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CONTRIBUTORS & STAFF BROOKE HANSSON is a research analyst and program administrator at Friends of the Lifers Youth Corp, a Jersey City nonprofit devoted to prisoner reentry, delinquency prevention and community improvement. She is also a photographer who explores the industrial landscapes of New Jersey through an artistic lens. damagedwear.com/bhp ERIC SCHKRUTZ is a McNair Academic-educated writer and photographer. He is currently working on a photo essay of his lifelong neighborhood, the West Side. You can find him riding around town on his yellow and black bicycle. ericofjerseycity.com TAD HENDRICKSON is a freelance writer based in Jersey City who has covered music of all genres, literature, the arts, food and real estate for publications ranging from the Wall Street Journal to Elle to the Village Voice. He currently writes the Jersey City Dad blog for the Jersey City Independent. jerseycitydad.com CHRISTOPHER LANE is based in Jersey City and specializes in documentary and portrait photography. He works on a regular basis for major publications and enjoys spending time in Jersey City with his wife Jasmine, son Morris and daughter Savannah. christopherlane.com LARYSSA WIRSTIUK is a writer and writing instructor who likes to spend time with her miniature dachshund Charlotte. Born and raised in North Jersey, Laryssa moved to Jersey City because she was curious about the city where her mother was raised. craftyourdrafts.com STEVE GOLD is the staff photographer at NEW and the Jersey City Independent. His photographs have also appeared in the Jersey Journal, the New York Daily News and other newspapers and magazines. popzero.com Chuck Kerr is the art director at NEW, where he moonlights from his day job as the award-winning art director for the alternative newsweekly the San Antonio Current. chuckkerr.com

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NEW EDITOR Jennifer Weiss PUBLISHER Catherine Hecht ART DIRECTOR Chuck Kerr STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Steve Gold GUIDE PHOTOGRAPHER Beth Achenbach CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Matt Hunger Melissa Surach COVER IMAGE Brooke Hansson MAP DESIGNER Jaden Rogers/FinePointDesigns.net MANY SPECIAL THANKS TO The loyal support of all businesses and organizations that encourage and sustain NEW. Advertising support makes NEW possible. Please show your thanks by supporting our advertisers. ABOUT NEW NEW is published four times a year by the Jersey City Independent. No part of this publication may be reproduced without prior written consent. We belong to the New Jersey Press Association, New Jersey Hyperlocal News Association and Authentically Local. CONTACT US general info@jerseycityindependent.com to advertise checht@jerseycityindependent.com WeAreNew.com JerseyCityIndependent.com Twitter.com/JCIndependent Facebook.com/JerseyCityIndependent


CONTENTs

22

14

8

8 ODE TO UPTOWN

22 vacant spaces

of friends built a new art scene on their

bring us the stories behind Jersey City's

side of the city.

houses where nobody lives and factories

Tad Hendrickson finds out how a group

14 SUMMER CRUSH

Local establishments are pumping out some sweet treats for the dog days –

Jennifer Weiss and Brooke Hansson

4 ON THE COVER

where nobody works.

34 JERSEY CITY MAP

57 JIVE TRAIN

36 LIVING GUIDE

The newest addition to NEW Magazine

Laryssa Wirstiuk talks to three summer

is the comic strip Jive Train, written by

food purveyors are taking their craft to

Jersey City's Dan Strauss.

the next level. Due to a research error, "City of Cats" in the Spring 2012 issue said that Carol McNichol was named in a lawsuit against Liberty Humane Society. She was not. We regret the error.

53 MARKETPLACE


ON THE COVER

THE CLOROX CHEMICAL

factory on Pacific Avenue is just one of many unused relics of Jersey City's industrial past. These shots by Brooke Hansson are outtakes from the package on the stories behind abandoned buildings in this issue. The company opened the plant in 1938; it was its first on the East Coast. In March 1965, Clorox announced its plans to vacate the plant. "From our third floor apartment's windows on Randolph Ave. and Claremont Ave., we could see this Clorox building," Beau_Geste writes on a historic photo of the building posted on wavz13's Flickr page (www.flickr.com/wavz13 hosts an amazing array of historic Jersey City photos – worth checking out). "They had mountains of chemicals piled up outside with shed-like roofs over them, while workers would shovel each day's delivery onto a conveyer belt system." The Jersey City Redevelopment Agency acknowledges a "recognized environmental condition" at the site, including possible chromium contamination.


in the

fridays @ sundown Aug 3 & 17

Riverview-Fisk Park

Aug 10 & 24

Washington Park

for additional info & list of sponsors visit riverviewneighborhood.org

or wpanj.org

26th ANNUAL PARK FEST & FLEA MARKET *rain date: Sept. 16

Palisade Avenue between Griffith & Bowers

Live Music, Shopping, Children’s Activities and Much More RIVERVIEWNEIGHBORHOOD.ORG

Vendors Wanted!


5TH

DOWNTOWN JERSEY CITY PRESENTS

AL ANNU

GROOVE

HOMEGROWN ORIGINAL LIVE MUSIC !

ON GROVE

GROVE STREET PATH PLAZA - 6PM TO 9PM PROUDLY SPONSORED BY: ice cream

tel: 201-839-5115 sandwiches

Saigòn Café

2 201

AYS WEDNESD

Owned PIZZA Family Since 1968

PAID FOR BY OR IN PART BY THE JERSEY CITY URBAN ENTERPRISE PROGRAM

317 Grove St. Ste 2 Jersey City, NJ 07302 • 201-547-3554 • jcdowntown.org

OVE O R G E TO TH E D I U AG

historic special improvement district

historic special improvement district

GROVE ST. PATH PLAZA (NEWARK AVE. & GROVE ST.)

MAY THROUGH DECEMBER

MONDAYS & THURSDAYS | 4PM - 8PM Local farms, multiple vendors extensive selections Local farms, multiple vendors andand extensive selections

PAID FOR BY OR IN PART BY THE JERSEY CITY URBAN ENTERPRISE PROGRAM

jcdowntown.org


ODE TO 8


Parrick Lally, Nick Ciavatta and Trish Szymanski of the band Sea of Otters

WRITTEN BY: Tad Hendrickson PHOTOGRAPHY BY: Christopher Lane

UPTOWN

How a Group of of Friends Built a New Arts Scene on Their Side of the City 9


T’S

It's the fourth Thursday of the month and that means that Uptown Crew is in the house. Technically speaking, it's their clubhouse – the Crew's monthly open mic takes place at Moore's, aka Bill and Ruth's, a funky bar located just to the west of the old Jersey City Medical Center. Owned by Bill and Ruth Moore for the last 42 years (Bill is now deceased), it's a time capsule of Jersey City's past, when these joints were a good place to mingle, say hi to the neighbors and unwind with a few cold beers or strong drinks. That's still the case today. On this night Uptown Crew founder and executive director Trish Szymanski is directing traffic as the evening's MC while her friend and comrade Neva Wartell spins R&B. Near the door there are tickets for raffles, super-cheap homemade food and CDs of headliner Sea of Otters for sale. Spirits were high because this was an extra special occasion: the twoyear anniversary of the organization. "Sometimes we have a great turnout, sometimes we have a small one," says Wartell, Uptown Crew's Associate Curator of Music and Culture. "But we have an unbroken record of having at least one new person each time either as an audience member or as a performer." There were several "newbies" on this night: B-Bark-A-Miss rapped along to backing beats on disc; Mark Hauptman, who lives down the street, played a loose solo version of "Rollin' and Tumblin'" on the harmonica; and Kurt Mattel played a couple of songs on dobro, including a nice version of the Rolling Stones' "You Got the Silver." Readings were done by regulars like former social worker Carol Sue Barrett, who wrote and published a book called Tails of a Social Worker. Tawana Williams read two poems, one about the ritual of greasing one's hair. Szymanski read a letter from a former slave to his former master, asking, among other things, for recompense for his years of work before he would consider coming back to work again.

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Behind the mic or standing by the bar, Szymanski is a force of nature with a voice that can easily be heard as she works her way through the room talking with everyone. A serial networker and community activist, Szymanski came up with the idea of creating an organization in her part of town and the name Uptown Crew just flew out of her mouth one day when she was talking to a friend. "She has a lot of experience doing a lot of different things," Wartell says of Szymanski. "She's a people person and she likes to network, connecting people with the arts, and arts with the people. She's real good with connecting what people do with opportunities to do what they do. She's also a whiz at public relations and publicity. She's always working it." A resident of Jersey City since 1997, Szymanski moved to the McGinley Square neighborhood in 2005. As she settled in she realized a lot of the people she knew from the downtown arts scene actually lived uptown near Journal Square, McGinley Square, Greenville, Bergen-Lafayette, the Heights and the other non-Downtown neighborhoods that make up about 80 percent of Jersey City. Some of these creative people were displaced after the tear-down of 111 First Street, an old warehouse that leased artist studio space and fostered the burgeoning Jersey City arts community, and left the crowded Downtown scene for cheaper rents and more space. Others were newer to Jersey City, and went directly to where it was more affordable, bypassing Downtown altogether. "We would run into each other going on the PATH train or on the street when we would be going to events," Szymanski recalls. "Then we'd get on our various modes of transportation and go back home. I thought to myself: That's kind of dumb. Not that what was going on Downtown wasn't cool, but I had written a couple of articles about Jersey City and learned how big it is.


Uptown Crew founder and executive director Trish Szymanski

“SHE LIKES TO NETWORK, CONNECTING PEOPLE WITH THE ARTS, AND ARTS WITH THE PEOPLE.� So I started to look around because I figure we could do something up here." Szymanski started the Uptown Crew Facebook group in December 2009 and within a month there were 100 members. In two months there were 200. By October 2010 Uptown Crew was a registered 501c3 nonprofit, and after two years there are now nearly 900 Likes of its Facebook page. "I had really just started to give people outside of downtown a sense of belonging to something," she says. "Sometimes you felt like you were in the Wild West if you were an artist who lived outside of Downtown. Everything happened there. The competition for space and money was fierce." Szymanski really wasn't planning on starting an arts organization, but she realized that something was in the air. At the same time, she was

personally growing out of her other associations around the city. So after talking to friends and neighbors, she figured the timing for it seemed right. The inaugural event was held at her loft space near McGinley Square on May 1, 2010. She had experience performing as a singer in coffee houses in the '70s, and read poetry or other writings in New York City at various open mics for decades. She knew she could pull together one herself and went for it, and a dozen people came. In June there was a dramatic reading where she connected some actors she knew with a theater teacher at North Bergen's High Tech High School who brought some students in to read from Washington Irving. Local singer-songwriter Mason Carpenter played a set at the end. "People in the neighborhood were just thrilled," Szymanski says of the 11


Neva Wartell, Uptown Crew's associate curator of music and culture

the early events. "We certainly got people to travel into the neighborhood, either to my house or Raphs Plaza, from other parts of the city. So right away we had new traffic on the block here." A resident of New Jersey for most of her life, Szymanski grew up in Roselle Park, landing in Middlesex County and then Elizabeth after that. Szymanski and Wartell, who is an ethnomusicologist, were both drawn to Jersey City by its diversity. This is a meeting point for their partnership in Uptown Crew as well as other locally oriented forprofit ventures they do together. "These days, if you are moving to Jersey City, you are moving from Ghana, Nicaragua, Uzbekistan, Paris – and I'm just thinking of individuals I know," Szymanski points out. "If you are moving here it's because you like living in a diverse place. As the world gets smaller and smaller, places like this tend to break down boundaries. It's a natural progression." 12

The people at Moore's were indeed a microcosm of Jersey City with a range of ethnic, racial, and social backgrounds. While the audience skewed a little older (bars have that effect), the performers ranged about 50 years in age. The tag line on Uptown Crew's Facebook page says: "The Crew is You." This night was ample proof of that.

The open mics at Moore's are great, but the Crew is also expanding. There was a communal bulb planting at McGinley Square in 2011, a series of mixed-genre live music performances called JC Originals are held in conjunction with citywide JC Fridays, and there is involvement in the Jersey City-based African Diaspora International Film Festival. Uptown Crew is once again looking at youth outreach. In the past there was Washington Irving reading for teens, and


during Thanksgiving 2011, Szymanski led a couple of young adults and teenagers around the McGinley Square area to give food to the homeless. Now Uptown Crew has partnered with One for All, a nonprofit run by Lelia Diaz that operates a Jersey City public school uniform recycling program out of Ed's Salvage Co. vintage store (store owner Ed Ramirez is a regular performer at the open mics, and is a longtime supporter of Uptown Crew). As is often the case, Szymanski hit it off with Diaz when she met her at Ed's. Soon Diaz was an Uptown Crew board member, and she also helped with the paperwork for getting official nonprofit status. Now they are starting a new youth-oriented programming together. "We were talking about providing something for the kids in the area," Diaz recalls. "In public schools, they have no outlets besides going to school. The first workshop we'll do is a writing workshop where students will learn about the elements of writing. Later that day we will do an open mic, but it won't be limited to those who went to the writing workshop." Other future plans include workshops where entrepreneurs, lawyers and

other professionals from outside the creative arts community will come in talk. It's a cliché to say that kids are our most important resource, but the potential impact for this project is immense and long-lasting, helping form and foster creativity early on. "The arts serve so many purposes in elevating a city," says Jersey City's Cultural Affairs director Maryanne Kelleher, an Uptown Crew fan. "In addition to making our neighborhoods more beautiful, the arts provide children with healthy outlets and alternatives from the street." Success is measured any number of ways. Not that the Uptown Crew team is comfortable resting on its laurels, but at this point, Szymanski looks at it all as gravy. It's gravy that still has to be cooked up and shared, but gravy nonetheless. "I could drop dead tomorrow and the Uptown Crew could go away, but some momentum is there already," she says. "I didn't start it – well, I started it in my neighborhood with a couple of other people – but I just shone a light on it. The minute I said, 'Hey we can do this?,' a lot of my neighbors who live outside of Downtown said: 'Oh, we can do this!'"

Performers at Uptown Crew's Open Mic (L-R): Ed Ramirez, B-BarkA-Miss, Margaret Leone

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SUM SUM MER MER CRU CRU SH SH

, Jersey City s Sweetest Treats for the Dog Days WRITTEN BY: Laryssa Wirstiuk PHOTOGRAPHY BY: Eric Schkrutz

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Fiesta Grill's halo-halo

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T The ideal summer treat, if you ask Roehl Empestan, is "a perfect combination of cold, creamy and sweet." Roehl is the nephew of Fiesta Grill owner Renato Empestan. With two Jersey City locations – one in Journal Square and one on West Side Avenue – Fiesta Grill serves a traditional Filipino dessert that embodies all the qualities Empestan describes. Halo-halo, Tagalog for "mixmix," is a dessert to both eat and drink. Throughout Jersey City, overheated summer revelers can find many variations of cold, creamy and sweet in both solid and liquid forms. Though halo-halo, available in abundance throughout Jersey City’s Little Manila, isn't an American summer treat, the all-American combination of ice cream and lemonade is just as easy to find. Don’t be fooled, though; ice cream from Torico in Downtown Jersey City and lemonade from Lizzmonade, found at Jersey City's farmers' markets and fairs, are not our forefathers' summer treats. Shaved ice and evaporated milk are the base ingredients in halo-halo, which, like an American ice cream sundae, is dappled with toppings like sweet preserved beans, tapioca, coconut, ube (or sweet yam), rice, plantain, and jackfruit. Fiesta Grill adds mango when it's seasonally available.  Ube and jackfruit are also staples at Torico, an ice cream parlor beloved by Jersey City locals. Torico plans on reopening in June, after undergoing renovations that took much longer than anticipated – a year and a half – to complete as owners Pete and Pura Berrios kept thinking of things they wanted to change or add. Over the 44 years the company has existed, Torico has adapted its offerings to accommodate Jersey City's increasingly diverse population. With the original goal of trying to satisfy his then-pregnant wife's cravings, Mr. Berrios started with snow cones and homemade syrups, evolved to sherbets

and introduced ice cream in the 1970s. Torico now offers 62 homemade flavors. "We did mostly traditional and fruity flavors. Tamarind and coconut were the first ones," says Christine Berrios, the owners' daughter. "We definitely have changed a lot of our flavors to cater to the community: a lot of Filipino flavors and Far East flavors. Lychee absolutely. We do ginger, avocado, mango. I love passionfruit and guava." Though Torico has always been a family affair, Christine Berrios has been more involved in the business since 2008, when her father became ill and was no longer able to endure laborious tasks like extracting juices from tamarind seeds and cracking coconuts. With about 10 to 20 of the flavors made on location every day, the kitchen is constantly buzzing. "I put everything on the back burner. I'm with my dad all the time, learning his recipes," she says. "We're always adding more and trying to make each recipe better." In an effort to even further improve her knowledge, Ms. Berrios recently completed a week-long gelato course at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, renowned for its food science department. "It's amazing how ice cream is considered a science," she says. For Lizzette Pagan, however, summer refreshment is more about intuition than science. About a year ago, the idea for Lizzmonade was born at a Little League game in the Jersey City Heights. Pagan, co-owner of the mobile stand that offers made-to-order artisanal lemonade and at the time Little League treasurer, decided to raise money for the league by selling lemonade at games. This summer, Pagan and husband Lamar McCloud are selling lemonade nearly every weekend at fairs, festivals, markets, and private events. "On big park days, we would set up a lemonade stand. The kids would press 17


A fresh berry-mint drink from Lizzmonade

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“WE WANTED OUR LEMONADE TO APPEAL TO ALL THE SENSES.” flavors and mix," says Pagan. "When I met Lamar, each time we would add fresh fruit. We did pineapple one day and on another day something else. Lamar said, 'We could sell this.'" Lizzmonade launched in May 2011 at a street fair in Summit. Submitting only a lengthy email explaining their business and drawings of how they would set up the stand, Pagan and McCloud were accepted by the fair's organizers. What makes Lizzmonade different from lemonade stands that entrepreneurial children set up on street corners is that each cup of lemonade is crafted according to a customer's preference of both flavor and sweetener. The recipe involves two lemons per glass and an approximate addition of simple syrup, ice and water. "We wanted our lemonade to appeal to all the senses. Our cups needed to be clear because the fruit makes these different colors. The sweetener options – that was huge for us. We had sugar and agave and then we got Stevia when people started to ask for it," says Pagan. "The important thing is that we're not a carnival food." Currently, Lizzmonade offers five mainstay flavors, called Liz Favorites. These include Cool-cumber (cucumber and basil), Berry Lustful (strawberry, raspberry and blackberry), Hotsie Totsie Mango (mango and habanero), Southern Comfort (peach and ginger) and Cherry Tart (cherry and kiwi). "The habanero pepper is a gazillion times more popular than I ever thought it was going to be," says Pagan. "I think what's also important is our source of inspiration. The cucumber basil

came from hand soap. The habanero came from buffalo wing sauce." Customers are also invited to create their own lemonade using up to two kinds of fruit, which varies based on what's fresh and available. Many ingredients are grown in the owners' own Jersey City Heights garden. "We ran out of mango one time, and a gentleman wanted pineapple and habanero instead," says Pagan. Sometimes, customers introduce Pagan and McCloud to ingredients they never knew existed. Last summer, Lizzmonade was at Van Vorst Park when one customer asked if he could bring an ingredient from his home. When he returned, he gave Pagan a handful of chocolate mint, not to be confused with the after-dinner candy, and asked if she could make a Lizzmonade with it. After conducting some research, Pagan learned that the mint plant is available in many hybrids, including orange mint and even pineapple mint. Though Fiesta Grill, Torico and Lizzmonade are all family owned and operated, Lizzmonade has very creatively tried to capitalize on the concept. This year, the business has expanded to what Pagan and McCloud call a "Famchise," a franchise agreement with a family they have known for years. The Famchise allows Lizzmonade to have a duplicate set-up at simultaneous events. "There are a lot more two-day and three-day festivals. When we finish an eight-hour day, it's tough to go in the next day. Now we have someone to rely on to do another day," says Pagan. 19


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"We used to coach little league together in Downtown Jersey City. Our daughters are best friends, and they were supportive at many of our events and have helped so much. It still is a family business." Similarly, Torico has a family that extends beyond bloodlines. Ten longtime employees are set to return when Torico reopens for business. Says Berrios, "I was so excited to be able to open and have the old crew." The staff may be the same, but the space is completely updated, both inside and out. The 135-year-old building has new windows, different floors, and higher ceilings. "The renovation took longer, but we did more than expected. It made sense to do more because we figured we'd never be doing a renovation again," says Berrios. "It was a lot of work but it was definitely worth it. It's really for the benefit of the community." Jersey City has played a major role in the growth of these businesses. "The diversity of the population allows businesses that are not considered mainstream to thrive," says

Empestan. "With so many cultures throughout our city, most people are not afraid to try something new." Pagan and McCloud are grateful not only for the local markets' affordable vendor fees but also for the people they get to know at these events. "Our fans Downtown, we just love them. They've been there, and they've been really supportive. I can't wait to hear, 'Oh my gosh, it’s nice to se you again,'" says McCloud. "We had a couple that would come to Van Vorst all the time. She always got the Classic, and he always tried something different." During the summer months, it's difficult to find fault with anything cold, creamy and sweet, but the success of these businesses does still depend on the weather. To please those customers who wouldn’t mind an eternal summer, Fiesta Grill and Torico are open yearround, but Lizzmonade is still trying to overcome one minor hurdle. "We’re so confident in what we do; the only thing that affects our business is weather," says Pagan. "You give us a sunny day, and Lizzmonade is selling out."

At left: Christine Berrios of Torico Above: Fiesta Grill's halo-halo

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SPACES The Stories Behind the Empty Buildings That Dot Jersey City’s Landscape Written by Jennifer Weiss Photography by Brooke Hansson Interviews by Jennifer Weiss and Brooke Hansson

WRITTEN BY: Laryssa Wirstiuk PHOTOGRAPHY BY: Eric Schkrutz

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We’ve all seen the empty shells on the skyline or the street corner: the house where nobody lives, the factory where nobody works.

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Jersey City is full of vacant buildings. Some are the ghosts of its manufacturing past; others, remnants of families’ more recent struggles.

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W

While some sections of the city have more than others, there are vacant properties in every neighborhood, says Mark Redfield, who works in housing code enforcement and leads Mayor Jerramiah Healy's Quality of Life Task Force. "Almost every neighborhood councilman has had to deal with the quality of life issues that surround them," from the grass not being cut, to squatters moving in, to worse, he says. "If you drive up and down the streets and just pay attention, you'll be surprised how many vacant buildings there are." In March, the city embarked on an ambitious count and registration effort that resulted in a list of about 840 vacant buildings. Most are residential – more people complain about vacant houses because they're usually closer to home and more of a nuisance. Fifty-six properties are considered abandoned, meaning, among other things, that they have been vacant

Special Thanks to the New Jersey Room of the Jersey City Free Public Library for its help with historical research.

for more than six months and have caused problems in the community. An ordinance adopted this fall created a $250 registration fee for vacant lots that increases to $500 the following year, an incentive to owners to do something with the lots. Redfield estimates the city spends about $100,000 a year looking after these properties, but says registration efforts have added $110,000 to the city's coffers. Once buildings are on the list, owners can be contacted more quickly if problems arise. What happens next is anybody's guess. Some buildings languish for years. Some are sold; old factories and warehouses in particular may be converted into housing. The key, says Mindy Fullilove, a professor of psychiatry and public health at Columbia University formerly of Jersey City who now lives in West Orange, is to support neighborhoods in a such a way that they prosper – and that changes benefit all residents, not just some. "Neighborhoods should make the plans and the cities should support them by making sure the neighborhoods get investment," she says. But for now, most of the hundreds of vacant buildings in town are sitting and waiting for something to happen – as are their neighbors.

What is it like to have one in your backyard?


Factory at Pine and Johnston The warehouse on Johnston Avenue between Pine and Monitor streets sports a prominent "Kid PK" graffiti tag and rows of rectangular candy-colored glass. Panes are broken and some are missing in spots; on one section, “Loser” is painted in bright bubble letters. The building appears to have gone up in the 1920s, and was used in the latter half of the century by a manufacturer of paper containers. A sign manufacturer followed. "Every time I come out, I take a peek at it," says Brian Mills, 21, who lives across the street on Pine. He says it's looked like this – falling apart – since he moved in six years ago. A fence around the property has seen better days, and the dry, grassy ground is pock-marked with trash: chip bags, drink cups, an empty box of cigarettes. A few old shipping containers sit in the yard. Nearby is a convenience store, a small park with a basketball court and the new Liberty Townhomes complex,

with its sign out front promising location, elegance and affordability. Mills has seen possums and raccoons, which have approached the apartment he rents with his family. He guesses they live on the grounds. He'd like to see a park go in where the warehouse sits. "Something better than this,' he says. "It looks kind of bad. I try not to pay too much attention to it. I just wonder when they're going to knock it down."

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CYLINDERS At bramhall avenue and Van horne street The set of cylindrical structures at Bramhall Avenue and Van Horne Street are like something out of a postapocalyptic fairy tale. There's a small window at the top of one of the towers, which are old concrete coal tanks. Looking up at them, you half expect a zombie Rapunzel to let down her hair. On a city insurance map, the tanks are labeled "McConnell Coal Co. Coal Yard," a coal company in Jersey City since at least the 1920s. The tanks likely went up between the '30s and '50s. Nearby there's a blue building covered with graffiti scrawls – "bang bang," someone wrote in black, and "murder game." Gilberto "Tito" Vasquez, 52, lives a

stone's throw from the structure and was recently repairing a wooden fence that separates his property from the vacant lot next door. He says it gets bad sometimes, especially during the summer – people will drive up, park their cars and have sex. The police come. "Of course it would be different if it was fixed up," he says. He raised his four boys here and does not plan to leave anytime soon. What would he like to live next door to instead? "Something nice, a building or whatever," he says, particularly since his taxes have risen dramatically since he moved in. "It would be better for this area."

2456 JFK BLVD. The Victorian mansion on John F. Kennedy Boulevard at Gifford Avenue must have been a real beauty in its younger days. It sits on a block dotted with grand houses, and was once an Orthodox synagogue, according to local resident Eugene Garrow, 76.

"I just don’t want to see more vandalism," says Garrow, who has lived on the block since the '60s and often passes by with his two cocker spaniels. "The place requires a great deal of interior and exterior work to make it anything." 29


factory in the heights The massive building on Oakland Avenue between Laidlaw and Jefferson in the Heights was once an industrial laundry. Nicholas Rivera, a 30-year-old dad who lives nearby, says it's been vacant for years – and that if he had millions, he'd turn it into a Boys and Girls Club. "This neighborhood is jam-packed with youth who really have nothing to do

after school," Rivera says. "The kids are always out here playing, but they don't really have anything to do… The potential this building has, it would be incredible." But barring that, he'd take a business – any business – of some kind. "It looks like it's just rotting," he says. "Hopefully it'll at least open up some jobs or employment."

BILLIARDS HALL ON FULTON "This area didn’t always look like this," says Michele Moreland, 52. "That old Billiards Hall use to be called A Touch of Class. It was a bar and we would hang out and shoot pool, and my cousins would play music there every weekend. It was really, really nice." The big vertical sign for the billiards hall has long since faded. Windows are boarded up and an awning has come down. When she walks by the hall now, Moreland remembers the good times she had there. "The drinks were cheap and the crowd was mature," she says. "I'd like to see it opened back up again. There's really no place to go around here. We need a nice place for mature people to be able to hang out and listen to some music."


25 crescent avenue Years ago, a man climbed up the side of the house at 25 Crescent and stripped the turret of its copper, says Mary, who is in her mid-50s and has lived across from the house for more than a decade. Mary runs a community garden on the corner of Crescent and Clinton, and says she'd rather see a community

center there; the house, which has been vacant almost the entire time she's been there, attracts rats. "It's a real eyesore," she says. "There’s no place for our kids to go outside of the Boys and Girls Club, which is Downtown and too far away."

OLD MONTICELLO THEATER The red building with angled white accents on its facade was once the Monticello Theater. Jeanette Daniels, in her 60s and a lifelong resident of Greenville, remembers it as grand. "My mother would take us there on Sundays after church," she says. "I used to see all the old movies there."

"We used to have so much here," she adds. "It's a shame that it shut down. It's a shame that we can't keep going with our history – it just stops and there's nothing happening anymore." Daniels says she hopes the building can be restored. "When I see it, it makes me really, really sad," she says.


ST. JOHN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH The church on Summit Avenue and Fairview is a crumbling beauty. Owned by the Episcopal Diocese of Newark, it was once the heart of the community, according to Dennis Doran, a resident of Summit Avenue for more than 40 years. "It was run by the local community," Doran says. "It was our center – our headquarters for community events. Our walking tours would begin and end there with an organ concert and refreshments... So the loss of this church has been deeply felt, the whole

community was impacted." Doran says the church was one of the most beautiful in the city, with Tiffany glass and a nickname – the millionaire’s church – because of all the "movers and shakers of Jersey City" who would attend. Doran says he would like to see anything happen to the church that could save it. It has so far avoided the wrecking ball but has yet to become something productive. "Even having housing there would be great," Doran says. "There was talk of it becoming a restaurant. That would be fine too."


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BE SURE TO use your smartphone to SCAN THE GUIDE'S QR CODES FOR some EXCLUSIVE DEALS from our advertisers!


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1. 172 Newark p. 55 2. Another Man's Treasure p. 49 3. Barcade p. 5 Liberty State Park 4. Basic Builders p. 45 5. Bigdrum Art & Framing p. 54 6. Bubby's Burritos p. 40 7. City of Jersey City p. 1 8. Complete Physical Rehabilitation p. 46 9. Gallerie Hudson p. 45 10. Groomingdales Pet Salon p. 53 11. Groove on Grove p. 6 12. Grove Street Bicycles p. 53 13. Grove Street Farmers Market p. 6 14. Hamilton Health & Fitness p. 47 15. The Hamilton Inn p. 36 16. Hamilton Square Back Cover 17. Hard Grove Cafe p. 40 18. Hazel Baby p. 53 19. Hound About Town p. 51 20. Hudson County Art Supply p. 54 21. Hudson Pride Connections Center p. 56 22. The Iron Monkey p. 38 23. Jersey City Art School p. 54 24. Jersey City Children's Theater p. 51 25. Jersey City Medical Center Inside Cover 26. Jersey City Super Buy-Rite p. 44 27. Jersey City Tattoo Co. p. 54 28. Kanibal Home p. 53 29. Light Horse Tavern p. 39 30. LITM p. 42 31. Made with Love p. 42

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p. 41 p. 5 p. 43 p. 52 p. 47 p. 43 p. 5 p. 43 p. 49 p. 48 p. 37 p. 42 p. 46 p. 48 p. 56 p. 55

OFF THE MAP Bricks 4 Kidz Creative Enabler DI=VA Creativity Coaching FlorYoga JC Fridays JC Lofts JCF Boot Camp Magic Cleaning Service Melinda Hirsch-Robinson Michelle Timek Yoga Natalie Miniard No Gas Pipeline Not Yo Mama's Affairs Qi for Wellness

p. 50 p. 54 p. 56 p. 55 p. 50 p. 7 p. 48 p. 53 p. 54 p. 55 p. 55 p. 56 p. 56 p. 55


JERSEY CITY GUIDE

THE HAMILTON INN 708 JERSEY AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 839 5818 hamiltoninnjc.com The Hamilton Inn is a welcome revival within the Downtown Jersey City community. Nestled on the corner of 10th Street and Jersey Avenue, a block from Hamilton Park, the Inn's cozy, classic atmosphere invites guests to dine indoors or out on a well-rounded menu that features organic meats and local produce, and ranges from truffled egg pizza to signature East LA fish tacos. Or, enjoy an Inn Burger at the bar, where you can also find a nightly happy hour, signature cocktails, assorted craft beers, and an impressive list of fine yet affordable wines. With its kitchen open until 1 am on the weekends, a not-to-miss brunch experience featuring $4 cocktails, and weekly specials that include Tacos & Trivia Tuesdays, Half-Priced Cocktails Wednesdays, Endless Happy Hour Thursdays, and Wine-Down Sundays, The Hamilton Inn's friendly staff is not the only reason to visit this bustling neighborhood fixture.

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SUMMER 2012

SKINNER'S LOFT 146 NEWARK AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 915 0600 skinnersloft.com

Skinner's Loft is an elegant yet casual, upbeat bistro-style restaurant. It features an eclectic menu of deliciously seasoned small plates and entrees, as well as tried and true comfort food, like a juicy burger. There are extensive beer, wine and liquor lists to accommodate those seeking the usual as well as satisfy the adventurous. The handcrafted bar is adorned with a copper ceiling and antique Italian tiled floor, with the loft space upstairs housing a beautiful, but comfortable, dining room. In the summertime, Skinner's Loft offers dining in the rooftop garden, serves specials daily, and features carefully made cocktails using fresh squeezed juices, house-made syrups, and house-infused liquors. Visit Skinner's Loft for lunch Tuesday through Friday, brunch on the weekends, and dinner until 11 every night.

PAID FOR BY OR IN PART BY THE NJ URBAN ENTERPRISE ZONE PROGRAM

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JERSEY CITY GUIDE

THE IRON MONKEY 99 GREENE STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 435 5756 ironmonkey.com

Founded 16 years ago by Stephen McIntyre, The Iron Monkey quickly became a favorite place for Jersey City residents to eat and drink. Today, The Iron Monkey offers casual, modern American cuisine with three floors for eating and drinking. The main bar has a wonderful traditional pub feel. The second floor offers an elegant, yet vibrant, dining experience that is perfect for dinner with friends or corporate parties. The Iron Monkey also boasts the only rooftop in Jersey City with dining and a full bar. In addition to having the most unique space in Jersey City, The Iron Monkey has been a longtime proponent of the craft beer movement. With 39 taps devoted to craft beer and a bottle list that numbers well over 300 bottles, The Iron Monkey ranks among the elite destination beer bars in the Northeast. 38


SUMMER 2012

LIGHT HORSE TAVERN 199 WASHINGTON STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 946 2028 lighthorsetavern.com

Opened in 2002, this local favorite has become an institution. Light Horse Tavern has a new young chef, Carlos Ortega, who brings a new exciting vision to the Jersey City culinary scene. The chef's philosophy is to source seasonal ingredients and to preserve the integrity of the product when cooking. The seasonal menu always includes a variety of fresh oysters and clams, as well as lighter fare such as grilled octopus salad, or heartier favorites like organic ale-braised rabbit with fresh garganelli pasta and green olives. Whether settling in at the bar for a pint or indulging in the spectacular cuisine, you are sure to become addicted to the experience. Check the website for special events including live jazz, a Wednesday seasonal farmers market tasting menu, and wine tastings. Visit any day for lunch, weekend days for brunch, and always for exquisite food, people watching and pristine outdoor seating. 39


JERSEY CITY GUIDE

HARD GROVE CAFE 319 GROVE STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 451 1853 hardgrovecafe.com Take one step inside this artsy Downtown restaurant and you'll know that you’re in for an entertaining evening. Latin music and Cuban mojitos set the tone for a South Beach-like party atmosphere, while authentic Cuban food choices are available – from Hemingway churrasco steak to shrimp with garlic sauce to the classic Cuban shredded beef. The Hard Grove Cafe has expanded its menu to include vegetarian selections with a Latin emphasis, like vegetarian lemon salsa chicken. On Tuesdays and Wednesdays, check out the allyou-can-eat Latin mango-pineapple BBQ chicken, ribs or pulled pork with prices starting at $9.99. The cafe offers brunch on weekends, and features selections like mixed berry pancakes, breakfast quesadillas and huevos rancheros – not to mention bottomless bloody marys and mimosas. Stop by the Hard Grove and enjoy a magnificent experience.

BUBBY's BURRITOS 440 JERSEY AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 333 1550 bubbysburritos.com Bubby's Burritos is a cozy Downtown California-Mexican eatery which prides itself on providing fresh, natural, lard-free ingredients in all its dishes. Its homemade corn tamales, nachos, burritos, tacos and quesadillas are oil-free and never too hot or spicy, while its salsas, guacamole and chili are handmade fresh on a daily basis with onions, cilantro and natural ingredients. Bubby's offers delivery throughout Jersey City and Hoboken.

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PAID FOR BY OR IN PART BY THE NJ URBAN ENTERPRISE ZONE PROGRAM


SUMMER 2012

MARITIME PARC 84 AUDREY ZAPP DRIVE JERSEY CITY 07305 T 201 413 0050 maritimeparc.com

Maritime Parc is the perfect summer destination for a quick evening escape or a weekend day-cation. Located in Liberty State Park, Maritime Parc welcomes guests from both sides of the Hudson to enjoy its scenic splendor and distinct brand of hospitality. Executive chef/owner Chris Siversen turns out seasonally inspired menus that spin local and sustainable ingredients into crowd-pleasing dishes. Visit Maritime Parc's gorgeous patio â&#x20AC;&#x201C; featuring views of the Manhattan skyline, Jersey City and the Hudson River â&#x20AC;&#x201C; for the restaurant's famous Thursday night $20 Oyster & Burger Bash, or while away an afternoon over Sunday Brunch.

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JERSEY CITY GUIDE

LITM 140 NEWARK AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 536 5557 litm.com Every day is new and exciting at LITM. The popular destination is a restaurant, bar & art gallery known for its creative, seasonal cocktails, extensive beer list, happy hour specials, modern American food and monthly art shows. Judges' Choice winner of the 2010 + 2011 4th Street Mac & Cheese Cookoff and People's Choice winner of the 2012 Chili Cookoff.

MADE WITH LOVE 530 JERSEY AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 451 5199 madewithloveorganics.com With artisanal breads, empanadas, quiches, cookies, pies and cakes made with organic ingredients, Made with Love is Jersey City's destination for sweet and savory baked goods. Now there's more to love: daily lunch, weekend brunch, communal dinners, art receptions, cooking/ baking classes and children's parties.

STEAM CAFE 276 NEWARK AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 706 2489 steamcafe-jc.com Steam Cafe features TM Ward Ethiopian blend coffee and espresso, loose leaf tea, croissants and breads that are baked daily, and handmade bagels from Wonder Bagels. It also offers signature sandwiches, homemade muffins, sweets from Sassy Sweet Treats and Willow & Olivia Creations, as well as many other daily surprises.

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PAID FOR BY OR IN PART BY THE NJ URBAN ENTERPRISE ZONE PROGRAM


SUMMER 2012

RUSTIQUE PIZZA 611 JERSEY AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 222 6886 rustiquepizza.com This longtime local favorite is under new ownership. Rustique serves killer brick oven pizza alongside delicious comfort Italian cuisine and homemade desserts – and it makes its own mozzarella and bakes its own bread daily. Rustique's food is fresh, homemade and delicious. Stop in and say hello. Free delivery every day – lunch & dinner.

RED FEAST WINE & LIQUORS 129 COLUMBUS DRIVE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 333 3360 Red Feast features a large selection of wines from around the world plus imported, domestic and craft beers. Its owners are also open to customer suggestions, so let them know if there is something you would like added to the inventory. Free delivery to Downtown Jersey City, including The Village, Newport, Exchange Place and Paulus Hook ($30 minimum order).

NYC-JC GUEST SUITES 88 BRUNSWICK STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 706 1017 nyc-jc.com NYC-JC Guest Suites offers luxury, short-term apartment rentals located on the waterfront in Jersey City, conveniently located close to the PATH stations. NYC-JC Guest Suites offers beautiful views and comfortable living at an unbeatable price. Book now using the code "NEW20" and receive 20 percent off.

PAID FOR BY OR IN PART BY THE NJ URBAN ENTERPRISE ZONE PROGRAM

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JERSEY CITY GUIDE

JERSEY CITY SUPER BUY-RITE 575 MANILA AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07310 (ACROSS FROM HOLLAND TUNNEL HOME DEPOT) T 201 239 1200 buyritewines.com Jersey City Super Buy-Rite is the largest liquor store in New Jersey, with over 30,000 square feet of retail space. Its size, financial strength and association with the Buy-Rite chain allows it to buy at the best prices possible and ultimately pass the savings along to you. Buy-Rite also has one of the largest beer selections in the world, as well as thousands of wines and spirits, and an extensive cigar selection. Buy-Rite might look like a big box retail store, but it strives to give you the same service you'd expect from a boutique wine shop, with numerous managers who are trained and certified wine, spirits and beer experts. Save 10 percent on wines with purchases of 12 bottles or more. Buy-Rite has free and ample parking, and delivery is also available to Hoboken and Newport â&#x20AC;&#x201C; mention this ad for free delivery!

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SUMMER 2012

GALLERIE HUDSON 197 NEWARK AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 434 1010 Gallerie Hudson goes beyond just ordinary framing. In addition to creating awardwinning designs, it offers conservation and restoration services and expert advice on how to properly preserve and showcase your art. Also featured in the gallery are original works of art by local artists and artists from around the world. Gallerie Hudson has thousands of choices in frames, from hand-crafted Italian mouldings to contemporary American hardwoods. Whether you need to frame a family photograph or a Picasso original, this is the place to go. Gallerie Hudson is fully insured and guarantees the quality of its workmanship. Gallerie Hudson now also offers digital photo restoration (see before and after pictures at right), as well as large-format photo and fine art printing. Hours: Tuesday through Friday 11 am-7 pm and Saturday 10 am-6 pm.

BASIC BUILDERS 21 EMORY STREET JERSEY CITY 07304 T 201 433 7358 basicbuilders.com Jersey City's premier kitchen engineers, Peter and Lissa Welles will design and remodel your kitchen with amazing creativity and enthusiasm. Their backgrounds in mechanical engineering and architecture will allow you to experience contracting at a whole new level. Stylish kitchens with tight budgets are Basic Builders' specialty.

PAID FOR BY OR IN PART BY THE NJ URBAN ENTERPRISE ZONE PROGRAM

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JERSEY CITY GUIDE

THERAPY WALK TALK LIBERTY STATE PARK JERSEY CITY 07305 T 917 913 3999 jillpedersen.com Therapy Walk Talk by Jill Pedersen Gestalt Psychotherapy combines walking with traditional psychotherapy. In a warm, supportive, inquisitive process you'll explore what isn't working in your life. May through October, in eight-week intensives, you set the pace as you build awareness and discover patterns that interfere with your happiness. Combining walking with psychotherapy in Liberty State Park is just one of the ways Jill Pedersen delivers therapy on the Jersey City waterfront. Taking traditional therapy out of the traditional setting allows you to choose from a variety of creative delivery strategies that support your lifestyle. Find a program tailored to your style and feel better, one step at a time.

COMPLETE PHYSICAL REHABILITATION 75 MONTGOMERY STREET SUITE 502 JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 433 6001 cprnj.com Since 2007, Complete Physical Rehabilitation has provided one-on-one physical therapy services specializing in vestibular (dizziness) rehabilitation and sports physical therapy, with the goal of helping clients return to active daily lifestyles. In addition to PT, it also offers acupuncture services, and hosts various weight loss and wellness seminars.

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SUMMER 2012

HAMILTON HEALTH & FITNESS 161 ERIE STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 714 7600 hamiltonhealthfitness.com Located inside Hamilton Square, Hamilton Health & Fitness combines the latest innovations with a spa-like setting. Taking its cue from the natural beauty of historic Hamilton Park, HHF is light, airy, green and natural. Large thermal windows flood the space with light, while natural stone and wood finishes accompany the most advanced cardio and weight-training equipment. In addition to an innovative, cutting-edge nutrition program, integrated amenities complete the experience for body and mind. HHF features an indoor lap pool, sauna and steam rooms, childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s room, group fitness classes and a fully equipped Pilates studio directed by Project Pilates. Group fitness classes include Pilates mat/tower/reformer, zumba, indoor cycling, intenSati, boot camp, kettlebell, yoga, water workout, and learn-to-swim classes. HHF offers the most holistic health and fitness experience in Jersey City.

PROJECT PILATES 161 ERIE STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 HEALTHY (432 5849) projectpilates.com Pilates is great for muscle stamina, strength, flexibility, mental clarity, health, wellness and awareness. Project Pilates offers a variety of classes to fit any budget including private and semi-private sessions, group tower, group reformer and group mat classes. The studio specializes in pre-/postnatal Pilates and injury prevention and recovery.

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JERSEY CITY GUIDE

JCF BOOT CAMP CITYWIDE | JERSEY CITY T 201 484 7848 jcfbootcamp.com

Daris Wilson started JCF Boot Camp in 2008 to give women an effective alternative to pricey personal training sessions and traditional gym settings, where the bulky equipment can be intimidating. The fourweek program for women of all ages and fitness levels is designed to challenge your fitness level.

SHAMPOO JC HAIR SALON 107 COLUMBUS DRIVE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 395 0045 shampoojc.com Shampoo JC Hair Salon is one of the most unique hair salons in Jersey City, inspired by decades of art, music and fashion. Whether you desire a hairstyle that's modern, classic, mod, sophisticated or bohemian, Shampoo JC's stylists will use their extensive artistic abilities to give you exactly what you want.

TOUSLED HAIR SALON 500-A JERSEY AVENUE JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 309 1200 mytousledhair.com There are good stylists who show up to work, and there are exceptional stylists who show up to create. Enjoy an Aveda aromatic stress-relieving treatment and comforting tea with your hair cut. This Downtown salon also offers teeth whitening sessions to accentuate one of your greatest features ... your smile (scan the QR code for a special discount).

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PAID FOR BY OR IN PART BY THE NJ URBAN ENTERPRISE ZONE PROGRAM


SUMMER 2012

SALONBE 106 RIVER DRIVE SOUTH JERSEY CITY 07310 T 201 222 1101 hairsalonbe.com With the perfect balance of a trendy yet upscale ambiance, Jersey City's premier salon has finally arrived. Located on the waterfront in Newport, SalonBe is here to help each client find their desired look for their personal lifestyle. Featuring some of Jersey City's most talented hairstylists, offering the most current services, and carrying the lead products in today's industry, SalonBe is sure to redefine and rejuvenate your confidence. Drop by or call to indulge in some of our grand opening promotions â&#x20AC;&#x201C; including free conditioning treatments with any service; 10 percent off all hair care products; and free cut, color and product consultations. Join SalonBe for complimentary wine and food every Friday as it showcases the work of a different local artist each week.

ANOTHER MAN's TREASURE 353 GROVE STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 860 9990 amtvintage.com Established in 2006, this "knockout vintage boutique" (Time Out New York) is open 7 days a week with new additions daily. Everything is hand-picked with current trends, classic seasonal styles and quality in mind. You can also visit AMT at its new showroom (pictured) to view its high-end vintage collection. To make an appointment, email showroom@amtvintage.com.

PAID FOR BY OR IN PART BY THE NJ URBAN ENTERPRISE ZONE PROGRAM

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JERSEY CITY GUIDE

BRICKS 4 KIDZ CITYWIDE JERSEY CITY T 917 309 8585 bricks4kidz.com

Bricks 4 Kidz classes provide an extraordinary atmosphere where children learn, build and play ... with LEGOÂŽ bricks. Its specially designed project kits and themebased models (such as space, construction or amusement parks) provide the building blocks for the Bricks 4 Kidz approach to educational play. Bricks 4 Kidz offers activities for children ages 3 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 13, including: after-school enrichment classes, week-long summer camps, birthday parties and preschool classes. Bricks 4 Kidz believes that kids learn best through activities that engage their curiosity and creativity. Visit the Bricks 4 Kidz website to learn more about its programs and events, as well as its week-long summer camps (Robotics, Stop-Motion Movie Making, Remote Control Mania and more).

JC FRIDAYS CITYWIDE | JERSEY CITY T 201 915 9911 jcfridays.com Art House Productions presents JC Fridays, a quarterly festival held throughout Jersey City at the start of every season. Local businesses and arts organizations join together to celebrate art and culture with a wide range of free events for the public. Programs include art openings and exhibits, music, dance, theater, poetry, film/video screenings and more! Next dates: September 7 and December 7.

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SUMMER 2012

JERSEY CITY CHILDREN'S THEATER 83 WAYNE STREET (IN THE BARROW MANSION) JERSEY CITY 07302 T 917 363 7429 jcchildrenstheater.org Jersey City Children's Theater (JCCT) celebrates the art of play and the diverse tapestry that is Jersey City. Through its unique and original curriculum of storytelling, play-making and theater games, children will discover new ways to express themselves and explore the world around them. In classes and performances, children will discover diplomatic ways to learn lessons of morality, courage, generosity and compassion – and have great fun doing it! JCCT offers in-house classes and afterschool programs for children 3 to 13 years old. Visit JCCT's website today to: • Register for JCCT's Summer Camp, A Dahlicious Summer, and explore the worlds of one of our greatest storytellers, Roald Dahl. • Get more information on its new show, The Fabulous Fables of Aesop! Performances June 9, 10, 16 and 17 (2 & 4:30 pm shows each day).

HOUND ABOUT TOWN 218 MONTGOMERY STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 201 721 5532 houndabouttownjc.com You live a stylish urban lifestyle – your pet should too! At Hound About Town, convenience meets community. These cozy boutiques focus on eco-friendly, locally made apparel and accessories, as well as optimal, sustainable nutrition choices for your pet. Second location at Hamilton Square (17 McWilliams Place – 201 918 5557).

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JERSEY CITY GUIDE

Photo courtesy of LDOphoto.net

PANEPINTO GALLERIES 371 WARREN STREET JERSEY CITY 07302 T 917 445 1830 panepintogalleries.com

STUDIO 371, at Panepinto Galleries, was founded by Stephanie Panepinto in 2011 as a collective space to host gallery viewings, film screenings, theatrical performances, photo shoots, art exhibitions and events of all kinds, as well as build a vibrant community of artists. Located in the heart of the Powerhouse Arts District in Jersey City and just minutes from Manhattan, STUDIO 371 is a unique and stylish space to create. The 3,500 square foot warehouse space includes 14' ceilings, an elevator, a loading dock, and convenient access for private and public transportation. In addition to a rotating program of cutting-edge art exhibitions and screenings, STUDIO 371 offers adult art classes and a series of artist "salons" aimed at facilitating a dialogue amongst art professionals in the field and other contemporary NY/NJ galleries and cultural institutions. To be a part of this exciting community, join the mailing list: art@panepintogalleries.com.


MARKETPLACE PRODUCTS & SERVICES

TO ADVERTISE IN THIS AREA PLEASE EMAIL: checht@jerseycityindependent.com

KANIBAL HOME Offering a range of refurbished furniture, found objects, vintage dishware and plenty of new home goods, apparel and gift items. 551 200 9386 | kanibalhome.com

Free 90 day Layaway Plan for Bicycle Purchases. Select in Stock Bicycles on Sale (while supplies last) Bring this Ad in and recieve: 10% Off Any In Stock accessory or clothing item. This discount can be combined with other specials! Vist our Website for Coupons and Specials

HAZEL BABY This family owned boutique has everything you need to make baby's world happy, healthy and safe. 201 918 5557 | 17 McWilliams Place | hazelbabystore.com

GROOMINGDALES PET SALON Professional, courteous pet styling with comfort as the first priority. Only all-natural products used. 201 659 5559 | 351 2nd St. | groomingdalesnj.com

PROFESSIONAL REPAIRS ON ALL BRANDS OPEN 7 DAYS â&#x20AC;˘ 3.5% SALES TAX (Excluding Labor) www.grovestreetbicycles.com

365 Grove Street Jersey City, N.J. 07302

(201) 451-BIKE

Paid for in part by the NJ urban enterprise zone program

GROVE STREET BICYCLES This full-service shop carries bikes for the entire family and offers lifetime service with every new bike purchase. grovestreetbicycles.com

MAGIC CLEANING SERVICE LLC $15 off when you mention this ad! Call 201 963 1147 or email info@magiccleaningservicellc.com to book an appointment. magiccleaningservicellc.com


Custom Framing Framed Art Celebrating 18 Years in Business

Open 7 Days a Week in Jersey Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Powerhouse Arts District 201-418-8771 HUDSON COUNTY ART SUPPLY Get student discounts on supplies, and huge canvas & studio furniture discounts at Hudson County Art Supply's two locations. hudcoart.com

BIGDRUM ART & FRAMING Whether the job is big or small, Bigdrum prides itself on quality workmanship and attention to detail. 201 418 8771 | 127 1st St. | bigdrumart.com

JERSEY CITY ART SCHOOL Courses include painting, sculpture, jewelry making, digital photography and kids classes. Figure Drawing every Wednesday. 326 5th St. | jcartschool.com

JERSEY CITY TATTOO CO. The best place in Jersey City for custom tattoos. Open 7 days a week; walk-ins welcome. 201 360 0139 | 253 Newark Ave. | jerseycitytattoo.com

CREATIVE ENABLER Kick that brand into high gear on a budget and make 2012 your best year yet. Downtown Jersey City owned and operated. creativeenabler.com

VIOLIN & VIOLA LESSONS WITH MELINDA HIRSCH-ROBINSON

Professional violist with over 15 years teaching experience. All ages and levels. First lesson is half price with ad. Call today! 917 771 8063 | mhrmusic.com


THE WARE HOUSE CAFE

140 BAY ST JERSEY CITY NJ 07302

the last few years

ORGANICINTELLIGENTSIA

COFFEE AND TEA

Gull's Cove sales

FRESH BALTHAZAR BAKERY CROISSANTS AND SCONES

Miniard is back

AND QUICHES SWEET HAUS BARS

Liberty Realty.

OPEN 8 AM - 6 PM DAILY THEWAREHOUSEJC.COM

CLASSIC SANDWICHES

After spending

mananging the

office, Natalie

at home at

100% BEAUTIFUL 100% HATE-FREE ZONE

 THE WAREHOUSE CAFE Come get plugged in and restored at The Warehouse. 201 420 8882 | 140 Bay St. | thewarehousejc.com

NATALIE MINIARD, SALES ASSOCIATE With 10+ years of experience in Jersey City, Natalie can handle all your real estate needs. 201 610 1010 | 201 240 7620 (cell) | nminiard@libertyrealestate.com

172 NEWARK You live Downtown. You shop Downtown. Now work Downtown. Offering cowork desk rentals for creative professionals, near the Grove PATH. jgsrealty.com

FLORYOGA.COM Yoga, personal training & wellness delivered to your door. Yoga Alliance accredited teacher trainings and pre-/post-natal yoga teacher training. 866 333 YOGA

MICHELLE TIMEK YOGA On-site outdoor/indoor vinyasa, pre/postnatal & restorative classes. Private, semi-private & group sessions. All are welcome! michelletimekyoga.com

QI FOR WELLNESS WITH JANINE BERGER-GILLET Certified Wu Ming Qigong instructor of the Dragon’s Way & Wu Ming Qigong for Breast Health. For more information and a class schedule: qiforwellness.com.


2012

One of a Kind Shopportunities Music, Fun, Community & Craftacular Activities

4th Annual BlowOut Bash! 6.23.2012 â&#x20AC;˘ 11am - 6pm Powerhouse Arts District

For more info on ALL our summer events:

www.notyomamasaffairs.com

NO GAS PIPELINE Become a member! Stop Spectra's pipeline! Membership of $20 includes free T-shirt. 201-892-3846 | nogaspipeline.org/membership

NOT YO MAMA'S FOOLS' FAIR Not Yo Mama's Affairs hosts its 4th annual BlowOut Bash on June 23, and keeps the BlitzCraft going with events through the summer. notyomamasaffairs.com

DI=VA LIFE COACHING Life coaching, wellness and fitness training. Mention NEW and get 25% off a 3-month coaching package. This year, invest in you. yaromilolivares.com

12TH ANNUAL HUDSON PRIDE FESTIVAL Come out and show your pride on August 18 at Exchange Place, and enjoy entertainment, music, food, dancing at this fabulous celebration. hudsonpride.org

UPTOWN CREW Presenting an open mic on the 4th Thursday of each month, readings and theatrical productions, and a teen program. 917 536 2682 | uptowncrew.org



NEW Magazine: Summer 2012