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NEVER LAZY

Spring 2014

Breathe Creativity

ALEXANDRA BANTI / ANTONIO BARRELLA / ATELIER DYAKOVA / CRISTIAN DAVILA HERNANDEZ ELEANOR TAYLOR / EMMA PILKINGTON / FEDERICO SORRENTINO / JACK VANZET / JOSHUA HIBBERT KEITH NEGLEY / KRZYSZTOF UBYCH / MORGANE KRISCHER / MOTHERBIRD / RUBEN BRULAT SALVADOR POZO / SAM FLAHERTY / SARA MELOTTI / ST. FRANCIS ELEVATOR RIDE


E D I T O R S A B B I E

C O H E N

Founding Editor Features Editor

J E S S I E

C O H E N

Founding Editor Art Editor

thirteen------spring 2014

C O N T R I B U T O R S

Alexandra BANTI Antonio BARRELLA ATELIER DYAKOVA Cristian DAVILA HERNANDEZ Eleanor TAYLOR Emma PILKINGTON Federico SORRENTINO Jack VANZET Joshua HIBBERT Keith NEGLEY Krzysztof UBYCH Morgane KRISCHER MOTHERBIRD Ruben BRULAT Salvador POZO Sam FLAHERTY Sara MELOTTI ST. FRANCIS ELEVATOR RIDE

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O N

T H E

C O V E R

‘Psyche’ / Joshua Hibbert

NEVERLAZYMAGAZINE@GMAIL.COM W W W. N E V E R L A Z Y. N E T • B L O G . N E V E R L A Z Y. N E T

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Editor’s Letter

New Year, spring, spring cleaning. All

We are also showcasing the stunning

the signs point straight at the idea of a

exclusive editorial pieces of Emma

new and improved NeverLazy Magazine.

Pilkington (p18), Federico Sorrentino

Newness does not necessarily mean a

(p50), Antonia Barrella (p60), Cristian

logo redesign, a reconsidered website

Davila Hernandez (p96), Sara Melotti

layout or new typographic decisions.

(p116) and Salvador Pozo (p164). In

Newness refers to something deeper,

this Spring 2014 issue, we are featuring

something interconnected with the way

portfolios from Melbourne to London

we communicate and collaborate with

and Milan to Los Angeles. It is this

our readers and contributors. When

multicultural aspect that keeps us going,

dealing with NeverLazy, one thing that

the fact that we are opening up worlds

never leaves our mind is the thought of

of creativity across all time zones, using

constantly bringing you inspiration in the

the power of digital technology to help

form of fresh, cutting-edge content, and

us reach our audiences. Over the past

that with each issue release and for all

two and a half years, as our content and

the moments in between. Presently, we

aesthetic have evolved simultaneously,

are gaining multifaceted and multicultural

NeverLazy has incessantly been

insight into the worlds of Jack Mussett

welcoming a bigger and more diverse

on behalf of Motherbird (p6) and Sonya

readership across the globe – and we

Dyakova of Atelier Dyakova (p188).

thank you deeply for this! JC

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06

72

140

Motherbird

Krzysztof Ubych

Alexandra Banti

18

84

152

Emma Pilkington

Sam Flaherty

St. Francis Elevator Ride

30

96

Jack Vanzet

Cristian Davila

164

Hernandez

Salvador Pozo

106

176

Joshua Hibbert

Morgane Krischer

116

188

Sara Melotti

Atelier Dyakova

128

202

Keith Negley

Ruben Brulat

38 Eleanor Taylor

50 Federico Sorrentino

60 Antonio Barrella

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MOTHERBIRD The art of minimalism meets brilliantly bold design with Motherbird, a design agency hailing from Melbourne, Australia. Created with little funding by creatives and close friends Jack Mussett, Dan Evans and Chris Murphy, Motherbird has nonetheless risen to success since its launch in 2009, thanks to the passion of its founders as well as a cool aesthetic through which it has earned considerable recognition. The agency seeks to communicate impactful messages through visually dynamic, mixed media designs bursting with influences of Melbourne’s city life and art and design scene. Discover more about Motherbird’s processes and aspirations through an awe-inspiring interview with Jack Mussett, exclusively for NeverLazy Magazine. >

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anyway and placed no major expectation

a terrific art and design culture that fosters

on ourselves. Months passed and people

the development of studios and creatives

The three of us met at high school while

began to take us seriously, and with every

like ourselves. The CBD is bustling and

studying Visual Communication and

new opportunity our game jumped to a new

there is always something interesting

Design. We formed a bond and followed

level. We became involved in the industry

happening. This greatly affects the way

our passion to the same University where

and had our name slung out there to great

in which we operate as a business and

we dreamt up the idea of opening a design

effect. Since then we’ve been building a

work as a creative studio – we are never

studio. We spent four years at university

body of work we are very proud of as well

starved for inspiration. Creativity is very

and as soon as we finished, we opened

as a strong reputation for the projects that

much influenced by the environment

Motherbird. Initially we began with nothing.

we undertake.

you surround yourself in, whether you

What is the story behind Motherbird?

We were offered a low rent studio space

like it or not. The nice thing about being

with little overheads, we bought two

Where is your studio? How does this

in Melbourne is that there is a general

computers and a couch and designed a

environment affect your work?

understanding and appreciation for design

website for our furniture. We started with

and art from the general public. This helps

no clients and no money. We saw this as a

Our studio is in the city centre of

form a dynamic and culturally interesting

minimal risk period given we had no money

Melbourne, Australia. Melbourne has

hub for us to work in. >

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What is your design philosophy?

Time differences are actually a lot easier to deal with than you’d think. By the

Foremost the essence of graphic design

time the day ends we have concepts or

is to communicate a message; without

something to present, and by the time we

this, it does not matter how good it looks.

wake up we have a set of concise feedback.

On top of this our design philosophy is very impact-driven. We strive to produce

How do you combine traditional and

graphics that are visually striking and

digital design processes?

engaging for the audience. We always aim to push boundaries and go into the

Given that we opened Motherbird directly

unknown. We believe it is our job to

from university, never previously dealing

explore the visual landscape and not be

with giant budgets, we have always been

content with producing the same routine-

rather resourceful. A lot of our work

driven design.

involves mixed media as opposed to purely generating this on screen. It isn’t always

What challenges do you face on a day-

appropriate, but it certainly gives a unique,

to-day basis as a creative team?

human element to the design. Many of our projects start from handmade objects

There are new challenges every day, some

or processes before we begin to add any

harder than others. However, given the

technology.

unique set up of our studio (3 Creative Directors) we usually share a lot of these

What projects are you most fond of and

challenges together. They’re mainly

what makes them unique?

administrative and business-related; we like to think we have a strong handle on our

We’ve always been very proud of our visual

creative process. Coming from education

campaign work for Billy Blue College of

backgrounds with very little business or

Design. This was a direct result of mixing

project management, we have had to learn

hand-generated and digital processes to

these things the hard way.

achieve a dynamic outcome. We created vibrant 3D scenes from folded coloured

How do you communicate with global

paper and then photographed them on

brands and their internal teams?

white backdrops. Initially the audience thought we had generated the images using

We’re very open in our communication

3D software and it wasn’t until we revealed

methods. Being such a small team, we’re all

the raw photographs of the process that

across every project that comes in and out

a greater appreciation for the project was

of the studio. We always assign a project

shown. We still often get asked which

lead for client liaison however, if they’re

programme we used to create the images.

not in the studio, any one of us can pick

There is an argument that you can create

the phone up and take on the role. We have

any image now using 3D software, but the

a couple of international clients who we

project and end goal was very much about

deal with via conference call or Skype.

process and a journey of sorts. >

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It was important to us and the client that

one of the underlying elements that

be storytellers, themselves. We are all

the imagery had strong ties to both hand-

can often make our work stand out. Our

designing, writing, thinking and curating our

and digitally-generated processes. As a

story of three young designers opening a

lives more than ever before; the everyday

result the project has been one of our most

studio directly from university is always a

human is now a designer. This of course

well-received pieces, appearing in several

favourable topic that we are often asked

poses the danger of DIY design; however,

journals, books and magazines, even

to discuss. This can certainly play against

those needing high-end design advice and

winning an AGDA [Australian Graphic Design

us from an experience point of view when

strategy will always seek a professional

Association] Award.

aiming to work with bigger companies

to take on these roles. Design tools are

however, with almost five years of running a

incredibly accessible now and our visual

How do you make yourselves and your

studio under our belts, we can now almost

landscape is inundated with an enormous

identity stand out from the rest?

shed this idea of inexperience.

amount of work, so much so that it is often difficult to tell apart the hypothetical from

We never intentionally aimed to stand out

What do you think is the future of

the commissioned work. Nevertheless, it

from other studios. The fact that we have

design?

is an exciting time for design and creative

three Creative Directors, all with unique

appreciation. Designers have and always

approaches allows our work to stretch

The future of design is very bright.

will have this unique opportunity to give

across a broad spectrum of visual styles.

Business is now embracing design as

voice to those who need to say something,

We certainly have common threads in

one of the most important factors in a

and perhaps even have a say themselves.

our work, but we try not to take the same

successful organisation from both internal

road twice. Our work is often very visually

and external viewpoints. With the rise in

striking whether this is through image,

technology and social media, more and

typography or colouring. This is probably

more people are being encouraged to

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A word of wisdom to share with us?

Use that voice wisely. ∞


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Photography Emma Pilkington

Styling Megan Byne

Makeup Collette Thorpe

Model Eleanor at Boss Model Management

BLOSSOMING There may be nothing better than a refreshing fashion story to guide us towards spring and ‘Blossoming’, a series of soft-spoken images shot by Emma Pilkington, pulls off this feat with little difficulty – not without thanks to its feminine aura and to the unmistakable innocence which oozes from its beautiful, rosy colour palette. ‘Blossoming’, styled by Megan Byne, is a demonstration of Emma’s distinctively feminine aesthetic. It is both a perfect ode to spring, and a particularly endearing story told through some of the season’s richest and most attractive hues. ∞ AC

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Dress We Are Cow, shoes River Island

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Cardigan TK Maxx, shoes River Island, two piece skirt and top Topshop

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Coat Topshop, bag Zara, shirt and trousers We Are Cow, shoes River Island

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Dress We Are Cow, shoes River Island

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Coat Topshop, bag Zara, shirt and trousers We Are Cow, shoes River Island

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Jacket Mango, dress See by Chloe, top worn over dress Stylist’s own

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Jumper, top and shorts Zara, earrings Topshop, shoes River Island

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Cardigan TK Maxx, shoes River Island, two piece skirt and top Topshop

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Top We Are Cow, bangle Stylist’s own, earrings Topshop

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Jacket Mango, dress See by Chloe, top worn over dress Stylist’s own

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Top We Are Cow, trousers Mango, bangle Stylist’s own

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JACK VANZET

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If anything, the works of visual artist Jack Vanzet are an absolute treat to the senses: a combination of graphic art and animation, each piece is a somehow-harmonious explosion of colour, shapes and energy that rings true to Jack’s unique musical background. The Australian, Melbourne-based creative works with strong abstract concepts, which he mashes up with bold patterns and streaks of movement to send powerful, vibrant and particularly memorable messages out to his audience. Jack offers multi-sensorial experiences through works which are consistently distinctive, yet also always rooted in one strong visual identity and style. With the likes of Vice and Adidas up his sleeve, Jack is certainly set to impress – something nobody could deny, once they’ve experienced the sheer creativity and dynamism hidden within his body of work. ∞ AC

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ELEANOR TAYLOR

With her soft, beautifully-textured

How did you develop your interest

illustrations that appear drawn from

for illustration?

picture books, 26-year-old Eleanor Taylor possesses an innate ability

I was homeschooled until the age of 16

to strike up nostalgia in the hearts

and creativity was always encouraged.

of her viewers. Having grown up

I spent a lot of my time wrapped up

submerged in books, Brighton-based

in books and I think this nurtured my

Eleanor developed a love for stories

imagination and gave me a love of stories.

from a young age and has since

I went to art school in Norwich then I did

grown into a storyteller with unique

an MA at the Royal College of Art in London

tales of her own. Eleanor produces

and graduated in 2011. During this time

calming illustrations which, although

I experimented with animation, film and

the result of lengthy experimental

large scale drawings but always felt the

processes, stand out through their

pull of illustration.

simplicity and echo the quiet space within which she enjoys working. Here,

How would you describe your ideal

she speaks to us about her favourite

workspace? How does the environment

illustrators, her ideal workspace and

surrounding you influence the way you

her ambition to eventually illustrate

work?

her own book. I am pretty close to having an ideal Who is Eleanor Taylor?

workspace. I work from home in a tiny studio flat in Brighton. As everything is

I am an artist and illustrator from the

in one room, my boyfriend and I have

seaside town of Brighton, England.

spent a lot of time perfecting the space >

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to make it a good working environment. I now have a corner of the room with built-in shelves and all my important equipment like my scanner and lightbox to hand. Ideally I like to work in a calm and quiet space. It’s really important for my focus, especially at the start of a project when I am coming up with ideas. The flat is at the top of the building so we get lots of natural light and I can hear the wind whipping round the building and lots of seagulls. I like to to think I can also hear the sea but I think it’s probably just the busy road at the bottom of my street.

Tell us a bit about the thinking process, creative methods and techniques behind your work…

When I create personal work I like to follow my instinct. I usually get an image in my head – it could be inspired by something I have read or watched or a current obsession I want to build upon. I draw lots of little thumbnails and then start creating roughs. I go through sheets and sheets >

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of printer paper doing my roughs. It’s

the roughs and brainstorming.

probably a bit wasteful and sometimes the drawing might just last a few seconds, but it

Who or what inspires your creativity?

takes a lot of drawing for me to get it right! The lightbox is my most valuable tool. I

My inspirations change all the time. I think

stick my rough down and draw and paint all

it’s good to be fresh and look at new things.

the components of the image on different

My current obsessions are old picture book

papers over the top. I draw and paint

illustrations, like Gwen White’s and Sheila

everything by hand and layer up my images

Jacksons’s stunning lithographs. I also love

a bit like a screen print on Photoshop. I like

reading science fiction and J. G. Ballard’s

to use spray paint, conte crayon, brush pens

short stories always provide an amazing

and an ink roller to get different textures.

source of inspiration.

Everything is then scanned in and the colour is changed digitally.

How do you see your career evolving in the future?

What challenges do you face when working on live briefs? How do you

I think my work would lend itself to

overcome these challenges?

lithography and it’s something I really want to learn in the near future. However it’s a

I always get an initial moment of pure terror

pretty complex technique, so I would want

when I first read a brief. My head goes

to dedicate a big chunk of time to it. For

blank and I think ‘shit - I don’t understand

the moment I am concentrating on creating

this!’ Then I take a deep breath and read

some screen prints. I also want to carry on

it through carefully. The hardest part of

illustrating and maybe write and illustrate

any brief is coming up with a great idea,

my own book! >

so I like to spend most of my time creating

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What has been your most successful or enjoyable creative experience to date?

Perhaps my most recent enjoyable experience was creating the piece for Wrap Magazine. It was a really nice, open brief to create an image based around a folk tale. I chose a contemporary tale called ‘Lady into Fox’ and it was so much fun drawing the women hanging out in the countryside. When I saw the final piece all printed it was very rewarding, as the whole magazine is beautifully presented with superb printing quality.

A word of wisdom to share with us?

Never regret the past. Always learn from your past experiences, even if at times things have been a bit rubbish! It sounds mega cheesy but they make you who you are, and nobody else can ever be the same or have your own individual take on the world. ∞

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Federico Sorrentino’s passion for the

working as a photography assistant to have

fashion industry is such, that he happily

been an invaluable learning curve, as it is

expresses how keenly he teaches it to his

what taught him to ‘understand the work

students at Marangoni Fashion School: ‘I

and world [of photography]’.

teach the fashion styling course [there], and I like to teach the passion for this work to

Now 27 years old, the Milan-based teacher

my students’. A true fashion photographer

and artist holds on to a firm belief in the

at heart, Federico sees beauty in reality,

importance of humility and in trusting one’s

simplicity and spontaneity and applies

own identity as a professional creative:

such values to his editorial work, thus

‘Milan is a big city with a lot of influences,

bringing out the vibrant and lively spirit of

so it is easy to fall into a common style. I’ve

fashion with amazing ease. His work in fact

learned that the important thing is to create

resembles impromptu snapshots more than

a personal identity and style and to believe

posed photographs, an aspect that remains

in that. It’s hard but we need to believe in

key to his individual aesthetic: ‘The more a

our personal work’.

picture is genuine, the more real and strong it will be,’ he says with conviction.

For his new editorial story ‘Spontaneity’, Federico drew from his love for old

Federico has honed his interest in

photographs and films which he combined

photography for seven years and continues

with colourful stylings, inspired by the 50s,

to develop his love for the practice,

60s and 70s and given a chic, contemporary

both through fashion editorials and

twist. Shot using a film camera, this

inspiring shots of his daily surroundings:

story provides one with a refreshing and

‘Photography for me is very important and I

evidently spontaneous burst of fun and

live every day to take pictures,” he tells us.

flair; it appears to us as a lovely means for

“I can’t walk around the world without my

moving towards the warmer and brighter

camera’. He deems his five-year experience

season ahead. ∞ AC

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Dress Frankie Morello, scarf Vivienne Westwood, hat H&M, shoes Sebastian

Photography Federico Sorrentino

Styling Clara Vayola

Spontaneity

Hair & Makeup Giuly Valent

Model Ludovica at BoomTheAgency

Video Maker Gabriele Renna

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Shirt Frankie Morello, headband Vintage, pants Vivienne Westwood

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Shirt Vivienne Westwood, skirt Frankie Morello, bracelet Gedebe, bag designinverso

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Dress Frankie Morello, coat Vivienne Westwood, coat Vintage

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Dress Frankie Morello, necklace Lolita Lorenzo

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Dress Vivienne Westwood, jacket Frankie Morello

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Shirt Frankie Morello, headband Vintage, pants Vivienne Westwood

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Shirt Vintage, necklace Lolita Lorenzo, jacket and pants Vivienne Westwood

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Dress Frankie Morello, coat Vivienne Westwood, coat Vintage

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Photography Antonio Barrella

MIDNIGHT METAMORPHOSIS Styling Lucia de Grimani

Hair & Makeup Valeria Orlando Model Katia Kan

With his brand new editorial story ‘Midnight Metamorphosis’, Antonio Barrella introduces one to a seductive world which oozes with mystery and drama. The fashion photographer joined forces with stylist Lucia de Grimani and make-up artist Valeria Orlando, to create one of his strongest stories yet – a compelling collection of images that presents itself with force, spunk and dark elegance, as it makes use of an intriguingly rough setting and a deep, monochromatic colour scheme. We couldn’t be more excited to present ‘Midnight Metamorphosis’, a story exclusive to NeverLazy Magazine. ∞ AC

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Dress Elena Leone

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Skirt Gattinoni Couture, body Repetto, bangle Bulgari vintage, shoes Designer’s own

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Dress Elena Leone

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Dress Elena Leone, jewels Casato Roma, socks Gallo, shoes Sergio Rossi

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Sweater Pinko, culotte Intimissimi, legwarmers Repetto, makeup V)or

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Jacket Muubaa, top Cut It Out, shorts with suspenders Intimissimi, shoes Jeffrey Campbell, socks Calzedonia

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Jacket Muubaa, top Cut It Out, shorts with suspenders Intimissimi, shoes Jeffrey Campbell, socks Calzedonia

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Dress Tankus, vest Zoe Paris, jewels Kenneth Jay Lane, shoes Zara Collection, socks Golden Lady, mask Luna Veneziana

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Kimono Vintage, necklace Breil

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KRZYSZTOF UBYCH The works of budding photographer

colour palettes, detailed wardrobes and

Krzysztof Ubych are truly refreshing

compelling settings, which he brings

breaths of elegance and darkness within

together with breathtaking portrayals

the world of fashion. With their demure,

of the female figure to create stories

polished and absolutely mesmerizing

brimming with emotion and dark glamour.

appeal, the artist’s works stand out

We’re excited to present pieces from

through their professional quality –

some of his most memorable series ‘In

a rather formidable trait, in fact,

the Darkland’, ’Insomnia’ and ‘The

considering the fact that Krzysztof is

Symbiosis’, amongst others. Keep a

new to his trade. Already a keen talent

close eye on this photographer, whose

with a vision of his own, Krzysztof

path in the industry we’re sure is set

expresses himself best through rich

in stone. ∞ AC

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Styling, hair and makeup Wioletta Maciejowska, corset designer Nika Danielska Design, model Barbara Kozłowska, studio Attic 29 Studio

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Styling and makeup Wioletta Maciejowska, hair Sebastian Szymański, dress designer Małgorzata Motas, headpiece/collar designer Joanna Dorosińska, model Angelika Kwiatkowska

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Styling and makeup Wioletta Maciejowska, hair Sebastian Szymański, designer Sebastian Szczepański-Siccone

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Hair and makeup Klara Margas, model Justyna Uboska at SPOT Management/2Morrow Model, fashion designer Małgorzata Chara

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Styling and makeup Wioletta Maciejowska, hair Sebastian Szymański, dress designer Małgorzata Motas, headpiece/collar designer Joanna Dorosińska, model Angelika Kwiatkowska

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Styling, hair and makeup Wioletta Maciejowska, dress designer Gosia Motas, model Barbara Kozłowska, studio Attic 29 Studio

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Hair and makeup Klara Margas, model Justyna Uboska at SPOT Management/2Morrow Model, fashion designer Małgorzata Chara

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Styling, hair and makeup Wioletta Maciejowska, corset designer Nika Danielska Design, model Barbara Kozłowska, studio Attic 29 Studio

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Hair and makeup Klara Margas, model Justyna Uboska at SPOT Management/2Morrow Model, fashion designer Małgorzata Chara

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SAM FLAHERTY

One to appreciate work spaces in which

Who is Sam Flaherty?

he can hear himself think, Sam Flaherty

creative spaces certainly inspire you to be creative. I think the best way to instil

describes himself in a way which

I’m a graphic designer, an art director, a

a creative atmosphere is to have creative

underlines his pensive character as

part-time meditator, a basketball-lover,

people around you. Personally, I like to

well as his focus. At 29, the United

a caffeine-avoider, a serial airplane

involve other people in my design process;

Kingdom-based graphic designer and art

ticket-buyer, a pale-ale drinker, a slowly-

feedback and suggestions (nearly) always

director produces designs that speak of

improving cook and a (pretty good)

benefit a project. It’s helpful to have other

his unfaltering know-how and identity,

boyfriend.

creatives who can give you that feedback

yet that still constantly remain

in the same area as you. I also like wooden

innovative and thought-provoking. In an

In what workspace or atmosphere do

floors and plants. For some reason, I always

exclusive interview, Sam lets us in on

you work best? How would you say your

come up with my best ideas when a plant is

the work methods and ethics behind his

surroundings influence the way you work?

nearby.

us a bit about a collaborative project

I can work anywhere where you can hear

Do you face any particular obstacles as

of his that we can look forward to.

the sound of your own thoughts. However,

a graphic designer? If so, how do you >

clean and spotless designs, and tells

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How do you normally approach a

a project without intention. It’s in the

creative brief? How do you combine your

minor details; typography, colour palette,

Graphic design has its share of obstacles.

aesthetic with the needs and desires of

language. Designers have to be able to

One of the major obstacles is self-

your clients?

create outside their comfort zone; not every

go about overcoming them?

satisfaction in your work; I don’t know many

project requires a beautiful typographic

designers who are ever completely satisfied

The one thing that I do consistently when

poster as a solution. But sometimes, when

with their portfolio. Finding inspiration in

approaching a new brief is to talk to the

you get a project that suits your aesthetic

times of pressure can be an issue, and can

client, to really get an understanding of

and the desires of the client are aligned

result in chewed fingernails or overdoses

their needs. This is foremost - if you don’t

with your own, it all comes together.

of heart palpitations. Overcoming obstacles

do this properly, you’ll likely struggle

is a constant process of bettering your

throughout the project. Then research,

technique and work; there’s nothing that

research, research. You have to have a

can’t be countered by taking a bit of time

grounding in the area that you’re working

I like working with no pre-determined

away from the desk and reading a book,

in before you can put pen to paper.

guidelines, existing branding or visual

going for a walk, or drawing silly faces.

How would you describe your ideal brief?

language. Building something from scratch Often your aesthetic will be stamped on

is the ultimate creative challenge – that’s >

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why often my favourite briefs are small

I think being young and fiery and working

horizon. My girlfriend, Jessie Bush, is a

start-up projects that require a face.

on Fluro magazine has been my most

photographer, fashion blogger and digital

memorable project to date. Fluro was a

strategist. We’ve decided to combine

What do you strive to achieve or

little self-published magazine myself and

our skill sets under the roof of a new

communicate through your work?

a group of friends ran in New Zealand.

agency. We’re going to be working with an

It lasted for about 4 years before we all

existing network of fashion, beauty and

A sense of clarity is important for me.

decided to go either travelling, grow up or

lifestyle brands to deliver brand strategy

I aim to reduce noise by removing all

do our own thing. We released 10 issues

that encapsulates identity design, digital

unnecessary elements; stripping bare

which, for all practical purposes, were

strategy, social media – all the buzzwords.

a design can often leave the clearest

excuses to have epic launch parties up

We’re about to launch our site, and have

message. To voice the heroic words of

and down the country. Looking back it was

just completed a photo shoot for our first

Antoine de Saint-Exupéry: “Perfection is

an avalanche of experiences, creativity,

client.

achieved not when there is nothing left to

technical design and networking.

add, but when there is nothing left to take away”.

A word of wisdom to share with us? Are you currently working on any ongoing or upcoming projects?

overhead, don’t look up. ∞

What has been your most memorable creative project to date, and why?

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When you notice a group of pigeons fly

I’ve got a very exciting project on the


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DECEPTION Photography Cristian Davila Hernandez Post production Milou van Mook, Cristian Davila Hernandez Designer Jivika Biervliet Styling Felicity van Dam Makeup Peter Dwars Hair Eldridge Mullenhof Retouch Cristian Davila Hernandez Model Tomas Rabbering at Tony Jones Model Management

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‘Deception’, an editorial story by

and being what he calls an ‘intuitive

up-and-coming fashion photographer

photographer’.

Cristian Davila Hernandez, presents an entrancing atmosphere through its

Who is Cristian Davila Hernandez?

play with textures, its monochromatic

What first sparked your interest in

hues and its extraordinary use

photography?

of solarisation. Aided by stylist Felicity van Dam and make-up artist

We want to answer this classical question,

Peter Dwars, the Netherlands-based

‘who am I?’ It’s really hard to tell exactly

photographer has created a conceptual

who I am… I think that nothing of me

series of exquisite quality, which

is original. I am the combined effort of

points at his limitless imagination

everyone I’ve ever known.

as much as it masks the fact that he is merely 20 years old. On top

I always wanted to buy a DSLR, so two years

of sharing his experience shooting

ago I bought one. I started to shoot mostly

‘Deception’, Cristian talks about both

what I saw as great and on my own terms.

his attachment to fashion photography

It began as a hobby, but nowadays >

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photography has become my passion. I’ve

also surrounded by photography every day

been studying since last year at the Photo

because of my studies.

Academy in Amsterdam, to step up my skills. Lately I have been really focused on

What creative achievement(s) are you

fashion photography; I have always been in

most proud of so far?

a fashion environment so that’s why I really like to shoot editorials nowadays.

What I usually say is that I’m happy, but not satisfied. And that is enough to keep me

As a photographer based in The

motivated.

Netherlands, how would you say your lifestyle and surroundings affect your

What is the concept or story of this

work or creative thinking?

editorial, ‘Deception’?

The Netherlands is so small and there is so

The concept of my editorial ‘Deception’ is

much creativity around me. Unavoidably,

that of breaking up the visual boundary of

photography, fashion and art are the main

an object. This usually involves colouring

creative sources that I am surrounded with

and blending the camouflaged object – in

on a high level – that influences me to push

this case the model Tomas – with the same

myself to become one of the best. I am

colours as the background against which >

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the object will be hidden. In the realm

worked out really well because I love the

of deceptive half-truths, camouflage is

minimalism in Jivika’s latest collection.

realised by ‘hiding’ some of the truths that you can’t see directly.

When I was researching people whom I wanted to work with I also came across

Tell us a bit about the process behind

Milou van Mook and the collage art that she

‘Deception’ and how you worked with

made for her graduation project at Willem

your team to bring the concept to life…

de Kooning Academy. The make-up artist Peter Dwars is one of my favourites – I had

Last summer I came up with the idea to

worked with him before and knew he would

shoot four different editorials in one day

be a good part in this project as well. He

with two models. ‘Deception’ was one of

had the idea of drawing a little bit from the

the four editorials, in which I have put a lot

style of Hubert Givenchy by creating dark

of time to make happen. I have also put a

eyes and using minimal, nude tones.

lot of time and research in finding people I wanted to work with and I am really happy

The model I worked with – Tomas Rabering

that I found the best people for this project.

– is from Tony Jones model management

One of them is stylist Felicity van Dam;

based in Amsterdam. I wanted a strong

she came up with the great idea of using

storytelling face and Tomas was perfect for

garments by designer Jivika Biervliet – it

this. He told me that he had just started >

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modelling, but he did a stunning job! I was

mind is one step beyond [everybody else’s].

really satisfied with his strong looks and

How do you see your career evolving in

poses, which is what gave the most power

future?

to my series. Firstly, I want to finish my bachelor’s degree In what atmosphere or context do you

at the Photo Academy in Amsterdam. I

work best? Who or what influences your

am young but I already know that I want

work?

to develop my fashion photography and become known for that.

I found out that even though I have a concept in my head, I really am an intuitive

Are you currently working on any ongoing

photographer and that’s why I always say

or upcoming photographic projects?

that ‘only intuitive knowledge is eternal’. I work best with feeling and seeing things

Yes, of course – a lot of editorials will be

right at the moment when I am shooting.

published soon. I am also working hard now on many ongoing editorials. I can’t say that

The person who has a lot of influence in my

much; all I can say is… keep an eye on me!

work... is myself. I make my own decisions to work things out. Of course, however,

A word of wisdom to share with us and

I get inspired by great photographers. One

budding photographers?

of my favourite [photographers] is Nick Knight – he is one of the few innovators

As an artist, your only concern is to shoot/

who does both photography and motion

create to achieve some kind of perfection,

pictures at this moment. I also admire his

on your own terms and not on anyone

different view on art and that his creative

else’s. ∞

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JOSHU Abstraction and surrealism blossom

practice, and about how his curiosity

in the art of Joshua Hibbert, whose

towards science and philosophy feeds

digital pieces reveal his underlying

into his everyday work.

interests in both psychedelic and enigmatic themes. A former graphic and

Tell us a little about yourself...

media design student, Joshua is drawn to interactive design and shines his

I’m a sea-driven acoustic surrealist based

brightest through the experimental edge

along the south of England. I graduated

that characterises much of his work.

from the University of Arts (London) in

Although a fresh graduate, the 23-year-

2011 with a BA (Hons) in Graphic and Media

old creates eclectic and atmospheric

Design, where I specialised in interactive

pieces bursting with colour, through

design, creating projects with furniture and

which much of himself and his passions

sonic space design. I enjoy researching and

permeate. Joshua talks to NeverLazy

creating philosophical theories, developing

Magazine about how he intertwines

soundscapes, collecting nature and

music and visual art in his creative

importantly, playing tennis. >

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HIBBE


UA

ERT

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Tell us about your work: what creativity

and destruction is vital in the making of

or Holy Celeb project, required me to be

processes do you follow and what themes

my works. The recycling process allows my

more esoteric whilst keeping a same idea.

do you tend to explore?

work to bring the new into the past.

With my celebrity project, I created many different types of design – typography,

My work embraces many approaches

Throughout the years my influences have

fashion, packaging, moving image, sound

depending on the concept and value of

flickered, but I’m always intrigued by art

design and 3D sculptures. It also pushed

a project. It can be described as logical

movements such as Gutai, Dada and early

my limits of thinking within our daily

psychedelia infused with conceptual,

surrealism. Science, philosophy and realism

context, and has definitely affected the way

deep minimalism. I love to use a whole

also infiltrate my subconscious and allow

I work with imagery since.

complex of technologies – mainly digital

my work to be a direct reflection of the

but blending it with initial handmade

changing world.

techniques, providing the work with

What have you learned from being a visual artist?

authenticity and humanism. Hand-found

What is the most ambitious project

and old leftover resources inspire me

you’ve undertaken?

through this process; I’m driven to bring

The main reflection of being a visual artist has allowed me to challenge my thoughts,

discarded objects to life whether a digital

Every project is challenging in its own

be honest and persevere with anything I do.

image, a sound sample or an old object

unique attitude. I feel my more conceptual

I feel it has changed my whole perspective

on the beach. The link between beauty

projects, such as my emotional furniture

of the visual world we live >

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in, the dangerous and soothing elements

found this new way to explore ideas. It’s

That’s a tricky one; [there are] so many

of it. Vitally it lets me express, focus and

now a ritual for me to make music weekly;

different minds. Personally, I’d love to

accept failure as a positive bridge to

I feel it complements my journey of image-

work with someone [who does something]

progression.

making.

completely opposite from what I do, and then the work would have a new voice:

Aside from visual art, you also

The leftover process can be seen through

Emmanuel Kant, Magritte and Da Vinci or

experiment with music. How do these

my tracks, the aura, spiritual energy I

on the contemporary side, Issey Miyake,

practices feed into each other? How

consume. In the near future I aim to merge

Derrick May, Vangelis, Sagmeister and really

present is your musical identity within

my sounds with digital imagery through

recently, Karborn.

your digital art?

movement, dance, fashion, and also sound spaces. I’ve previously worked as a VJ so I

As an artist, what are your resolutions for

Music is something I began doing

have made moving images for other music

2014?

by accident, really: I aimed to build

projects.

soundscapes for a communication project,

Trying out new processes, finding new

but the electronic layering process inspired

Who from within the digital arts and

contexts to work in and pushing my visuals

me to build musical atmospheres or places,

music spheres would you most want to

forward in a 3D state. “Carpe Diem.” ∞

as I call it. I’ve been joyful ever since I’ve

collaborate with?

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Photography Sara Melotti

LACED SENTIMENTS Styling Marita Virgillito

Hair & Makeup Erika Ginevra Meyer Model Katalina at Woman

‘Laced Sentiments‘, a new story by London- and Los Angeles-based fashion photographer Sara Melotti, is nothing short of graceful as it welcomes the change in season with open arms. A luscious cocktail of creamy colours, delicate knits and form-fitting lace garments, ‘Laced Sentiments‘ reintroduces both the vintage trend and floral pattern as it seeks to explore the beauty of simplicity. Styled by Marita Virgillito, this story is a quiet and heartwarming reminder of the natural charms and sensitivity that come with the brand new season. ∞ AC

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Shorts Individuals, lace shirt Tug Store Vintage Selection

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Top Sartoria Vico, underwear Individuals

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Bra Individuals, skirt Tug Store Vintage Selection

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Shorts Sara Loi, bodysuit Individuals

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Underwear Individuals, cardigan Sartoria Vico

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Bra Individuals, skirt Tug Store Vintage Selection

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Top Vintage, pants Sartoria Vico

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Underwear Individuals, cardigan Sartoria Vico

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Top Vintage, pants Sartoria Vico

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Bra Individuals, skirt Tug Store Vintage Selection

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Shorts Individuals, lace shirt Tug Store Vintage Selection

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The soft playfulness and nostalgia

for dessert. I grew up Wisconsin, and moved

that perspire through Keith Negley’s

to Seattle when I was 23 I think. I moved to

collage-inspired illustrations are so

New York for a couple years and just now

raw, it’s almost unfathomable that

moved back to Seattle last summer. I’ve

whoever happens upon them wouldn’t

been working as a freelance illustrator full

immediately feel connected to them.

time since 2002. I like tattoos, vintage drum

Such height of emotion is a rare

sets and fresh air.

quality amongst contemporary works of art, and it says much about Keith’s

How did you develop your interest for

creative strengths and character – one

illustration? How formal is your training?

that, as we discovered, is grounded, steady and latched onto his passion

I earned my BFA from the Milwaukee

for illustration. As we catch up with

Institute of Art and Design in 2000 and

the American visual artist, we come

my MFA from the School of Visual Arts in

to appreciate his deeply engrossing

New York in 2013, so I guess you could say

personality and the little details

my training is pretty formal. I initially got

of his life that make his world so

interested in illustration when I realized

fascinating.

early on I would never cut it as a comic book artist. I had dreams of working for DC

Tell us a bit about yourself and your

or Marvel in high school and those dreams

background…

were crushed when I went to my first comic convention and saw all the other artists

I live in Seattle, Washington. I’m married

waiting in line to get their work reviewed

and we have a five-year-old son. I eat

and it was light years ahead of mine. Turns

peanut butter toast for breakfast and cereal

out I actually enjoy editorial illustration >

KEITH NEGLEY

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much more than I ever enjoyed drawing comic book characters.

How would you describe your ideal workspace? How does the environment surrounding you affect the way you work?

My ideal workspace would have cement floors so I can make a mess. Natural light of course, a table for getting messy, and a table for being clean. Studio mates who are close enough for me to bounce ideas off of, but magically disappear at will. Also in this fantasy I’m wearing my pyjamas and no one minds. Oh, and there’s a cleaning service included in the rent… and they clean brushes. It’s also down the street from my house.

I can’t say my environment influences the way I work overtly. I will just say that having talented creative people in your vicinity is paramount. I’m competitive by nature as most artists are and seeing people more talented than I working their butts off certainly lights a fire under mine. >

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What are the thinking process, creative

Do you face any particular obstacles

methods and techniques behind your

when working on briefs? What would you

work?

say is the best way to overcome these challenges?

I try not to limit myself to one medium, and use whatever I feel would be the most

A constant obstacle I face daily when

interesting at the time. I compose my

working on an assignment is doing what

pieces on the computer first and tend to

I think is best for the assignment versus

think of it as cut paper, building shapes on

doing what I think the client wants me to

top of shapes, not using line for anything.

do. Without realizing it I will censor myself

And then I’ll paint the parts and pieces by

out of fear the client will think what I’m

hand and scan that in and assemble it in

doing is too unusual, or not similar enough

Photoshop, collage style. I use charcoal,

to the work in my portfolio. It’s easy to play

tempera paint, pencils, watercolour, cut

it safe and just repeat yourself, but that

paper, and things I’ve run through a Xerox

makes for very boring work. Boring to look

machine. A typical piece could easily

at and boring to make. I have to consciously

consist of one of those things or all of

choose to take risks and surprise myself

them, depending on where I think it wants

in the process of creating a piece and not

to go. I’m always focused on good design,

be concerned with whether or not the

first and foremost, and after that it’s about

client will like it. How do I overcome this

letting the different media and layers

challenge? I muscle through it when I’m

interact. It’s half hyper control with the

lucky. >

computer, and half complete improvisation with the traditional media.

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Who or what inspires you, creatively?

‘Enjoy’ is a strange word. Most of my favourite pieces required a lot of struggling

Tragedy inspires me. Heartbreak, anxiety,

and frustration. The fun part comes after

the human condition all inspire me. I also

it’s finished, seeing it printed, or online.

get inspired by work that is brazen, work

And that feeling of accomplishment, no

that doesn’t appear to take my needs as a

matter what it is you accomplished, is

viewer into consideration, and work that is

very fleeting. But I will say I love working

revealing something intimate. I also love

for the New York Times Op/Ed with

imagery sync’d to music; it’s a powerful

Matt Dorfman. The time constraints are

combination. Music videos, film trailers,

intense, no time to second-guess decisions,

when done well, can be works of art.

no time to explore every option. No other jobs get me as pumped, and few art

How do you see your career in illustration

directors are as fun to work with. That and

evolving in the future?

it’s in print the very next morning. If you bomb it no one will remember, but if it’s

I would love to get into teaching illustration

great it can live forever.

in some capacity someday soon. I’d also like to work on children’s books and get

A word of wisdom to share with us?

into other facets of publishing. I’d also like try getting involved in animation studios

Surprise yourself with your work; if you

creating key frames.

don’t surprise yourself, you won’t surprise your audience. ∞

What has been your most successful or enjoyable illustration project so far?

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Once an aspiring illustrator with a fondness

Although she has set her sights on honing

[about] your personality then it will not

for drawing, Alexandra Banti took a rather

her photographic skills, Alexandra still

be as good as it can be’.

different turn when she realised the

clearly retains a devotion to traditional art

possibilities that photography, as a unique

and expresses this through her admiration

As she speaks of her most interesting

form of expression, could provide her

of 19th century painters and culture: ‘[The

artistic experience to date – a series

with: ‘During my graphic design studies, I

19th century] was a very sophisticated and

inspired by Gian Lorenzo Bernini’s

took some photography lessons. Not very

elegant period. I’m very inspired by [it],

sculpture ‘Apollo and Daphne’ – Alexandra

interesting ones, but they forced me to

especially the Pre-Raphaelites. I feel very

unveils her creativity as much as she

discover the camera and photography,’ she

close to their topics, and I really like the

shows just how heavily old art practices

says. ‘I fell in love with it. I can go much

fact that women are the main characters in

influence her: ‘I wasn’t a photographer

further in my ideas with photography than

their paintings,’ she says, following which

[when I first discovered the sculpture] but

with drawing’.

she unavoidably confirms her interest in

a few months ago, I remembered it again

photographing women, in particular.

and decided to make a photographic series

Currently a graphic design student based

around it. It wasn’t very easy, but it was

in Toulon, France, the young artist has come

Combining the female figure with rich

a great experience. I think I can say that I

to find her niche within the photographic

colour schemes, Alexandra fills her

fell in love with [the sculpture]; there was

world, as a creator of what she terms

painting-like work with allure and passion

such emotion [in it], it was such a perfect

‘romantic, dark and out-of-time’ pieces.

without robbing it of its confident and

masterpiece’.

Much like the ideal workspace that she

powerful attributes. She allows much

describes – ‘an ancient room with ancient

of herself and her passion for old art to

An explorer of complex themes inspired

furniture’ – Alexandra’s work is a breath

seep through her work, in a way which

by the beauty and intricacy of fine art,

of timelessness and detains a certain old,

encapsulates her belief that ‘your creation

Alexandra is currently working on two

glamorous charm.

has to be a part of your personality.

projects inspired by Alfons Mucha and

You don’t have to try to imitate someone’s

Dante Rossetti’s ‘Proserpine’. ∞ AC

style because, in my mind, if it’s not

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Photo, headpiece and makeup Alexandra Banti, model Kim-Lou Monnier

ALEXANDRA

BANTI

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Photo, styling and makeup Alexandra Banti, model Graziella

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Photo, styling and makeup Alexandra Banti, model Ines Kozic

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Model and dress Aria-Ă„slinn

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Photo, headpiece and makeup Alexandra Banti, Dress Clara Maeda, model Sirithil

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Photo, styling and makeup Alexandra Banti, model Ines Kozic

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Photo, styling and makeup Alexandra Banti, model Lyn Agrume

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Dress Caroline Barral, makeup Suzanna Rieu, assistant Jérémy Delphin, model Aria-Äslinn, location Raray Castle

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ST. FRANCIS ELEVATOR RIDE There’s something about St. Francis

I didn’t want to use my name for my work.

disconnection, more as an extension of

Elevator Ride’s work that entrances

I wanted to be a personality or a brand,

my sense of humour than anything else.

– the impressive levels of detail,

something that could evolve and be its

I like finding the dark corners lurking

colour and attention, perhaps, that do

own entity outside of my personal life. It’s

within ideals and shining a light on the

more than merely hint at the artist’s

a way for me to work with ferocious

weird stuff hiding there. The key is trying

drive; the versatility of his portfolio

intimacy but present the finished products

to bring inherently uninviting imagery

which features animated work, designs,

with some detachment or distance. St.

and transforming them into something

collages and mixed media pieces; or

Francis Elevator Ride is a gallery show

attractive and eye-pleasing.
Also, girls.

maybe the quantity of personality which

and a body of work; it’s a freelance design

Lots of girls.

the American artist displays through

company and a clothing and keepsakes

his craft and not merely through his

brand. I felt like tying something highly

You work with a variety of mediums -

quirky pseudonym. These assets are

conceptual to my given name would be

how do you adapt your visual identity

nothing less than admirable and they

limiting: thus, St. Francis Elevator Ride.


to each medium, and which do you think

transpire through our exchange with the

best suits you?

artist and art director, who gives us

How would you say your personality is

a fascinating snapshot of the world in

reflected through your work?

which he lives.

I went to school for design but also had a lot of studio art classes, so it seemed

A lot of my work has been informed by

natural to me to combine physical and

What is the story behind the name ‘St.

personal narrative, as well as the

digital mediums. I would have to say the

Francis Elevator Ride’?

experiences of close friends. I tend to

medium I find myself using most often is

explore themes of morbidity or

digital collage-illustration. There’s a lot >

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more freedom when I’m working on my

movement allows me to emphasize a

computer versus working solely by hand.

message more effectively than I would

Some of my source images would not work

otherwise be able to through static imagery.

effectively compositionally if they were just cut and pasted without the aid of digital

What do you aim to achieve by

touchups. Analog techniques, such as

combining vintage imagery with a surreal,

cutting, gluing and painting, make the work

contemporary aesthetic?

much more precious when I’m trimming space stations from astronomy journals, but

Old things are good. Really good. New

Command-Z has saved my ass more times

things are good, too, but they lack a certain

than I can count.

charm or interest simply by default because they are new. I think each subsequent

How do you use animation in your work,

generation has pangs of artificial nostalgia

and what does this communicate?

for the relics of the generations who came before. It’s natural, and it’s always been

Working digitally creates opportunities

that way. I like to capture that widespread

for animation. Looping cinemagraphs

feeling each generation has that makes

or animated GIFs gives me the chance

precocious teenagers reference “the good

to embellish particular elements of a

old days” they were never a part of in the

composition. Sometimes, having several

first place. >

frames to illustrate a hand or eye

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How do you maintain your originality

You’ll notice some of these are musicians;

and vision? What is it that keeps you

I strongly gravitate toward working with

inspired?


them because different forms of music have had a profound influence in shaping my

Mostly through a panicked mixture of

sense of aesthetics and general interest in

constant second-guessing and self-doubt,

design.

working and reworking the same pieces for hours on end. Also, the following sources

Tell us about your one, biggest dream...

serve as wells of inspiration that never seem to run dry: surrealism, postmodern

My dream is not to have to worry about

pop art movements, clean typefaces and

the value of a dollar or let it get in the way

contemporary design, hand-me-down

of my artistic endeavours. Also, I’d really

Gentlemen’s Quarterlies circa 1960 to

love to Scrooge McDuck a giant vault of

1980.

Frankenberry cereal.

Which artists would you most want to

A word of wisdom to share with us?

collaborate with? Never settle in your work. Always look for I do not collaborate often, but if I had

ways to improve artistically, whether it be

to pick a few it would be Jacob Whibley,

subjectively or technically. Always strive to

Ashkan Honarvar, Aaron Draplin, David

be better in your craft. ∞

Carson, John Cale, Sam Flax and Kate Bush.

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Photography Salvador Pozo & Peter Versnel

Concept & Styling Marlou Schreurs & Samantha Top for Stream Styling

Hair & Makeup Dainora Dulcyte Model Tessa

CAUGHT BY THE SEA Sensuality, strength and confidence reign in ‘Caught by the Sea’, one of the latest projects by talented fashion photographer Salvador Pozo. With the help of amazing stylings by Samantha Top and Marlou Schreurs, the Netherlands-based creative has crafted a lively and dynamic editorial story which packs a punch and which well and truly has one wishing for warmer days. Using the boldness and textures of a beach setting, Salvador brings an undeniable dynamism to this story, in ways which give the latter bursts of colour and character that one can only stop to admire. ∞ AC

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Dress Ana Alcazar

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Jacket Mink Pink, top Individuals

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Jacket Mink Pink, top Individuals, trousers Jeans by Timo

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Dress Hunkydory

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Jacket Black Lily, dress Tony Cohen

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Dress Ana Alcazar

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Body Simon Perele

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Jacket Ted Baker, trousers Angelina, necklace Mique Jewelery

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Dress Ana Alcazar

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Photography Anthony Arquier, model Karina Women Agency

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Photography Anthony Arquier, model Pavlina Women Agency

MORGANE KRISCHER A balance of refinement, structure and elegance, Morgane Krischer’s garments incorporate intriguing elements and materials together with the sophistication of haute couture. At the ripe age of 21, the young fashion designer and Atelier Chardon Savard graduate has already developed an exceptionally strong creative identity for herself, as she bases her work on her architectural and artistic influences and creates immersive stories. She tells us of her fascination for experimenting with new materials and of her dreams to gain experience as a designer around the world, as she shares with us previews of several of her imaginative and polished collections. >

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First and foremost, tell us a bit about yourself...

I’m Morgane Krischer. I came to Paris four years ago to study fashion at L’Atelier Chardon Savard. I chose this school because I could really develop my own universe and expand my creative sensibility. Every year I can also present two or three outfits at the final show, which is great professional experience to step into the fashion world with. But I have hesitated between interior design and fashion for a while – in fact I’m still thinking about it.

How would you describe your work?

My inspirations are eclectic but more focused on design architecture and the arts – such as photography and literature. Everything could be an inspiration. >

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Photography Chochana Rosso, model Nicolas Hau

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Photography Josh Caudwell, model Alexandra Velia

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Photography Anthony Arquier, model Karina Women Agency

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The arrangement of a pavement in the

menswear. Right now I feel more attracted

universes. Every internship I have done

street, the draping of a curtain, light

to menswear: I think there is a lot to do and

has given me so much in such different

reflected on metal. I love working with

to offer to it. Creating clothes for men is a

ways. Traveling is really important for me

unusual materials and recycling items. For

passion of mine; making a man feel elegant,

as well. I’m more attracted to Scandinavian

instance, I work with boat sailing materials

subliming his personality and revealing his

countries and I would like to try [working

or medical X-ray sheets. What I like most

virility, all through clothing, is a real source

there] soon. But my final goal is to launch

is the research, how to turn a material into

of inspiration.

my own ready-to-wear and haute couture

something else; seeing different results, the

brand for both womenswear and menswear.

transformation of materials and how they

What are you most curious to experiment

match.

with?

What has been your most memorable experience so far as a young designer?

What other materials do you most

I would like to develop new technologies

enjoy using?

for clothing alongside scientists, and find

I’m really young and I haven’t had many

out how to make these [technologies]

experiences, but all my experiences so

I love experimenting with a lot of materials;

match with our contemporary lives – for

far have been really nice. My internship

I don’t have a favourite one. On the

instance, new intelligent fabrics or ways of

at Iris Van Herpen was one of the most

contrary, I love looking for new things to

sewing. I’m also attracted to researching

memorable, maybe because it was my first

work with and trying to model those. But I

materials. New technologies have already

one. I lived in Amsterdam for three months,

love working with natural and noble fabrics

given us a lot but they could give us so

with an amazing team. I met a real family

such as silk and linen.

much more, especially in the area of

and wonderful people. Also, working with

clothing.

Iris Van Herpen was a huge experience and I learned so much about precision,

You’ve worked on both menswear and womenswear. Which do you prefer,

What is your biggest ambition right now?

about completely new ways of constructing garments; I also found

and which is most challenging to you? For now I would like to gain experience,

new sources of inspiration, new ways of

Both are more than challenging. They’re

travel and work for a few brands all over

imagining garments, of combining dreams

completely different, and I like to mix them

the world; learn different ways of creating,

and reality. Everything was new, >

and seek inspiration from womenswear for

working, getting inspired from several

from the pattern-making to the creation of

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Photography Chochana Rosso, model Nicolas Hau

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every material. In a way, we had to forget

ne me les fait pas regretter et je reconnais

everything we learned at school about the

ainsi qu’elles étaient bonnes. Après tant

classic way of making clothes. I also did

d’années, elles durent encore aujourd’hui,

a longer internship at Balmain in Paris.

quelque part dans ce cœur aux fidélités

It was a completely different thing. I got

pourtant difficiles. Et je sais qu’aujourd’hui,

a lot from this experience as well about

sur la dune déserte, si je veux m’y rendre, le

embellishment, embroidery, and very

même ciel déversa encore sa cargaison de

feminine and sensitive ways of creating.

souffles et d’étoiles. Ce sont ici les terres de l’innocence.

A word of wisdom to share with us?

[In the warmth of dawn, having passed the first few waves of darkness, a new being

Here are two extracts from novels which

cleaves through the heavy waters of the

mean a lot to me, and that I want to share

night. Remembering these joys does not

with you:

make me regret them, and I know then that they were good. After so many years and to

“Chaque homme doit inventer son chemin.

this day, they still exist somewhere in this

[Each man must build his own path.]”

heart of mine that usually isn’t so loyal.

– Jean-Paul Sartre, Les Mouches.

And I know that today, if I were to go to the deserted dune, the same sky would pour

“Dans la petite aube tiède, passé les

down its breaths of wind and stars. These

premières vagues encore noires et amères,

are the lands of innocence.]”

c’est un être neuf qui fend l’eau, si lourde

– Albert Camus, L’Été ∞

à porter, de la nuit. Le souvenir de ces joies

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Photography Anthony Arquier, model Pavlina Women Agency

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Photography Chochana Rosso, model Nicolas Hau

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ATELIER DYAKOVA

A contemporary artist of fine-tuned

Who is Sonya Dyakova?

skill, award-winning Russian graphic

to apply the same principle to all projects. I try to be thoughtful about what the task

designer Sonya Dyakova impresses with

I was born in Ukraine, grew up in Siberia,

is – and the solution comes from that. My

simple and sleek, yet also boldly

spent my teenage years in California and

work is about communicating by various

expressive designs. The 38-year-old

here I’ve been, living in London for 14 years means, using typography, colour, space and

visual artist, art director and owner

now.

of multidisciplinary studio Atelier

the tactile aspects of printing, or digital [mediums] if the project is an app, for

Dyakova draws from the lives and

I moved to London because I liked the level

stories of people who surround her, to

of creative work here. I bought the book

communicate the truth and essence of

‘Process’ by Tomato and thought I should

What is the story behind Atelier

things through her work – a feat which

come to London and work for them. When I

Dyakova?

she accomplishes beautifully, through

arrived I immediately felt right – this is my

classic designs which she always

kind of city.

structures and finishes to perfection. In an exclusive interview, she takes a

example.

I worked as a designer for studios like Frost Design and Kerr Noble when I first came

How would you describe your aesthetic?

moment to talk to us about the London-

to London, before my six and a half-year period at Phaidon Press. My role there

based Atelier Dyakova, her opportunity

I don’t know how to describe my aesthetic,

started out as a design manager, art director

to join Frieze Magazine and her

perhaps it’s better done by someone else?

and eventually design director. I was

ambitions for the year ahead.

I don’t have one approach; I don’t tend >

working under the creative direction >

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of Alan Fletcher, and am so thankful I got

How does being an artist in London differ

People’s stories. I get really inspired by

to know him. Two and a half years ago I

from your experiences in Russia and the

meeting interesting people: hearing where

was asked to re-design Frieze Magazine. It

United States?

they are from, what they love, what they

was my chance to go solo, and I did just it.

My experience in Russia was one of a

do, their travels; their resilience, their work

I just got a new studio space in Shoreditch

teenager so I never worked there, really

ethic. And I love watching documentaries

(London), so that’s really exciting.

– apart from a logo design for a bank in

on the BBC [British Broadcasting

Siberia, in the very early days. London is

Corporation]. Recent favourites are about

The studio’s projects include:

the most motivating, inspiring and lively

Judith Kerr, children’s author; [Mstislav]

Ron Mueck monograph for Fondation

place; when I got here it felt just right.

Rostropovich, a Russian cello player; and

Cartier

One of my motivations is a fear of being

photographer Vivian Maier.

Edmund de Waal monograph for Phaidon

mediocre, a fear of being a bad or lazy

Press

designer. It’s looked down upon to be

I recently had the most fantastic

Design and art direction for Frieze

fearful of something, but honestly to some

conversation over dinner with David

Magazine, app + marketing campaigns

degree it pushes me.

Gentleman and was very much in awe:

photography book for Aperture, NY

85 years old, working every day... wow.

Hayward Gallery publication & exhibition

What inspires and motivates you as an

This was my first meeting with Alliance

graphics

artist?

Graphique Internationale (AGI). I also

FutureSpace digital magazine for iPad

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love film and music, another form >


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of storytelling or expression, and I draw a

subject at hand. It’s not about me; I am

lot from both.

communicating stories and messages, summing up something or someone.

What achievement are you most proud of now?

As a creative, what are your resolutions for 2014?

For me it’s not about big achievements; it’s about many smaller things that happen.

So many goals this year; [I have] big

Nothing is achieved solely by myself. I’d

expectations for myself... To expand my

rather say I am thankful for things, like

practice, allow my studio to grow. To widen

being a mother to a beautiful daughter,

my clientèle and vary the nature of projects

becoming a member of AGI, being blessed

I take on. To keep meeting fantastic people

with many wonderful friends.

and exchange ideas, have a conversation.

What do you want people to see through

A word of wisdom to share with us?

your work? Be genuine in every thing you do. You’ll The story, the truth, the essence of the

never regret that. ∞

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There’s an admirable simplicity in the

and of his most enjoyable project to

work of Ruben Brulat who, although

date, answering our questions in a way

merely 25 years of age, possesses a

which keeps to his simple yet deeply

striking thoughtfulness and assurance.

secretive and charming aesthetic.

A self-proclaimed nomad, the Frenchborn artist photographs natural

How did you develop your interest

landscapes with all the grace and

for photography? How formal is your

wisdom of photographers whose years

training?

of experience stretch much farther behind them than do his – a thought

It started in early 2008: I simply took a

illustrated, if anything, by the degree

camera and started shooting. Over the

of sensibility and the emotional

months, this grew slowly into something

qualities contained within his work.

much bigger and brought me so much more

By exploring the connection between

than I would have expected.

mankind and nature, Ruben captures the vulnerability of the human figure

How would you describe your ideal

and the power of nature with a raw

workspace? How does the environment

and delicate beauty. Here, he speaks

surrounding you influence the way you

of his beginnings as a photographer

work? >

RUBEN BRULAT

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The environment brings me inspiration. For

Challenges are great, and every time one

now, as I travel most of the time I do not

comes up I am always very intrigued on

have a ‘home’, so [my ideal workspace] is

how to go past it.

ever-changing. What has been your most successful or Your portfolio is sophisticated and

enjoyable creative experience to date?

intriguing. Tell us a bit about the concepts and ideas behind your work…

‘Paths’, the latest project – [it was about] discovering cultures and the challenge of

Since the beginning, my work has been

photography in unknown places and with

a sort of quest to find this relationship

unknown people. This project lasted for

between us and Nature, what surrounds us.

months. It was magnificent.

Embrace or be embraced. How do you see your work as a Who or what inspires you creatively?

photographer evolving in the future?

Everything. Everyone. But of course, more

I see it as work that will bring me towards

specific subjects or feelings taken out of

more of the unknown.

the moments that mark me the most. A word of wisdom to share with us and How do you perceive a challenge and how

budding photographers?

do you overcome it? Ways leads to other ways. ∞

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Credits Alexandra Banti http://www.alexandrabanti.com

Keith Negley keith@keithnegley.com http://www.keithnegley.com

Atelier Dyakova sonya@atelierdyakova.com http://www.atelierdyakova.com

Krzysztof Ubych https://www.facebook.com/ KrzysztofUbychPhotography

Cristian Davila Hernandez http://www.visualsbyhernandez.com/contact http://www.visualsbyhernandez.com

Eleanor Taylor http://www.eleanortaylor.co.uk

Morgane Krischer http://morganekrischer.tumblr.com

Motherbird http://www.motherbird.com.au

http://eleanorsvisions.tumblr.com

Ruben Brulat Emma Pilkington emma@emmapilkington.co.uk

hello@rubenbrulat.com www.rubenbrulat.com

http://www.emmapilkington.co.uk

Salvador Pozo Federico Sorrentino

http://www.salvadorpozo.com

info@federicosorrentino.com http://www.federicosorrentino.com

Sam Flaherty http://www.samflahertycreative.com

Jack Vanzet jackvanet@gmail.com http://www.jackvanzet.com

Sara Melotti saramelottiphotography@gmail.com http://saramelotti.com

Joshua Hibbert joshuahibbert@live.com http://joshuahibbbert.blogspot.com

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St. Francis Elevator Ride http://www.stfranciselevatorride.com


Disclaimer All content published in NeverLazy Magazine and/or appearing on NeverLazy Magazine’s digital platforms (website, blog, social networks) is unless stated otherwise, copyright Š 2011-2014 NeverLazy Magazine, the Editors and respective Contributors and collaborating individuals. Any adaptation, reproduction, direct-linking and/or selling of content found in NeverLazy Magazine and/or NeverLazy Magazine platforms is strictly forbidden. Content may not be reused or republished unless consent is found between the Editors, the Contributor, and Third Party, and written permission is attributed by both the Editors and respective Contributors and collaborating individuals.

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NeverLazy - Issue 13 - Spring 2014  

Join us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/neverlazy NeverLazy is an online visual arts & fashion magazine showcasing the works of emergin...