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Unit: Visual Thinking Nevil Fernandes Ebook / Work book


This publication will be a walkthrough of second term of first year BA (Hons) Graphic Design at the Arts University of Bournemouth. My names is Nevil Fernandes and you will be reading my report of components of the unit: briefs, lectures seminars, process and review. This document is about a unit called Visual Thinking, which focused on extending our visual awareness by exercising individual creative language. The objective of the unit was to learn by attending lectures, workshops and seminars of ones interests, provided within the schools of art to develop us as designers, by testing and expand our range of skills through process and other professions.


Through the book you will witness chapters chaining a body of work enhanced by a broader visual context, generated by short diagnostic exercises. Process, Ideas and learning will be assisted with narrative of my journey through this unit.

During this term, opportunity to visit Berlin to support our study and expand our knowledge for our professional practices was given. Also, a writing tasks (introduced later) was assigned to practice our research abilities to produce an essay answering a question in regards to a specific designers and leading thinkers.

Overall, the report will be a written demonstration of my journey focusing on typography, study of broader specialism, utility of time and experience of art from outside of the UK.


Typography can be used as a powerful vehicle to transmit ideas and notions of culture, gender, history, materiality and value. The function of typography is to communicate a message so that it effectively conveys and reinforces meaning. In the early 20th Century Beatrice Warde in The Crystal Goblet ascertained that typography should render itself invisible and be subservient to the content. In the 21st Century digital intervention has allowed greater access to typographic technologies and no longer is typography judged on its ability to remain within these constrained parameters. Typography as a semiotic resource in its own right is capable of transmitting meaning. The study of semiotics has been used by academics to analyse and deconstruct Post Structuralist Theories. If we look at the work of The Semiotic Alliance on http://www.semiotics.co.uk we can see how semiotics are used within the commercial sector to help some of the world’s biggest brands find fame and fortune. If we go much further back in history to the Middle Ages we see how religious and secular texts use Illuminated Characters to accentuate meaning, reinforce understanding and establish hierarchical construction. Even the use of colour is codified to provide particular emphasis and meaning to the texts.


N A T L H U I S N I V I G K 300mm high

M T R P E A S R A E I O I C T E S O U C E Y S 150mm high


Group partner: Nischal Gurung Distincitve character: I

To start off, we listed all the key words that related to our distinctive character

Innocent Indicate Inch Illegal Insist Imagine illuminate

Invest Input Instruction Image Injury Income Incline Inspire invent

Iron Italic Inject Invention Ice Inside Inspire Independent Incident Infront

As a result we chose to work with the word instruction.


Definition Instruction: a direction or order.

Instruction Before we started to develop a concept, we examined the word to understand its true meaning and presence within typography and graphic design. We looked into processes of graphic design and found out that instruction are common when producing print jobs. By making this link, we stretched to look at the utility of instruction

It was vital for us to form a ground of how instruction are utilised through design, before generating concepts. So we as a group split up and produced research that is related to instructions but also of stuff that interested us both. Within the span of two days we came up with the following research.


To make the user to visualise a course of direction by the use of colours and lines interested me thoroughly. The London underground map is a schematic design firstly designed by Harry beck to make tube travel from one point to another easy. The tube map being graphically and physically still, it provides instructions for travel through its strategic design.

My group partner collected some user manuals because they are a reservoir of information that give orders to execute an outcome. Without these, we are unable to learn to use products


I contributed Dan Hoopert’s to the research, whereby his 3D typeface designs was made form string that transformed the typeface he used into a new typeface. His work broaden into other specialism such as photography and packaging design. Personally his ability to still to manipulate a traditional material into words/ design caught my attention and late my group partners.


These games as you may already know, function by joining dots together to form an illustration. My group partner noticed this as instructions for creativity because, this method of delivery usually is served to children to get them to learn creatively.


The last contribution to the research were pictures of letterform that we both went on to finding in the landscape. The symbol ‘i’ which is commonly used to instruct and inform people in the environment is brought to our attention.

The following pages are idea generation pages demonstrating our key ideas and concept for the project by putting together our found research.


The first concept is based on the principles of Lego and user interactivity. The model that will be formed will be of cardboard cubes that make the character ‘I’. The cardboard will have graphics on each component of the mode, and once connected, the word instruction is revealed along with the shape of the model.

The second concept was based on the idea of using strings to join pins with string to form an ‘i’. We based this design on the principles of user interactivity because we learned that instruction are always used by someone to execute an outcome, therefore we wanted to bring this element into this


Third concept that we generated is a model that will be made from card with myriad folds that form the character ‘I’. The creases that that make up the model will connect to make triangles; the pattern of triangular shapes that occur in the works of Dan Hoopert inspired the aesthetics of this idea. Again, user interactive principles apply.

Concept 3 is a user interactive activity where a net with numbers that the user will have to fold in a sequence to produce the model. The tube map also influenced the visuals where by the model looks like a net that joins together to form a complete picture; just like the line of the tube map illustrates the underground network.


Second part of the typography research will be looking at distinctive typefaces and analysing them to find the right typeface to develop my design. We will be doing this by choosing a number of fonts that fits the criteri For the second task for the unit asked us to produce a postcard to A6 dimensions. The postcard had to incorporate a visual of our 3D model along

The quick Here you can see the breakdown of our chosen typeface and the selection process. We began by deconstructing the characteristics of the characters of the against a widely used phrase in typography to test fonts ‘the quick brown fox’.

Why we chose to research the typeface ‘Niagara’ and Gill Sans MT? When we found out that the form of the ‘i’ within the Niagara solid and Gill Sans MT reflected the form of the symbol ‘I’ found in the environment from our previous research collection. Due to our discovery of the symbol ‘I’ we wanted to extend our study by Where does Niagara Solid Typeface come from? Niagara solid typeface also belongs to the font family ‘Niagara’ (Image location), and this font was designed by Tobias Frere-Jones in 1994. Niagara solid is the primary font style of the font ‘Niagara’ which was published by type foundry ‘Font Bureau’ in Boston in 189 by David Barlow The inspiration came to Tobias through the straight-sided geometric fonts from his era and this is demonstrated through a mixture of weights and engraved styles within the characters. The font was first recommended for newspapers books and corporate use. (Independent

iI


Niagara Solid

brown fox It is known that, news corporations such as THE INDEPENDENT already adopted this font style for their corporate logo, and based on the recommendation of use font reflects the informative purpose of the organisation. This reflected our research stages, whereby the definition of the word instruction holds the meaning of instruction, therefore, meaning that the font is purposed for informative design due to its resemblance to the ‘THE INDEPENDET’ news corporate logo.

Aa Bb Cc Dd Ee Ff Gh Hh Ii Jj Kk Ll Mm Nn Oo Pp Qq Rr Ss Tt Uu Vv Ww Xx Yy Zz


History has it, Eric Gill designed the Gills san’s MT Typeface for the monotype corporation; designed between 1928 -1932, and was the first sans-serif of its kind to be widely distributed. The principles of this design follows of those established by Edward Johnston in his iconic font for the London Underground. Gills Stem

THE QUICK Tail

How could we use this within our project? Due to the simplicity of the form found the character ‘i’, its purpose is reflected, where by purpose of graphic design is to communication complex topics simply. Because, instruction as show from our research, is a simple guide to execute an objective, we realised that the purpose of the typeface will reflect the themes of simplicity found within the word instruction. Furthermore, we also realised the typeface is used for the BBC corporate logo, where they gather information and distributed via broadcast. Again the typeface make an automatic link to the instruction and the component of the that word; Information- making an automatic link.


Because the research into the characters was produced, we were able to ensure ourselves that the choice of font share a relationships within the word Instruction and the history would support the typeface used within the designs. The typefaces are clever in the way that the meaning of the purpose it reflects and benefits the external form of the topic in question effectively.

Gills san’s MT

BROWN FOX ascender

shoulder

the quick brown fox counter

The typefaces that we will be testing with are, Gills Sans MT and Negara Solid. We tested these two typefaces because, we were looking to translate the form of the ‘I’ symbol found in the environment. We perused (location of the image) the form of this particular ‘I’ character typeface because, that typeface is recognised internationally for information and instruction.

Overall, we chose to work with both and typeface because, they contrast of their own individual forms, compliments each other, therefore we incorporate both of the typefaces together in the design to make the delivery design clearer.


1. Step one of the process of making the model was selecting a type of base. A base was necessary because the concept requires nails to be planted into a material. Therefore, we chose MDF for the base. Because MDF has a surface that you can correct if any errors are made by sanding the wood, we use this as starting point to engrave our design.

2. Using illustrator, we drew the character ‘I’ and plotted the regions where the nails would be punched. The regions for the nails to be punched were labelled with a circle. We did this because we believed that by making the markings it would not only allows us to produce and accurate letter ‘I’ but also reflect the influence of the dot to dot game, via the markings on the MDF. We applied this method to the instructional text of the concept.

3. Print. Using the laser printer, we were able to print the illustration plan straight onto wood. We printed the lower case ‘I’ by Gill Sans MT. To make sure we engraved using the laser cutter, by choosing the following settings. 4. We then processed the concept by nailing the nails within the marked circles (as illustrated with the illustration document) with a hammer and 3inch metal nails. 5. Using a white picture frame cord, we complete the concept by tying the cord at the start of the numerical order of point and wrapping it around the nails to complete the shape.


For the second task for the unit asked us to produce a postcard to A6 dimensions. The postcard had to incorporate a visual of our 3D model along with supporting text of the character that you worked on. The objective of this unit was to extend our visual awareness, therefore it was clear that we were asked to think of ways we can utilise mediums in a number of ways. As a result we were asked to make a postcard.

Produce an A6 postcard with the image on one side and a brief description of word on the other.

Height & Width: 105mm x 148mm Margins: 5mm (all sides) Bleed: 3mm Slug: 10mm

We first selected the photos from the photo-shoot that we thought were of high quality. The second age of the postcard; correcting photographs. We then went onto changing the brightness and quality of the image to balance the shadows and lighting of the image. Once we were happy with the image we saved the file as ‘.Tiff’ file at 300dpi resolution. We than introduced the image into InDesign. To open the file within indesign, I went to File> new. Here I entered the dimensions of the post card.

Once the image was ready, I aligned the cursor to the top left corner of the and left clicked to load the image to size.


Here you can see the alignment created. To produce a description for the postcard we turned to our research on typography and print specifications and summarized the description to the importance of instructions. For the summary we joined following research to generate a description for the postcard: Print specification are a set of clear instruction that are given to the printers when producing print for companies, clients and in general within in the graphic design industry. Print speficaioncation are also visuals that indicate the way you interpret words. Typography supporting the form of an image can have distinct graphic voice compared to a typeface that is displaed on its own. Typographic forms are instructions that instruct us to interpret information and communicate in multiple ways. The description that generated upon reflecting onto these key pointes was: A detailed instructions is a language to communicate within in a spectrum of specialism or in general to execute intended ideas. Printers require instructions that designers have to provide; thickness of paper; or the colour of text/fonts as such. Instructions can come long and short like chains, and like so, it systematically ties everything togeth-

“A detailed instructions is a language to communicate within in a spectrum of specialism or in general to execute intended ideas. Printers require instructions that designers have to provide; thickness of paper; or the colour of text/fonts as such. Instructions can come long and short like chains, and like so, it systematically ties everything together.�


After completing the postcard we assessed it with a person outside of the group to understand areas for improvement, and realised that the postcard quality wasn’t working as well as we thought therefore we noted the criticism. Constructive criticism - What you’re trying to say needs to be fastened together, I am a bit confused and it unclear of what exactly trying to say. - Contextualise and paraphrase the description. - Try other cords, this cord looks clunky and doesn’t demonstrate ‘accuracy’ which is critical for instructions. - The wood brown engraving is melting into the brown of the wood, I can’t read it properly. - The composition is good but the alignment and spelling error require attention. With this feedback we had to go back to the drawing board and make changes because the execution was not successful and resulted into a failure.


Here we realised that the cord looked overly clunky and did not demonstrate accuracy of the word instruction visually. Also on the other hand, the engraving and the colours of the MDF presented visibility of the text poorly. We realised this and instantly went back to developing a solution.

Looking back at our font research, we selected to test out Niagara Solid font. By doing this we were able to overcome the uneven balance in number of pins required for the title against the stem on the Gill Sans MT by replacing the typeface with Niagara Solid. With Niagara Solid, we were able to anticipate the number of pins required for the title (4 in total) which meant that balance to the design will be restored.

Here we realised the colour of the engraving and the wood is melting together and it hard to notice the text on the design. To check if the text appears better with a hard light we photographed the model to see if the engraving become visible. As a result, we realised that the colours did not improve the visibility of the text.


Because the text lacked visibility due to the colours of the wood matching with colours of engraving, we decided that we will paint the wood a different colour inverse the colour of the wood underneath, making the text visible. We also changed our minds on the choice of font to Niagara solid font because the Gill sans MT font did not complement the design this font was simpler (reflects back to our objective of concept) sophisticated and fit well with the design.

We followed the process below to make changes to the design. Cut wood to size using table saw, Paint wood with black acrylic paint, Leave paint to dry. Open new file in illustrator

Type instructions on right hand side of the canvas to with Niagara solid font Type ‘I’ using Niagara font at 140pt and lock layer. Using the circle shape draw small circles on the corners of ‘I’ and label each with number, starting with 1 for the first circle.

Check to see if wood paint is dry, If yes, print onto wood using laser cutter. Collect picture frame pins according the number of circle and punch them in to the circles. Grab picture frame wire and wrap around the nails to form


make the post card. To improve the description of the postcard, we began by chaining the description text by revisiting our research and recollecting our points and refined the description to the following. “Printers require instruction that designers have to provide such as quality of paper, choice of font, colour and text. Like script typography, specific instructions connects a spectrum of We felt that this descript was much finer and straight to the point and incorporated all the points that we wanted to make clear about the word and purpose of instructions within graphic design. Eventually we settled with this combination here because the character was visible, the description text had an alignment that was adopted from the form of the letter. Plus it was clear what the word was, due to the description and the top quarter of the character.


The result of our 3D development had to be presented at 300mm printed dimensions in order to be wall mounted to the requirements asked. For the 3D development to be presented, we executed a photo-shoot of the 3D model to enable us to tweak the appearance before the print. After the photography session, we put the photograph through Photoshop to tweak errors in the design before print.

In order to improve, we began by chaining the description text by revisiting our research and recollecting our points and refined the description to the following. Instructions; a language for communication – Improved Version “Printers require instruction that designers have to provide such as quality of paper, choice of font, colour and text. Like script typography, specific instructions connects a spectrum of specialism together.”


This is the final outcome that we generated and the description that we came up was significantly different to the previous.

Post card design from the studios of Arts University of Bournemouth

Instructions;

a language for communication

Printers require instruction that designers have to provide such as quality of paper, choice of font, colour and text. Like script typography, specific instructions connects a spectrum of specialisms together.


Letters in the landscape - A lexicon of urban typography This unit begins with a visit to Poole where you will identify, collect and photograph, examples of vernacular letterforms in the town. Your images could be literal interpretations of details of road signs, hand painted signs, neon signs, fragments of words, individual characters, manhole covers, gravestones or shop-front signs. Documenting these typographic havens is crucial to rebuff the constant threat from planners and councils that choose to subvert local history and ignore the rich traditions of vernacular heritage. Alternatively, you could choose to record a slightly more challenging abstract collection of ‘hidden signs’ drawn from architectural forms, found objects, and unintentional typographic structures. You will be working teams of two and planning which letterforms you each photograph in order to create a lexicon of vernacular letterforms. Remember, you will need a full alphabet It is important that you keep accurate notes for each of the pictures: ie Photographer, Location, Date, Description before returning to AUB and uploading your pictures to hard drive. You will then go through a process of picture editing and retouching in readiness to prepare layouts for the book they will be published in. For this project we gather in a group of 3 and went to Pool, Bournemouth and began to take photos of shapes that resemble letter forms and general typography for the lexicon we were going to produce.


After we collected the images we downloaded the images onto the computer ready to be processed. It was essential to have all of the letters of the alphabet. Within our group, we dived the pictures into alphabet from A – Z by renaming the files. We then separated from the group and chose the images that we think are the best for the group of alphabets given. The group picture of the alphabet that I had was from A – H and from this I picked images that were rich in quality of resolution, composition and typography. These are the alphabet that we picked and bring together as a group. It was important for us to separate from the group because, it enabled us all to contribute as a group and provide an input to the project and the book. To begin with, we had multiple images, and most of our group, selected 3 different images of the same character from the alphabet, therefore it was essential to go under a group moderation of the photographs for the book together to narrow down the images that will go forward into the production of the book.

Third stage of the process: We made sure that all our alphabet was complete by producing a group folder on drop box to share, update and upload the pictures. This made it easier for us to work on our individual pictures and increase the speed of production. I preferred having the pictures online and loaded to go because, I was able to track progress of the files, update them at any time I wanted, and share easily to keep the communication and production process flowing from my side The first stage to producing the book was to correct visual errors within pictures for the book. I selected images within adobe bridge from characters A – H and imported them into Photoshop. To fix the images and get the most natural look to the images, we edited only the contrast, brightness, hue, composition and file type.


Here are the images that I selected and improved within Photoshop. Instantly, you can see that the image became richer, meaning when the light reflects off the image when printed it will not look dull. I then cropped the image using the crop tool, to make sure that there isn’t an abundance of negative space on the page. I chose this composition because the ‘H’ looked as if it is following the 45 degree angle causing a equal balance across the two page. I then increased the vibrancy of the brown of the iron against the yellow of the pavement using the hew tool. Using the HUE tool, I moved the middle adjuster to left to emphasis the brown. .It gave the image a bit earthier feel to the image. Because the lighting was low due to the weather, the image came our very grey and dull. To improve the quality of the image, using the brightness and contrast panels, I moved the brightness slider up by 11 points and the contrast to 5 points. The results of the image was a natural well exposed picture. Eventually, the process came to an end. I finished editing the image by going to file > Save As> .Tiff I repeated this process to all of the images, adjusting each image individually with different ratios of contrast/brightness, cropping, hue and file type ready to be adjusted in InDesign. I felt that the images that we photographed required the changes that I made because, the paper quality and visual quality has an affect on the appearance of the image physically, therefore by enhancing the appearance of images, I felt that the images will have stronger impact on the print-


First of all, as a group we sat together and produced a paper mock-up using pen and paper of where the typefaces will go to determine the spread of the characters on the pages. The grid that we produced looked like this This enabled us to ensure, where the pictures that we selected will go on the pages that make the lexicon. Making a plan helped us communicate whilst being away from each other, because there were times when one of our group member was confused on where to start because the characters were split across the pages and that two of us were occupying the same page with the same character. To resolve this, we phone each other to discuss the characters for the page once more without being in front of each other. To bring the images into the book, we first had to create a document to the following dimensions. CMYK, 300mmx300mm and 300dpi resolution. To make the pages we clicked on the plus button and generated 32 pages, two for the insides covers for either side of the book and the rest for the alphabet pictures. Although there are 26 letters in the alphabet, we increased the number of pages to give room for characters that will consume two pages. To place the Image, File> Place > Image, action was carried out to load the image onto the screen. Than placing the cursor against the slug of the page (Top left corner) I mounted the image on the page. For the double spread pages the image had to be halved, and we did this by using the scale features of the image that appears when the image is clicked on to half the image. For the image to appear double spread, the picture that will go on the left hand page of the double page spread had to be on the right hand page of the book plan on InDesign. After arranging all of the pictures together correctly on the InDesign document, I than exported the file to PDF. To do this, I selected, File, export, (from the file type drop down menu) .PDF. Doing this we were able to send the paper off to the printers accordingly as they only accepted pdf files to print. The layout of the book had to be accurate in order for the lexicon to fit accurately once mounted. By producing the plan for the layout of the book not only helped us to communicate but also helped us when making the arrangement within InDesign. Form this I personally learned that planning before producing a book not only helps the production but also save times when arrange the book itself.


Production process To make the book we first started off by printing the book on A3, 180gm paper. The book was printed form a PDF file. The book binding method that we were going to use was French fold. Below is the process that I carried out to produce the book in step by step format. Step 1: Fold, the printed paper in half. Make sure when folding, that the images are on the outside of the fold. When folding use the bone folder to crease the page and use a light box to see where to fold. Due to the light flowing through the paper, the precise fold is achieved, because you cleared able to see where to fold. Also use crop marks to help guide and accurately fold. Step 2: Binding the book. Place the binder upside down and open claps as far as possible. Feed two sheets of paper on into the jaws, leaving an access of paper on both side. Feed the folded book pages together and clamp the jaws, look sheets of paper and the pages of the book together using the swivels to fasten. Complete this stage by recovering the wing nuts back vertical against the wood. Now fasten the side clams against the table to hold the book upright and the two sheets of paper prevent glue from running down the side of the book or sticking the book to jaws of Lumbeck press when removing. Also fastening the book allows the book to remain stagnant when binding and drying.


Step 3: Apply the first coat of adhesives on the spine of the book and place muslin over the coat and wait to dry. Once dry, place another coat over the muslin and wait to dry. Again apply a third coat of adhesive and finish. Step 3.5: strip access paper used in stage 1 quickly from the spine leaving only the muslin stuck to the book. Step 4: Collect paper that will be the cover of your book and measure the book to the following dimension and crease. A+, A+B, A+B+C. In our case the dimension were, 19.2m+19.6m+20.7mm. Using the folding machine, crease the cover of the book to the dimension given. Step 5: Using a piece of paper, mask around area B (spine) and apply adhesive using a brush. Careful not to go outside the parameters of area B. Now place spine of the book on to the adhesive are B of the cover and clench the cover side ‘A’ together against the book, by using the bone folder.

Step 6: Mask around area C and place adhesive against within the area C and fold the spine against the book. Careful not let the adhesive spread because that will later stick the back pages of the book together. Step 7: Using the lumbeck press, place the book within the jaws, by using the swivels to undo the claps and sliding the book in between the clamps and fastening them. This will allow the book to harden the last few coats of adhesive. Step 8: Using the guillotine, measure the assess paper ground the book and slice down the unwanted access paper of the cover.


Trip to berlin, Germany was made available to inform our practice and experience first-hand art within the culture. During our time there we visited design group edenspiekermann, historical sites, and art museums. Visiting edenspiekermann, we were delivered a talk on how they as a group produce, collaborate and live within graphic design. The talk delivered an idea of what graphic design is truly like and how design process actually works. We were also introduced to how design has an impact on what we do and how we live. Another component of this journey was to demonstrate our ability to research, theoretical awareness, and combine range of materials, media and techniques. As a result, this demonstration had to be presented in a written essay exploring a designer or design group’s attitude. Text document that had to be presented had to consist of 2,500 words reflecting the element of your research on leading thinkers.

Berlin

For the focus of my essay, my research targeted Bruce Mau and his attitudes, intent, belief and ethics within design. The discussion centres his recent works to build a prosperous economy through design methodology, whilst questioning, can design save us? Reason to arrive at this topic was due to the lectures, workshops and seminar that question my understanding


Conclusion and review of writing the essay. Because the essay was a closing curtains of the unit, I was able to benefit from the study completely. Arriving at conclusion of the essay allowed me to get a greater scope of graphic design and understand that graphic design is product of art as a whole.

Staring the essay was difficult as my skills lack to swallow briefs at first sight. Therefore, the project started on a low. As the term progressed, learning about specialism helped breakdown this issue in turn broadening the possibilities of approach and ultimately leading to the written outcome. Another flaw was writing the essay, not knowing how to structure a discussion came to result a major issue. My lack of awareness of the facilities available within the arts university that support essay writing resulted In taking time out to learn how to write an essay through tutorials, study guide books by Stella Cottrell and internet sources in between sessions.


As a result, I’ve learned that to improve interpretation of a brief and essay writing; an exterior research is compulsory before attempting to attack the given brief. For example, if I looked for essay writing session, my essay, in theory would have been better written. Also, use available content given, agendas, topics delivered and workshops to greater your understanding by connecting the dots.


The essay on the other hand encouraged my analytical and writing skills that are essential for the practice of design. Without the essay, I would not have raised questions, in turn failing to develop my knowledge on practice. Overall, the essay befitted my practice from regions of understanding, question and knowledge and experiment. Visiting Berlin and having the opportunity to meet designers from a leading design group encourage my love for design and also open my eyes to what it is that I am studying and what I could be doing in the future. “It’s nice to be good at what you do, but it helps if you know a thing or two about other subjects as well” – Paul Woods, edenspiekermann, 2014

Attending the talk at edenspiekermann not only broadened my understanding of graphic design but also helped me understand that design is more than just communication. The experience of being in a design studio for the first time and words of advice from Paul Woods, later influence the topic of my essay. Other benefits also came with the journey to Germany such as, my views changed on propaganda design of the war by learning the culture and history during war through the memorial sights and museums. It is very rare that I attend museums and embrace art physically other than through a computer screen, by attending this visit to berlin, and visiting museums I was fully able to emerge myself with art, design and architecture as subject of art overall. This educational visit not only deliver greater understanding of the subject of art altogether, but also brought a new methods of thinking to my study of design.


Another component of this journey was to demonstrate our ability to research, theoretical awareness, and combine range of materials, media and techniques. As a result, this demonstration had to be presented in a written essay exploring a designer or design group’s attitude. Text document that had to be presented had to consist of 2,500 words reflecting the element of your research on leading thinkers. For the focus of my essay, my research targeted Bruce Mau and his attitudes, intent, belief and ethics within design. The discussion centres his recent works to build a prosperous economy through design methodology, whilst questioning, can design save us? Reason to arrive at this topic was due to the lectures, workshops and seminar that question my understanding of design. Learning about the different specialism, two questions grew that took my notice, why are there separate facilities when the outcomes reflect multiple specialism? Also, Do I really understand the purpose, potential and utility of design? Raising these concerns; my essay took foundation from these questions to arrive at the essay topic. Conclusion and review of writing the essay. Because the essay was a closing curtains of the unit, I was able to benefit from the study completely. Arriving at conclusion of the essay allowed me to get a greater scope of graphic design and understand that graphic design is product of art as a whole. Staring the essay was difficult as my skills lack to swallow briefs at first sight. Therefore, the project started on a low. As the term progressed, learning about specialism helped breakdown this issue in turn broadening the possibilities of approach and ultimately leading to the written outcome. Another flaw was writing the essay, not knowing how to structure a discussion came to result a major issue. My lack of awareness of the facilities available within the arts university that support essay writing resulted In taking time out to learn how to write an essay through tutorials, study guide books by Stella Cottrell and internet sources in between sessions. As a result, I’ve learned that to improve interpretation of a brief and essay writing; an exterior research is compulsory before attempting to attack the given brief. For example, if I looked for essay writing session, my essay, in theory would have been better written. Also, use available con-


Letters in the landscape This workshop was advantageous to my study because the purpose of the workshop matched the diagnostic exercise assigned at the start of the unit. I found this work shop very enjoyable and mind stimulating. Because the objective was to capture typography, I was able to see typography in a new forms and light. Typography is all around us but we fail to admire the form it flourishes in. Our very structure belongs to the forms of typography, but at the same time it remains invisible. Identifying the fonts was challenge and at the same time thrilling as I notice multiple forms that share the characterises of typefaces that we take for granted today. This study drove the lexicon letters in the project an informed my study directly.

Chromophilia The subject of colours is not just the spectrum of which it appears in but also the subject in which it behaves. Human and colour behaviours are not much different, just like how our personalities are weighed on our preference of situation or admirable objects, colours are weighed in percentages that suit the content. Colour originates from around us and as human we have produced a vast combinations that carry the personality of its origins by means of light and pigment. The clear prism is a great example of natural projection of colour through the behaviours of light. Each colour is known to have a personality and visibility but when flat colours almost same in value are placed together our ability to distinguish the difference is absorbed by their personalities. Illusions are made this way.


Explosive drawing Explosive drawing workshop explores expression of one’s self through marks and materials against an audio narrative. This workshop did not contribute to the diagnostics exercises of my work or support my study in anyway. However, I perused this workshop to understand self-expression through the means of marking making.

A narrative defines process and its product, without a narrative or sense of expression, any mark is devalued. Throughout the workshop the exercise was to revolve around the room and flood a canvas with marks, over marks of others to demonstrate a narrative within narrative. Over the course of the workshop, the collaborative outcome delivered was a visual chaos by which students within the work shop created a whole new narrative which anyone is able to interpret in their own way.


Unit: Visual Thinking Nevil Fernandes Ebook / Work book

Visual Thinking  

Work book/ Ebook Nevil Fernandes

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