to come. Featured here is a compact but comfortable family home inspired by the vernacular cottages that give this

neighborhood a character of laidback, friendly fun. The gambrel front, with its sailboat cutout shutters, disappears at the ocean-facing side of the house where corner pavilions, defined by octagonal roof shapes with finials at their peak, flank a full two-story façade. A second-floor deck spans between the pavilions and offers ocean views. The deck is accessible from the second-floor hall and the master suite and via an exterior stair. Outdoor stairs often look like afterthoughts. They are a design challenge, especially on a site where blocking the view is undesirable. Here the stair is pulled away from the façade and set at an angle, making it more sculptural and blocking less of the adjacent screened-in porch.

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157 Brewster-Chatham Road (Route 137), East Harwich, MA 02645 (508) 945-4500 psdab.com Special Marketing Section 89

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Portfolio of Fine Architecture

Rob Bramhall Architects

Irvin Serrano

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n practice since 1991, Rob Bramhall Architects offers comprehensive design services for fine custom residences and vacation properties from Canada’s Prince Edward Island to Florida’s Gulf Coast and into the mountains of the American west. Led by architect Rob Bramhall, the firm is organized as a small studio-team of professionals who bring a range of skills in site design, architecture and interiors to each of their projects. Bramhall is passionate about his work and a stickler for making sure his projects are well-designed and solidly built. His plans are precise,

so contractors know exactly what to do, and he stays on top of even the smallest details. With a background in the construction industry Rob began framing houses at age 15. The architect has an intimate understanding of the building process. It is the personal attention that Bramhall gives to each of his projects that sets the firm apart. “We live and breathe every project we do. Our clients know that they can reach out with questions and ideas—any time, day or night,” he says. “When we take on a project, we are totally heads-in and hands-on. It’s all about lifestyle and about ‘getting it’ when it comes to each client.”

R o b Br a m h a l l

RBA

R OB B RAMHALL A RCHITECTS Rob Bramhall Architects 14 Park Street Andover, MA 01810 (978) 749-3663 robbramhallarchitects.com Special Marketing Section 91

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Portfolio of Fine Architecture

Richard Mandelkorn

Bereznicki Architects

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house needs to nourish your soul to be truly wonderful; it’s really about poetry. I ask myself: What can I use as a starting point, as the spark that gets amplified and refined, until it becomes a strong light, capable of suggesting a yet unexpressed reality? How do I design your home in a way that holds up a mirror to you? How do I make it uniquely yours—a home that

truly supports who you are? I had the good fortune to spend my childhood in Europe, surrounded by the product of many generations of intense architectural thought. This early exposure to undiluted authenticity has had a lasting effect on my design instinct. I strive to look beyond the surface, to find the essence of the design. I approach each project with a humility that is open to the unspoken intentions of my client and a commitment to reflect my client’s spirit. – Ivan Bereznicki, AIA

Cambridge • Osterville (617) 354-5188 bereznicki.com

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Portfolio of Fine Architecture

Jane Messinger

Catherine Truman Architects

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atherine Truman Architects is a contemporary architecture and design firm in Cambridge. We focus on work with existing buildings requiring substantial renovation and modernization; projects include urban and rural homes, total renovations, and expansions. Our

work is characterized by simplicity and clarity of form and function; we embrace the mix of contemporary design with the patina of the antique. Each one of our projects is different, as each client and house is different. We believe that the best projects are a result of a close working relationship between client, architect, and builder, and enjoy working collaboratively with both to achieve lasting results.

C AT H E R I N E T R UM A N

Catherine Truman Architects 29 Warren Street Cambridge MA 02141 (857) 285 2500 truman-architects.com

Special Marketing Section 93

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Portfolio of Fine Architecture

Portfolio of fine Architecture

Chip Webster Architecture

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Chip Webster Architecture communities. CWA’s designs reflect est known for

development, a complete design a strong attention to detail, efficient its elegant, yet oeuvre, and project management. and a notable creative individual home yet use of space, CWA’s portfolio of With oeuvre, anddiverse project management. a strong attention to detail, efficient With Best known for its elegant, CWA’s diverse portfolio of residential, useWell of space, andin a notable creative individual homethe design, richness. versed Nantucket design, firmthe firm of residential, commercial, and master commercial, and the master planning richness. Well versed in Nantucket Chip Webster Architecture building requirements, of Chip Webster (CWA)design and planning designs, credo of designs, the credo creating spaces design andthe building has been exploring creative solutions arguably among mostrequirements, stringent Architecture creating spaces thatofsurprise, delight, that surprise, delight, and inspire is arguably among the most stringent in in ecologically sensitive architecture, in the United States, the firm is (CWA) has been and inspire is evident throughout the the United States, the firm is renowned evident throughout the firm’s work. interior design, community planning, renowned for its navigation of exploring creative solutions in firm’s work. for its navigation of regulatory and historic preservation since 1983. regulatory processes in projects ecologically sensitive architecture, processes in projects nationwide. With For more than twenty-five years, the nationwide. With afor reputation for interior design, community planning, a reputation artistic collaboration, firm has worked nationally from its artistic collaboration, the company and historicNantucket preservation since 1983. office. Led by MIT graduate the company works closely with works closely with clients, Led by MIT graduate clients, engineers, and engineers, contractors in Chip Webster, Chip the CWA design team all project in phases, from cultivating the client inspiration and and contractors all project Webster, theintegrates Nantucket-based Chip Webster Architecture Chip Webster Architecture initial visionthe to the completion design with the use of phases, client’s from cultivating client’s CWA designprogressive team integrates client 9 Amelia Drive 9 Amelia Drive of construction. renewable resources. initial vision to the completion of inspiration and progressive design Nantucket, MA 02554 The firm’s offerings are Projects range in scope from Nantucket, MA 02554 construction. with the use of renewable resources. (508) 228-3600 comprehensive, including concept classic island cottages to mixed-use (508) 228-3600 The firm’s offerings are Projects range in scope from chipwebster.com development, a complete design communities. CWA’s designs reflect comprehensive, including concept classic island cottages to mixed-use chipwebster.com

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Portfolio of Fine Architecture

MICHAEL J. LEE

Curl Simitis architecture + design

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t Curl Simitis architecture + design, we believe in the enduring integrity of craft, and we believe in the importance of architecture to be an expression of its time. In an area as rich with history as New England, the balance between the two is where we find the most potential for meaningful design solutions, whether in a

renovation or a new house. We’re modernists at heart, but finding the appropriate expression of our clients’ personalities balanced with context is our favorite part of the process and is what we do best. Architects Matt Simitis and Richard Curl created the firm in 2014 and were joined by interior designer Courtney Driver shortly thereafter. Although a young firm, they have a combined 60 years of experience in residential design.

R i c h a r d C u r l , M at t S i m i t i s , C o u rt n e y Dr i v e r

Curl Simitis architecture + design Eastman Building 533 Main Street, #6 Melrose, MA 02176 (781) 620-2736 cs-ad.com

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Portfolio of Fine Architecture

GREG PREMRU

SpaceCraft Architecture, Inc.

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paceCraft has been creating distinctive homes and country houses across New England for more than 15 years. We treat each project as a unique and special case, listening carefully to our clients about their family dynamics to craft the inviting, comfortable spaces that enable them to thrive. Known for our strong relationships with both client and builder, we take pride in making the journey to your new home an enjoyable one.

Our designs are timeless, innovative in layout, exquisite in detail, and built to last. We love breathing new life into historic houses, transforming them with modern amenities for today’s lifestyle. SpaceCraft homes have earned several historic preservation awards and been featured on the PBS series This Old House. Our name speaks to exactly what we do. We design homes with warmth and character, crafted with care, and with a purpose for every space. We believe that your home should be a welcoming, inspiring

sanctuary, and that the true measure of our work is how “at home” you feel every time you walk in the door.

SpaceCraft Architecture, Inc. 5 Raymond Street Lexington, MA 02421 (781) 674-2100 SpaceCraftArch.com

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Original brick walls and wood ceiling beams were preserved throughout the former industrial space. Cold-rolled steel with a black patina finish and reclaimed heart pine comprise the staircase, which has cantilevered elements that make it appear to float.

Industrial Chic

An old wharf building on Boston Harbor makes the perfect setting for a couple who appreciate history but live very much in the present. Text by James McCown // Photography by Eric Roth // Produced by Kyle Hoepner

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CLOCKWISE FROM

TOP: The kitchen’s tapering metal island is inspired by midcentury iconography and fabricated by metal artisan Bartek Konieczny. Konieczny also crafted the island’s movable light fixture. The Knotty Bubbles chandelier hanging from the sky-lit ceiling alludes to the seafaring traditions of Boston. FACING PAGE: Lindsey Adelman’s Agnes chandelier hovers above the B&B Italia chairs and dining table.

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hey are a bi-coastal couple, but not along the usual New York-to-Los Angeles axis. Rather, they divide their time between Boston and northern California’s coast. Their respective passions are complementary—she for handcrafted objects and he for high technology and precise design. Their stunning two-story pied-àterre is in one of the old industrial wharf buildings that overlook Boston Harbor. It represents a remarkable collaboration among design professionals, all of whom sought to celebrate the space’s industrial roots while meeting the clients’ criterion that it refer to Boston and their own New England roots. “It’s low tech/high

tech,” says architect David Hacin. “They were attracted to this space because it was where both of their passions could be addressed. It was important to them to preserve the eccentricities of the space. Utilitarianism is the aesthetic.”

ABOVE: Rachel von Roeschlaub Maniatis’s acrylics on LP records add a dash of color to the media room. BELOW: The powder room’s sculptural concrete sink partners with another of Adelman’s light fixtures. FACING PAGE: A gallery connects two parts of the loft and features acrylic resin works by Sand T Kalloch.

Project Team Architecture: Hacin + Associates Architects Interior design: Jama Samek, Jama Samek Interior Design Builder: FBN Construction

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“It’s great to wake up to the sounds of the boats and watch planes taking off from Logan Airport,” the wife says. “Here, I get the sunrise, and in my California home I get the sunset.” CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE: Roomy, but cozy, the swiveling sofa adds a bold punch of color to the master bedroom. A floating wall forms the guest room headboard, where three photographic works by CE Morse hang above the bed. In the master bath, custom wood millwork embellishes the concrete trough sink and warms the room’s pale palette.

The couple already had an apartment in the building, and when another one came on the market, they bought it and combined the vertically contiguous spaces. The program included rooms for the two college-age sons, a high-tech media room, and placement of the master bedroom so the couple can see the harbor from their bed. “It’s great to wake up to the sounds of the boats and watch planes taking off from Logan Airport,” the wife says. “Here, I get the sunrise, and in my California home I get the sunset.” Hacin’s big design move was to cut a large opening between the floors to allow for a new open-tread stairway with skylights above to bring natural light deep

into the unit. In order to highlight the brick walls and the wood ceiling beams, new partitions create a language of crisp floating volumes that contrast with the texture of the original materials. “They wanted to preserve the DNA of the building,” says Matthew Manke, who works in Hacin’s office as a senior associate. As for attached elements in the space, such as doors and countertops, “Nothing is off the shelf,” Manke says. “It’s all custom-made.” With this dramatic backdrop as a canvas, interior designer Jama Samek was challenged to express the clients’ wishes. “It was about a juxtaposition of the industrial and the modern aesthetic,” she says.

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“Because it is on the harbor, I wanted everything to speak to that. The colors reflect everything you see there.” Samek specified furnishings with a decidedly contemporary, European bent, including furniture from B&B Italia, Kasthall rugs from Sweden, and light fixtures by Philippe Starck. On the lower main level, the master bedroom sits at one extreme and offers the required dramatic harbor views. A large, open space adjacent accommodates the kitchen, dining room, and floating stairway. A gallery, whose floor is dark gray schist quarried in western Massachusetts, connects to the sons’ bedrooms and media room at the opposite end. The upstairs is the “wow” space designed for maximum punch. A circular seating area cozies up to a brushed stainless-steel fireplace that offers a contrast to the uneven industrial brick wall. A larger living room area on this level is a study in comfort, with its tranquil backdrop of January–February 2018 | New England Home  105

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grays given a jolt of color by a bright red chair and bold art. The couple asked art consultant Jacqui Becker to help them choose the perfect art. “Their only directives were that they wanted color and they wanted the art to represent Boston,” Becker says. “I took the main important spaces and created a virtual gallery with five or six possible pieces for each space,” she explains. “Then I watched them. How did they react? I intuit what I think the client will like. “For example, for the main spot in the

upstairs living room, I chose four or five abstract expressionist paintings. When we put up the Marjorie Minkin work Cephalopod, I knew it would be a perfect match.” In the dining room, a piece by Patrick Hughes called In Tents plays tricks with perspective and appears to move and change as you walk about it. Five identically sized works by Sand T Kalloch add bold splashes of color to the gallery. The couple’s lack of formal art training made them more interesting cli-

left: The second level holds a smaller seating area, grounded by a Paola Lenti rug, for intimate conversation. above: A bright red chair and Marjorie Minkin’s vivid artwork add energy to the serene upstairs living room without detracting from the stunning view visible beyond a generous terrace with plantings by Winston Flowers.

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“The industrial aesthetic is about distilling the elements that are there,” says Bartek Konieczny. “It’s about honesty. When you bring industrial design into a residence, you translate that raw language.”

ents, Becker says. “You don’t need to be schooled in art to appreciate it,” she says. “This couple had an almost childlike openness to the new.” Bartek Konieczny is an artist whose medium is metal. He created numerous doors, light fixtures, and the kitchen’s striking island. “I kept feeling like we needed another material,” says interior designer Samek. “Then a light went off and it was metal. So we had brick and wood, and now we had metal.” Like the rest of the team, Konieczny wanted to highlight the building’s industrial character. “I wanted to build on that feeling,” he says. “The natural patina of

metal is like a painting to me.” The doors in the apartment are huge objects, weighing about three-quarters of a ton each, Konieczny says. Every screw, rivet, and bracket is custom designed and fabricated in his studio. The kitchen island is a gracefully tapering metal object with a distinct midcentury feel, like a finned automobile or jet airliner. “The industrial aesthetic is about distilling the elements that are there,” he says. “It’s about honesty. When you bring industrial design into a residence, you translate that raw language.” Chris Magliozzi, executive vice president of FBN Construction, was also on

board to fulfill the clients’ wishes. “There was a computer model of the entire existing space,” he says, “and every time the client or designers had an idea, we’d see how it could be done. For example, we got salvaged wood beams to preserve the original space’s look.” The wife has a deeply personal interpretation of the industrial aesthetic’s appeal. “I’m the first generation in my family with a college degree,” she says. “I’m from a blue-collar background. The industrial reminds us of where we came from.”  RESOURCES : For more information about this home, see page 172. January–February 2018 | New England Home  107

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Interior designer Jenn Sanborn chose to keep the entryway’s existing wallpaper, then introduced vintage pieces both to add a layer of interest and to offer a preview of the home’s casual English country vibe.

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No Place Like Home

A few structural fixes and a stylish makeover entice a couple to fall in love with their house—again.

Text by Debra Judge Silber | Photography by Michael J. Lee | Styling by Karin Lidbeck Brent January–February 2018 | New England Home  109

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Sometimes the best way to find what you’re looking for is to just turn around.

John and his wife, Annmarie, had been searching for a new home for months. Having given up on finding a lot on which to build, John found himself in Boxford, Massachusetts, standing at the door of yet another colonial, yet another house that just didn’t match his idea of a home. Then he turned and saw the house across the culde-sac. The expanded Cape-style home was just what

he and Annemarie had been looking for. It wasn’t for sale, but when his agent approached its emptynester owners, they agreed to let John have a look inside. “I opened the door and said, ‘I’ll take it,’ ” John remembers. The traditional style and the bright, unpretentious interior spoke to him immediately. And it said, “home.” A dozen years and three children later, the couple still loved their house. But it hardly looked different from when they had first moved in. The furniture felt uninspired. The red and gold color scheme they favored had begun to look dull and repetitive. “They were stuck,” explains designer Jenn Sanborn. “Sometimes when you don’t know where to start, you don’t do anything.” Like her clients, Sanborn appreciated the home’s

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Wall paneling cures multiple ills in the great room by giving the small firebox more presence while minimizing the impact of the television. FACING PAGE: A soffit was extended to provide the great room’s new barrel ceiling a place to land. It also allowed the designer to inch the sofa forward by placing a thin table behind it.

Project Team Interior design: Jenn Sanborn, Sacris Design Builder: Platt Builders

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J

enn Sanborn had the chairs stripped, painted light gray, and reupholstered. She placed them all atop a wool-and-jute rug. “It gives the room a crisper, fresher feel, even though it’s still formal,” she says. •

positive features. But as someone whose ability to pick up on architecture gone wrong borders on a sixth sense, she knew the house needed more than a coat of paint here or a potted plant there. “It was a well-built house and it had very good bones, but there were things that absolutely did not work,” she says. Architectural missteps included an oddly angled wall in the dining room and a host of troubles in the great room, among them a partially vaulted ceiling that clashed with the room’s graceful Serlian window. Smoothing out these architectural glitches would be the first step in making those rooms more inviting. But the rest of the rooms needed attention as well. To bring them alive, Sanborn would apply “layers”— wallcovering and paint, carpeting, millwork, artwork, furniture, window treatments, accessories, lights— with each stratum contributing to the beauty and comfort of the room. Finding the right furniture pieces, materials, and fabrics to layer involves both consultation with the

ABOVE: A fresh finish was all the perimeter cabinets needed. The island, however, was enlarged and reborn in the image of a European range. LEFT: A built-in wet bar adds versatility to the breakfast nook. FACING PAGE: Stripping, painting, and reupholstering the dining room chairs lent the beautiful but staid mahogany dining set a whole new look.

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“J

ohn’s a good dresser, so I incorporated aspects of menswear as an homage to that,” including herringbone and plaid patterns that appear in stonework, rugs, and upholstery, says Sanborn. •

client, and a bit of convincing to be open-minded. “Part of it is trying to decipher what makes your clients tick,” Sanborn says. “John’s a good dresser, so I incorporated aspects of menswear as an homage to that,” including herringbone and plaid patterns that appear in stonework, rugs, and upholstery throughout the house. Combining this aesthetic with her clients’ reverence for antiques, Sanborn nurtured an English Country style that speaks subtly through the fabrics, patterns, and vintage pieces she sourced based on the couple’s tastes. At the same time, she upended the home’s traditionalism with creative approaches that sent predictability packing. In the dining room, the couple’s mahogany table and matching shield-back chairs were elegant, but all too familiar. Sanborn had the chairs stripped, painted light gray, and reupholstered, creating a contrast that emphasizes the table’s detailing. She placed them all atop a wool-and-jute rug. “It gives the room a crisper, fresher feel, even though it’s still formal,” she says. For the kitchen, Sanborn designed a unique island

that embeds a Wolf cooktop in a quartz countertop. Bold blue drawers and pullouts feature locally fabricated stainless-steel strapping and bronze corners. Both the island and a freestanding pantry cabinet, designed by Sanborn to look like an old-fashioned icebox, were crafted by the carpentry team from Platt Builders. Details include authentic icebox hardware and chamfered edges characteristic of British wall paneling. Inside, it’s all business, with shelves and door racks supplying ample room for food and small appliance storage. Inspired functionality also reigns in the mudroom, where Sanborn replaced the multiple closets with lockers for each family member and a built-in grab-and-go/stop-and-drop space that includes a

ABOVE AND FACING PAGE: The sitting room got new life as a billiards room. The antique pool table, turned chair, and Scottish tartan rug reference a country manor, but the purple walls, upholstery, and mantelpiece disrupt any presumptions. A slightly darker color on the interior of the window grids helps them disappear into the landscape. January–February 2018 | New England Home  115

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RIGHT: In the master bedroom, a luxuriously upholstered bed and geometric grasscloth wallcovering replaced a spartan four-poster and bland painted walls. BELOW: Wainscoting of Italian tile adorns the niche that holds the new freestanding tub. FACING PAGE: The master bedroom’s fireplace, like the others in the house, was converted from gas to wood burning.

bench seat and storage drawers along with a wine cooler and refrigerator and freezer drawers. Functionality—with a stroke of fun—also rescued the living room. In place of two lonely wingchairs, Sanborn introduced an antique pool table, outfitted the bay window as a cushioned bench seat, and cloaked it all in tones of gray and purple. The wall colors weave together in a tartan rug. The designer’s ingenuity left an even more striking mark in the home’s not-so-great great room. Beyond bland, the space suffered from a number of architectural indignities. The angle of the vaulted ceiling felt wrong, and even more disturbing was a double French door cast as a window halfway up the interior wall. The fireplace was set awkwardly to one side, and was undersized, forcing it into a losing battle with the TV for focal-point dominance. The main sofa, placed against the far wall, was disen-

gaged from both. “It didn’t work on so many levels,” Sanborn says. “It was a great room that was anything but great.” She introduced both style and balance by incorporating the fireplace and the TV in a paneled wall that maximizes the former and helps the latter disappear. A limestone surround in a herringbone pattern gives the fireplace new stature amid the gray panels that wrap three walls of the room, including the one where the door-in-the-wall was replaced with an elegant half-moon window. Platt Builders reworked the awkward ceiling into a sleek barrel vault, using prefabricated oak ribs sourced specifically for this project. “It was Jenn’s vision, and then it took a team effort to bring it into focus,” says project manager Lawrence Howell. The barrel shape required a soffit on the wall opposite the fireplace that improved the balance in the room and also allowed Sanborn to nudge the faraway sofa a few inches closer to the action. A comfortable checkered Chesterfield and a rug in glen plaid tie it all together. John remembers when the family returned from vacation to see the finished home. His reaction was the same as it had been the day he first spied the house, only better: “It was unbelievably beautiful, but it was homey. It felt like it was ours.”  RESOURCES : For more information about this home, see page 172.

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Tom Rickman’s engaging landscape gives the front parlor—the first room visitors see—a burst of blue sky. Hearthside shelves hold a cache of treasures, including cast bottle installations by Boston artist Brynn Dizack. FACING PAGE: A traditional flight of stone steps leads to the front door of the classic 1880s Boston brownstone.

All in Good Time

A family’s thoughtful approach to remodeling ensures that their Boston brownstone will suit their tastes and needs for years to come.

Text by Megan Fulweiler  Photography by Eric Roth  Produced by Stacy Kunstel

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Project Team Interior architecture and design: Kristine Irving, Koo de Kir Architectural Interiors Builder: Greg Pomeroy, Pomeroy & Company

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T

hat classic tune about how you can’t hurry love holds true in design, too. When it comes to long-lasting domestic bliss, details matter. Something as seemingly trivial as an awkward closet door, for example, can upset the happy rhythm of

daily living. The key to a comfortable, efficient nest? Foresight, imagination, and hours of careful planning, which is just what took place recently in Boston’s South End. Rather than rush into a haphazard renovation, the owners and their young son lived in their Victorian brownstone for two years. They studied how they used the rooms, how traffic flowed, and which corners yearned for sun. When

Lined with white oak, the innovative wet bar instantly transforms the front parlor into an ideal entertainment space. FACING PAGE: The sparkly Ochre pendant is a modern twist on chandeliers of the past. A hide rug by Yerra references scallop shells, playing to the wife’s love of the ocean.

they were confident in what they needed, they recruited designer Kristine Irving to launch a transformation. “My clients are very thoughtful people,” Irving explains. “They knew substantial work was ahead and wanted to be sure they got it right. Their priorities were more open space, including an open kitchen, more natural light, a change of palette, and new finishes and furnishings.” Remodeled in the 1990s, the handJanuary–February 2018 | New England Home  121

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CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE: New steel-framed windows give the back parlor the feel of a Parisian atelier. The room’s wealth of texture includes a sculptural metal Jieldé floor lamp and a bold Merida carpet topped with a hide area rug. The contemporary vibe is played up with an Andy Warhol poster above a streamlined console.

some brownstone had shed many original details. Still, the good bones were intact, and charming bay windows and a marble fireplace remained to underscore the building’s character. Instead of wiping out history, Irving and contractor Greg Pomeroy set out to balance the past with the present. New systems had to be worked into the aging structure and, further ratcheting up the challenge, the South End is a historic district with all the usual constraints. Undeterred, however, Irving and Pomeroy delivered a sublime home that couldn’t be more suitable. “The project was primarily a gut renovation of the parlor floor along with the kitchen and garden levels,” says Pomeroy. “To achieve the vision Kristine developed with her clients, she designed a number of unique cabinets that required innovative solutions.” Handling the millwork themselves, Pomeroy and his crew could fine-tune every nuance. The seamless collaboration between designer and contractor, in fact, rewarded the young family with a

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“A bountiful amount of cabinetry doesn’t just mean more storage. It also reinforces the idea that every space can be maximized to improve everyday living,” says Greg Pomeroy. high degree of functionality. “A bountiful amount of cabinetry doesn’t just mean more storage,” Pomeroy is quick to point out. “It also reinforces the idea that every space can be maximized to improve everyday living.” To that point, visitors need only settle themselves for drinks on the Ligne Roset sofa in the reworked front parlor. Irving cleverly added width by demolishing a wall and opening the room to the staircase. Then she tore out a curved wall at the parlor’s far end, magically forging way for not only a stunning wet bar (with, presto! unobtrusive bifold doors that slide

into pockets), but also a posh powder room behind it. The crown moldings were replaced, and shelving sprang up to flank the original mantel, which Irving restored to awaken its glory. A glass ceramic fire screen, like an architectural cufflink on a formal French cuff, lends the antique marble a fun, modern note. Out went yesterday’s dark woodwork, except for the handsome stair rails and balusters. Irving conjured today’s harmonious theme with prefinished wide-board white-oak flooring and walls painted Benjamin Moore’s creamy Chamois (“my white,” she says).

A host of streamlined upholstered pieces suggest relaxation, while texture— note the Lawson Fenning burlwood cube tables fronting the hearth—provides interest. Speaking of interest, no mundane shelves here. Instead, an assortment of artwork, including a series of cast bottles, demands attention. The front parlor’s serene vibe continues down the hall into the back parlor, too. Here, a casual cowhide tops a custom Merida rug, and there’s a generous Ethnicraft coffee table big enough for all three family members to put up their feet at once. Above the sofa hangs a

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CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE:

Meticulous planning allowed for additional shelving and cabinetry in the family room, where Eero Saarinen’s Womb Chair from Knoll is a popular seat. Casual dining is made comfy with a long banquette outfitted in Pierre Frey fabric. Pale cabinetry, surfaces, and flooring give the spacious kitchen its clean, modern feel.

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It’s all astoundingly ordered and symmetrical, which makes the bright urban space even more of a marvel. “Remember, in an old house nothing is level,” says Kristine Irving. “The trick was, we had to make it look like it is.”

vintage poster, and a pair of Andrea Star ­Greitzer’s photographs are displayed near the tweed-lined wing chairs. “The art was the only thing we didn’t buy for this house,” says Irving. “The owners brought it all with them.” The new gorgeous European-style metal windows, on the other hand, were the designer’s idea. “They make the room feel like Paris,” she says. Ingeniously engineered windows (think an assembly of steel plates creating a supporting frame) pump natural light into the kitchen, as well. Previously, this level was a hodge-podge of quirky rooms, but no more. The spacious galley sports a sea of marble, pale painted wood cabinets, and a Saarinen table, along with a tailored banquette dressed in a Pierre Frey fabric. A chalkboard wall at the seat’s end is the ideal exclamation

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point for an eight-year-old wishing to express himself. There’s even a workstation, tucked discreetly into a cabinet, that appears and disappears, like the wet bar, as needed. It’s all astoundingly ordered and symmetrical, which makes the bright urban space even more of a marvel. “Remember, in an old house nothing is level,” says Irving. “The trick was, we had to make it look like it is.” The enviable cooking area spills right into an intimate family room where a gas fireplace is set like a jewel into an unabashedly contemporary limestone wall. Since this room is three steps down from the street, Irving added pull-up shades to give privacy without diminishing natural light. White oak shelving (backed with the same Phillip Jeffries wallpaper as the shelves in the front

parlor) and cabinetry echo the woodwork found throughout the house. Another custom Merida rug adds a soft touch. And accommodating the Italian sofa is a liveedge oak log table—once part of a mighty frigate ship—salvaged from the Charlestown Navy Yard. Stage two of the brownstone’s makeover will be the bedrooms on the two upper floors, although Irving has already put her chic stamp on the master suite. A fabulous Madeline Weinrib carpet and Kofod Larsen chair hint at what’s to come. In concert with their talented team, though, the owners are content for now to volley ideas and plot the rest. Perfection, as they will be the first to tell you, takes time. 

ABOVE: A warm-toned Phillip Jeffries wallpaper cozies up the master bedroom. LEFT: The addition of a powder room between the parlors was life-enhancing. Dressed in wallpaper from Abnormals Anonymous, the small space has large presence.

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Mountain Makeover

The Vermont getaway’s extensive exterior facelift includes a new standing-seam roof and siding, a streamlined and modernized deck, an expanded master bedroom, and a welcoming new entryway.

A Vermont ski house sheds its 1980s skin in favor of a contemporary, yet classic, look. Text by Robert Kiener | Exterior photography by Les Jörgensen  Interior photography by Michael Partenio | Produced by Stacy Kunstel January–February 2018 | New England Home  129

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Multiple textures—in the artwork by Kathryn Lipke through Stowe’s West Branch Gallery and in the variety of fabrics—along with shots of bold sky-blue against a neutral background lend interest to the living room. FACING PAGE: A natural cleft slate fireplace studded with custom-made sconces is a focal point of the room.

“who knew?”

asks Kerry Berchem, as she smiles and recalls how the modest renovation she and her husband, Craig Goos, planned for their 1980s ski home in Ludlow, Vermont, morphed into an extensive, year-long redesign and makeover. The couple expected to spend two or three months on the revamping, but “one thing invariably led to another and it just sort of grew and grew,” explains Berchem, a financial executive based in Fairfield, Connecticut. “But we got exactly the house we were hoping for. We are thrilled!” Berchem, who grew up in Vermont and loves skiing, introduced her husband and their three children to the sport at Okemo Mountain, and the family took so eagerly to the slopes that they began looking for a

Project Team Architecture: Jodie Fielding, Roots Design Studio Interior design: Holly Hickey Moore, Holly Hickey Moore Interior Design Builder: The McKernon Group

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The kitchen (left) and adjacent dining area (facing page) feature a combination of open shelving and custom cabinets. A pair of spider-like ceiling lamps that can be reconfigured to shed light where it’s most needed illuminates the raised island, which steps down to meet the wood-and-metal dining table.

“When the house is full, guests can be sitting at the table eating or chatting, while the living room is packed with people enjoying the fire or the views,” Kerry Berchem says. “There’s a sense of separation and room for everyone.”

weekend ski home in the area. They eventually found this five-bedroom, four-bath, 2,700-square-foot home close to the mountain. “It was a great house, but it needed updating,” remembers Berchem. After spending time in the home for a year, the couple decided to renovate the kitchen, but then, as Berchem relates, “We kept seeing other things that we wanted to change. It had good bones and suited our family, but we wanted to put our own stamp on it.” To do just that, Berchem and Goos enlisted the aid of designer Holly Hickey Moore, who practiced in Vermont at the time. “I visited the home and agreed with Kerry that the time-warp, 1980s look—white walls, Berber carpeting, knotty pine ceilings—had to

go,” Moore says. We decided to aim for a timeless, eclectic design.” Moore remembers that the couple asked for a design they described as “boutique hotel meets contemporary ski chalet.” Bercham adds, “We knew that we would have lots of visitors and wanted a boutique hotel look so guests wouldn’t feel they were descending on us and invading our home, but would feel relaxed when they came to stay with us.” The designer brought in another Vermonter, architect Jodie Fielding, initially to help finalize a new fireplace and stairway design. “But Jodie also had so many great ideas about updating the house that the project suddenly expanded in scope—again,” says Berchem. “Like many houses of that period, it had more deck than needed,” Fielding says. “In fact, there was so much deck that you could barely see the house.” The couple agreed, and much of the expanse was removed or reconfigured. The decking that remained was replaced with clear cedar and edged with handrails of sleek metal topped with cedar. The home also lacked an obvious front door, so

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Bright, fun colors—from the wall tiles behind the wood-burning stove to the rainbow-hued carpet to the throw pillows—dominate the home’s basement level, which is the children’s domain, complete with ping-pong table and rooms for games galore.

“I repeated many of the colors to make the design more cohesive, much like a hotel uses color to pull together its different rooms,” says Holly Hickey Moore

Fielding suggested adding the striking entry section, also finished with clear cedar to blend in with the decking, along with a custom-designed ski and boot room. While they liked the rest of the house’s basic configuration, the couple decided to bump out the master bedroom and incorporate a dramatic master bathroom. “It was a challenge to work on this project because we were changing so many features on the fly,” says contractor Justus Cameron, vice president of The McKernon Group, the company responsible for the renovation as well as for the home’s custom cabinetry. “It was one of those renovations where you’d uncover siding and discover rotten wood or take an interior wall down and realize we needed new insulation. Before we knew it, we were taking the inside walls down to the studs and reinsulating,

replacing the roof, and redoing the foundation.” To create a feeling of continuity throughout the house, Moore chose a color palette that includes lots of charcoals and other grays, creams, and European oak finishes. The kitchen cabinets, all of the interior doors, and the window frames were painted with the same gravel-gray color. “I repeated many of the colors to make the design more cohesive, much like a hotel uses colors to pull together or brand its different rooms,” the designer says. She updated the Berber-covered floors by installing cerused white-oak engineeredwood flooring throughout the house; she applied the same wood to the ceiling of the great room. Moore and Fielding joined forces to design the living room’s arresting ceiling-high fireplace of natural cleft slate with a custom quartzite surround. The previous fireplace was built of fieldstone, but the January–February 2018 | New England Home  135

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“Before we knew it, we were taking the inside walls down to the studs and reinsulating, replacing the roof, and redoing the foundation,” says The McKernon Group’s Justus Cameron.

owners wanted something with a “simpler, cleaner” look. “The cleft-edge gives a textual focal point to the room,” says Fielding. “It also provides a strong visual contrast to the quartzite.” The massive fireplace is studded with a collection of custom-designed lighting sconces, fabricated from the same wood used in the room’s floor and ceiling. The design team and Berchem purposely chose smaller furnishings to ensure the rooms look clean and uncluttered. “I wanted to retain an efficient use of space and to do that, we kept the scale of the furniture relatively small,” she says. The eclectic interior design also made it possible to add a few of her favorite pieces of furniture and artwork to the mix. The kitchen, the site of the makeover that eventually inspired this whole-house renovation, sets the tone for much of the project. “I love the kitchen’s clean look, from the open shelves to the custom cabi-

LEFT TO RIGHT: Snowflake-inspired tiles in the master bathroom’s shower suit the home’s ski-area location. The bath also holds a twelve-foot-long marble sink. Natural materials in neutral tones add to the master bedroom’s peaceful ambience.

nets to the wood-clad range hood to the island that tumbles down into the dining table,” says Berchem. Although the kitchen and the living room flow into one another, the spaces feel very different. “When the house is full, guests can be sitting at the table eating or chatting, while the living room is packed with people enjoying the fire or the views,” Berchem says. “There’s a sense of separation and room for everyone.” She and her husband report they are so pleased with the transformation of their once-dated ski home, they admit that one day—in the distant future—they would like to make it their retirement home. “There is a timeless, warm feeling to this house that is so inviting,” she says. “Who wouldn’t want to spend as much time as possible here?”  RESOURCES : For more information about this home, see page 172.

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InterIor DesIgn by nIna Farmer PhotograPhy by erIc roth

A Showroom with Extraordinary Resources

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•Perspectives New England Design Considered From Every Angle

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Open Door Policy

Simple and elegant or rich in detail, the style of the seemingly humble knob is surprisingly influential. 1. HK020, Hamilton Sinkler, Raybern Decorative Hardware, Charlestown, Mass. | raybernhardware.com

4. Windsor Crystal Knob, Emtek, Handle it!, Portland, Maine | handleitshowroom.com

2. K002 Estate Knob, Baldwin Hardware, Lacillade’s Home Design Center, Williston, Vt.  | lacilladeskitchenandbath.com

5. Door Knob with Port Oro Carrara Marbles, Fersa, Brassworks Fine Home Details, Providence, R.I., and Boston Fine Home Details, Newton, Mass.  | finehomedetails.com

3. Callisto Art Glass Door Knob, Sun Valley Bronze, Needham Lock & Decorative Hardware, Needham, Mass. | decorativelocks.com

6. Manor, Water Street Brass, Brassworks Fine Home Details and Boston Fine Home Details

7. Ore Door Knob, Rocky Mountain Hardware, Close to Home, South Burlington, Vt. | closetohomevt.com 8. 5025S, Lowe Hardware, Rockland, Maine  | lowe-hardware.com 9. Nantucket, Edgar Berebi, Mack Designer Hardware, Burlington, Mass.  | mackdesignerhardware.com

| edited by lynda Simonton | January–February 2018| New England Home  139

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Perspectives

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Hedonistic Hibernation

Rich, luxurious fabrics—mohair and velvet—in deep jewel hues, warm wood tones, and artwork that elevates the room all add up to a welcoming space. Comfortable furniture promotes relaxation with a cocktail in hand (fresh off the brushed-brass bar cart of course) while a plush carpet means feet always have a soft spot to land. Overall, this sophisticated lounge designed by Duncan Hughes is a place to stretch out and unwind while surrounded by the best. | Duncan Hughes Interiors, Boston, (617) 426-1440, duncanhughes.com | 1. Weston club chair by Edward Ferrell + Lewis Mittman, The Martin Group, Boston Design Center, martingroupinc.com | 2. Eliza drinks cart by Jan Showers, Kravet, Boston Design Center, kravet.com | 3. Edie sofa by Holly Hunt, Webster & Company, Boston Design Center, webstercompany.com | 4. Bolle 3 Grande light fixture by Gallotti & Radice, Casa Design Living, Boston, casadesignliving.com | 5. Park Slope cocktail table, Century Furniture, Boston Design Center, centuryfurniture.com | 6. Hand-knotted rug (107773), Dover Rug & Home, Boston, Natick, and Burlington, Mass., doverrug.com | 7. Serafina by Kerry Brooks, Galerie d’Orsay, Boston, galerie-dorsay.com

| edited by lynda simonton | 

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Perspectives

Five Questions

Kitchen design has come a long way, says Pierre Matta of Newton Kitchens & Design.

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How did you get involved in kitchen design? I have been a general contractor, a cabinet maker, and a furniture maker. My passion is designing and building custom furniture and cabinets. I like to incorporate aspects of furniture into cabinet design. My style is kind of edgy, funky. I love using multiple materials together. If we do a clean, crisp kitchen, I like to balance it with a warm wood floor, ambient lighting, a colorful backsplash,

cool hardware—just that splash of something that makes it stand out without going overboard.

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The kitchen has become the hub of the home. How has this influenced design? Times have changed since the kitchen used to be segregated in the back corner of the house. Many homeowners now want the kitchen exposed to another living space because they enjoy sharing

| Interview by Robert Kiener | Photography by john soares | 142  New England Home | January–February 2018

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Hand-carved wood tells a story of commitment to detail, time-honored skill, and the desire to create a legacy of lasting beauty.

At JW Construction, we provide custom millwork inhouse and are proud to have restored some of the finest historic homes in New England. Let us craft some timeless beauty for your home.

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Perspectives:

Five Questions

the experience of cooking with friends and family. So it’s important to have a design that lets the cook be part of the company and entertainment. Islands are great because everyone likes to hang out, smell the food, talk. Adding a prep area at the end of an island allows you to talk to your company as you work. A second sink in an island ensures your back isn’t turned on company when you’re getting dinner ready.

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What are the challenges of incorporating modern kitchens into traditional homes? Many New England homeowners who are transitioning to a cleaner, modern look for the kitchen may think, “I have to go with white, high-gloss, flat-panel cabinets.” But this is not necessarily true. To balance a modern kitchen with a more traditional home, you might do a flat wood finish on a door to tone it down. Or you can incorporate raw materials—I like classic rosewood or glass—to soften that

modern look. You want to marry the two styles and have them complement each other. Adding classic touches that work in both modern and traditional designs assures a transitional kitchen will stay in style longer.

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Is it true that kitchen design is hard to get right because it’s so personal? Absolutely. Because everyone is unique in the way they like to cook, it’s wrong to impose cookie-cutter ideas on people. Before I come up with a design idea, I like to go to a client’s home and interview them. I see how they use their kitchen and ask them what they like and dislike about it; what they would like to change and what they would like to keep. Personal details matter, too. For instance, we have lots of couples where the husband is tall and wife is short. So we will make the island lower for the wife, and we’ll raise the hood vent for the husband so he doesn’t hit his head on it when he leans over the stove. We also take into consideration the height of people when deciding how deep the sink should be. An eight-inch-deep sink is very different

from a ten-inch one because you have to lean over more to use a deeper sink. Those two inches can put a big strain on your lower back.

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What does modern lighting add to a kitchen design? Lighting is functional, but it can also be used to set the tone or mood. I like to load up a kitchen with lights. When we build our cabinets, we rout out the bottoms to install LED lights that are flush, so you don’t see any wiring or need any clunky light fixtures under the cabinets. We also do toe-kick lighting; it’s a great night light because it lights up the floor and cascades out, creating a pathway. LED lights now come in different shades and warmth—anything from a soft ambient light to daylight lighting. It’s very important to put everything on dimmers and be able to control the lighting in different zones. You want your task lighting to be very bright and your ambient lighting to be adjustable from dim to moderate. Lighting can really bring a kitchen design to life. | Newton Kitchens & Design, Newton, Mass., (617) 559-0003, newtonkd.com 

More than a Player Piano, the Disklavier Enspire is the ultimate home entertainment experience.

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Perspectives

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At Home with Dogs and Their Designers By Susanna Salk A house, no matter how beautifully appointed, doesn’t become a home until it’s inhabited. The twenty-one designers featured in this charming book would go a step further, insisting that it takes a dog (even better, multiple dogs) to give a house its soul. Stacy Bewkes’s photos—of Robert Couturier’s quartet of pups lounging on a Louis XVI daybed in his Connecticut home, of Schuyler Samperton serenading Tricky, her sheepdog-terrier mix, in their Maine cottage—celebrate puppy love. The designers’ own words make it clear that chic interiors and dog ownership go paw in hand very nicely. Each home reflects its owner’s style, but they all have one thing in common: no space is off limits to canine members of the family. This book, which includes a guide to animal adoption and rescue organizations, offers both design inspiration and major “Aww” factor. | $35, Rizzoli, rizzolibookstore.com

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Timeless: Classical American Architecture for Contemporary Living By Patrick Ahearn With an eye attuned to design from childhood, architect Patrick Ahearn was strongly influenced by his home town of Levittown, New York. The houses and streets of America’s first planned community were thoughtfully designed and laid out in a perfect balance of density and scale. When Ahearn writes, in the forward of his new book, that his career has been shaped by two core beliefs—“that design—good design— has the power to improve people’s lives, and that learning

from the past is crucial to creating the future”—he can trace the origins of that first conviction to his boyhood in Levittown. Ahearn has spent his long career putting those principles into practice here in New England. The two-dozen projects featured in Timeless stand as beautiful evidence of his positive impact on our architectural landscape. | $60, Oro Editions, oroeditions.com

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Heroic: Concrete Architecture and the New Boston By Mark Pasnik, Michael Kubo, and Chris Grimley Brutalist architecture—that modernist, sculptural style rendered in bare concrete—flourished in Europe and the United States following World War II, partly because concrete was inexpensive and partly because modern architects wanted a departure from the ornate styles of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Among American cities, Boston was especially transformed by concrete. Civic, cultural, academic, and residential buildings sprang up between 1968 and 1973, as the city became a laboratory for experiments in urban planning. Brutalism, an Anglicization of the French term Béton Brut—literally bare concrete—is one of those styles people either love or hate on first sight. The trio who put together this book are presumably among the first group. With contributions by a number of distinguished architects, Heroic surveys and celebrates the trove of Brutalist buildings by such luminaries as I.M. Pei, Le Corbusier, Marcel Breuer, and Mary Otis Stevens that dot the Boston landscape. | $50, The Monacelli Press, monacellipress.com

| Reviews by Paula M. Bodah |  146  New England Home | January–February 2018

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Perspectives

What Makes It Work

Rich layers of texture and pattern soften and animate the formality of a Massachusetts dining room.

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The designer took one cue from the clients’ existing English table, dining chairs, and sideboard. New upholstered chairs from Baker were added to complement their Jacobean feel.

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The room’s smooth, sharp, white ceiling moldings and fireplace now frame an interplay of scraped, encrusted, and watery textures. A bold moiré wallcovering, an organically patterned rug from Landry & Arcari, the over-mantel painting by Henry Botkin, even the figured oak flooring all play their part.

The windows sport a charming inversion of the standard treatment: heavy Roman shades have been overlaid with airy appliqued sheers.

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Touches of cream and coral/persimmon hues help warm the otherwise cool, gray space, like glowing embers seen through ash.

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A few judicious round forms—the very large, yet open, Ironies chandelier, a bronze-and-glass Donghia side table topped with an equally curvaceous marble sculpture, printed roundels on the window-shade fabric—add diversity to a room otherwise dominated by rectangles. Project Team

Vani Sayeed, Vani Sayeed Studios Newton, Massachusetts, (617) 275-3253, vanisayeedstudios.com

| edited By Kyle Hoepner | Photography by Nat Rea | 148  New England Home | January–February 2018

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Greg Premru Photography

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Trade Notes By Paula M. Bodah

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1) The team at Landry & Arcari. 2) Housing NOW Partnership’s affordable house design. 3) Designer Mark Haddad.

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We already knew our friends at Landry & Arcari Rugs and Carpeting were

special, so we can’t say we’re surprised that the company has received the prestigious Massachusetts Retailer of the Year Award from the Retailers Association of Massachusetts. The judges look for companies that provide an “exceptional product, unparalleled service, and demonstrate originality in all they do.” We applaud the Landry & Arcari team for doing just that, as well as being the good citizens they are with their community involvement, including their eight years (and counting!) of sponsoring New England Home’s “5 Under 40” Awards.  I  Boston, Salem, and Framingham, Mass., landryandarcari.com

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As usual, we count a number of our talented acquaintances among those who took home awards from the 2017 Builders and Remodelers Association of Greater Boston’s (BRAGB) PRISM Awards. We can’t fit all the deserving winners here, but an abridged rundown of those who garnered multiple awards includes builders FBN Construction, Cape Associates, and Sea-Dar Construction; interior designers Kristina Crestin, Leslie Fine, and Vani Sayeed; and architects Morehouse MacDonald and Associates and Polhemus Savery DaSilva. Photos of people enjoying the festivities can be seen in Design Life, page 156.  I  For the complete list of awards, see prism-awards.com

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The year closed on an upbeat note for Audio Video Design. Not only did the Westwood, Mas-

sachusetts-based company open a new showroom in Osterville, on Cape Cod, president Brad Smith and his team also won a gold PRISM Award for Best Use of Smart Home Technology. The good-looking media room that earned the prize resides in a Cape Cod house built by Encore Construction with interior design by Kotzen Interiors. In 2018, AVD plans

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to begin hosting events in its new Technology and Design Center at the Westwood location.  I  Westwood and Osterville, Mass., avdesigns.com; Sudbury and Dennisport, Mass., encoreco.com; Wellesley, Mass., kotzeninteriors.com

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Among the winning projects in the 2017 AIA

(American Institute of Architects) New England Design Awards was a beauty by Patrick Ahearn that graced the pages of our September-October 2017 issue. The judges called the work, an addition to a historic Edgartown, Massachusetts, home, “an excellent interpretation of the traditional,” in bestowing a Merit award. Other residential winners included Citation awards to Boston’s Ruhl Walker Architects, Elliot + Elliot Architecture of Blue Hill, Maine, and Birdseye Design of Richmond, Vermont. Gray Organschi Architecture, of New Haven, Connecticut, and Roger Ferris + Partners of Westport, Connecticut, took home Merit awards, while an Honor award went to GO Logic of Belfast, Maine.  I  For a complete list of winners, visit aianewengland.org

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Working from home has its good points, but designer Tiffany LeBlanc is thrilled to have moved the offices of LeBlanc Design from her house into spacious new quarters in Boston’s SoWa district. Working with Sea-Dar Construction, LeBlanc renovated the fourth-floor space at 560 Harrison Avenue to suit her and her staff of four, reconfiguring to have private offices and gathering areas, all dressed in a clean, transitional style that, LeBlanc says, fosters creative thinking.  I  Boston, leblancdesign.com

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The term affordable housing doesn’t necessarily conjure up images of the finest in architectural design, but a new collaborative effort called Housing NOW Partnership aims to change that. Four Falmouth, Massachusetts, companies—Jill Neubauer Architects, developer Michael Galasso Haddad photo by Kiera Slye. Neubauer image courtesy Jill Neubauer Architects

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of the nonprofit TRI, The Valle Group builders, and Bernice Wahler Landscapes—formed the partnership to address Cape Cod’s shortage of houses that are as good-looking as they are affordable. The group’s model uses the classic Cape Cod cottage as inspiration for its charming abodes, the largest of which is a 1,448-square-foot, threebedroom configuration with a proposed price of under $225,000. The group has land and a plan to build its first unit in 2018.  I  housingnowpartnership.com

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N I N A’ S T I P S F O R REMODELING YOUR KITCHEN

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Mark Haddad has had a distinguished career as a designer, most recently as a principal at Haddad Hakansson Design Studio. His newest venture is ­Interiology Design Company, a fullservice project management and interior design firm. The company of six includes three designers in addition to Haddad, with experience in all aspects of creating beautiful luxury interiors.  I  Watertown, Mass., interiology.com

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Beth Odence’s background includes corporate sales and marketing, designing and manufacturing children’s knitwear, and, from 2006 until recently, owning a home staging firm serving Boston’s luxury home market. Now she puts all that diverse experience to work with her new company, Design No. Five, an interior design firm based in Hyannis, Massachusetts. She and her three on-staff designers oversee all aspects of interior design, and operate a by-appointmentonly home boutique.  I  Hyannis, Mass., designnofive.com

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Interior designers will tell you that juggling skills are an important part of their work. The joy may come from the creative aspects of a job, but just as important are such logistics as keeping tabs on where furniture and accessories that have been ordered may be, then getting those pieces delivered on schedule and set in the right place. A new company, Local Flow Logistics, takes much of that worry off the designer’s shoulders. Designers can have products sent to the Hingham, Massachusetts, company, where they will be inspected and stored in a climate controlled warehouse. Come installation day, their staff will deliver and arrange everything to the designer’s specifications.  I  Hingham, Mass., localflowlogistics.com 

Tip 1 Maximizing your storage is essential to having a great kitchen. I have seen many kitchens that have no place to put the frying pans, no real pantry and no counter space on either side of the cook top. These are not functioning kitchens. I maintain that all cabinets less than 12 inches wide are useless. What can you store in them? Not much. If you are going to spend the money to remodel your kitchen, let a designer help you maximize the storage space so you really can use it. No more trips to the basement to get that pan or roll of paper towels. At Dream Kitchens, I guarantee we will give you at least 30 percent more storage.

Tip 2 Life has changed. The kitchen is the center of our lives. We cook, our children study, and we entertain in the kitchen. This makes the layout essential. How many times have you asked your child to “stop standing there so I can get to the fridge?” We should be able to easily chat with guests, put chips and dip out on a buffet, and watch TV. We want guests welcome in the kitchen, but on the fringes where they add to the fun but don’t get in the way.

Tip 3 Get rid of the clutter. Most countertops are packed with the coffee maker, toaster, food processor, blender, knives, spices and pantry items. This makes it almost impossible to prepare food and makes the kitchen look messy. Have a place to store everything so you can see and use those beautiful countertops. At Dream Kitchens we will store everything away so you are ready for company at any time of day! Nina Hackel, President | Dream Kitchens | 139 Daniel Webster Highway Nashua NH | www.adreamkitchen.com | 603-891-2916 ADVERTISEMENT

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Design Life

edited by Lynda Simonton

Heading Home to Dinner

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A spirit of giving and creativity guided the Boston design community to found Heading Home to Dinner, a bar cart and tabletop event held at the Boston Design Center. More than forty designers generously shared their time and talents to create themed tables and carts. The event kicked off with a cocktail party and concluded with a celebratory dinner, where many of the carts were auctioned off to raise money for Heading Home, a nonprofit dedicated to helping families transition from homelessness to permanent housing. 2

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| 1. Marie Antoinette and Louis XVI inspired “Let Them Eat Cake!” by Kristin 12 Paton | 2. Mally Skok, Lawrence Powers, and Frank D. Hodge | 3. Steven Favreau, Haley Horn, and Dennis Wyrzykowski | 4. An elegant table designed by Phoebe Lovejoy | 5. Eric Haydel and his table, “Modern Ivy” | 6. Pamela Copeman gathered inspiration from Monet’s gardens at Giverny for her table design | 7. Jill Najnigier, Donna Milano Neligon, Jakub Staron, and Chesie Breen | 8. Michelle Cortizo toasts her bar cart, “New Year’s Champagne”  | 9. Vani Sayeed with her bar cart, “Maharani’s Cocktail Hour” | 10. “The Artist Collaboration” imagined by Megan Pesce | 11. Suzanne Roche Thomlinson, Robin Pelissier, and Danielle Pecce | 12. Alissa Carruth, Maria Mancino, Dennis Duffy, Joseph DeChiaro, Anna Lee Rose, and Jennifer Driscoll

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Photography by Allan Dines (1, 3, 11) . Additional photos courtesy Boston Design Center and Caitlin Cunningham Photography

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Design Life Boston Design Market

Designers enjoyed the best of the Boston Design Center at the annual Boston Design Market. The two-day event featured nationally renowned keynote speakers, panel discussions, new product releases, the launch of Heading Home to Dinner, and more. It was a great opportunity for designers to connect with their peers and get inspired.

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| 1. Award-winning architect Gil Schafer signs a copy of his book A Place to Call Home for Vivian Robins | 2. Soaking in the art at the Boston Art pop-up shop  | 3. Barbara Sallick, co-founder of Waterworks, and Eric Roseff  | 4. Designers, including Christina Oliver, keeping their skills sharp at one of several ASID New ­England CEU courses offered throughout the market  | 5. New England Home’s editor-in-chief Kyle Hoepner leading a panel discussion called “Innovators in Design: Advancing the Design Industry” | 6. New England Home’s Kathy Bush-Dutton with designer Michael Carter at the new Waterworks showroom | 7. Jim M-Geough enjoys a rare quiet moment during Design Week | 8. Colleen Mothander of Camden Hydes chats with a customer | 9. Listening to Gil Schafer in the seminar room  | 10. Gabriella Levy of immerLit | 11. Suzi Hlavacek of Boston Art | 12. Mary Bess Engel with Noah Pelletier of Lladró

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Design Life Glorious Bites at Divine Design Center

The beautiful Divine Design Center showroom in Boston was the Northeast stop on the Glorious Bites challenge from sparkling wine vintner Gloria Ferrer. The mission of the event was to find the most glorious appetizer in the country. Ellen Verdugo was judged the winner in our area with her Smoky Spanish Paprika-Dusted Sea Scallops, designed to pair with Gloria Ferrer’s Sonoma Brut.

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| 1. Raquel Steinfeld, 3 Maranda Kolesinskas, Jana Neudel, Mariette Barsoum, Elizabeth Nguyen, Samantha DeMarco, and Madison Silvers | 2. Cooking as a spectator sport | 3. Elise Nerlove, Tia Butts, Susan Anderson, Eva Bertran, and Jennifer Luttrell  | 4. Ellen Verdugo, Veronica Callaghan, Lisa Keys, and Hidemi Walsh

2017 PRISM Awards

The Sheraton Boston Hotel was the setting for the gala celebrating the winners of the 2017 PRISM Awards, sponsored by the Builders and Remodelers Association of Greater Boston. The awards recognize the finest projects and outstanding achievements of builders, developers, architects, and other professionals in the home-building industry.

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| 1. Bradley Framson, Andrea Mongeau, and Krystle Szala  | 2. Jim Cappuccino, Ryan Alcaidinho, Sean Dougherty, Gregory Ehrman, and Mark Hutker | 3. Allison LaChance and Sharon DaSilva | 4. Susan Tweed, Marcia Summers, Mike Brown, Justin Babcock, and Eric Adams  | 5. Greg Mackintosh, Larissa Cook, and Stephen Farley

Glorious Bites photos by Connor Bowen and David Bruno PRISM Awards photos by Charlene Graham

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Design Life Casa Design Living’s Tour de Casa

It was a beautiful fall evening—perfect for guests to take a grand tour of the four Casa Design Group showrooms in the heart of Boston’s SoWa Art + Design District. Architects and designers took to the quaint pedestrian-only boulevard at 460 Harrison Avenue to enjoy Casa Design’s updated showrooms, connect with their peers, and toast stylish living.

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Cumar’s 25th Anniversary

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| 1. The Casa Design Group’s team | 2. Ryan Stanton, Jessica Schwartz, Rebecca Rivers, and Eduardo Serrate | 3. Brian Khoo and Marty Smith  | 4. Rebecca Abrams and Josh Linder | 5. Maria Mancino, Joseph DeChiaro, Mika Durrell, and Julia Vandal | 6. Meichi Peng, Rina Okawa, and Peter White

It was a multi-generational celebration marking Cumar’s twenty-fifth anniversary, as the family hosted a party at their Everett, Massachusetts, showroom. More than 250 guests were treated to fabulous hors d’oeuvres, music, and beautiful vignettes showcasing the company’s semi-precious stones, along with home furnishings from Artefact Home | Garden, Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams, and Landry & Arcari Rugs and Carpeting. 2

 | 1. Ivo Cubi and Carlotta Cubi 4 with Carlotta’s daughters Luci and Isabella | 2. Guests enjoy themselves in the decorated showroom  | 3. New England Home’s Adam Japko with Dawn Carroll, Beverly Mahoney, and New England Home’s Kathy BushDutton | 4. Carlo Baraglia and Eric Roseff | 5. Sertac Cakim and Mary Algiers | 6. Justine Sterling, Andrew Sidford, and Donna Venegas

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Casa Design Living photos by Dana J. Quigley Cumar photos by Russ Mezikofsky

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Photo by Susan Teare

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BradfordsRugGallery.com 297 Forest Avenue Portland, Maine p: 207.772.3843 | f: 207.773.2849 Monday - Saturday 9am - 5pm Just off I-295 Exit 6B

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Calendar

edited by lynda Simonton

2 1 1) Georgia O’Keeffe: Art, Image, Style celebrates the artist’s unique aesthetic 2) Step back in time at Historic New England’s photography exhibit Images from the Past 3) Take the chill out of winter at the Lyman Estate’s exotic plant sale 4) Find the rare and the whimsical at the Boston Antiques, Vintage Art & Design Show and Sale

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JANUARY All the Flowers Are For Me Through April 1 Pakistani artist Anila Quayyum Agha has created a luminous art installation that is inspired by Persian and Turkish textiles, architecture, and miniature paintings. The exhibit encourages visitors to contemplate the differences and similarities that define us and our relationships. I Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Mass., (978) 745-9500, pem.org

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Georgia O’Keeffe: Art, Image, Style Through April 1 This exhibit celebrates the style of Georgia O’Keeffe, pairing the artist’s understated and carefully designed garments with photographs and her paintings to illuminate her signature style and aesthetic. I Peabody Essex Museum Forcing Spring Bulbs January 13 Take a break from winter at this class that will teach you the basics of bulb forcing. You will plant a layered container that includes a variety of cheery bulbs such as daffodils and hyacinths. I 1 p.m.–3 p.m. $50 members, $63 non-members. Arnold Arboretum, Boston, (617) 524-1718, arboretum.harvard.edu Boston Antiques, Vintage Art & Design Show and Sale January 13–14 This annual event is considered one of the premier antique shows in the region. More than 100 dealers will be on hand with a variety of antiques and collectibles, including antique and vintage furniture, antique jewelry, fine art, silver, and vintage books. I Saturday 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sunday 11 a.m.– 4 p.m. $10. Shriner’s Auditorium, Wilmington, Mass., (781) 862-4039, neantiqueshows.com Houseplant and Begonia Sale January 19–21 Counteract winter chill with a trip to the Lyman Estate Greenhouses for an exotic houseplant sale, where hard-to-find terrarium plants, succulents, cactus, citrus, rare bulbs, and other specimens will be available for purchase. I Lyman Estate Greenhouses, Waltham, Mass., (781) 891-1985, historicnewengland.org Portland Museum of Art 2018 Biennial January 26–May 30 Maine’s rich pool of artistic talent is celebrated in this

annual event. The PMA Biennial features artists with meaningful connections to Maine and strives to enrich the cultural lives of the people of the state. I Portland Museum of Art, Portland, Maine, (207) 775-6148, portlandmuseum.org

FEBRUARY Garden Design Workshop for Home Gardeners Beginning February 7 Wondering how to begin to design your home’s garden? Award-winning designer Christie Dustman will take you through the process of organizing a coherent garden in this five-session class.  I Wednesdays, 6:30 p.m.–8:30 p.m. $150 members, $190 non-members. Arnold Arboretum, Boston, (617) 524-1718, arboretum.harvard.edu Images from the Past: History of Photography in New England February 10 Join curators for an introduction into the photographic collections in Historic New England’s library and archives. You will learn about nineteenth- and twentieth-century photographic processes and explore the work of outstanding New England photographers. I Otis House, Cambridge, Mass., 1 p.m.–5 p.m. $30 Historic New England members and students, $45 non-members. Pre-registration is required. Call (617) 994-6678 or register at historicnewengland.org 68th Annual New England Home Show February 23–25 More than 50 experts will be on hand to answer your building and remodeling questions and share the latest in building products and technology. After you pick the brains of all the industry pros, you can enjoy cooking demonstrations, a furniture-building zone, craft zone, and food specialty area. I Friday noon–9 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m.–9 p.m., Sunday 10 a.m.–6 p.m. $9. Seaport World Trade Center, Boston, (508) 823-0389, newenglandhomeshows.com  EDITOR’S NOTE: Events are subject to change. Please confirm details with event organizer prior to your visit. January–February 2018 | New England Home  161

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New In The Showrooms

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1. Ocean Deep The stylish Sands drinks table with a starfish-shaped base adds that touch of gold every room demands. | Windsor Smith for Century Furniture, Boston Design Center, centuryfurniture.com 2. Mirror, Mirror Palacek’s Amaya mirror with deep teal wooden beads may be the fairest of them all. | Nicola’s Home, Yarmouth, Maine, nicolashome.com 3. Bangle and Bauble 2nd Avenue Lighting’s Corsica chandelier features a circular frame that sparkles with an array of stunning clear and amber faceted crystal beads simulating the fluid movement of water droplets. | Vermont Lamp & Shade, Essex Junction, Vt., vtlamp.com 4. Channel Surfing Luxurious channel tufting is the star of the show in the new John Marie sofa by Perennials Social. | EJ Victor, Robert Allen,

Boston Design Center, robertallendesign. com, and Cabot House, various New England locations, cabothouse.com 5. Animal Attraction In Southwestern Native American cultural lore, the horned toad is considered a sacred medicine animal. Add a decorative touch to desk or bookshelf with this sculptural version. | Modern Relik, Waltham, Mass., modernrelik.com 6. Wax On Kelly Wearstler, known for her ultra-glam and daring designs, created Gem for Ann Sacks—a collection of encaustic tiles in bold designs. Elope is shown here.  | Ann Sacks, Boston Design Center, annsacks.com

| edited by lynda Simonton | 162  New England Home | January–February 2018

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VERMONT HANDMADE LIGHTING

West Rupert, Vermont

800 844-9416

Dan Cutrona

www.AuthenticDesigns.com

AUTHENTIC DESIGNS

561 Boylston St., Suite 200 | Boston, Ma 617-859-7623 | 800-945-2979 intbuilders.com

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New In The Showrooms

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1. Design Revived The club chair adopts a modern point of view with the Marion’s ebony base, sleek shape, and bold orange fabric.  | Lillian August for Hickory White, Grand Rapids Furniture, Boston Design Center, grandrapidsfurniture.net 2. Joy Ride Imagine the pure delight in brushing and washing at this whimsical Pashley Bicycle sink by Crosswater. | Designer Bath, Beverly and Watertown, Mass., designerbath.com 3. City of Light These charming Ca C’est Paris plates from Gien will be on every Francophile’s wish list. | Somerset Home, Hamilton, Mass., somerset-home.com

4. Ebony & Ivory The incomparable Bunny Williams elevates a simple cabinet with an ebony finish and faux bone design that packs a graphic punch. | Theodore & Company, Duxbury, Mass., theodoreandcompany.com 5. Stick Figure La Petite floor lamp by Quaglio Simonelli exhibits geometric perfection without symmetry. The tidy shade rests, seemingly precariously, on a stem-like base.  | Chimera, Boston, chimeralightingdesign.com 6. Tactical Textile Employ Romo’s lush velvets anywhere you want to create a cozy and inviting nest. Shown on the chaise: Benito and Tatiana. | Romo, Boston Design Center, romo.com

164  New England Home | January–February 2018

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Premier Properties By maria L a piana

Bellevue Avenue Beauty

Splendor in the Glass

Barn Baby, Barn

Barn Baby, Barn

Kathryn Clair, the listing agent for this property in Roxbury, Connecticut, calls it “quintessentially New England.” That can mean a lot of things—from cozy Colonial to sprawling farmhouse to brick Cape—but in this case, Clair is referencing its bucolic setting, plethora of stone walls, and spectacular views. The barn-style home is set on an idyllic country road and overlooks the Litchfield Hills, open pastures, and distant woods. The professionally landscaped parcel on four acres is private, with a gated entry and a courtyard of crushed gravel bordered by low stone walls. There are sheltering walkways and wide decks, and a pool and spa surrounded by manicured lawns. The 5,400-square-foot house was built in 1997 in the style of a modern, openplan barn, with weathered gray siding and a shake roof. The current owners completed a thorough renovation

166  New England Home | January-February 2018

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several years ago, which included the addition of a master bedroom and bath, gym, sauna, and art gallery space. Living areas gently flow into one another on the main level. The mood throughout is tranquil, with rich architectural detail, exposed beams and wide-board floors, and unobtrusive, high-end finishes suitable for a wide array of furnishing styles. ROOMS: 14 This is a house designed for entertaining; 5 BEDROOMS 5 FULL BATHS the kitchen features a spacious center 1 HALF BATH island, commercial-grade range, and 5,400 SQ. FT. Sub-Zero refrigerator. The master suite $2,795,000 is on the main floor, with four bedrooms on the second level and a lower level with the gym and sauna and space for a workshop/ studio. The living room opens onto a large deck, while a roomy porch overlooks those extraordinary views of gorgeous gardens, the | Continued on page 171 Splendor in Glass photos by Elyssa Cohen; Barn baby, Barn photos by Michael Bowman

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W H E R E E XC E L L E NC E L I V E S

WESTON, MASSACHUSETTS Magnificent estate on 23 acres in the heart of Weston. Beautifully renovated main residence, guest cottage & field house. Spectacular grounds, gardens & freshwater pond with waterfall. $18,500,000

CONCORD, MASSACHUSETTS Architectural masterpiece provides 10,395 sf and fully integrates smart-house technology. 23.5 acres offer privacy, extraordinary manicured gardens and woodlands with trails. $12,500,000

Represented by: Kathryn Alphas-Richlen, Sales Associate C. 781.507.1650

Represented by: Jonathan P. Radford, Sales Associate C. 617.335.1010

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS Renovated, 4-level custom home on Commonwealth Ave. with direct elevator, 13 rooms, 5+ bedrooms, 6.2 baths, high ceilings, gym, media room, garden, and 2 parking spaces. $12,250,000

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS Exquisite Flat of the Hill Townhome offering high ceilings, 2 fireplaces, high-end kitchen, commercial elevator, 4 bedrooms, 3.3 baths, home theatre, terrace, deck, and 5-car garage. $8,995,000

Represented by: Michael Harper, Sales Associate C. 617.480.3938

Represented by: Michael Harper, Sales Associate C. 617.480.3938

WESTON, MASSACHUSETTS This custom luxurious & sleek open concept smart home features 11 rooms, elevator, state-of-the art systems, Poggenpohl kitchen, screened porch, lush grounds and 3-car garage. $8,980,000

NEWTON, MASSACHUSETTS Distinctive brick Georgian estate privately set on 2.6 acres. Impeccable interior, magnificent grounds, elevator, pool, patio, tennis court, & carriage house w/ 5-car garage. $8,500,000

Represented by: Deborah M. Gordon & Carole Milott, Sales Associates D. 617.974.0404 | C. 617.721.0499

Represented by: Jayne Bennett Friedberg, Broker Associate C. 617.899.2111

COLDWELLBANKERLUXURY.COM

C O L D W E L L B A N K E R R ES I D E N T I A L B R O K E R AG E

The property information herein is derived from various sources that may include, but not be limited to, county records and the Multiple Listing Service, and it may include approximations. Although the information is believed to be accurate, it is not warranted and you should not rely upon it without personal verification. Real estate agents affiliated with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage are independent contractor agents and are not employees of the Company.Š2018 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Operated by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker, the Coldwell Banker logo, Coldwell Banker Global Luxury and the Coldwell Banker Global Luxury logo are service marks registered or pending registration owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. 210856NE_10/17

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W H E R E E XC E L L E NC E L I V E S

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS Renovated building offers 12 luxury residences with concierge services 24/7. The 8th floor residence comprises, 4 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, wine cellar, balcony and parking. $7,750,000

CHESTNUT HILL, MASSACHUSETTS Private, 1 + acre estate in Olde Chestnut Hill, accessed by private driveway features grand living spaces, well-appointed kitchen, impressive master suite, and English Boxwood Gardens. $6,850,000

Represented by: Jonathan P. Radford, Sales Associate C. 617.335.1010

Represented by: Deborah M. Gordon, Sales Associate C. 617.974.0404

BROOKLINE, MASSACHUSETTS Stately brick Colonial in Sargent Estates set on 1+ acres of landscaped grounds with pond views, renovated kitchen, conservatory, library, 6 bedrooms, and home theatre. $6,400,000

WESTON, MASSACHUSETTS Gorgeous Brick Front Colonial estate in desirable Weston Country Club, with pond views, 17 rooms, 5 bedrooms, open floor plan, custom kitchen, patio, plus finished 3rd floor and lower level playroom. $4,850,000

Represented by: Deborah M. Gordon, Sales Associate C. 617.974.0404

Represented by: Kathryn Alphas-Richlen, Sales Associate C. 781.507.1650

WELLESLEY HILLS, MASSACHUSETTS Impressive Patrick Ahearn design in coveted Wellesley Farms offers 8,000 sq.ft. of living. 8 bedrooms, stunning detail. Pool, spa, fire pit and outdoor kitchen create the perfect back yard. $4,650,000

BROOKLINE, MASSACHUSETTS A 2017 stunning gut renovation. A Gourmet kitchen which over looks a terraced garden. 4 season sunroom with stone fireplace and glass Nanawall. $4,150,000

Represented by: Ellen Walsh, Sales Associate C. 781.254.2337

Represented by: Jill Streck, Sales Associate C. 617.510.0771

COLDWELLBANKERLUXURY.COM

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BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS Single family home on The Flat of Beacon Hill with 4 levels, 4 fireplaces, terrace, eat-in kitchen, deck, 4 bedrooms, new garden, and garage parking. Ready to customize. $3,986,000

BROOKLINE, MASSACHUSETTS Fisher Hill! Stucco Colonial home on 20,000+ SF lot with original period details, marble foyer, living room with fireplace, sunken den, sunroom, 6+ bedrooms, and indoor pool. $2,990,000

Represented by: Elaine Dolley, Sales Associate C. 617.331.0243

Represented by: Deborah M. Gordon, Sales Associate C. 617.974.0404

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS Enjoy Ritz-Carlton 5-star services, breathtaking unobstructed views, 2,242 sf in near perfect condition, 3 bedrooms, 3 ½ bathrooms, 24-hour concierge, and 1 garage space. $2,895,000

NEWTON, MASSACHUSETTS Exquisite 2-year young home set on 17,540 corner lot with 11 rooms, 5 bedrooms, chef's kitchen, Brazilian teak floors, detailed moldings, solar panels, and 2-car garage. $2,499,000

Represented by: Jonathan P. Radford, Sales Associate C. 617.335.1010

Represented by: Jamie Genser, Sales Associate C. 617.515.5152

DUXBURY, MASSACHUSETTS Landmark home with superb updates, 5 bedrooms, 4 fireplaces, chef's kitchen, Cathedral family room, roof deck with panoramic water views, and deeded private ownership of King Caesar Beach. $2,499,000

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS Exquisitely renovated residence at Rowes Wharf offering water views, gourmet kitchen, living/dining room, two plus bedrooms, deeded parking, and Boston Harbor Hotel amenities. $2,275,000

Represented by: Chris Swem, Sales Associate C. 781.561.5163

Represented by: Antonia Monarski, Sales Associate C. 617.905.4588

C O L D W E L L B A N K E R R ES I D E N T I A L B R O K E R AG E The property information herein is derived from various sources that may include, but not be limited to, county records and the Multiple Listing Service, and it may include approximations. Although the information is believed to be accurate, it is not warranted and you should not rely upon it without personal verification. Real estate agents affiliated with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage are independent contractor agents and are not employees of the Company.©2018 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Operated by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker, the Coldwell Banker logo, Coldwell Banker Global Luxury and the Coldwell Banker Global Luxury logo are service marks registered or pending registration owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. 210856NE_10/17

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7

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Beautiful and historic 9 bedroom 6.5 bath beachfront estate on Long Island Sound is a potential dream home. Minutes to downtowon.

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NEWPORT AND SURROUNDING RHODE ISLAND COMMUNITIES

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Premier Properties

Continued from page 166 |

pool, the pasture, and the hills. Duly Noted: Roxbury is a small town (population 2,300) with a reputation for attracting artists of every stripe; over the years it’s become known as something of a magnet for the rich and famous. Many A-list celebrities have called the picturesque town home, including composer Stephen Sondheim, journalist Gay Talese, actors Daniel Day-Lewis and Denis Leary, writer Frank McCourt, novelist William Styron, sculptor Alexander Calder, and playwright Arthur Miller, who lived there from 1956 to 1961 with his wife, Marilyn Monroe. Contact: Kathryn Clair, William Pitt Sotheby’s International Realty, Washington Depot, Conn., (860) 868-6926, williampitt.com. MLS# L10239327

Bellevue Avenue Beauty

If “grand” is the first word that comes to mind when you set eyes on this home, then “tasteful” is the first thing you think of when you step inside. It has all the hallmarks of a Newport mansion—impossibly spacious rooms with vaulted ceilings, outstanding architectural millwork, and inlaid floors. Located on Newport’s famed Bellevue Avenue, Rockry Hall was designed in 1890 by renowned architect Seth Bradford. The iconic Gothic Revival has been redone, remodeled, and completely refreshed over the last decade. So while period details abound, the residence has been comfortably ushered into the ROOMS: 12 twenty-first century. The home is clearly 7 BEDROOMS 6 FULL BATHS historically significant, says listing agent 2 HALF BATHS Paul Leys, but what’s more remarkable 10,217 SQ. FT. is how immensely livable it feels. Light $6,250,000 and bright, open and contemporary with crisp finishes, it’s anything but stuffy. At more than 10,000 square feet with seven bedrooms, this is a large home, but its spaces are well-defined so it doesn’t feel vast. The first floor is suitable for both entertaining on a grand scale and family living. The bedrooms are configured for a large family (the current owners have five children), and there is ample space for family members of all ages to get together—or get away from it all. The Christopher Peacock–designed kitchen is a stunner with its marble floor, island that seats seven, and iceboxinspired cabinetry. It’s a good bet that any prospective owner will want to make this place his or her own, but for the record, we’d be in favor of leaving the gorgeous color palette—from dove gray and champagne to shades of sand and seaglass—exactly as is.

Duly Noted: A fire ravaged the Bradford-designed estate soon after it was completed. During its reconstruction, a neighboring Queen Anne was moved and attached to the original structure, making for an odd mix of periods. But when the residence was later restored, architects leaned toward its Gothic Revival roots. They reconstructed the porte cochere, among other features—and earned the home the Newport Historical Society Preservation Award. Contact: Paul Leys, Gustave White Sotheby’s International Realty, Newport, R.I., (401) 862-6706, gustavewhite.com. MLS# 1174552

Splendor in the Glass

Two separate structures combine to create this striking glass-walled home in Arrowsic, Maine, “a singularly beautiful spot that makes you feel as though you’re miles away from the world,” according to listing agent Kim Latour. In fact, the home is just minutes from Bath, the biggest city in the area outside of Portland. The home was designed by a German art dealer to display his extensive art collection. Built on a five-acre lot and deliberately sited directly on 475 feet of water frontage, it puts nature on display as well, offering stunning views across the landscape and the water. The home was featured in the German edition of Architectural Digest. The main house and guest house are connected visually by their nearly identiROOMS: 10 cal exteriors and minimalist interiors. 4 BEDROOMS 2 FULL BATHS They’re also connected literally, by a 2,832 SQ. FT. series of decks, wide expanses that blur $1,500,000 the lines between built environment and great outdoors. The main house has an open living area defined by half-walls. The kitchen is a minimalist’s dream—simple but functional. The master suite is a private sanctuary and an artful retreat with its own living room/gallery. The guest house features a sitting area, a charming bunkroom plus two additional bedrooms, a full bath, and laundry room. The home is ideally crafted for one or two people who enjoy company, and yet a family could live there easily, maintaining privacy with plenty of common space. Duly Noted: The city of Bath is thirty-four miles northeast of Portland. Named one of America’s Best Small Cities, Bath (population 8,400) is a popular tourist destination, thanks to its charming downtown, unique shops and restaurants, and notable examples of nineteenth-century Federal, Greek Revival, and Italianate architecture. Contact: Kim Latour, William Raveis Real Estate, Portland, Maine, (207) 253-5330, raveis.com. MLS# 1327353  January-February 2018 | New England Home  171

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Resources

A guide to the products and professionals in this issue’s featured homes

ROOMS WE LOVE: THE REAWAKENING PAGES 42–46

Page 42: Interior designers: Susan Schaub and D. Scott Bell, Theo and Isabella Design Group, Sudbury, Mass., (978) 505-1616, theoandisabella.com; rug from Landry & Arcari Rugs and Carpeting, landryandarcari.com; draperies fabricated by Sam’s & Son Custom Drapery Workroom, samsandson. com, with fabric by Zoffany, zoffany.com; venetian plaster by Pietra Viva, pietravivaitaly.com; chandeliers from Made Goods, madegoods.com; sofa fabrics from Zoffany; lounge chairs from John Pomp, johnpomp.com, and O. Henry House, ohenryhouseltd.com; bench cushion fabrics from Colefax and Fowler, colefax.com; coffee tables from Dessin Fournir, dessinfournir.com, and Porta Romana, portaromana.com. Page 44: Parlor designer: Elizabeth Benedict, Elizabeth Home Decor & Design, Chestnut Hill, Mass., (617) 965-0069, elizabethhomedecor.com; rug from Landry & Arcari Rugs and Carpeting; cocktail table and sofa fabric from Kravet, kravet.com; Keith Fritz credenza from M-Geough, m-geough. com; chandelier from Knight Furniture Showrooms, knightfurn.com; artwork by Pauline Curtiss, paulinecurtiss.com; draperies fabricated by Frank’s Custom Draperies, East Taunton, Mass., (508) 828-1712, with fabric from JF Fabrics, jffabrics. com. Dining room designer: Mally Skok, Mally Skok Design, Lincoln, Mass., (781) 259-4090, mallyskokdesign.com; area rug from Fibreworks, fibreworks.com; lighting and mirror from Currey & Company, curreycodealers.com; bar cart and shelf from Made Goods. Page 46: Charlotte’s Closet designer: Robin Gannon, Robin Gannon Interiors & Home, Lexington, Mass., (781) 862-0466, robingannoninteriors.com; wallpaper from Schumacher, fschumacher.com; fabrics from Cowtan & Tout, cowtan.com; drapery fabrication by Hillary Kimmel, Sew What, sewwhathillary.com. Bath designer: Vivian Robins, Vivian Robins Design, Westford, Mass., (617) 7635718, vivianrobinsdesign.com; general contractor: Geoff Tompkins, GTT Construction, Groton, Mass., (978) 448-3763; wall tile from Discover Tile, discovertile.com, installed by ARC Marble & Tile, arcmarble.com; wallpaper from the Martin Group, martingroupinc.com; artwork from Powers Gallery & Fine Framing, powersgallery.com.

SPECIAL SPACES: MIX AND MATCH PAGES 50–55

Architecture: Adolfo Perez,

Adolfo Perez Architect, Newton, Mass., (617) 527-7442, adolfoperez.com Interior design: Nathalie Ducrest, La Tour Design, Brookline, Mass., (617) 232-3533, latourdesignboston.com Builder: Zeb Arruda, Brite Builders, Somerville, Mass., (617) 776-6782, britebuildersinc.com Landscape architect: Gregory Lombardi Design,

Cambridge, Mass., (617) 492-2808, lombardidesign.com

Custom kitchen hardware: Ray Ciemny, Artisan Iron,

Page 52: Powder room sink from Alape, alape.com; faucets by Dornbracht, dornbracht.com; mirror from Electric Mirror, electricmirror.com. Page 54: Billiards table by Billards Toulet, billard-toulet.com; light fixtures from Zaneen, zaneen.com.

Pages 108–109: Antique bench and hall rack

INDUSTRIAL CHIC PAGES 98–107 Architecture: Hacin +

Associates, Boston, (617) 426-0077, hacin.com Interior design: Jama Samek, Jama Samek Interior Design, Winchester, Mass., (781) 729-1559, jamasamekid.com Builder: FBN Construction, Hyde Park, Mass., (617) 333-6821, fbnconstruction.com Metal fabrication: Bartek Konieczny, Bartek Konieczny Studios, Abington, Mass., (617) 9211166, bartekkonieczny.com Art curator: Jacqui Becker, Jacqueline Becker Fine Arts Consulting Services, Newton, Mass., (617) 527-6169, beckerfinearts.com Outdoor terrace plantings: Winston Flowers, ­Boston, (800) 457-4901, winstonflowers.com Pages 98–99: Stairway by Hacin + Associates; metal door by Bartek Konieczny Studios. Pages 100–101: Agnes chandelier in dining room by Lindsey Adelman Studio, lindseyadelman.com; table and chairs by B&B Italia, bebitalia.com; painting over fireplace by Patrick Hughes, www.patrick hughes.co.uk; kitchen island and movable lamp by Bartek Konieczny Studios; kitchen cabinets by Bulthaup, bulthaup.com; island stools from Crate & Barrel, crateandbarrel.com; Knotty Bubbles stairway chandelier by Lindsey Adelman Studio. Page 102: Gallery artwork by Sand T Kalloch, sandtworks.com. Page 103: Media room furniture by B&B Italia; rug from Kasthall, kasthall.com; powder room light fixture by Lindsey Adelman Studio; artwork by Lazaro Montano, lazaromontano.com. Pages 104–105: Master bedroom headboard designed by Jama Samek Interior Design; furniture by B&B Italia; rug from Kasthall; movable shades from Lutron, lutron.com; light fixture by Philippe Starck from Flos, flos.com; guest room artwork by CE Morse, cemorsephoto.com; Dado side tables by B&B Italia; lamps from Artemide, artemide.net/en/; Charles bed by B&B Italia, rug from Kasthall; master bath tile from Heath Ceramics, heathceramics.com; Acapulco chair from Innit, innitdesigns.com. Pages 106–107: Seating area sofa and tables by B&B Italia, rug by Paola Lenti, paolalenti.it; living room furniture by B&B Italia; rug from Kasthall; painting by Marjorie Minkin, ­marjorieminkin.com.

NO PLACE LIKE HOME PAGES 108–117 Interior designer: Jenn

Sanborn, Sacris Design, Amesbury, Mass., (978) 388-5948, sacrisdesign. com Builder: Platt Builders, Groton, Mass., (978) 448-9963, plattbuilders.com

Groton, Mass., (978) 448-0028, artisaniron.com

through Sacris Design; brass chandelier by E.F. Chapman through Visual Comfort, visualcomfort. com. Pages 110–111: Blue chairs from Jessica Charles, jessicacharles.com; sofas from Wesley Hall, wesleyhall.com; coffee table from Jonathan Charles, jonathancharlesfurniture.com; pillow fabrics from Kravet, kravet.com; rug from Stark, starkcarpet.com; plaid throw from Abraham Moon & Sons through Red Bird Trading Company, redbirdnewburyport.com; antique fireplace tools through Sacris Design; wall art by Pat Forbes through Paula Estey Gallery, paulaesteygallery.com; Dependable wall color from Pratt & Lambert, prattandlambert.com; chandeliers from Visual Comfort. Pages 112–113: Backsplash tile from StoneImpressions, stoneimpressions.com; stools from Wesley Hall; teapot pendants from Currey & Company, curreycodealers.com; countertops from Colorquartz, colorquartz.com; banquette from Wesley Hall; pedestal table from Keystone Collections, keystonecollections.com; William Yeoward chairs from Jonathan Charles; chandelier from Visual Comfort; built-in wet bar by Platt Builders; Arcadia wallpaper in dining room from Thibaut; chandelier and sconces from Visual Comfort; rug from Fibreworks, fibreworks.com. Pages 114–115: Stevens & Graham rug from Stark; Brinjal wall color from Farrow & Ball, farrow-ball. com; Everard Coffee wall color from Benjamin Moore, benjaminmoore.com; map wall art from Ambler Art Group, amblerartgroup.com; antique side chair through Sacris Design; plaid pillows from Abraham Moon & Sons, moons.co.uk; vintage light fixture from E.F. Chapman through Visual Comfort. Pages 116–117: Bed and headboard from Wesley Hall with fabric by Hodsoll McKenzie through Zimmer & Rohde, zimmer-rohde.com; lamp from Visual Comfort; Pine Cone Hill bedding from Ralph Lauren, ralphlauren.com; pillows from West Elm, westelm.com; grasscloth wallcovering by Paper and Ink through Wallquest, wallquest.com; carpet from Stark; chandelier from Visual Comfort; art over fireplace from the Paula Estey Gallery, paulaestey gallery.com; lounge chair from Jessica Charles; vintage lounge chair, table, and standing lamp through Sacris Design; master bath tub from MTI, mtibaths.com; tile surround by K.J. Patterson through Portico Fine Tile, porticofinetile.com; tub filler from DXV, dxv.com; flooring tile from Settecento, settecento.com; light fixtures from Visual Comfort; curtain fabric from Clarence House, clarencehouse.com; vanity from Restoration Hardware, restorationhardware.com; gilt stool through Sacris Design.

ALL IN GOOD TIME PAGES 118–127 Interior design: Kristine

Irving, Koo de Kir Architectural Interiors, Boston, (617) 268-8111, koodekir.com

Construction and millwork:

Pomeroy & Company, Charlestown, Mass., (617) 242-8565, pomeroyco.com Audio/video design/installation: System 7, Boston, (978) 887-1200, systemseven.com Drapery Workroom: Designer Draperies of Boston,

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Boston, (617) 268-2391, designerdraperiesofboston.com Pages 119–121: Burlwood cube tables from

Lawson-Fenning, lawsonfenning.com; hide rug from Yerra, yerrarugs.com; Arctic Pear pendant light from Ochre, ochre.net; sconces from Urban Electric Company, urbanelectricco.com; sofa from Ligne Roset, ligneroset.com; Porada side chairs through Casa Design Boston, casadesignliving. com; lounge chairs from Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams, mgbwhome.com; fire screen from Ameico, ameico.com; ottoman fabric by Jacques Bouvet et Cie, jacquesbouvet.com; painting by Thomas Rickman, tomrickman.co.uk; wallpaper backing shelves by Phillip Jeffries, phillipjeffries.com; sconce from Urban Electric Company; cast bottle art installations by Brynn Dizack, gobrynngo.com; carpet runner from Merida, meridastudio.com; antique spool-of-cotton stool from Andrew Spindler Antiques, spindlerantiques.com; cabinet hardware and faucet from Waterworks, waterworks.com; art in bar by Porter Teleo, porterteleo.com; wall sconce from Urban Electric Company; moon bowl on bar from KleinReid, kleinreid.com. Pages 122–123: Jesse sofa from Casa Design Living; carpet from Merida Studio; chairs from Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams; Jielde floor lamp from Horne, shophorne.com; Ethincraft coffee table from Lekker Home, lekkerhome.com; side table from Art Applications, artapplications.com; photography by Andrea Star Greitzer, asgreitzer.com; Warhol print from Zinc Details, zincdetails.com; framing by A Street Frames, astreetframes.com; wall sconce from Urban Electric Company. Pages 124–125: Kitchen lighting from Lambert et Fils, lambertetfils.com; dining table and chairs from Knoll, knoll.com; appliances from Yale Appliance, yaleappliance.com; flooring from DuChateau, duchateau.com; pillows from Jonathan Adler, jonathanadler.com; banquette fabric from Pierre Frey, pierrefrey.com; workstation stool from Anthropologie, anthropologie.com; family room limestone tile from Ann Sacks, annsacks.com; Womb chair from Knoll; custom carpet by Koo de Kir for Merida; Jesse sofa from Casa Design Living; oak side table from Longleaf Lumber, longleaflumber.com; wallpaper from Phillip Jeffries, phillipjeffries.com. Pages 126–127: Mr. Blow powder room wallpaper from Abnormals Anonymous, abnormalsanony mous.com; faucet from Waterworks; master bedroom carpet from Madeline Weinrib, madeline weinrib.com; bedding from Annie Selkie, annieselke. com; pillow fabric from Schumacher, fschumacher. com; bench from Outpost Original, outpostoriginal. com; vintage Kofod Larsen from Reside, resideinc. com, with Maharam seat fabric, maharam.com; wallpaper from Phillip Jeffries; bed from Design Within Reach, dwr.com; lamps from Arteriors, arteriorshome.com.

MOUNTAIN MAKEOVER PAGES 128–137

Architecture: Jodie Fielding,

Roots Design Studio, Burlington, Vt., (802) 922-2949, rootsdesignstudio.com Interior design: Holly Hickey Moore, Holly Hickey Moore Interior Design, Dallas, Tex., (201) 663-5440, hollyhickeymoore.com Builder: Justus Cameron, The McKernon Group, Brandon, Vt., (802) 247-8500, mckernongroup.com

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ARCHITECT & BUILDER

Resources Pages 128–129: Railings by Nop’s Metalworks,

S H O W R O O M S

OSTERVILLE

FALMOUTH

CHATHAM

nopsmetalworks.com; sconces from Troy Lighting, troy-lighting.com; entry pendant from Visual Comfort, visualcomfort.com. Pages 130–131: Art above sofa by Kathryn Lipke through West Branch Gallery, westbranchgallery. com; sofa by Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams, mgbwhome.com; chairs from Chairish, chairish. com, reupholstered by Jeff Groleau, Upholstery Solutions, upholsterysolutionsvt.com, in fabric from Robert Allen, robertallendesign.com, with Perennials piping, perennialsfabrics.com; rug from Stark Carpet, starkcarpet.com; table lamps from Arteriors, arteriorshome.com; ottomans from Tazi Designs, tazidesigns.com; fireplace light fixtures designed by Holly Hickey Moore and fabricated by Conant Metal & Light, conantmetalandlight.com; coffee table from West Elm, westelm.com; wood floors and ceiling through Planet Hardwood, planethardwood.com; Cloud White wall color and Gravel Grey door color from Benjamin Moore, benjaminmoore.com; leather pillow from Pottery Barn, potterybarn.com; embroidered pillow from Lulu and Georgia, luluandgeorgia.com. Pages 132–133: Light fixtures from Visual Comfort; Gravel Grey cabinet paint from Benjamin Moore; countertops from ColorQuartz, colorquartz.com; stools from Hickory Chair, hickorychair.com, with Kravet fabric; runner by Serena & Lily, serenaandlily. com; brass faucet from Delta, deltafaucet.com; backsplash tile from Cepac Tile, cepactile.com; Edgecliff cabinet pulls from Schoolhouse Electric, schoolhouse.com; dining table designed by Holly Hickey Moore with top crafted by The McKernon Group and base crafted by Nop’s Metalworks; Laurent dining chairs by Suzanne Kasler for Hickory Chair, with fabric by Kravet; range hood designed by Holly Hickey Moore, crafted by The McKernon Group. Pages 134–135: Shelves designed by Holly Hickey Moore, crafted by The McKernon Group, painted in Loyal Blue from Sherwin-Williams, sherwin-williams. com; Zig Zag on One tiles by Popham for Ann Sacks, annsacks.com; rug, coffee table, and sofa from West Elm; artwork by Otto Berchem, ottoberchem.com; Eclipse light fixtures on shelves from Visual Comfort; ping-pong table from Killerspin, killerspin.com; runner from CB2, cb2.com. Pages 136–137: Mountain White marble from Marble and Granite, marbleandgranite.com; faucet from Kohler, us.kohler.com; wood backsplash from Planet Hardwood; Villa D’Oro Granada mosaic shower tile from Walker Zanger, walkerzanger.com; black shower slate from Tile Showcase, tileshowcase.com; shower fixtures from Kohler; bedroom built-ins designed by Holly Hickey Moore, built by The McKernon Group; cabinet hardware from Alexander Marchant, alexandermarchant.com; bed from Restoration Hardware, restorationhardware.com; bolster fabric from Robert Allen; fur pillows from West Elm and Anthropologie, anthropologie.com; light fixtures by Kelly Wearstler for Visual Comfort; Slocum end tables by Vanguard through David Gilbert, davidwgilbert.com; art by Charlie Bluett through West Branch Gallery; wood ceiling from Planet Hardwood. 

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A guide to the products and professionals in this issue’s featured homes A.J. Rose Carpets & Flooring 49 Audio Video Design 160 Authentic Designs 163

Kitchen Views at National Lumber 45 LDa Architecture & Interiors 149 Leslie Fine Interiors, Inc. 4–5 Living Swell 34 Lynn Creighton Realtor 170

Back Bay Shutter Co., Inc. 43

Matthew Cunningham Landscape Design, LLC 141

Bereznicki Architects 92

Mayer & Associates 80–81

Bertola Custom Homes & Remodeling inside

Merida 1

back cover

Boston Stone Restoration 157 Botello Home Center 165 Bradford’s Rug Gallery 160 Butter Pat Industries 165 C.H. Newton Builders, Inc. 12 California Closets 27 Catamount Builders 48 Catherine Truman Architects 93 Charles Hilton Architects 37 Charles R. Myer & Partners, Ltd. 72–73 Chip Webster Architecture 94

Modern Metal Solutions 165 Morehouse MacDonald & Associates, Inc. 31 MWI Fiber-Shield 64 Newton Kitchens & Design 65 Patrick Ahearn Architect, LLC 84–85 Paul F. Weber Architect, LLC 86–87 Pella Windows & Doors 53 Pellettieri Associates, Inc. 35 Platemark Design 20

Clarke Distributors 40

Prospect Hill Antiques 173

Coldwell Banker Previews International 

R.P. Marzilli & Company, Inc. 47

Cumar, Inc. 16 Curl Simitus Architecture & Design 95 Cypress Design 56 DiMauro Architects 74–75 Divine Design Center 8–9 Dover Rug & Home 41 Dream Kitchens 151 Fagan Door 157 Falcetti Pianos 144 FBN Construction Co., LLC back cover Ferguson 153 Flavin Architects inside front cover Foster Associates 56 Frank Webb Home 59 Garage Headquarters 54 Hampden Design+Construction 57 Herrick & White Architectural Millwork 29 Hutker Architects 76–77 The Inspired Bath 147 International Builders, Inc. 163 J.W. Construction, Inc. 143 Jamestown LP/Boston Design Center 19 Jan Gleysteen Architects, Inc. 78–79 Janine Dowling Design, Inc. 23 Julie Moir Messervy Design Studio 159 Kenneth Vona Construction, Inc. 2–3 Kevin Cradock Builders, Inc. 70 Kinlin Grover 170

HOME

MGa | Marcus Gleysteen Architects 15

Polhemus Savery DaSilva Architects Builders 88–89

Crown Point Cabinetry 61

to our online

Meyer & Meyer Architecture and Interiors 82–83

Christopher Hall Architect 51

167–169

WELCOME

Longfellow Design Build 174

Rob Bramhall Architects 90–91 S+H Construction 67 Salem Plumbing Supply Designer Bath 97 Sea–Dar Construction 24 Sewfine Drapery Workroom 39 Shope Reno Wharton 155 Siemasko + Verbridge 63 The Sliding Door Company 22

Eric rOth PhOtOgraPhy

Ad Index

SpaceCraft Architecture 96 Studio A Design 33 Sudbury Design Group, Inc. 10–11 Surroundings 159 Systems Design & Integration, Inc. 55 TMS Architects 6–7 Tyler & Sash 138 Valor Fireplaces 145 Wayne Towle Master Finishing & Restoration 17 Wolfers 69 Youngblood Builders, Inc. 21 New England Home, January–February 2018, Volume 13, Number 3 © 2018 by New England Home Magazine, LLC. All rights reserved. Permission to reprint or quote excerpts granted by written request only. New England Home (USPS 024-096) is published 6 times a year (JAN, MAR, MAY, JULY, SEP, NOV) by New England Home Magazine, LLC, 530 Harrison Ave, Ste 302, Boston, MA 02118, (617) 938-3991. Periodical postage paid at Boston, MA, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to New England Home, PO Box 5034, Brentwood, TN 37024. For change of address include old address as well as new address with both zip codes. Allow four to six weeks for change of address to become effective. Please include current mailing label when writing about your subscription.

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nehomemag.com January–February 2018 | New England Home  175

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Sketch Pad

Design Ideas in the Making

house was set atop a hill, with sweeping views of other hills • The beyond. Our task: to create elegant spaces that would also be

fresh, relaxed, and—a particular imperative—take advantage of the long south views and bring the outside in as much as possible. The owners love to cook and entertain; they envisioned guests gathered for elaborate meals in the space shared by the kitchen and breakfast room. They also asked to be able to lounge near the windows and enjoy the view. Our solution includes a banquette with curved ends, built to span the width of the room. Three French casements open out directly above the seat cushion and stretch up to meet the ceiling trim. A custom detail at the top conceals both screens and shades that can be rolled down as needed—allowing plenty of open, bug-free access to the landscape. Pairs of French doors at either end of the banquette lead to east and west terraces, providing additional flow to outside entertainment “rooms.” Wood walls washed with ivory milk paint, hand-scraped and stained hickory floors, unlacquered brass hardware that will develop a patina with age—plus a particularly beautiful pair of sconces chosen by the owners themselves—work in concert to make a warm, inviting space with all of the outdoor connection that was so desired. | Jennifer Hart, Hart Associates Architects, Belmont, Massachusetts, (617) 489-0030, hartarch.com

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Photo by Shelly Harrison

Waltham, MA | (781) 975-1809 | bertolacustom.com

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617.333.6800 | fbnconstruction.com

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Profile for New England Home Magazine LLC

New England Home January - February 2018  

The Past Made New

New England Home January - February 2018  

The Past Made New