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Photo by Aspen Architectural Photography

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The

2009

luxury

56

Issue

FEATURES 54

LUXURY IS... A SPECTACULAR SITE A Colorado ranch house celebrates its mountain views with living spaces that extend to the great outdoors.

56

LUXURY IS... IN THE DETAILS Contemporary design is sophisticated yet comfortable in a custom Aspen home that showcases extraordinary attention to detail.

64

LUXURY IS... A GRAND GATHERING PLACE The Snow Ghost Chalet elegantly combines touches of Montana’s mountain tradition with contemporary style.

73

LUXURY IS... A BALANCED APPROACH Strong architectural features meet tasteful appointments for a room that exudes pure mountain luxury.

DEPARTMENTS 24

ML PICK The roots of a teak tree are transformed into a striking—and functional—objet d’art.

33

SHOPPING The High-Country Furniture Guide Twenty essential pieces, in styles that range from traditional to rustic, sleek to mountain-modern.

37

INSIDER’S GUIDE Aspen, Colorado Discover our favorite places to dine, shop and explore in Colorado’s most luxurious mountain destination.

40

REAL ESTATE Live the high life for a week or a season in one of Clear Creek Group’s luxe vacation homes.

80

HOUSE OF THE MOMENT Spectacular design, amenities and scenery at the BootJack Ranch.

ON THE COVER Phillip’s Ridge, an ultra-luxe vacation rental home offered by The Clear Creek Group, gives visitors a true taste of the high life in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Turn to page 40 for more. Photography by Gordon Gregory 4

ML | November / December 2009

PHOTO BY DAVID O. MARLOW

nov/dec


DAHL MONTROSE 1133 N. TOWNSEND AVE. MONTROSE, CO 1-800-542-3245 l www.dahldesign.com


online

Join the CONVERSATION! Mountain Living online. It’s where high-country style is revealed like never before

Mountainliving.com Your one-stop high-country design source. Find an architect or designer and discover new shops and showrooms. Explore hundreds of beautiful mountain homes for inspiration. Browse our latest design discoveries on our blog. COMING SOON: ML’s exclusive video report on the latest trends in kitchen design.

ook: On Fa ce b Lo ve! e Room s W

Digital Edition See beh in d-the-scen es foota ge from our pho to shoo ts

You’ve got to see it to believe it. Log on to mountainliving.com to view our Digital Edition, which allows you to virtually “flip” through every page of the magazine online. Click on a page and get linked directly to local products and services.

e-Newsletter Don’t start your week without the tips, product picks and event updates featured in our e-newsletter. More than 10,000 of the West’s most discriminating design enthusiasts receive our weekly e-newsletter every Tuesday. Sign up for yours at mountainliving.com.

“Flip” throu gh the pa ges of our Digita l Edition a t Moun ta in livin g.com

Facebook http://companies.to/mountainlivingmagazine/ Become a high-country design insider by joining the Mountain Living Facebook Fan page, where you can mingle with hundreds of designs enthusiasts just like you. With regular updates from our editors, you’ll be the first in the know.

Twitter @MtnLivingMag For an all-access pass to see where our editorial and creative teams have been and what they’re doing—right now—join us on Twitter. More than 1,000 of you already have. From in the office to on location, see what it’s like inside ML.

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ml | editor’s letter

There was a time when “luxury” was all about excess. It was the biggest, the priciest, the most decked out and over the top. But these days, as we’re all thinking a bit more carefully about each purchase, we find ourselves looking for more rational reasons for making a decision to buy. These days, “luxury” has to offer something more. Today, we’re looking for something special, something authentic, something that will stand the test of time. So as we created this year’s Luxury Issue, we kept that in mind, searching out products and homes that aren’t just the most extravagant, but that offer something truly unique. On the pages that follow, you’ll find 20 essential pieces of furniture designed to last a lifetime (page 33), our picks for the very best places to visit in Aspen, Colorado (page 37), a company that lets visitors experience a true taste of the West in some spectacular Jackson Hole rental homes (page 40), and a selection of high-country homes that beautifully illustrate luxury’s many different shapes and forms. And, because it’s still “ Today, we’re looking for fun to dream, we couldn’t resist adding an oversomething special, something the-top House of the Moment (on page 80) that offers every amenity imaginable—yes, with a authentic, something that will stand the test of time.” price tag to match. Luxury may no longer always be about having the biggest or the most, but that doesn’t mean we can’t still have some fun. It seems to me that the new luxury is about something far more satisfying: thoughtful design, fine craftsmanship and attention to detail. It’s about finding the special things that speak to us, so let’s enjoy looking for them.

CHRISTINE DEORIO, EDITOR IN CHIEF cdeorio @mountainliving.com

8

ML | November / December 2009

PHOTO BY DEBORAH COTA

Luxury Is...


www.mountainliving.com FOLLOW US ON: Facebook http://companies.to/mountainlivingmagazine Twitter @MtnLivingMag PUBLISHER Holly Paige Scott EDITOR IN CHIEF Christine DeOrio ART DIRECTOR Loneta Showell MANAGING EDITOR Caroline Eberly ASSISTANT ART DIRECTOR Tanya Cantu COPY EDITOR Michelle Asakawa CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Linda Hayes, Norman Kolpas, Nancy Richman Milligan CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Gibeon Photography, Gordon Gregory, Karl Neumann Photography, David O. Marlow MEDIA ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Cyndi Hochberg, Katrina Nail SALES & MARKETING COORDINATOR Sarah Herscovici INTERN Joe Schwartz

HOME DESIGN DIVISION PRESIDENT Adam Japko SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, OPERATIONS Stuart Christian DIRECTOR OF PUBLISHING OPERATIONS Rick Higgins PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Cheryl Jock PRODUCTION MANAGER Shannon McKelvey CIRCULATION MANAGER Kurt Coey NEWSSTAND MANAGER Bob Moenster ADVERTISING AND EDITORIAL OFFICES 1777 South Harrison Street, Suite 903, Denver, CO 80210 303-248-2060 • 303-248-2064 Fax www.mountainliving.com ADVERTISING INQUIRIES hscott@mountainliving.com EDITORIAL INQUIRIES cdeorio@mountainliving.com FOR SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: 888-645-7600 Printed in U.S.A.

CHAIRMAN & CEO Daniel McCarthy CFO Gerry Parker GENERAL COUNSEL Susan Deese

10

ML | November / December 2009


i n t e r i o r s Ć”

i n n o v a t i v e

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t i m e l e s s

p l a n n i n g

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a r c h i t e c t u r e

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i n s p i r e d

KSa

4 6 5 A n g l e r s D r. S u i te C . S te a m b o at S p r i n g s, CO 970.875.0590 | info@ksaarch.com | www.ksaarch.com


SCULPTED FROM THE ELEMENTS

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Proud Interior Designer of the unforgettable Blue River Custom Homes Summit County Parade Home 2009 – Winner of 10 awards

SHANNON SCHUTZ, LEED®AP PRESIDENT INTERIOR DESIGNER info @dwellingsinteriordesign.com www.dwellingsinteriordesign.com

BLACK AND WHITE PHOTOGRAPHS BY ILENE NOVA

DENVER OFFICE: 1701 WYNKOOP ST. SUITE 306 DENVER, CO 80204 720.533.4801


LIVING

MOUNTAIN

Coming in January 2010: ML’s Redesign Debut

20

ML | November / December 2009


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

SPOTLIGHT ON:

Crystal Glass Studio & Parkside Gallery Crystal Glass Studio & Parkside Gallery 50 Weant Boulevard Carbondale, CO 81623 970-963-3227 www.crystalglassstudio.com sales@crystalglassstudio.com

22

Crystal Glass Studio is awash in color and light. Artist Mary Matchael founded the business in historic downtown Carbondale, Colorado, in 1972. In the years since, the fine architectural stained, leaded, etched and fused glass works that Mary and her small team of local artisans has designed and fabricated have traveled far beyond their town. “Our work has been shipped all over the country, and as far away as Mexico, Switzerland and Saudi Arabia,” Matchael says. While commissioned designs include stained, etched and fused glass panels, Matchael is now focusing on custom lighting, including ceiling and wall mounted fixtures. “It’s fun to incorporate art, glass, color and light, and to experiment with new technology,

ML | November / December 2009

such as LED lights, which bring more energy efficiency to our work,” she explains. Each metal fixture is hand-forged locally and crafted with customized frames and finishes. The unique glass designs, which utilize recycled glass, are achieved with sand carving, kilnforming and etching techniques. As Carbondale has long been known as an artists’ community, the studio is also home to the recently opened Parkside Gallery, a new venue for local and regional fine craft artists. Mediums include wood, metal, ceramic, jewelry and mixed media art pieces. “It has helped to expand our offerings in addition to our commissioned work,” says Matchael. For more information, please visit www.crystalglassstudio.com


ML | www.mountainliving.com 23


ARBORESCENT ART Founded in 1990 by Alon Langotsky and Daphna Dor, Chista has earned a reputation as the source for organic-chic furniture, lighting, art and accessories. Crafted of indigenous woods collected from around the world, each piece is thoughtfully designed to maintain its one-of-a-kind natural features. To create the Solid Wood Lounge, pictured here, craftsmen began with the root system of a standing-dead tree that would otherwise have been bound for a landfill. The single slab of wood was cut and carved in just the right places to form a long and low lounge chair that measures nearly eight feet in length. The artistic process is painstakingly slow, but the result reveals the very nature of the tree in a new and functional form. It’s the perfect balance of gentle curves and sharp angles, rough-hewn edges and smooth surfaces, primitive and modern design. Available to the trade. www.chista.net

24

ML | November / December 2009


ml pick

LUXURY IS

one-of-a-kind design

ML | www.mountainliving.com 25


Discover the latest trends as you are planning your next project… Our new online videos, brought to you by leading design correspondents (our editors!), showcase emerging trends in kitchens, baths and furniture, plus ideas and real solutions to help you achieve these looks in your own home.

BEHIND THE SCENES AT THE VIDEO SHOOTS

See what’s new in kitchens, bath and furniture at

WWW.MOUNTAINLIVING.COM ML | www.mountainliving.com 27


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

SPOTLIGHT ON:

Spanish Pueblo Doors

1091-B Siler Road Santa Fe, NM 87504 505-473-0464 support@spdoors.com www.spdoors.com

28

“You always know a Spanish Pueblo door,” says Will Ott, president and CEO of Santa Fe’s premier custom door shop, Spanish Pueblo Doors. “Each one is handcrafted using timehonored techniques, and has its own unique character and texture. They really stand out.” It’s been that way since 1952, when renowned photographer Ernest Knee opened the original Spanish Pueblo workshop just off the Santa Fe Plaza. Ott took the reigns 30 years later and is responsible for most of the company’s design work. Today, Spanish Pueblo Doors inhabits a 12,000-square-foot showroom and workshop just outside of town. The collection has grown

ML | November / December 2009

to more than 100 unique designs, including northern New Mexico and classic Spanish Pueblo patterns, all crafted from knotty alder, wormy maple and other types of wood. Customers, who range from homeowners to architects and designers, are always encouraged to participate in custom designs as well. Beyond their obvious function, Spanish Pueblo doors add to the form and beauty of a home. Additional details and features, such as arches, sidelights, transoms and hand carvings, make them adaptable to seemingly endless settings, which is just another reason why Spanish Pueblo Doors can be found not just in the Southwest, but in all 50 states.


Statement of Ownership, Management, and Circulation 1. Publication Title: Mountain Living 2. Publication No.: 017-726 3. Filing Date: 9/21/09 4. Issue Frequency: Jan, Feb, Mar/April, May/Jun, Jul, Aug, Sep/Oct, Nov/Dec. 5. No. of Issues Published Annually: 8 6. Annual Subscription Price: $29.95. 7. Complete Mailing Address of Known Office of Publication (Not Printer): 2305 Newpoint Parkway, Lawrenceville, GA 30043. Contact Person: Kurt Coey, 303-524-6557. 8. Complete Mailing Address of Headquarters or General Business Office of Publisher (not printer): 2305 Newpoint Parkway, Lawrenceville, GA 30043. 9. Full Names and Complete Mailing Addresses of Publisher, Editor, and Managing Editor: Publisher: Holly Scott 1777 S. Harrison St. Ste 903 Denver, CO 80210. Editor: Christine DeOrio 1777 S. Harrison St. Ste 903 Denver, CO 80210. Managing Editor: Caroline Eberly 1777 S. Harrison St. Ste 903 Denver, CO 80210. 10. Owner (If the publication is owned by a corporation, give the name and address of the corporation immediately followed by the names and addresses of all stockholders owning or holding 1 percent or more of the total amount of stock. If not owned by a corporation, give the names and addresses of the individual owners. If owned by a partnership or other unincorporated firm, give its name and address as well as those of each individual owner. If the publication is published by a nonprofit organization, give its name and address.): Network Communications, Inc. (NCI) 2305 Newpoint Parkway, Lawrenceville, GA 30043 Gallarus Media Holdings, Inc. (owns 100% of NCI) 2305 Newpoint Parkway, Lawrenceville, GA 30043 11. Known Bondholders, Mortgagees, and Other Security Holders Owning or Holding 1 Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages, or Other Securities: Network Communications, Inc. (NCI) 2305 Newpoint Parkway, Lawrenceville, GA 30043 Gallarus Media Holdings, Inc. (owns 100% of NCI) 2305 Newpoint Parkway, Lawrenceville, GA 30043 12. Tax Status: For completion by nonprofit organizations authorized to mail at nonprofit rates. The purpose, function, and nonprofit status of this organization and the exempt status for federal income tax purposes: Has Not Changed During Preceding 12 Months. 13. Publication Title: Mountain Living 14. Issue date for circulation data below: Sep/Oct 2009. 15. Extent and nature of circulation: A. Total no. copies (Net Press Run): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 40,321. No. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 31,282. B. Legitimate Paid and/or requested distribution (By Mail and Outside the Mail): 1. Outside-county Paid/Requested mail subscriptions stated on PS Form 3541. (Include direct written request from recipient, telemarketing and internet requests from recipient, paid subscriptions including nominal rate subscriptions, employer requests, advertiser’s proof copies and exchange copies): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 10,749. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 9,513. 2. In-county Paid/Requested mail subscriptions stated on PS Form 3541. (Include direct written request from recipient, telemarketing and internet requests from recipient, paid subscriptions including nominal rate subscriptions, employer requests, advertiser’s proof copies and exchange copies): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, Not Applicable. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, Not applicable. 3. Sales through dealers and carriers, street vendors, counter sales, and other Paid or Requested Distribution Outside USPS: Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 4,349. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 3,766. 4. Requested Copies Distributed by Other Mail Classes Through the USPS (e.g. First-Class Mail): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, Not applicable. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, Not applicable. C. Total paid and/or requested circulation (Sum of 15b(1), (2), (3), and (4)): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 15,098. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 13,279. D. Nonrequested Distribution (By Mail and Outside the Mail): 1. Outside-county Nonrequested Copies on PS Form 3541 (Include Sample copies, Requests Over 3 years old, Requests induced by a Premium, Bulk Sales and Requests including Association requests, Names obtained from Business Directories, Lists, and other sources): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 5,510. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 1,786. 2. In-county Nonrequested Copies on PS Form 3541 (Include Sample copies, Requests Over 3 years old, Requests induced by a Premium, Bulk Sales and Requests including Association requests, Names obtained from Business Directories, Lists, and other sources): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, Not applicable. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, Not applicable. 3. Nonrequested Copies Distributed Through the USPS by Other Classes of Mail (e.g. First-Class Mail, Nonrequestor Copies mailed in excess of 10% Limit mailed at Standard Mail or Package Services Rates): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, Not applicable. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, Not applicable. 4. Nonrequested Copies Distributed Outside the Mail (Include Pickup Stands, Trade Shows, Showrooms and Other Sources): ): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 3,818. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 2,848. E. Total Nonrequested Distribution (Sum of 15d (1), (2), (3) and (4)): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 9,328. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 4,634. F. Total Distribution (Sum of 15c and e): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 24,426. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 17,913. G. Copies not Distributed (See Instructions to Publishers #4, (page #3): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 15,895. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 13,369. H. Total (Sum of 15f and g): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 40,321. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 31,282. I. Percent paid and/or requested circulation (15C divided by f times 100): Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 62%. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing date, 74%. 16. Publication of Statement of Ownership for a Requester Publication is required and will be printed in the Nov/Dec 09 issue of this publication. 17. I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who omits material or information on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil sanctions (including civil penalties).

ML | www.mountainliving.com 29


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

SPOTLIGHT ON:

Old Hickory Furniture Company

Old Hickory Furniture Company 403 S. Noble Street Shelbyville, IN 46176 800.232.BARK www.oldhickory.com

Comfort. Character. Tradition. Since 1899, Old Hickory Furniture Company has been building these attributes and more into every piece of furniture they make. Located in Shelbyville, Indiana, the company’s original hickory sapling designs traveled far and wide to homes and resorts across the country. Destinations included the home of President Andrew Jackson—the company was named after his nickname, “Old Hickory”— along with national park lodges like the Old Faithful Inn at Yellowstone National Park. While many of those rustic designs, including the Old Faithful Inn chairs and Andrew Jackson rockers, are offered today, the Old Hickory product line has grown considerably to include what Bob Morrison, Vice President of Sales and For more information, please visit www.oldhickory.com

30

ML | November / December 2009

Marketing, calls a new generation of more contemporary pieces. “We try to reinvent what we do and cater to our new customers,” he says. New highlights, made with the same attention to detail, include hickory lighting with rawhide or birch-bark shades and live-edge walnut tabletops, beds, dressers and chairs. Upholstery and accent pieces, such as pillows, duvets and Old Hickory Throws by Pendleton, and artist Rod Crossman’s wildlife prints in Old Hickory frames, are offered as well. By nature, hickory saplings are versatile, durable and sustainable, attributes that make the material perfect for today’s lifestyle and sensibilities. “People make an investment in Old Hickory furniture,” says Morrison. “It’s not here today and gone tomorrow.”


From hand tooled leather sofas and hammered copper tables to antler mirrors and luxury bedding. WesternPassion offers an exciting selection of furnishings to complete your mountain home, rustic lodge or refined ranch.

more resources. more photos. more of what you love about Mountain Living.

Call or Visit Us At

888 972 239-1777

32

ML | November / December 2009

mountainliving.com

Your Source For Specialty Home Furnishings, Lighting and Accessories


ml | shopping

LUXURY IS

that indispensable piece of furniture

that will follow you for a lifetime. Here you’ll find 20 essential pieces — in styles that range from rustic to sleek, traditional to mountain-modern — that feel right at home in the high country.

High-Country

Furniture Guide ML | www.mountainliving.com 33


High-Country

Furniture Guide

chair

lighting

Bowed Chair Chajo, www.chajo.com

If your style is

mountain modern

Champs-ElysĂŠes Chandelier Lalique, www.lalique.com

Inauguration Lantern Currey & Company, www.curreyco.com

If your style is

traditional

Fisk Chair Hickory Chair, www.hickorychair.com

If your style is

sleek

If your style is

rustic

34

ML | November / December 2009

Buttercup Rocker Blu Dot, www.bludot.com

The Great Divide Chair Tim Groth, www.timgrothfurniture.com

Chandelier Hive Modern, www.hivemodern.com

Antler Sconces John Gallis, www.norsemandesignswest.com


ml | shopping

table

Landscape Diptych 2 Chista, www.chista.net

case good

Time Giorgetti, www.giorgetti-spa.it

accessory

Industrial Mirror Global Views, www.globalviews.com

Marseilles Table Kravet, www.kravet.com

Regency Grillwork Cabinet John-Richard, www.johnrichard.com

Hans Pedestal Table Jonathan Adler, www.jonathanadler.com

Elk Sofa Table Nordberg Furniture, www.nordbergfurniture.com

Radar Piero Lissoni for Cassina, www.cassinausa.com

Omaha Sideboard Eric Shell, www.spearswoodworks.com

Trellis Gold Pillow Bliss Studio, www.blissstudio.com

Cartoccio Vase Fontana Arte, www.fontanaartecorp.com

Squash Blossom AppliquĂŠ Pillow The Buffalo Collection, www.scenicmesa.com

ML | www.mountainliving.com 35


Quality Reclaimed Wood Products

Trestlewood

®

Truckee, California development Featured Products: Trestlewood Developer:

II “Salty Fir” Timbers and Siding

Architect:

General Contractor:

East West Partners

Zehren & Associates

R.A. Nelson & Assoc., Inc.

Truckee, California

Avon, Colorado

Reno, Nevada

We encourage you to try:

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Powerful, dynamic search and group functionality... the ultimate way to find just the right unique wood product.

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Trestlewood. Because they don’t make wood like they used to. ® Colorado 36

ML | November / December 2009

Idaho

Illinois

Indiana

Montana

Texas

Utah

Wyoming


PHOTO BY BRANDS & KRIBBS ARCHITECTURAL PHOTOGRAPHY

ml | insider’s guide

LUXURY IS

Aspen

On the slopes or off, this little mountain town with the big reputation makes it easy to find your wintertime niche STORY BY LINDA HAYES

1. GISELLA The understated yet elegant atmosphere at this new hot spot (sister to Campo de Fiori and formerly Gusto) is the perfect backdrop for fine Italian cuisine inspired by the regions of the Veneto, Liguria and Campania. Try the homemade gnocchi ragu, zuppa de pesce or vitello Milanese. The international wine list is extensive, from by-the-glass selections to magnums. 970-925-8222, www.gisellaaspen.com >>

ML | www.mountainliving.com 37


ml | insider’s guide

3

2

2. ASPEN MEADOWS RESORT A Bauhaus-style gem on 42 quiet acres at the edge of town, the Meadows is pure delight. Ski-mountain views abound from 98 studio to two-bedroom suites and stunning Plato’s Restaurant. Free shuttles make the five-minute trip to town a snap. 970-925-4240, www.aspenmeadows.com

4

3. THE LITTLE NELL From the 92 guest rooms and suites recently redone by famed designer Holly Hunt to chef Ryan Hardy’s celebrated cuisine at Montagna, The Little Nell delivers with style. The location, at the foot of Aspen Mountain and just steps away from town’s toniest shops and restaurants, can’t be beat. 970-920-4600, www.thelittlenell.com

4. MCHUGH ANTIQUES & FINE JEWELS Owners and

5

longtime Aspenites Ricki and John McHugh have a keen eye for quality, and it shows in every corner of this exceptional gallery, which specializes in a hand-picked collection of 17th- to 20th-century furnishings, silver and crystal, plus modern American and antique jewelry. 970-925-4212

5. AMEN WARDY Inspired modern living is the concept

6. ASPEN SNOWMASS An Aspen lift ticket is good for all four mountains — Aspen Mountain, Aspen Highlands, Buttermilk and Snowmass —which offer 336 trails for skiers and boarders of every level. Don’t ski? There’s ice-skating, snowmobiling, snowshoeing and plenty more off-piste activities to keep you busy. www.aspensnowmass.com

6

7. LULU WILSON Tucked into a restored Victorian-era

7

mining cabin and named after a former resident with a rowdy reputation, LuLu Wilson draws a savvy crowd who come for chef Shane Coffey’s city-fine fare. Favorites include crispy duck confit, ancho-crusted tuna and chorizostuffed quail. 970-920-1893, www.luluwilsonaspen.com ●

more 38

ML | November / December 2009

Find more of our favorites at www.mountainliving.com.

PHOTOS: 3. JASON DEWEY 6. JEFF HANLE 7. DANIEL BAYER

behind this luxury home-accessories boutique that’s chockfull of everything from tableware to creative hostess gifts to gourmet goodies. Finds include limited-edition and one-ofa-kind pieces from designers like Mary Jurek and Michael Aram. 970-920-7700, www.amenwardyaspen.com


My

Style

Looking for originality? You’ve found it. What color does it come in? You tell us. Adorned with chrome, each custom built Elmira Stove Works appliance is true to its era, while offering the performance and features found in the most modern kitchen appliances. Let us build one for you.

ElmiraStoveWorks.com 1-800-295-8498

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ML | www.mountainliving.com 39


ml | real estate

LUXURY IS

A Home Away from Home

Jackson Hole’s Clear Creek Group makes it easy to find that magical getaway in the mountains (and makes it feel just like home) whether you’re staying a week, a month or until the snow melts PHOTOS BY GORDON GREGORY Imagine traveling to Jackson Hole, Wyoming, and checking into a luxury hotel—complete with every service and amenity imaginable—where each room is a spectacular, private mountain home. It’s exactly what the Clear Creek Group founders Morgan Bruemmer and Betsy and Phil Stevenson envisioned when they created their boutique rental and management firm for luxury properties in Jackson Hole. Here’s how it works: When the owners of some of Jackson Hole’s finest vacation homes head back to their primary residences, they allow the Clear Creek Group to open their properties to visitors in search of an authentic Western experience. Before you arrive, the Clear Creek Group will fill the cupboards with food and the vases with flowers, turn on the lights and turn down the beds. And during your stay, they’ll arrange anything you can imagine, from backcountry pack trips to heli-skiing to dinner prepared by a personal chef. With a long list of rental homes to choose from, ranging from intimate hideaways for two to sprawling lodges for the entire family, it’s easy to find a place that feels just like home. 40

ML | November / December 2009


PROPERTY PICK Pictured here, the Phillip’s Ridge rental property is a magnificent Western lodge perched atop a rocky ridge, high above Jackson Hole. Filled with splendid works of art, the five-bedroom home features thick log walls and tree-trunk supports that contrast beautifully with fine antiques and soft, rich fabrics. Grand living and dining spaces are separated by a massive two-sided stone fireplace and illuminated by a 40-foot-high wall of windows. Each of the five master suites is warmed by a stone fireplace and features a decadent private bath and terrace or porch. Other luxe touches include a bowling alley, pub, movie theater and two hot tubs. Visit www.theclearcreekgroup.com for current rates. �

THE CLEAR CREEK GROUP Jackson, Wyoming 307-732-3400 www.theclearcreekgroup.com

ML | www.mountainliving.com 41


www.tetonheritagebuilders.com 307.733.8771 • 406.522.0808

www.hawtinjorgensen.com 307.733.4364

www.verdonelandarch.com 307.733.3062 • 208.354.1020


the

Luxury Living Guide

A M O U N TA I N L I V I N G S P E C I A L M A R K E T I N G S E C T I O N

ML | www.mountainliving.com 43


the Luxury Living Guide

SPECIAL MARKETING SECTION

Gallegos Corporation “Building solutions for distinctive projects” is more than just a tagline for the Gallegos Corporation, stone and masonry construction specialists headquartered in Vail, Colorado. “It’s a way of life,” explains Gary Woodworth, COO. “We really are second to none at finding the right solutions for our clients’ projects.” Woodworth knows of what he speaks. Prior to taking on the role of COO for the family-owned Gallegos Corporation, he was President of the Plaster/Stucco and Marble/Granite divisions. Gerald Gallegos, the company’s CEO and a Colorado native, founded the Gallegos Corporation in 1970. Bob Gallegos, CFO, joined his brother at the company in 1982. Gallegos Corporation it has become an industry leader, with offices in Aspen, Denver and Sun Valley, Idaho, and projects around the country. “Have trowel, will travel,” Gerald says. For clients, who include architects, builders, interior designers and homeowners, the Gallegos Corporation provides services ranging from consultation on material selection to construction management, stone fabrication and installation. The company’s highly-trained craftspeople—many of whom have been with the company for more that two decades—specialize in stone, masonry, stucco, plaster, concrete, marble, granite, art rock and stone sales. Giving back to the community is a priority for this local company, and founder Gerald Gallegos sets a strong example by serving on the boards of the El Pomar Foundation, Vail Valley Foundation, Youth Foundation, Minturn Community Fund, and Roundup River Ranch. “Gallegos is a wonderful company to work for and it comes from Gerald,” Woodworth says. “It’s part of our culture to give back.” For more information, visit www.gallegoscorp.com

Gallegos Corporation Corporate Headquarters 0100 Yacht Club Drive Wolcott, CO 81655 P 970-926-3737 F 970-926-3727 www.Gallegoscorp.com Mailing Address: P.O. Box 821 Vail, CO 81658

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ML | www.mountainliving.com 45


the Luxury Living Guide

SPECIAL MARKETING SECTION

Robert G. Sinclair Architecture, Inc. Robert G. Sinclair Architecture, Inc., gives new meaning to the concept of a full-service firm. “I model the business around my ability to be involved in every aspect of a project,” says principal Robert Sinclair, AIA. “From siting to concept and design to construction, I’m involved every step of the way.” Based in Aspen, Colorado, and with satellite offices in Manhattan and Milwaukee, Sinclair and his experienced, professional staff design luxury homes for clients who live across the country, from the Rocky Mountains to the coasts. Each home is uniquely suited to its surroundings and Sinclair’s designs are inspired by the opportunities each site presents, from views to topography. Sinclair’s clients also play a significant role in each design. “It’s about much more than the number of bedrooms and bathrooms a client needs,” Sinclair says. “It’s about how people will live in the house. Those needs speak to things like interior details and materials. How a house is to be used is its soul.” A member of the U.S. Green Building Council, Sinclair is sensitive to building responsibly. “It’s entirely possible to build a ‘green,’ energy efficient house without compromising the integrity of design,” he says. No matter the size or scope of a project, Sinclair’s dedication to providing creative, customized design is foremost. “It’s our passion,” he says. “Connecting with our clients is key.” For more information, visit www.rgsarchitecture.com

Robert G. Sinclair Architecture, Inc. 710 East Durant Avenue, Suite W4 970-925-4269

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Aspen, Colorado 80611


the Luxury Living Guide

SPECIAL MARKETING SECTION

Lyon Design Group Dallas Lyon Interior Designer ASID

Ask interior designer Dallas Lyon, ASID (American Society of Interior Design), what makes her relationship with clients so successful and her answer comes easily. “I’m very intuitive,” she says. “I can read clients, narrow down their likes and dislikes, and figure out what will work for them.” That kind of confidence comes from nearly a decade of experience as owner of Lyon Design Group, a full-service Vail Valley interior design firm. Lyon’s client relationships often begin with what she calls a “meet and greet” at her stylish studio in the quaint town of Edwards, Colorado. The studio is warm and comfortable, full of eccentric spontaneity—such as the antique Chinese red lacquered buffet paired with a custom, contemporary glass top table of Lyon’s own design. “It’s a great place to sit down with clients to go over ideas and brainstorm over fabrics and furniture concepts,” she says. Lyon describes her style as diverse and eclectic. She likes to mix things up, often incorporating contemporary artwork with French Country antiques. “I call it French Country with a twist. It’s about taking something expected, and throwing in an element of surprise... the art of being subtle and sexy at the same time.” For every project, from renovations to new custom homes, Lyon designs with sustainability in mind, choosing carpets, paints and other finishes that are as eco-friendly as they are stylish. Not one to follow trends, she approaches each project with a fresh perspective, relying on her own creativity to create spaces that are bold, stylish, never repetitive, and that, above all, reflect her clients’ vision. Says Lyon: “I want to make my clients’ homes enjoyable places to live.”

Lyon Design Group 970-926-8682 275 Main Street, Suite O-209 • Edwards, Colorado 81632 www.lyondesigngroup.com • info@lyondesigngroup.com

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creative innovative interiors

By Dallas Lyon ASID

275 Main Street, Suite 209 Edwards, Colorado 81632 970.926.8682 www.lyondesigngroup.com


the Luxury Living Guide

SPECIAL MARKETING SECTION

Ec-lek-tic “Most people never expect to find a store like this in Taos,” says Sophia Vander, manager of Ec-lek-tic, which specializes in Asian antiques, furnishings and 1910-1920 Art Deco rugs from Kashgar. “It takes you into another world.” Located just north of the Taos Plaza in a historic building across from the town’s main post office, the shop’s exterior hints at what’s inside. Antique wood doors from China lean against the adobe walls, water trickles from a fountain, and a 25-foot-tall marble Buddha bids welcome from atop a lotus perch. Inside, the 2,500-square-foot space is divided into four small rooms. It’s friendly and cozy, with wood floors and, in winter, fires crackling in a pair of kivas. Customers explore every nook and cranny, discovering antique wonders from Tibet, India, China, Thailand and Laos, and marveling at how at-home these finds seem in New Mexico. The job of sourcing these items—from a 250-year-old coral-and-turquoise Tibetan pot to Indian tapestries to Ming Dynasty furniture—falls on the capable and experienced shoulders of Robert Vander, who is Ec-lek-tic’s original founder. “Mr. Vander is a carpenter by trade and has a passion for wood and a fantastic eye,” says Vander. “He travels several times a year on buying trips. Every piece is hand-picked, so it’s like his own personal collection.” Amid more grand antiques, Ec-lek-tic also offers a collection of smaller finds that are perfect for gifts or keepsakes. There are precious jewelry boxes, Chinese card boxes, chess sets, tapestries, mirrors, lamps, and Buddha statues in marble, granite, porcelain and bronze—and every one is a delight. Every time you come in, you’re sure to find something you’ll treasure. “We take pride in having something for every customer, and at different price ranges,” says Vander. “It’s exciting to see their enjoyment.”

Ec-lek-tic 401 Paseo del Pueblo Norte Taos, New Mexico 87571 575-758-7232 www.eclektic505.com eclektic505@yahoo.com Hours: 11:00 to 5:30 Monday through Saturday, By appointment on Sunday

For more information, please visit www.eclektic505.com

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the Luxury Living Guide

SPECIAL MARKETING SECTION

Hayn Enterprises, LLC Founded fifty years ago by Carl O. Hayn as Hayn Marine, the Rocky Hill, Connecticutbased company has long been a leading manufacturer and supplier of turnbuckles and related hardware for the marine industry. Now, with Carl Hayn Jr. at the helm, the tides have turned. With an eye on the future, Hayn Marine’s technology and expertise have been adapted for use in the architectural and industrial fields. Specializing in 316 grade stainless steel, Hayn Enterprises is dedicated to manufacturing the highest quality products possible, including intricate cable rail systems and architectural hardware, as well as custom trellises for “green” walls in environmentally sensitive homes. What sets Hayn apart from the rest? “Because we are manufacturers, we are able to provide custom solutions with a very fast turnaround,” explains general manager Brett Hasbrouck. “As innovators, we can modify, tweak, or make adjustments based on individual customer requirements.” Whether for new construction, retrofits, or a combination of both, design concepts tend to be creative. “Owners of higher-end homes don’t want the norm,” he says. “We have many standard systems as well as customize solutions to meet our customer’s requests.” While the majority of Hayn products are sold within the United States, Hasbrouck notes that demand has expanded to offshore markets. Hayn also offers “Job Shop” services with recent contributions to projects including stadium logos at Yankee Stadium in New York City and custom hardware found in the Situation Room in the White House.

Hayn Enterprises, LLC 51 Inwood Road Rocky Hill, CT 06067 www.hayn.com sales@hayn.com Phone: 800-346-4296 860-257-0680 Fax: 800-441-4296 860-257-0683

For more information, please visit www.hayn.com

Don’t let the rail spoil your view Hayn has 50 years of experience manufacturing quality stainless steel cable hardware. Call today and let our knowledgeable sales staff help make sure your dream home keeps the perfect view.

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LUXURY IS

A Spectacular Site A COLORADO RANCH HOUSE CELEBRATES ITS MOUNTAIN VIEWS WITH LIVING SPACES THAT EXTEND TO THE GREAT OUTDOORS STORY BY CAROLINE EBERLY

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY KARL NEUMANN


LOCATED IN THE HEART of the Yellowstone Club in Big Sky, Montana, this home appears to be one with its surroundings, as if it came to rest there quite effortlessly. Not so. In fact, securing the home to its site—a mountainside slope with a grade of nearly 18 percent—required architect Reid Smith of Reid Smith Architects to perform a feat of architectural ingenuity. He designed the house to have a long, narrow axis (to minimize the amount of slope along the home’s footprint and the amount of digging into the hillside) that maximizes views of mountain peaks to the south and makes the most of natural light. He also stacked architectural forms on top of each other to raise the home above tree line. (When inside, Smith says it feels like “you’re sort of floating in the sky. It’s treetop living.”) And while the palette of exterior finishes— hewn Douglas fir channel siding, steel accents and formal touches of walnut here and there—may complement the home’s native surroundings, the house has its own presence. The structure is “proud,” Smith says, commanding attention from its perch on the hillside to the base lodge and development below. ●

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Visit www.mountainliving.com for a guide to this home’s products and pros.

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STORY BY NANCY RICHMAN MILLIGAN PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID O. MARLOW

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LUXURY IS

Details

In the

CONTEMPORARY DESIGN IS SOPHISTICATED YET COMFORTABLE IN THIS CUSTOM ASPEN HOME THAT SHOWCASES RICH COLORS AND TEXTURES, AND EXTRAORDINARY ATTENTION TO DETAIL

Contemporary Comfort

Ten-foot glass doors smoothly glide apart, melting away the

distinction between indoors and outdoors in a dining room that celebrates its connection to nature. “It feels like the room is flowing into the outdoors,” says architect John Galambos, who designed the disappearing corner doors and glass deck railings to maximize the panoramic views of mountain and valley. Interior designer Donna Guerra and colleague Katherine Taylor selected colors and finishes that reflect the warmth of a Colorado sunset: rich walnut floors, a modern mahogany trestle table and a golden jacquard upholstery fabric to unite a disparate grouping of chairs. “We had the homeowners’ classic X-back chairs refinished with a dark ebony stain for an updated look,” Guerra says. She added high-back chairs for a more stately presence in the tall room. A light cove and dropped fir ceiling bring down the volume of the vaulted ceiling and add glowing ambient lighting. A very simple bronze-and-glass chandelier seems to float in the air, while silver branch candlesticks shine in its spotlight. Drop-down window shades are hidden in the ceiling cove. “We went really clean with details, subtle and sophisticated,” says Galambos, who worked on the home with fellow architect Rich Pavcek.

ARCHITECTURE GALAMBOS ARCHITECTS

>>

INTERIOR DESIGN DG & A INTERIORS

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The conjoined tub and shower form the centerpiece of the master bathroom. Everything is smooth and clean, and then we have this wonderfully textured

shower wall for contrast.

--John Galambos

Bathing Beauty “This is the view of the master bathroom as you approach it from the bedroom,” says interior designer Donna Guerra. “We wanted to make a statement and not say ‘bathroom.’” The designers and architects worked together with an eye for drama and a desire to set an inviting scene in the generous space. “The main reason for the high ceiling is to bring in natural light from high above,” says Galambos, who had the clerestory windows above the shower frosted for privacy (the house is set on a steep slope with windows visible from the street). He added a distinctive ceiling element with a curved light cove to soften the space. “It’s the same fir wood as in the living room, just expressed a little differently,” he says. Luxe materials fill the grand space, from chocolate-stained rift oak on the bath surround and floating vanities to the Crema Marfil marble countertops and limestone-encased floors and walls. “But it’s the texture of the basketweave tile that just lures you into this bathroom,” notes Guerra. “You want to go in and see it up close.” Adding to the luxurious spa experience are the hydrotherapy air-jet tub, waterfall bath faucet and cantilevered stone bench in the shower.

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The transparency of the wine cellar

enhances the feeling of luxury and opens the

room to the entire entertainment space.

--Donna Guerra

Dramatic Display Far from hidden in a stone grotto, the wine cellar unabashedly stands out front and center. Located at the base of an elegant floating stone staircase that leads up to the main living area, the cellar is visible from the entire lower-level media room. “In contrast to a wine room as an afterthought, this is really part of the big entertainment space,” says Galambos. A clean glass wall is all that separates the temperature-controlled room, allowing the eye to peruse the brilliant displays of wine bottles. “The visibility makes the cellar more intriguing and inviting, allowing wine collections to be displayed almost like trophies or artifacts,” Guerra says. With a nod to the exterior of the house, a mixture of Colorado Buff and Chico sandstone gives some heft to the wine cellar walls. A walnut wood column with an exquisite grain pattern offers contrast to the glass. “The column helps ground the room,” Guerra explains. The interior designer coaxed a skilled craftsman out of retirement to fabricate the custom copper sink. And to top everything off, she selected a clean, boxy light fixture that echoes the shape of the sparkling glass room.

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Luxury does not have to be over-appointed. It’s about the details, how everything fits together. And comfort.

Luxury is simplicity.

--John Galambos

Exhibition Kitchen A stunning balance of form and function, this glowing kitchen serves as the heart of the home. “This is a visual kitchen because it is open to the living and dining areas and positioned for entertaining,” says Galambos. “But it also must serve as a functional kitchen.” To accommodate multiple requirements, the architect and interior designer camouflaged the refrigerator, food pantry, dish pantry and microwave with wood cladding. “The whole 9½-foot wall reads as a paneled wall,” says Guerra. Floating shelves, rather than upper cabinets, also contribute to the kitchen’s nontraditional look. The custom cabinets are fashioned of ribbon-cut mahogany and have a sleek, furniture-like appearance. “The warm palette of the cabinetry and wood floor is contrasted by metallic elements,” says Galambos, referring to the metallic porcelain backsplash tiles and the imposing range hood made of plated steel with a blackened finish. For the countertops, Guerra chose honed Absolute black granite. “With so much daylight in the kitchen, we didn’t want something highly polished or reflective,” she says, “so we went with honed granite to complete the soft, modern look.”

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LUXURY IS

A Grand Gathering Place 64


THE SNOW GHOST CHALET ELEGANTLY COMBINES TOUCHES OF MONTANA’S MOUNTAIN TRADITION WITH CONTEMPORARY COMFORT AND STYLE STORY BY NORMAN KOLPAS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY GIBEON PHOTOGRAPHY 65


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ARCHITECTURE & INTERIOR DESIGN CTA ARCHITECTS ENGINEERS

From its prime location near the entrance to Elk Highlands, the residence known as the Snow Ghost Chalet literally sets the tone for the exclusive new community of custom homes at Montana’s Whitefish Mountain Resort. The enclave’s developers decided to collaborate on the design of the 6,400-square-foot home with CTA Architects Engineers, a venerable firm with seven-plus decades of history in the Rocky Mountain West, to create an elegant design tailored for contemporary living. It’s a style CTA partner and project manager David Mitchell describes as “Montana mountain architecture.” MOUNTAIN LIVING: What were the aesthetic goals for this particular expression of “Montana mountain architecture,” and how did you achieve them? DAVID MITCHELL: We tried to incorporate traditional elements of alpine architecture, updating them in the process. On the exterior, we used local stone—quarried about 40 miles from the site—in tan, dark brown and black hues. The stones were dry-stacked, a technique that uses very thin joints of mortar about a quarter of an inch thick and half an inch deep. When done with dark mortar, it creates a very distinct joint line with an old-fashioned look. Inside, we exposed less truss work than you might expect in a mountain home, and we cleaned up everything that does show, streamlining and modernizing its look. The interior walls are all done in Venetian plaster with an integral caramel color and were burnished to give them a deep, rich finish. The floors are granite that was honed and polished for a more elegant, European-style feeling. We took the same approach for the window and door trims, using unornamented high-gloss cherry wood, and instead of the traditional bronze hardware you might expect, we used brushed nickel. Overall, we tried to keep the architectural lines very clean and simple. >> OPPOSITE: The interplay between the home’s interiors and their surroundings finds dynamic expression in the main entry, where slate floor tiles and walls of locally quarried stone flow from the exterior through double solid-cherry doors into the foyer.

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BELOW: Pine-beamed ceilings soar 18 feet above the kitchen and, to its right, a formal dining room with east-facing views toward Glacier National Park. FACING PAGE: Opposite the kitchen, the great room focuses on a massive stone fireplace and views of Whitefish, Montana.

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ML: For a house with such a grand scale, the interiors feel surprisingly intimate. Was that part of your plan? DM: The house does feel very homey for its size, and that’s a result of its scale and the arrangement of living spaces. The home’s setting—there is a lot of heavy timber rising behind the one-acre site on a rocky outcropping, and mountains all around—offers a lot of verticality, which we tried to complement with horizontal lines. From the [front] entrance, it looks like a one-story house, but in fact it’s three stories tall. The entire upper level is situated within the main level’s truss work; the lower level is built into a downslope and opens out onto a big patio and grassy area. ML: What were your goals in terms of the space’s function? DM: We designed the house as a place where multiple families can gather. The main level features a master suite, and there are two more guest master suites on the upper floor, so the house can accommodate three sets of adults. The lower-level bedroom functions like a bunkhouse: it has several bunk beds that can sleep up to six kids. >> 69


ML: How were you able to strike a balance between public and private spaces? DM: Everyone can come together on the main level, which offers a very nice open kitchen, casual and formal dining areas, a sitting area and a television area. The upper floor opens onto a mezzanine, situated just below the trusses, which is a great space for morning coffee or evening wine. Each bedroom suite is a very private haven, and the kids are all together downstairs, so you can easily accommodate separate groups of people throughout the house. ML: The main-floor master suite looks especially luxurious. DM: When we design master suites, our goal is to create a space that feels more like a master spa. Rather than chopping the suite up into bedroom, bathroom and closet, we pulled out the tub and gave it the same warm ambience and views as the master bedroom. ML: In the bedroom and throughout the house, the furnishings are so seamlessly integrated with the architecture. How did you accomplish that? DM: CTA owns a home furnishings store called Toad n’ Willow, which supplied all of the furniture for this home. We spent as much time selecting and designing the furnishings as we did designing the structure itself. All of the interior architectural details—the wall color, the cherry trim, the granite floors—set the stage for furnishings that are equally clean-lined and also made of natural materials. We believe that architecture shouldn’t be too dominant. By integrating the furnishings, we ensure that the two don’t compete. Ultimately, it’s all about the people who live here and how they bring the house to life. ● ABOVE: In the spa-style master bath, the tub shares the same views as the bedroom. RIGHT: Tucked to one side of a cherry-paneled wall that conceals the staircase on the home’s main level is a casual television viewing area.

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ml | get inspired

LUXURY IS

A Balanced Approach Strong architectural features meet tasteful furnishings for a room that exudes pure mountain luxury

PHOTO BY DAVID O. MARLOW

SETTING THE STAGE

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Few spaces unite architecture and interior design with such feel-good accord as this great room in an Aspen Highlands home designed by architect Jamie Brewster McLeod and interior designer Karen Moore. Brewster McLeod worked with a palette of uniform—but far from bland—materials to define the large room’s architectural elements: fir for the trusses, walnut for the floors, and Arkansas moss stone for the columns and fireplace. “Everything feels very comfortable, very uniform in style, texture and luxury,” she says, “but there are accents throughout the harmonious palette.” To blend architecture with furnishings, Moore worked with the homeowners to handpick their favorite fabrics and textures, then carefully wove them into the space. Rather than introducing many colors, Moore chose varying textures to add nuance to the room. To perfect the mood, she designed a layout of custommade lighting fixtures: an impressive chandelier to occupy the lofty ceiling space and a series of wall sconces that add just the right amount of glow. www.brewstermcleod.com www.interiorsetc.com

Visit www.mountainliving.com for a guide to this room’s products and pros. ML | www.mountainliving.com 73


out & about

T

36th Telluride Film Festival

Telluride Film Festival Telluride, Colorado September 4-7, 2009 Mountain Living was proud to play a supporting role in the 36th Telluride Film Festival, presented by the National Film Preserve. The annual celebration of art and film, set in the spectacular Rocky Mountains, featured works from more than 25 countries, including 24 new feature films, 11 revivals, 29 short films and 10 documentaries, plus appearances by some of film’s great talents, from Helen Mirren and Nicolas Cage to up-and-comer Carey Mulligan. Photos 1-8 by Michael Caufield/Wire Image

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5

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1. Producer Jens Meurer (left), actress Helen Mirren and writer/director Michael Hoffman attend the annual filmmakers portrait. 2. Director Werner Herzog speaks at a Q&A session. 3 and 9. Telluride’s main street, Colorado Avenue, during the Telluride Film Festival. 4. Actor Nicolas Cage speaks at the Nicolas Cage and Davia Nelson conversation. 5. Actresses Helen Mirren (left) and Laura Linney attend the annual filmmakers portrait. 6. Actor Viggo Mortensen (left) and Ken Burns speak at the Tribute to Viggo Mortensen. 7. Actor Fred Ward (left) and director Christian Carion attend the Patron’s Brunch. 8. Actress Carey Mulligan speaks at the Real Lives Becoming Reel Characters seminar.

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ML | November / December 2009


PHOTO BY AUDREY HALL

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SPOTLIGHT ON:

Chef de Maison Catering “Appetizers are the most exciting morsels you can put in your mouth,” says Rutherford Maule. “You get all of the flavors in just one bite.” Maule knows of what he speaks. As founder, owner and executive chef of Denver-based Chef De Maison Catering, he has spent the last 10 years pleasing discerning palates in Denver, Vail, Aspen and, soon, Boulder, Colorado. Maule’s culinary path can be traced back to his native New Zealand, where he was professionally trained, and Australia’s famed Byron Bay. Over the years, as Maule has traveled around the world, he has picked up a sensibility about the role food plays in our lifestyle and spirit. “It all comes together on the plate,” he relates. Whether for cocktail parties or formal

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ML | November / December 2009

dinners, Maule’s menus feature French-Asian fusion cuisine with an emphasis on seafood and are inspired by the seasons. “My food is a combination of the robust French cooking style, lighter Asian influences and seasonal ingredients,” he explains. Whenever he can, Maule creates “dishes of the moment” for clients who allow him freedom of expression. When more planning is required, menus are planned in advance. Maule’s experience ranges from elegant gatherings at private homes to meals at rustic 10th Mountain Division huts, to which guests snowmobile or ski in. Either way, the experience is decidedly delicious. For more information, please call 970-477-2433

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more 29 48-49 10 16 39 30 27 9 13 15 IFC 46-47 77 53 28 18 IBC 42 21 36 42 51 26 32 79 BC

WORTHOTEL.COM

Go to www.mountainliving.com to learn more about these companies. KEVIN CLARK ORIGINALS www.kevinclarkoriginals.com LYON DESIGN GROUP www.lyondesigngroup.com MYERS & COMPANY www.myersandco.com NAYTURA www.naytura.com NEW ENERGY WORKS www.newenergyworks.com OLD HICKORY FURNITURE COMPANY www.oldhickory.com OLD WORLD HEIRLOOMS www.oldworldheirlooms.com PALO DURO HARDWOODS www.palodurocollection.com RKD ARCHITECTS, INC www.rkdarch.com RMR GROUP www.rmrgroup.net RMT ARCHITECTS www.rmtarchitects.com ROBERT G. SINCLAIR ARCHITECTURE, INC www.rgsarchitecture.com ROYAL PALMS RESORT AND SPA www.royalpalmsescapes.com THE SHAGGY RAM www.theshaggyram.com SPANISH PUEBLO DOORS www.spdoors.com STANTON GLASS STUDIO, LLC www.stantonglass.com SUN MOUNTAIN DOOR www.sunmountaindoor.com TETON HERITAGE BUILDERS www.tetonheritagebuilders.com TKP ARCHITECTS www.tkparch.com TRESTLEWOOD www.trestlewood.com VERDONE LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS www.verdonelandarch.com VERTICAL ARTS www.vertical-arts.com WARDCRAFT HOMES, INC. www.wardcraft.com WESTERN PASSION www.westernpassion.com THE WORT HOTEL www.worthotel.com URSUS CUSTOM HOMES www.worldsfinestskinvestment.com

Vol. XV, No 8© 2009 by Network Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. Permission to reprint or quote excerpts granted by written request only. Mountain Living ® (ISSN 1088-6451) is published 8 times per year in Jan, Feb, Mar/Apr, May/June, Jul, Aug, Sep/Oct, Nov/Dec, by Network Communications Inc. 2305 Newpoint Parkway, Lawrenceville, GA 30043. Periodical postage paid at Lawrenceville, GA and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Mountain Living® P.O. Box 9002, Maple Shade, NJ 08052-9652. For change of address include old address as well as new address with both ZIP codes. Allow four to six weeks for change of address to become effective. Please include current mailing label when writing about your subscription. Subscriptions, $29.95 for one year; $52.95 for two years. Canada and Mexico add $20 per year. Single copy price $4.95. Subscription questions, (888) 645-7600. CPM#40065056. Canada post PM40063731. Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: Station A, P.O. Box 54, Windsor, ON N9A 6J5.

ML | www.mountainliving.com 79


ml | house of the moment

LOCATION Pagosa Springs, Colorado LISTING PRICE $68 million

House of the Moment LUXURY IS Large enough to accommodate more than 50 guests, the BootJack Ranch is one of the finest recreational ranches in the West. Situated in Colorado’s southern San Juan Mountains, the ranch comprises more than 3,100 acres of lush meadows and forests—all bordered by the San Juan National Forest, Weminuche Wilderness and panoramic mountain views. Fly Fishing Team USA has trained on the seven miles of the San Juan River and Wolf Creek that traverse the property; an additional six lakes and several ponds are well stocked with several species of trout. No expense was spared when building and restoring the ranch’s rustic log, timber and stone structures, which include a 13,800square-foot main residence, four luxe log cabin homes, and a guest lodge with eight individual cabins. A spectacular 12,000-square-foot spa and aquatic center features striking glass walls that open to let in the fresh mountain air.

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ML | November / December 2009

PHOTO COURTESY PEAKS REAL ESTATE SOTHEBY’S INTL. REALTY

LISTING BROKER Bill Fandel, Peaks Real Estate Sotheby’s International Realty, 970-369-7700, www.tellurideluxuryproperties.com


Helicopter or lift access, from the door step of your own mountain home...

ARE YOU UP FOR IT?

Your Design and Build Team

REVELSTOKE, BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA www.worldsfinestskinvestment.com

Mountain Living  

November 2009

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