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BUILDING ENERGY 13 CONFERENCE + TRADE SHOW FOR RENEWABLE ENERGY AND GREEN BUILDING PROFESSIONALS

MARCH 5-7, 2013 SEAPORT WORLD TRADE CENTER BOSTON, MA NESEA.ORG/BUILDINGENERGY

CONFERENCE PROGRAM PLATINUM LEVEL SPONSOR BuildingEnergy13 workshops and sessions meet continuing education requirements for AIA (HSW & SD), BOMI International (RPA, FMA and/or SMA graduates), BPI*, InterNACHI, NARI, NAHB and USGBC*. * See website for workshops and sessions accredited by BPI and USGBC.

Welcome from Conference Chair, Paul Eldrenkamp Welcome to BuildingEnergy 13!

What is BuildingEnergy? BuildingEnergy (BE) is the most established and most cross-disciplinary renewable energy and high performance building conference in the region. Organized by members of the Northeast Sustainable Energy Association, it brings together more than 4,000 renewable energy and green building professionals from across the US and Europe for three days of networking, 80 accredited educational sessions and a high-level trade show.

Why Attend BuildingEnergy? Network with industry leaders Make business-to-business connections as well as grow your client base. Learn about new techniques and new technologies at over 80 conference sessions and workshops. Earn your professional credits in highly engaging multi-disciplinary sessions. Meet like-minded individuals, share information and sharpen your wholesystems-thinking skills.

BuildingEnergy Attendee Breakdown 51% Building professionals (architects, engineers, builders, planners, contractors, facility managers, developers and designers) 23% Energy and environmental professionals

Here’s something I really want to share with you to kick things off. Earlier this year NESEA member Fred Unger shared links to a couple of TED talks with NESEA’s BuildingEnergy13 Planning Committee. Here they are: Peter Diamandis – Abundance Is Our Future, in which Diamandis makes a case for optimism -- that we’ll invent, innovate and create ways to solve the challenges that loom over us. “I’m not saying we don’t have our set of problems; we surely do. But ultimately, we knock them down.” and Paul Gilding – The Earth is Full, in which Gliding suggests that we have used up all our resources, that we have filled up all the livable space on earth, and that the possibility of the devastating consequences that entails are both terrifying and oddly hopeful. While the debate these two talks represents is a critical and fascinating one, I kept wondering “How do we really bring it home to the community at the BuildingEnergy Conference to make sure the questions Gilding and Diamandis are asking inform the way we think about our day-to-day work?” We are certainly more than capable of being the clever and creative community that Peter Diamandis describes. It’s also true, on the other hand, that the Big Problems that Paul Gilding describes seem very real to a lot of us in the NESEA and BuildingEnergy community. But the bottom line is that even the practitioners who are most pessimistic about resource depletion seem pretty eager to get up and get to work in the morning to solve problems for their clients, as far as I can tell. Maybe that’s because active engagement is a great antidote for despair—I certainly didn’t see any evidence of despair at BuildingEnergy12 this last March, only of active engagement. Here’s what I think is the best way to have the Gilding-Diamandis debate at BuildingEnergy13: Make sure our content is accurate and reality-based; avoid confirmation bias in our selection of topics and speakers; focus on the areas where theory meets practice so that our theory stays grounded in marketplace realities and our practice is informed by a larger context that keeps it in the category of “solution” rather than “problem”. I believe that our planning committee has done just that. I hope you’ll join us and let us know what you think!

—Paul Eldrenkamp

15% Educators, homeowners, students and non-profit organizations 11% Government, investing, media and marketing, real estate, and health care

NESEA would like to thank BE13 Conference Chair, Paul Eldrenkamp of Byggmeister, and Vice Chair, Marc Sternick, Dietz & Company Architects, Inc.

Conference Highlights Opening Forum:

Tuesday March 5 | 6:00 PM-8:00 PM HARBORVIEW BALLROOM

This forum is an opportunity to connect with conference attendees who share your passion. Going beyond a simple networking event, the facilitated format allows you to engage in small group topical conversations and declare what you want to learn at BE13. By the end of the evening, groups will form and head out to dinner to continue their conversations. Light appetizers and cash bar.

Keynote: Alex Blumberg of NPR

Wednesday, March 6 | 8:45 AM-10:30 AM Plenary Space next to Trade Show

We’re excited to have NPR’s Alex Blumberg delivering the BuildingEnergy 13 keynote address. He’ll be bringing his signature wit and clarity as he speaks on the issue of “economics for environmentalists.”

NEW FOR 2013 All new workshops! Tuesday, March 5

Solar, DERs, Passive House and more. See pp. 3-6

New Tracks Retrofit for Resilience – Cities

This track tackles the sustainability issues unique to cities and their inhabitants. Fundamentals

For professionals at all levels, sometimes it’s a revelation to get back to basics.

Alex Blumberg is a contributing editor for NPR’s Planet Money. He is also a producer for the public radio program This American Life, and an adjunct professor of journalism at Columbia University. He is known for his prize-winning radio documentaries and the This American Life episode “Giant Pool of Money,” a program on the housing crisis. Called “the greatest explainer ever heard” by noted journalism professor Jay Rosen, Blumberg’s “Giant Pool of Money” became the inspiration for NPR’s Planet Money.

Moving the Marketplace

Following the Keynote will be the presentation of $10,000 to the winner of NESEA’s Zero Net Energy Building Award.

Katrin Klingenberg of Passive House Institute US will demo cool Passive House gadgets on Demo Stage 2 at 4:30pm followed by a Passive House tour of the trade show floor at 5:45pm. Meet at the NESEA booth 507 for the tour.

Zero Net-working

Wednesday March 6 | 12:30 PM-2:00 PM BEACON HILL COMPLEX - OPEN TO TRADE SHOW PASS HOLDERS

Meet and learn from this years NESEA Zero Net Energy Award Applicants.

Trade Show Reception

Wednesday, March 6 | 5:30 pm-6:30 pm

An open networking event on the trade show floor sponsored by the Massachusetts Multifamily New Construction Program. Cash bar. Free with conference or trade show pass.

NESEA Night Dinner Cruise Aboard the Spirit of Boston

How do we get better building practices into the mainstream?

Passive House Special Events Wednesday, March 6

Hands-on Demo Stages

2 stages running all day Wednesday and Thursday on the Trade Show floor. For more details, see p. 20.

Wednesday March 6 | 6:30 PM-9:00 PM Spirit of Boston Dock next to the Seaport World Trade Center

Join your friends new and old for a delightful cruise with a buffet dinner and cash bar aboard the Spirit of Boston. Awards for Distinguished Service and Professional Leadership will be presented. Beyond that, it’s just a great networking party. Space is limited. Cost: $55 for members; $65 for all others.

Closing Forum – What will be the Hot Topics at BuildingEnergy 2025? Thursday March 7 | 4:00 PM-5:30 PM Cityview Ballroom - OPEN TO TRADE SHOW PASS HOLDERS

The final session of the conference will wrap up everything we learned at BE13 by forcing us to think out loud about where all our new-gained knowledge is taking us. The format: Six NESEA thought leaders will work within the pecha kucha framework to offer their predictions regarding what we’ll be grappling with in the sessions and workshops at BuildingEnergy in March, 2025. This will followed by a period of quick-paced audience discussion. The 90 minutes will then wrap with a compelling preview of NESEA, 12 years hence. This closing session will offer an engaged response to the too-rarely asked question: “Just where are we going with all of this?“

USGBC Workshop

Wednesday, March 6, 8:30am-5:00pm Amphitheater $95 ($125 for non-members of the USGBC MA Chapter). Contact events@usgbcma.org to register

The USGBC Massachusetts Chapter is presenting a workshop for green building professionals who are pursuing the LEED GA credential, and those who would like to understand better the basics of the LEED system, especially the new version, LEEDv4. Attendees will be provided with study materials and lunch and snacks are included.

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EXPECT THE BEST Full-Day Workshops Tuesday March 5, 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Complete speaker bios at nesea.org/buildingenergy/speakers

❚ Auditing Multifamily Buildings Workshop Speakers: Heather Nolen, Steven Winter Associates, Inc.; F.L. Andrew Padian, The Community Preservation Corporation

Many people who have expertise in single family buildings run away from multifamily buildings, which are some of the most profitable, high occupancy, and shockingly, most energy inefficient buildings in the country! Learn from two experienced auditors how to look at larger buildings with an eye toward details which can generate massive energy savings. The morning will be spent discussing the science of multifamily building efficiency and in the afternoon we’ll head out to do an audit on a nearby building.

❚ Biomimicry in Action: Applying Nature’s Lessons for Resilient Design Workshop Speakers: Janus Welton, Eco-Arch Designworks; Dr. Anamarija Frankic, University of Massachusetts, Boston; Randall Anway, New Tapestry, LLC

In this “hands-on, minds-on” workshop, participants will interface with practicing professionals who are actively working in the emerging field of biomimetic design. Providing just enough theory, we will explore cutting edge thinking about resilient design and what it means to look deeply into the natural world for lessons we can take back to the design studio.

❚ Building an Air-Tight House* Workshop Speakers: Mark Newey, Center for EcoTechnology; Paul Huijing, Paul Huijing, LLC

This workshop will focus on practical strategies for assuring building air-tightness. It will provide an overview of the basic building science that causes air leakage, identify typical air leakage paths, and 3

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describe best practices for preventing or sealing leakage points. This workshop will also cover how to manage the new construction process to assure that air leakage can be minimized at every stage. Topics covered include: building code, checking air tightness, key building science concepts, ventilation and more. *Qualifies for 5.5 Massachusetts CSL credits (.5 Code / 5 Energy)

❚ Building Passive House Homes – Details, Process, Lessons Learned Workshop Speakers: Declan Keefe, Placetailor; Chris Corson, EcoCor Design Build; Matthew O’Malia, G O Logic, LLC; Alan Gibson, G O Logic, LLC

Not long ago Passive House was an exotic, just-out-of-reach fantasy for us in the Northeast. But in the last couple of years, three New England home builders with dramatically different styles and approaches have embraced the mode of “all-Passive House, all the time.” And they’re doing it cost-effectively! How do they do it? Smoke and mirrors? We’ll cover designs, details, materials, subcontractor push-back, costs, scheduling, and lessons learned about things these builders will never try again.

❚ Building Science 101

Workshop Speaker: David Keefe, Vermont Energy Investment Corp.

This overview of residential energy efficiency is appropriate for future auditors, would-be retrofitters, and anyone else who lives in a house. We’ll cover the basics of heat, air, and moisture flow; insulation and air sealing materials; comparing heating fuels, heating systems, and hot water systems; common building performance

problems and solutions; blower door testing; condensation, indoor air quality, and combustion safety. No previous technical knowledge is needed.

❚ Crash Course on Building Science for Military Veterans

Workshop Speaker: Henry Gifford, Chris Benedict, R.A.

This session will help veterans in the Northeast start down the path to becoming energy professionals. Energy performance and renewable energy companies need people with keen observational skills who are able to work independently on technical tasks, sometimes in unpleasant conditions and at odd hours - things veterans have been trained for. This session is a first step toward helping veterans re-tool their technical skills and help reduce our dependence on foreign oil.

❚ Deep Energy Retrofits

Workshop Speakers: Linda Wigington, Affordable Comfort; Matt Berges, The Affordable Green Housing Center; Greg Pedrick, NYSERDA; Cador Pricejones, Byggmeister; Ken Neuhauser, Building Science Corporation; Kristen Simmons, Kristen Simmons Architects; Kerry Koskinen, RetroFuture Remodeling

A Deep Energy Retrofit (DER) is a comprehensive re-engineering of a home or building aimed at reducing its heating energy consumption by as much as 80% and its total energy consumption by 50% or more. Case studies will include low-income housing on a tight budget, market-rate retrofits, and one Passive House retrofit. Topics will include design strategies, construction details, mechanical systems, compromises made, hard lessons learned, and frank discussions of cost and payback. All experience levels welcome.

3/5/13 TUESDAY ❚ Net Zero Energy and Beyond

Workshop Speakers: R. Carter Scott, Transformations, Inc; Mike Duclos, DEAP Energy Group

We’ll show cost-effective examples of homes modeled to produce over 10,000 kilowatt hours more than they use in a year. Now you can also use your car to power a portion of your house when the grid goes down! We’ll detail techniques and incentives for the shell and the renewable energy systems. We’ll discuss energy modeling, Passive House techniques to improve energy efficiency and passive survivability, monitoring, troubleshooting and more. This workshop is targeted to builders, developers, architects and others looking to regain a competitive advantage in today’s marketplace.

❚ Skills for Building Resilient Communities

Workshop Speakers: Joel Gordes, Environmental Energy Solutions; Donald Watson, Donald Watson, Architect; Maureen Hart, Sustainable Measures; Alex Wilson, BuildingGreen

Facilitated by four leading professionals, this workshop offers state-of-the-art design and planning strategies that directly link resilience with sustainability. Participants will acquire all the information and resources needed to understand the issues and broaden their professional practices. You’ll depart with knowledge of how sustainability and resilience policies and practices can strengthen businesses, careers, and communities.

❚ The Master’s Guide to Designing Spray Foam Insulation Projects & Installing Them Right Workshop Speaker: Henri Fennell, HC Fennel Consulting

This master class workshop is a comprehensive study of spray foam project design, policies, procedures, installation, safety protocols and more. We’ll cover the foam industry, foam plastic as a building enclosure technology, and open and closed

cell polyurethanes in specific building applications. Case studies will provide illustrations of technique and common problems along and what to expect, look for and test in a finished installation.

Morning Workshops Tuesday March 5 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

❚ An Introduction to PHPP (Passive House Planning Package) Software

Workshop Speaker: David White, Right Environments

The PHPP is a great tool for predicting heating demand and peak heating load in low-load buildings. We’ll begin with a concise, directed overview of how the tool works and what advantages it offers, and continue with modeling the heating energy demand and peak heating load of a single family home.

❚ Best Practices for Efficient Hot Water Systems in Single and Multifamily Buildings

Workshop Speaker: Gary Klein, Affiliated International Management

Domestic hot water use can be a very large proportion of the energy use in a residential, commercial or multifamily building, depending on occupancy type and climate. The components of the system must be integrated so that occupants will tend to use it efficiently. What is the most energy, water, and time efficient way to install a hot water system? How can these considerations be integrated into good building design? We’ll use an interactive, hands-on approach to explore the topic.

❚ Conflicts Between Performance and Compliance: What it Takes to Make High Performance Buildings Workshop Speaker: Bill Rose, Prairie Research Institute, University of Illinois, Urbana – Champaign

This workshop will examine some of the most contentious issues in our architectural, design, and construction practices: vapor barriers, attic ventilation, radon, house ventilation, moisture control, and energy reduction in buildings. We’ll use the “compliance versus performance” framework to dig into the guidelines, standards, and codes that govern these issues. We won’t provide “The Answer,” but you’ll leave with the tools and understanding for better designs and better buildings.

❚ Simplified Space Conditioning Strategies for Low-Load Homes

Workshop Speakers: Duncan Prahl and Dave Stecher, IBACOS, Inc.

Here’s the scenario: your client has asked for the cheapest way to heat and cool her newly built (or retrofitted) air-tight, superinsulated building. This workshop helps guide your choices for low-load houses (retrofit or new construction) that meet industry comfort measures. We’ll discuss the lowest installed- cost marketavailable system and how it has failed to meet existing standards, and we’ll identify other low-cost options. We’ll use fieldwork to draw larger conclusions for a variety of climatic regions and house configurations.

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3/5/13 TUESDAY ❚ Structural Engineering for a Brave New World Workshop Speakers: Ben Brungraber, Fire Tower Engineered Timber; Len Morse-Fortier, Simpson, Gumpertz & Heger

These dynamic presenters will provide engineering case studies showing how to bring your old building into the 21st century as carefully and cost-effectively as possible, and how to give it the best chance to survive into the 22nd century. We’ll bring you up-to-date on current research and discuss risk-management and best practices.

❚ WUFI Passive Workshop: Next-Gen Modeling Tool for Passive House and Building Professionals in North America

Workshop Speaker: Katrin Klingenberg, Passive House Institute US

Over the past year, the Passive House Institute US, Fraunhofer Institute for Building Physics, and Owens Corning have partnered to develop an all-in-one modeling tool that fulfills newly identified modeling needs for a passive house or building in all climate zones of North America: WUFI Passive. We’ll introduce this next generation passive modeling tool, its expanded capabilities and planned improvements.

❚ PV 101: Grid-tied PV Systems for Architects, Engineers and General Contractors

Workshop Speakers: Steven Strong, Luke McKneally, Pat Retelle, and Robert Erb, Solar Design Associates

Everything your design and building team needs to know to successfully incorporate photovoltaics PV into their projects. Learn the efficiencies and costs of different system options, general sizing guidelines, design and mounting options, designing a solar-friendly building, load and harvest calculations, availability of financial incentives, permitting and installation issues and coordination with other trades. 5

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Afternoon Workshops Tuesday March 5 2:00 PM - 5:00 PM

❚ Commercial Passive House Design Principles

Workshop Speaker: Adam Cohen, Structures Design/ Build

We will explore the basic principles of commercial Passive House Design and give an overview of commercial concepts and how they differ from residential projects. We’ll discuss three commercial building types: Standard, Complex and Special and present case studies of both European and US projects. A hands-on exercise will help put these ideas into practice. Attendees should have familiarity with basic Passive House Design Principles.

❚ Fundamentals of Energy and Buildings: Calculating and Understanding Heating Loads

Workshop Speaker: Peter Temple, Keene State College

This workshop will cover basic knowledge and skills for heating load calculations for a simple building. Participants will gain experience by calculating, evaluating, and comparing heat load for a few different types of buildings. We’ll divide into working groups of similar experience levels and work with assistant instructors. Related energy principles, concepts, and calculations will be demystified and practiced.

❚ Getting Real About Primary Energy – What it Means for Passive House Standards in North America

Workshop Speaker: Katrin Klingenberg, Passive House Institute US

It’s becoming essential in Passive House building that we understand the differ-

ence between site energy and primary energy. “Site energy” is consumption measured at the building; “primary energy” is the total energy required to generate and deliver that site energy to the building, and can be a factor of three or more times the site energy. We’ll explain calculating primary energy; discuss how it relates to fuel choice and geographic region; suggest how the current passive house standards and practices can be improved; and design strategies.

❚ Lessons Learned from High Performance Buildings: What Went Wrong?

Workshop Speakers: Scott Greenbaum, Greene Energy Consultants, LLC; Steve Di Giacomo, EMA – Energy Management Associates, Inc.

We will review numerous projects we have commissioned, retro-commissioned, and energy audited and illustrate common issues in design, implementation, and control strategies resulting in high energy consumption. We’ll reveal a surprising list of buildings that do and do not meet high performance criteria and review common mistakes with VAV systems, CO2-based demand control ventilation, over-sizing equipment, simultaneous heating and cooling, EMS controls, EMS specifications, Sequences of Operation, Trend Logs, etc. We will show how we corrected these common mistakes and provide some common sense ways to avoid them.

❚ Structural Detailing for Energy Efficient Building Envelopes Workshop Speakers: Jim D’Aloisio, Klepper, Hann & Hyatt and Russ Miller-Johnson, Engineering Ventures, Inc.

This workshop will provide state-of-theart strategies to minimize thermal energy losses caused by structural elements in the building envelope. We’ll cover detailing strategies, design techniques, new developments in advanced practice, and the current state of ongoing research

based on work with the Structural Engineering Institute’s Thermal Bridging Task Committee. At the end we’ll have a Structural Detail Jam Session to critique good, bad, and problem conditions. Bring your details!

Schedule at a Glance Tuesday 8:00

This workshop will provide a working understanding of principles and tools for cost effective deep energy savings in existing commercial buildings by engaging attendees in interactive learning activities. We’ll cover integrative wholesystems design, bundling measures to capture savings, life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) and making the business case. We’ll play RMI’s “Deep Retrofit Scenario Game” to explore establishing performance-based goals, bundling integrated energy efficiency measures (EEMs), tunneling through cost barriers and identifying key triggers and right-timing indicators.

This workshop compares system and component efficiencies - which hardware and systems configurations work best for different project types - as well as how to match an inverter with an array, solar access, grid interconnection, code compliance, disconnects, fusing, labeling, grounding and ground faults, fire safety issues, common errors to avoid, system commissioning and outlook for the PV marketplace through 2016.

11:00

12:00

1:00

2:00

3:00

4:00

5:00

6:00

7:00

8:00

9:00

8:00

9:00

6:00–8:00 OPENING Forum and networking

2:00–5:00 afternoon Workshops 9:00–5:00 full-day Workshops

Wednesday 8:00

9:00

10:00

11:00

12:00

1:00

2:00

3:00

4:00

5:00

6:00

7:00

10:30–6:30 Trade show, cyber cafe, Demo stages

8:45–10:30 KEYNOTE: alex blumberg, npr

11:00–12:30 12:30–2:00 morning Lunch Sessions

2:00–3:30 Afternoon sessions

4:00–5:30 Afternoon sessions

11:00

2:00

4:00

5:30–6:30 trade show RECEPTion

7:00-9:00 nesea night BUFFET CRUISE

ABOARD THE SPIRIT OF BOSTON

Thursday 8:00

9:00

10:00

12:00

1:00

3:00

5:00

6:00

7:00

8:00

9:00

10:00 - 4:00 Trade show, cyber cafe, Demo stages

❚ Advanced PV Design for Practitioners

Workshop Speakers: Steven Strong, Luke McKneally, Pat Retelle, and Robert Erb, Solar Design Associates

10:00

9:00–12:00 Morning Workshops

❚ Trade Secrets for Getting to Deeper Savings in Commercial Buildings

Workshop Speakers: Kendra Tupper and Coreina Chan, Rocky Mountain Institute

9:00

8:30–10:00 morning Sessions

10:30–12:00 MORNING SESSIONS

12:00–2:00 Lunch

2:00–3:30 Afternoon sessions

4:00–5:30 CLOSING FORUM: bE 2025

“What can you expect from me as a BE presenter? My best.” – Dave Foley, Holland & Foley Architects.

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SURPRISING FINDINGS, BELIE TRACKS AND SPONSORS TRACK 1

Room AND TRACK CHAIRS

SESSION SPEAKERS

Cityview 1 Track chairs Rachel White, Greener Every Day Jonathan Kantar, Sage Builders

Session Speakers:

TRACK 2

Harborview 1 Track chairs Heather Nolen, Steven Winter Associates, Inc. F.L. Andrew Padian, The Community Preservation Corporation

TRACK 3

Waterfront 2 Track chairs Laura Notman, Architect Kristen Simmons, Kristen Simmons Architects

Session Speakers:

TRACK 4

Harborview 3 Track chairs Robert Leaver, New Commons Bernice Radle, Buffalo Energy

Session Speakers:

TRACK 5

Cityview 2 Track chairs Jess Lerner, Green on the Inside Jamie Wolf, Wolfworks, Inc.

Session Speakers:

TRACK 6

beacon hill complex Track chairs Bill Stillinger, PV Squared Rob Meyers, South Mountain Company

Session Speakers:

TRACK 7

Waterfront 3 Track chairs Matt Root, Conservation Services Group Satpal Kaur, Chris Benedict R.A.

Session Speakers:

TRACK 8

Cutting Edge: What the Pros Want to Know

harborview 2 Track chairs Marie McMahon-Meehan, National Grid Mark Price, Sustainable Energy Analytics

Session Speakers:

TRACK 9

cambridge complex

Session Speakers:

Homes

Multifamily

Commercial/Institutional

Retrofit for Resilience – Cities

Whole Systems in Action

Renewables: On the Grid and On Your Building

Fundamentals

High Performance Mechanicals Track chairs Robb Aldrich, Steven Winter Associates, Inc. & Ventilation David Stecher, IBACOS Inc.

TRACK 10

Moving the Marketplace

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skyline Track chairs Mitch Anthony, Titanium Alexis Miles, Consultant

Chair: Samantha Wood, Coldham & Hartman Architects Ellen Tohn, Tohn Environmental Strategies Jonathan Wilson, The National Center for Healthy Housing

Session Speakers:

Dan Rieber, Northern Manhattan Improvement Corporation Tom Sahagian, Enterprise Community Partners

Chair: CaitrĂ­ona Cooke, Conservation Services Group Wagdy Anis and Wei Lam, Wiss, Janney, Elstner, Associates, Inc.

Chair: Robert Leaver, New Commons Bernice Radle, Buffalo Energy

Chair: John Abrams, South Mountain Company Marjorie Kelly, Tellus Institute

Chair: Bill Stillinger, PV Squared Jessica Lillian, Solar Industry Magazine Laurence Mackler, Solaire Generation

Peter Yost, BuildingGreen

Chair: Christine Cronin, Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Inc. Chris Benedict, Chris Benedict R.A. Fiona Aldous Chair: Margaret Song, Cape Light Compact Linda Wigington, Affordable Comfort, Inc. David White, Right Environments Carl Shapiro, Steven Winter Associates, Inc.

Session Speakers:

Coreina Chan, Rocky Mountain Institute Kendra Tupper, Rocky Mountain Institute

EFS CHALLENGED SESSION DESCRIPTIONS

3/6/13 WEDNESDAY

session1 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM

Health Opportunities and Pitfalls of Energy Upgrades–What Doesn’t Smell Can Still Hurt Us

Energy upgrades can profoundly impact indoor air quality. While following best practices for ventilation and source control may reduce exposure to pollutants, ignoring air quality issues can lead to significant health risks. This session presents new EPA guidelines for protecting occupant health during energy upgrades, as well as new research on changes in occupant health after weatherization. It’s a must know subject for programs and companies seeking to minimize liability issues and improve client health.

Large Multifamily Boilers: How to Understand and Manage

Large Multifamily Boilers can be intimidating. This session will explore large boilers, when to replace, how to update existing boilers to be more energy efficient and what controls make sense.

Airtightness Performance of Whole Buildings: Design, Construction & Verification Testing

IECC 2012 and ASHRAE 2010, now require air barriers in building enclosures for the first time. This means that LEED will now require them in certified buildings. The US Army Corps of Engineers, the Navy and Air Force, as well as the GSA all have new requirements for airtightness performance of whole buildings. There are several ways of achieving compliance in design, construction and verification testing. Testing procedures will be briefly reviewed as well as the newly developed test protocol. The ASHRAE 1478 Research Project results, measuring the air-tightness of commercial buildings built after the year 2000, will be reviewed. These conclusions regarding modes of commercial building air leakage will be shared with the audience.

The City is a Whole System

How do cities work? What conditions are pushing cities in the Northeast to focus on becoming more resilient? In becoming more resilient, how does the polis, or the energetic vibe of the people, make a place a soulful, whole system in action? What building and energy practices are making cities more resilient? What can we do to get good sustainability projects done in cities? As practitioners, what do we need to learn next about cities? These questions will be addressed in both the presentation and facilitated conversation.

Building the Generative Economy

Climate change and economic inequalities are requiring an economy that is based less on more and more on enough. Our ability to collaborate in new ways and employ democratic structures that encourage widespread ownership, community accountability, and common stewardship of resources will become essential. Our challenge is to begin to understand how the transition will occur, how we’ll position ourselves to be resilient and responsive, and what all this means for our lives and livelihoods. Ms. Kelly will be available to sign copies of her latest book, Owning our Future, following this session.

Renewable Energy Markets in the Region and Beyond

In 1974, when NESEA was first organized, solar PV and wind were fringe novelties not seriously considered by energy professionals. Today renewable resources are promoted and developed through a mainstream global infrastructure. This session examines the state of renewable markets, demonstrating the interdependence among regional and national policies, equipment manufacturers and distributors, and how “clean energy” meets customer demand today and in the likely future.

H2OUSE – Everything You Ever Needed to Know About Residential Water Consumption and Conservation

Water is energy-intensive; energy is water-intensive. That is the case for using water wisely. This session will lay out the relationships between energy and water and guide both building professionals and their clients through water-smart design, specification, installation and operation of all things residentially liquid.

Construction Matters: Enclosure Design and Commissioning Through Construction

How does a tough New York architect collaborate and contend with a tough New York contractor to implement the design of her beautifully detailed Passive House apartment buildings? How does building enclosure commissioning help achieve quality during the design and construction process? Join accomplished designers Chris Benedict and Fiona Aldous as they present on the challenges of achieving quality, high performance and energy efficient designs.

Heat Pump Water Heaters in Cold Climates

Heat Pump Water Heaters can use much less energy than conventional electric water heaters, but they remove heat from the home. Do they make sense in a cold climate? If so, when and how? How do they compare to other water heating options using gas, LP or oil? Speakers will present data from several HPWH studies and will discuss challenges and opportunities in cold climates.

The Power of a Good Story

Rocky Mountain Institute understands that deep energy efficiency cannot be achieved without the buy-in and support of key stakeholders, and that stewardship requires the education and the inspiration of those stakeholders. This session aims to help practitioners translate proposed efficiency strategies into powerful stories that make the case for clients.

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TRACKS AND SPONSORS TRACK 1

Room AND TRACK CHAIRS

SESSION SPEAKERS

Cityview 1 Track chairs Rachel White, Greener Every Day Jonathan Kantar, Sage Builders

Session Speakers:

TRACK 2

Harborview 1 Track chairs Heather Nolen, Steven Winter Associates, Inc. F.L. Andrew Padian, The Community Preservation Corporation

Session Speakers:

TRACK 3

Waterfront 2 Track chairs Laura Notman, Architect Kristen Simmons, Kristen Simmons Architects

Session Speakers:

TRACK 4

Harborview 3 Track chairs Robert Leaver, New Commons Bernice Radle, Buffalo Energy

Session Speakers:

TRACK 5

Cityview 2 Track chairs Jess Lerner, Green on the Inside Jamie Wolf, Wolfworks, Inc.

Session Speakers:

TRACK 6

beacon hill complex Track chairs Bill Stillinger, PV Squared Rob Meyers, South Mountain Company

Session Speakers:

TRACK 7

Waterfront 3 Track chairs Matt Root, Conservation Services Group Satpal Kaur, Chris Benedict R.A.

Session Speakers:

TRACK 8

Cutting Edge: What the Pros Want to Know

harborview 2 Track chairs Marie McMahon-Meehan, National Grid Mark Price, Sustainable Energy Analytics

Session Speakers:

TRACK 9

cambridge complex

Session Speakers:

Homes

Multifamily

Commercial/Institutional

Retrofit for Resilience – Cities

Whole Systems in Action

Renewables: On the Grid and On Your Building

Fundamentals

High Performance Mechanicals Track chairs Robb Aldrich, Steven Winter Associates, Inc. & Ventilation David Stecher, IBACOS Inc.

TRACK 10

Moving the Marketplace

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skyline Track chairs Mitch Anthony, Titanium Alexis Miles, Consultant

Chair: Kristina Eldrenkamp, Albert, Righter & Tittmann Architects Marc Rosenbaum, South Mountain Company Ben Graham, Natural Design Build

Chair: Sylvia Clark, Stonecipher and Clark Environmental Solutions, LLC Mary Jane Poynter, Vermont Energy Investment Corporation Jason Block, Steven Winter Associates, Inc. D. Dickinson Henry, The Jordan Institute Eric Gardner, New Ecology Chair: Jacob Knowles, Bard, Rao + Athanas, Consulting Engineers, LLC Ellen Watts, Architerra

Chair: Bernice Radle, Buffalo Energy Jean Carroon, Goody Clancy Bill Rose, University of Illinois

Chair: Henry MacLean, Timeless Architecture Vivien Li, The Boston Harbor Association Anamarija Frankic, Green Harbors Project Chair: Joel Gordes, Environmental Energy Solutions Chris Lotspeich, Celtic Energy Guy Warner, Pareto Energy Ltd. Carl Frattini, Northeast Utilities Andy Shapiro, Energy Balance

Chair: F.L. Andrew Padian, The Community Preservation Corporation John Tooley, Advanced Energy Gunnar I. Baldwin, LEED AP, TOTO, USA Inc

Chair: John Walsh, Western Massachusetts Electric Company Adam Kohler, Kohler & Lewis Engineering

Session Speakers:

Jane Carbone, Homeowners Rehab. Inc CaitrĂ­ona Cooke, Conservation Services Group

3/6/13 WEDNESDAY SESSION DESCRIPTIONS

session2 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

The Resilient Home

What are the basic characteristics of a resilient home? In a changing world that is both unsustainable and unpredictable, how well are the occupants’ needs–for food, water, heat, waste treatment, electrical power and communications–met? What aspects of the community support resilience? Two professionals will present examples of their thinking about how to embody resilience in our homes and communities. We’ll also examine the balance between good design and human behavior in envisioning resilience.

By the Numbers: Energy Data in MF Rehab/Retrofit

By the numbers: Energy hog or skinny cow? This hand-picked panel will discuss total energy use in multifamily buildings including existing buildings and those that have undergone energy retrofits. Speakers will provide data from NH, MA, VT and NY projects including benchmarking numbers, actual savings realized by multifamily buildings and retrofit cost data.

Large Zero Net Energy Projects: Successful Design & Delivery Approaches

Most Zero Net Energy projects completed to date have been houses. As the scale of ZNE projects increases, greater design challenges promise exciting new concepts for advanced high performance buildings. What makes large ZNE buildings fly? This session presents successful strategies for overcoming design and delivery challenges, including architectural integration, energy load reduction, systems selection, life cycle costing, regulatory permitting, and integrated project delivery. Participants will review conceptual ideas, energy modeling, and BIM documentation for Architerra-led projects in Massachusetts, New York and New Hampshire, gaining an understanding of critical choices and key decisions.

Efficiency, Durability or History: Pick Two?

Historic buildings make our cities livable and attractive. Almost by definition, they’re resilient — otherwise they would not have survived this long. But they’re also energy hogs, by the standards of what NESEA practitioners try to design and build. Adding insulation on the inside can compromise exterior durability; adding insulation to the exterior compromises history; not adding insulation at all burdens the stewards of these buildings with high operating costs and large carbon footprints. What’s the best balance of these three priorities of efficiency, durability, and history? This important and far-ranging conversation between two of our greatest thinkers about historic preservation may not give you any easy answers, but you’ll come out with a much keener sense of the right questions to be asking in your preservation practice.

Resilient Urban Waterways

Established on its estuary in 1630, Boston has become one of the most vital urban centers in the United States, and yet suffers from unresolved challenges with its waterways and harbor, exacerbated by global climate change and sea level rise. Protecting the integrity and restoring the ecology of Boston’s watersheds and waterfronts is an essential ingredient in assuring the resiliency of the City and the opportunity for a thriving Boston Harbor into the future.

Maintaining a Secure and Resilient Electric Grid

This session reviews the drivers behind the need for grid resilience such as climate disruption, possible cyberattacks, the growing complexity of the electric system and other issues around grid reliability. Microgrids hold the promise to improve grid performance by integrating distributed demand and supply options with “smart grid” technologies. Systematic design is needed to overcome conflicting business interests and incentives in order to produce highperformance buildings integrated with efficient microgrids.

Managing Heat, Water, Vapor, Air and Light

Learn the basics of selecting a home’s mechanical systems to provide comfort and efficiency. Learn how building enclosure efficiency affects the system choices you make. Learn a process to choose the best overall heating, cooling, hot water and ventilation system to optimize comfort and energy savings. By the end of the session, you will understand the basic components of the mechanical systems for a home, and will have a tool to guide the discussion of the choices that must be made. Examples will be presented of some typical mechanical systems choices for efficient homes.

Advanced Water Issues: What the Pros Can Teach You

Water usage and management is not just a building decision, but as we saw in recent widespread droughts, it’s a statewide and regional issue. The water that we use and often do not reuse in our homes is small in comparison to some of the other water we don’t consider in our daily consumption, such as washing cars and watering lawns. Lifestyle choices can negate all the savings you get from your 1.1 gallon shower head. Learn both ends of the water use and conservation balance with these two professionals who live and breathe water.

Air Source Heat Pumps

Modern air source heat pumps are much more versatile than older generations, and even in colder climates they’ve become a viable alternative to fossil-fuel heating systems. The session will discuss configuration, challenges, and performance of these systems in several different applications and building types.

Investment in Sustainable Building Pays for Itself

First cost financing drives development, but operating costs stay with the building forever. Homeowner’s Rehab, Inc., in diligently tracking post occupancy energy consumption on all of its buildings, has gained valuable information which has informed design decisions on new projects and exposed issues in completed projects that would normally go undiscovered.

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nesea.org/buildingenergy 10

TRACKS AND SPONSORS TRACK 1

Room AND TRACK CHAIRS

SESSION SPEAKERS

Cityview 1 Track chairs Rachel White, Greener Every Day Jonathan Kantar, Sage Builders

Session Speakers:

TRACK 2

Harborview 1 Track chairs Heather Nolen, Steven Winter Associates, Inc. F.L. Andrew Padian, The Community Preservation Corporation

Session Speakers:

TRACK 3

Waterfront 2 Track chairs Laura Notman, Architect Kristen Simmons, Kristen Simmons Architects

Session Speakers:

TRACK 4

Harborview 3 Track chairs Robert Leaver, New Commons Bernice Radle, Buffalo Energy

Session Speakers:

TRACK 5

Cityview 2 Track chairs Jess Lerner, Green on the Inside Jamie Wolf, Wolfworks, Inc.

Session Speakers:

TRACK 6

beacon hill complex Track chairs Bill Stillinger, PV Squared Rob Meyers, South Mountain Company

Session Speakers:

TRACK 7

Waterfront 3 Track chairs Matt Root, Conservation Services Group Satpal Kaur, Chris Benedict R.A.

Session Speakers:

TRACK 8

Cutting Edge: What the Pros Want to Know

harborview 2 Track chairs Marie McMahon-Meehan, National Grid Mark Price, Sustainable Energy Analytics

Session Speakers:

TRACK 9

cambridge complex

Session Speakers:

Homes

Multifamily

Commercial/Institutional

Retrofit for Resilience – Cities

Whole Systems in Action

Renewables: On the Grid and On Your Building

Fundamentals

High Performance Mechanicals Track chairs Robb Aldrich, Steven Winter Associates, Inc. & Ventilation David Stecher, IBACOS Inc.

TRACK 10

Moving the Marketplace

11

| BuildingEnergy 13

skyline Track chairs Mitch Anthony, Titanium Alexis Miles, Consultant

Chair: Brian Butler, Boston Green Building Linda Wigington, Affordable Comfort Greg Pedrick, NYSERDA Matt Berges, Environmental Health Watch Chair: Andrew D’Agostino, The Community Preservation Corporation Tom Vitale, En-Tech Associates, Inc., PE Syracuse NY Brody Vance, Franklin Energy Services Chair: Kristen Simmons, Kristen Simmons Architects Coreina Chan and Kendra Tupper, Rocky Mountain Institute

Chair: Robert Leaver, New Commons Steve Hammer, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a roundtable of experts

Chair: Jesse Selman, Coldham & Hartman Architects Kate Stephenson, Yestermorrow Jacob Deva Racusin, New Frameworks Natural Building Megan McNally, Rusted Grain Frank van Mierlo, 1366 Technologies Dan Leary, Power Owners, Inc.

Andy Shapiro, Energy Balance

Chair: Ian Finlayson, MA Department of Energy Resources Michael Blasnik, M. Blasnik and Associates

Chair: Lois Arena, Steven Winter Associates, Inc. Tom Butcher, Brookhaven National Laboratory

Session Speakers:

Chuck Schwartz, LI Green

3/6/13 WEDNESDAY SESSION DESCRIPTIONS

session3 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Taking Deep Energy Retrofits to Scale

What is the potential for the Deep Energy Retrofit (DER) as a market rate solution for existing housing, especially affordable housing? Are there other scalable paths to achieving deep reductions in home energy use? This session will review barriers and opportunities on a broad scale. Presenters will share lessons learned from The Thousand Home Challenge, NYSERDA’s DER program in New York, and an Environmental Health Watch study of DERs in leasepurchase housing in northeast Ohio.

Blower Door Use in Multifamily (MF) Buildings

Two distinct methods for employing blower doors in multifamily buildings exist: one involving multiple doors and many staff members supporting a buildingwide whole building tightness test before and after; the second involving individually pre-and post-testing apartments and individually airsealing them. Learn the tips and tricks of both methods from these seasoned field professionals.

The Portfolio Challenge – How to Scale DERs Across Multiple Buildings

In this panel presentation, Rocky Mountain Institute shares the results of its 2012 Portfolio Energy Retrofit Challenge. The Challenge is a coordinated effort with partners New Buildings Institute and True Market Solution to work with six office and retail portfolios and determine a portfolio-wide strategy for implementing deep energy savings. An interactive Q&A session (min. 30 minutes) will follow the panel presentation Context: Many building portfolio owners are saving energy in their buildings by replacing individual technologies and components with more efficient products. This one-for-one replacement leaves savings on the table. Owners could achieve deeper savings, but it is daunting figure out how to do that across a portfolio. Established management practices don’t support the added consideration of energy and building owners often to think of energy management as a complication. Owners don’t know what’s possible in their buildings. How low can their energy use go? What reduction goals are reasonable? What’s the best way to phase improvements across buildings? How should owners prioritize?

Avoiding Disaster: Resource Resilience in Energy Systems

We’ve got three feet of storm-surge water over a hundred city blocks. We’ve got a half-dozen really angry high-level people with conflicting priorities in the same room trying to fix things: City Hall, the utilities, engineer, architect, developer, and tenant associations. Even worse, we’ve put an MIT energy planning professor in charge. What happens when the arguing and finger-pointing stops and they get to work on solutions? What can we learn about how we should be designing our future buildings and energy systems in cities?

Resilient Capacity

This session explores examples of how community engagement can build our skill base, redevelop regional-based trades, and empower under-served and disenfranchised populations to have a role in the development of climate change resilient homes and neighborhoods. We will introduce strategies that focus not just on building materials, methods, and energy sources, but our personal practitioner challenges and successes working collaboratively with people, owners, and community to create resilient communities in an era of climatic uncertainty.

The Frontiers of Renewable Resource Technology

Refinements in our use of the all-important solar energy resource continue today in ways that improve its efficient conversion and storage, moving us closer to a clean energy future. This session presents innovators focused on new designs for solar and wind energy technologies and advanced battery and other storage. Rather than survey “what’s cooking in the laboratory”, the speakers are leading technological solutions that are advanced enough to attract serious commercial interest.

Mechanical Systems

Learn the basics of selecting a home’s mechanical systems to provide comfort and efficiency. Learn how building enclosure efficiency affects the system choices you make. Learn a process to choose the best overall heating, cooling, hot water and ventilation system to optimize comfort and energy savings. By the end of the session, you will understand the basic components of the mechanical systems for a home, and will have a tool to guide the discussion of the choices that must be made. Examples will be presented of some typical mechanical systems choices for efficient homes.

Measured Retrofit Results: 10 Simple Things That Work, 10 Simple Things That Don’t

Measured results from common energy efficiency retrofits and energy savings actions are hard to find. This session will summarize the results of many large scale impact evaluations based on billing data as well as smaller scale research projects that demonstrate the real world savings from a range of efficiency measures. Many commonly recommended measures and actions have a poor track record of savings while others work as expected. Potential explanations for the results will be discussed, while claims of rebound effect will be exposed as mostly scapegoating.

Getting the Most from Condensing Boilers

High-efficiency, condensing boilers have been available in the U.S. since the 1990’s and are now common in the residential market, but in many instances they are not achieving consistent condensing performance levels. This presentation outlines key findings from both laboratory tests and long-term field evaluations and will provide guidance in system design and configuration to optimize safe, reliable, and efficient boiler performance.

Creation of a Mass Market for Energy Efficiency on Long Island

LI Green’s methodology is based around research findings that have identified solutions to key resistance points that homeowners have when considering investing capital to make energy improvements to their residences. They have found that client buy-in and understanding is greatly enhanced with the participation of “Community Energy Coordinators” – people who act as impartial technical liaisons. This information could help other communities implement successful energy efficiency programs.

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nesea.org/buildingenergy 12

GENERATING NEW IDEAS TRACKS AND SPONSORS TRACK 1

Room AND TRACK CHAIRS

SESSION SPEAKERS

Cityview 1 Track chairs Rachel White, Greener Every Day Jonathan Kantar, Sage Builders

Session Speakers:

TRACK 2

Harborview 1 Track chairs Heather Nolen, Steven Winter Associates, Inc. F.L. Andrew Padian, The Community Preservation Corporation

Session Speakers:

TRACK 3

Waterfront 2 Track chairs Laura Notman, Architect Kristen Simmons, Kristen Simmons Architects

Session Speakers:

TRACK 4

Harborview 3 Track chairs Robert Leaver, New Commons Bernice Radle, Buffalo Energy

Session Speakers:

TRACK 5

Cityview 2 Track chairs Jess Lerner, Green on the Inside Jamie Wolf, Wolfworks, Inc.

Session Speakers:

TRACK 6

beacon hill complex Track chairs Bill Stillinger, PV Squared Rob Meyers, South Mountain Company

Session Speakers:

TRACK 7

Waterfront 3 Track chairs Matt Root, Conservation Services Group Satpal Kaur, Chris Benedict R.A.

Session Speakers:

TRACK 8

Cutting Edge: What the Pros Want to Know

harborview 2 Track chairs Marie McMahon-Meehan, National Grid Mark Price, Sustainable Energy Analytics

Session Speakers:

TRACK 9

cambridge complex

Session Speakers:

Homes

Multifamily

Commercial/Institutional

Retrofit for Resilience – Cities

Whole Systems in Action

Renewables: On the Grid and On Your Building

Fundamentals

High Performance Mechanicals Track chairs Robb Aldrich, Steven Winter Associates, Inc. & Ventilation David Stecher, IBACOS Inc.

TRACK 10

Moving the Marketplace

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| BuildingEnergy 13

skyline Track chairs Mitch Anthony, Titanium Alexis Miles, Consultant

Chair: Kerry Koskinen, RetroFuture Remodeling Ben Brungraber, Fire Tower Engineered Timber Len Morse-Fortier, Simpson, Gumpertz and Heger

Chair: Alison Keay, The Jordan Institute Darien Crimmin, WinnCompanies William Zoeller, Steven Winter Associates, Inc. F.L. Andrew Padian, The Community Preservation Corporation Chair: Laura Notman, Architect David Del Rossi and Jackie Henke, TD Bank

Chair: Bernice Radle, Buffalo Energy Chris Mason, City of Northampton Sustainability Coordinator Catherine Tumber, author of Small, Gritty and Green Chris Hawley, City Planner in Buffalo, NY. Chair: Jamie Wolf, Wolfworks David Foley, Holland & Foley Architects Anamarija Frankic, Green Harbors Project Chair: Rob Meyers, South Mountain Company Jason Gifford, Sustainable Energy Advantage Stephen Kaufman, Clean Asset Partners Kevin Quilliam, SREC Trade Bruce Harley, Conservation Services Group

Chair: Mark Price, Sustainable Energy Analytics John Straube, Building Science Corp. / University of Waterloo

Chair: Robb Aldrich, Steven Winter Associates, Inc. Grant Salmon, Steven Winter Associates, Inc. Larry Harmon, Air Barrier Solutions

Session Speakers:

Chair: Lisa Hiserodt, Sustainable Endowments Inst./LEEF Network Dennis Carlberg, Boston University Sarah Hammond Creighton, Office of Sustainability, Endicott College Jenna Ide, MA Department of Capital Asset Management Joseph LaRusso, City of Boston

3/7/13 THURSDAY

SESSION DESCRIPTIONS

session4 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Standing Up to Extreme Weather

The changing climate and growing frequency of extreme weather events present enormous challenges to our homes. As we retrofit and build for high performance, how can we ensure that homes can stand up to heavier snowfall, flooding, higher winds and the like? In this session two structural engineers will share their insights—based on years of experience building durable wood structures and investigating building failures—on best practices for designing resilient and high performing homes.

Multifamily Rehab: LEED, WAP, and DER

This session will explore three distinct styles of affordable housing retrofit for durability, efficiency, and comfort. The first will be a deep energy retrofit of a large Boston MF property. The second, a LEED retrofit of a CT Housing Authority building and the third, a standard weatherization retrofit of a housing authority complex in upstate NY. Presenters will discuss the pre- and post-energy usage in comparison to the projections, and why they succeeded or failed.

Bringing Net-Zero Energy from Design to Operations

In this session we’ll share the story of TD Bank’s first net zero energy store located in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Since it opened in May of 2011 we’ve monitored its actual performance compared to modeled performance to ensure we’re tracking at net zero energy. What makes this presentation unique is that we’ll share the lessons learned that we encountered as we looked at the monthly consumption of this store location comparing modeled versus actual performance and the modifications we made to systems from interior and exterior lighting, HVAC systems and plug load impacts. We’ll share the small items that made a large difference, but are not picked up in typical commissioning efforts, and the differences we found between our modeling assumptions and actual conditions to help shine a light on these items so the audience members leave with real take away data to bring back to their projects.

What Small Cities are Doing… Buffalo, NY and Northampton, MA

Big cities too often get the spotlight when it comes to sustainability, but there are a lot of really cool, innovative things happening in our smaller cities that we need to know about. From creative zoning codes, solar initiatives, food production, sustainable community planning and promoting energy efficiency city-wide, smaller cities are taking the lead and continue to raise the bar. Learn about how Buffalo is overhauling its zoning code and how Northampton is promoting green communities and why the smaller cities are small, gritty and green.

Systems Literacy: What You Didn’t Know You Knew!

Systems thinking employs visual, verbal, and mathematical tools to look beneath the surface of events to the systemic structures beneath. Using these tools allows us to find where real leverage can be applied to best effect. We’ll apply these useful tools to familiar challenges in design, engineering, and construction, learning how to make effective use of this knowledge in our daily practice.

REC Markets Across the Northeast

The creation and trading of Renewable Energy Credits (RECs) are essential to the financing, development, and operation of clean energy projects today. Exactly how they function varies according to a state’s policies and regulations. This session will present an overview of REC activity today. Speakers actively involved in REC aggregating and trading will address the strengths and weaknesses of the several REC markets that have emerged in the northeast.

Energy Calculations for Everyone

In order to understand energy use, a little math can go a long way. Do you know how much energy your home uses, or how it compares with similar homes? Do you know how the R-value of insulation relates to the R-value of a wall or roof assembly? This session will introduce some critical numbers and calculations to address basic energy use in buildings. Participants will receive a framework that will allow them to be informed when making design choices. Not everyone likes numbers, but to paraphrase Lewis Carroll’s Cheshire Cat: if you don’t know where you’re going, any road will take you there. In order to define high performance, one needs to use concrete metrics; in order to design for high performance, one needs to use the right inputs. This session will help participants understand the inputs and the metrics in a way that the most math-phobic participants will feel comfortable with.

How Much is Too Much?

Used to be that the answer to “How do I increase building energy performance?” was to add insulation and do more air-sealing, just about every time. Now with growing code minimums, lower renewable energy costs, and an acceptance of super insulation, a more careful analysis may be justified. Building component insulation, airtightness, window performance, renewable energy costs, occupant life style and mechanical system efficiencies all need to be considered. When is “more insulation” too much? What are the best mechanical and renewable systems? How should occupants be factored in? This session will revisit some popular assumptions about how to design the optimal energy efficient home.

Multifamily Ventilation Challenges

Ventilation in multifamily buildings can be tricky. As buildings get taller, pressures can get crazy. This session will focus on analyses of high-rise apartment buildings including mapping of complex pressure patterns, airflow networks, and interactions between envelopes and mechanical systems. Discussion will combine the results of the studies with the existing peer-reviewed body of knowledge and highlight strategies which may prove effective in the design, construction, and operation of tall multifamily buildings, as well as a discussion of potential retrofit solutions.

Leaders in Energy Efficiency Financing

According to a March 2012 report by Deutsche Bank Climate Change Advisors and The Rockefeller Foundation, investing $279 billion in building retrofits in the United States could “yield more than $1 trillion of energy savings over 10 years.” Developing a return-oriented approach to capturing savings generated by energy efficiency projects insures long term capital for re-investing in future efficiency opportunities. Public agencies and educational institutions are leading the way in energy efficiency financing by implementing creative strategies that put efficiency savings back to work.

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nesea.org/buildingenergy 14

TRACKS AND SPONSORS TRACK 1

Room AND TRACK CHAIRS

SESSION SPEAKERS

Cityview 1 Track chairs Rachel White, Greener Every Day Jonathan Kantar, Sage Builders

Session Speakers:

TRACK 2

Harborview 1 Track chairs Heather Nolen, Steven Winter Associates, Inc. F.L. Andrew Padian, The Community Preservation Corporation

Session Speakers:

TRACK 3

Waterfront 2 Track chairs Laura Notman, Architect Kristen Simmons, Kristen Simmons Architects

Session Speakers:

TRACK 4

Harborview 3 Track chairs Robert Leaver, New Commons Bernice Radle, Buffalo Energy

Session Speakers:

TRACK 5

Cityview 2 Track chairs Jess Lerner, Green on the Inside Jamie Wolf, Wolfworks, Inc.

Session Speakers:

TRACK 6

beacon hill complex Track chairs Bill Stillinger, PV Squared Rob Meyers, South Mountain Company

Session Speakers:

TRACK 7

Waterfront 3 Track chairs Matt Root, Conservation Services Group Satpal Kaur, Chris Benedict R.A.

Session Speakers:

TRACK 8

Cutting Edge: What the Pros Want to Know

harborview 2 Track chairs Marie McMahon-Meehan, National Grid Mark Price, Sustainable Energy Analytics

Session Speakers:

TRACK 9

cambridge complex

Session Speakers:

Homes

Multifamily

Commercial/Institutional

Retrofit for Resilience – Cities

Whole Systems in Action

Renewables: On the Grid and On Your Building

Fundamentals

High Performance Mechanicals Track chairs Robb Aldrich, Steven Winter Associates, Inc. & Ventilation David Stecher, IBACOS Inc.

TRACK 10

Moving the Marketplace

15

| BuildingEnergy 13

skyline Track chairs Mitch Anthony, Titanium Alexis Miles, Consultant

Chair: Andrew Webster, Coldham & Hartman Architects Peter Troast, Energy Circle Kohta Ueno, Building Science Corporation Peter Warren, Warren Construction Chair: Erica Suarino, Steven Winter Associates, Inc. Bomee Jung and Brian Cheigh, Enterprise Community Partners, NYC Office

Chair: Carolyn Sarno, NEEP Peter Fourtounis, LEED AP, Elkis Manfredi Architects Eric Friedman, DOER

Chair: Bernice Radle, Buffalo Energy Hilary Beber, NYC Mayor’s Office of Long-Term Planning and Sustainability Lesley Patrick, CUNY’s Institute for Sustainability Chair: Amelia Amon, Alt. Technica Justin Good, the Sanctuary at Shepardsfield Elizabeth DiSalvo, Trillium Architects Chair: Paul Gromer, Peregrine Energy Group Carrie Cullen Hitt, SEIA Timothy Roughan, National Grid

David Keefe, Vermont Energy Investment Corporation

Lew Harriman, Mason-Grant Consulting Bill Rose, University of Illinois

Chair: Robb Aldrich, Steven Winter Associates, Inc. Everett Barber Jon Child, PV Squared Craig Robertson, Heliocentrix, Inc.

Session Speakers:

Sadie McKeown, The Community Preservation Corporation Dana Bourland,The JPB Foundation

3/7/13 THURSDAY SESSION DESCRIPTIONS

session5 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Historic Preservation Meets Building Science: The Mallett Deep Energy Retrofit

This recently completed project set out to demonstrate the compatibility of historic preservation and deep energy retrofits. The project, a renovation of an 1886 cottage, generated considerable controversy within the historic preservation community. A series of compromises allowed the project to go forward and achieve remarkable air tightness levels. The presenters will review the process associated with planning DERs in historically relevant structures as well as the specifications required to achieve exceptional air tightness.

PartnerPREP: Portfolio-wide Energy Management for Affordable Housing

Enterprise, a national leader in greening affordable housing, launched a program in NYC that attempts to move the market to a new portfolio-based model of energy management. The PartnerPREP program focuses on building the capacity within affordable housing organizations to establish and attain ambitious portfolio-wide energy management goals. This program bridges the need for simplification and coordination for the housing owners while cultivating a pipeline of retrofit, preventative maintenance, and training opportunities for energy efficiency vendors.

Case Study: The North Shore Community College Health Professions and Student Services Building: Campus Zero Net Energy Case study presentation on the design and operation of the Commonwealth’s first state funded ZNEB. A 58,700 SF academic building which houses the North Shore Community College’s Allied Health Professionals Programs, it includes laboratory spaces, classrooms, offices and assembly spaces.The Health Professions building, at the time of the opening dedication in the fall of 2011, was the second largest building project in the country designed to achieve a Zero Net Energy goal. In this session, we will begin by discussing the policy decisions of the Commonwealth to raise the standard on high performance building design and the impact on public projects. For pre-occupancy, a critical look at the design strategies used to conserve, reduce, and generate on-site energy will reveal major challenges the team faced during the design process. This exploration questions the effectiveness of the strategies and tools for predicting energy consumption vs. production.

Planning for Resilience and Rebuilding in an Era of Climate Change: The NYC Response

Cities across the country are developing sustainability and resilience plans that address the challenges of climate change. NYC is a city of islands with nearly 600 miles of coastline and the majority of its carbon footprint (75%) embedded in buildings. Buoyed by their concern of rising tides in low-lying areas, NYC has developed a multipronged approach to respond to rising temperatures and tides. Learn from two experienced speakers about NYC’s vulnerability to climate change and the multifaceted approach to changing the City’s carbon footprint.

Sensing Resiliency

Just as strong, healthy bodies look and feel better, thriving, diverse ecosystems are more beautiful, sonorous, temperate, and adaptable. How can we employ our sensory abilities in design for resiliency? How can multi-sensational, quality-of-life strategies improve our bloated buildings, unstable infrastructure, and disconnected communities? Can a lean, fit, elegant aesthetic make resiliency more appealing than emergency preparedness? We’re inviting your input on how resiliency appears, sounds, smells, tastes, and feels.

Interconnections, Net Metering and Caps

Differing perspectives claim that regulated utilities are either enablers of grid-connected renewable energy or obstructionists to its orderly deployment. This session discusses three current issues: reliably interconnecting solar generators to the existing distribution (or transmission) system; the ability of hosts to obtain retail credit for their kWhs irrespective of local demand; and the rationale behind establishing a ‘cap’ on the total amount of non-dispatchable generation that can be safely accommodated on the grid.

Building as a System

A building is more than walls, floors and a roof. It is a system balanced with invisible underlying connections similar to a human body. An improvement to one part of a building can sometimes cause unanticipated effects on another part of the building system. This session focuses on becoming able to predict and/or diagnose these effects, primarily in order to prevent the negative ones. No prior technical knowledge is needed.

Should Building Codes Regulate Humidity and Moisture in Buildings? What’s Important, What’s Not… and How To Decide.

The cost of moisture-related problems in buildings has exceeded billions of dollars in the last ten years. According to credible research, dampness-related health effects has cost the public tens of millions of dollars in financial terms, not to mention the emotional cost of financial pressures and building disruption. On the other hand, was any of this necessary? What do we really know about the effects of moisture in buildings? How can we be sure they are as bad as we think? …And if they really cause such expensive and disruptive problems, shouldn’t we prevent them through building codes? What code requirements would prevent the observed problems? This presentation will explore the issues and suggest ways to proceed with respect to managing humidity and moisture in buildings.

The Sun and Thermal Loads

Using the sun to heat people, spaces, and water is centuries old. Three practitioners with decades of experience will discuss the role of solar heating in modern buildings. Does solar space heating make sense? When, and how? How about water heating? How does active solar thermal compare to PV-powered heat pumps? The panel will give their perspectives on when “solar heating” makes sense and how it’s best accomplished.

Green Financing 101

With all of the magic tricks (ESCO, PACE) predicted for years as the way to finance energy efficiency, affordable housing has followed weatherization and subsidies. Meanwhile, both affordable and market rate housing have found refinancing to be the best tool for investing in energy efficiency. Hear about the process and some case studies to see how easily this works.

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nesea.org/buildingenergy 16

TRACKS AND SPONSORS TRACK 1

Room AND TRACK CHAIRS

SESSION SPEAKERS

Cityview 1 Track chairs Rachel White, Greener Every Day Jonathan Kantar, Sage Builders

Session Speakers:

TRACK 2

Harborview 1 Track chairs Heather Nolen, Steven Winter Associates, Inc. F.L. Andrew Padian, The Community Preservation Corporation

Session Speakers:

TRACK 3

Waterfront 2 Track chairs Laura Notman, Architect Kristen Simmons, Kristen Simmons Architects

Session Speakers:

TRACK 4

Harborview 3 Track chairs Robert Leaver, New Commons Bernice Radle, Buffalo Energy

Session Speakers:

TRACK 5

Cityview 2 Track chairs Jess Lerner, Green on the Inside Jamie Wolf, Wolfworks, Inc.

Session Speakers:

TRACK 6

beacon hill complex Track chairs Bill Stillinger, PV Squared Rob Meyers, South Mountain Company

Session Speakers:

TRACK 7

Waterfront 3 Track chairs Matt Root, Conservation Services Group Satpal Kaur, Chris Benedict R.A.

Session Speakers:

TRACK 8

Cutting Edge: What the Pros Want to Know

harborview 2 Track chairs Marie McMahon-Meehan, National Grid Mark Price, Sustainable Energy Analytics

Session Speakers:

TRACK 9

cambridge complex

Session Speakers:

Homes

Multifamily

Commercial/Institutional

Retrofit for Resilience – Cities

Whole Systems in Action

Renewables: On the Grid and On Your Building

Fundamentals

High Performance Mechanicals Track chairs Robb Aldrich, Steven Winter Associates, Inc. & Ventilation David Stecher, IBACOS Inc.

TRACK 10

Moving the Marketplace

17

| BuildingEnergy 13

skyline Track chairs Mitch Anthony, Titanium Alexis Miles, Consultant

Chair: Mike Duclos, DEAP Energy Group Alan Gibson and Matt O’Malia, GO Logic

Chair: Heather Nolen, Steven Winter Associates, Inc. Michael Bobker, Building Performance Lab, CUNY Institute for Urban Systems Les Bluestone, Blue Sea Development Company, LLC Lee Vardakas, Aegis Energy Services Inc. Adam Cohen, Structures Design/Build, LLC

Chair: Robert Leaver, New Commons Elizabeth Humstone and Margarita Iglesia Boston Architectural College Chair: Jess Lerner, Green on the Inside Peter Larson, Ashley McGraw Architects David Foley, Holland & Foley Architects

Chair: Joel Gordes, Environmental Energy Solutions Adam Thurrell, PV Squared James Dunn, Future Solar Systems LLC

Chair: Kristina Eldrenkamp, Albert, Righter & Tittman Architects, Inc. Chris Briley, Green Design Studio Phil Kaplan, Kaplan Thompson Architects Chair: Andy Shapiro, Energy Balance, Inc. Eberhard Paul, The Paul Company

Chair: David Stecher, IBACOS Duncan Prahl, IBACOS

Session Speakers:

David Gabrielson, PACENow Jessica Bailey, CT Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority (CEFIA)

3/7/13 THURSDAY SESSION DESCRIPTIONS

session6 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

Passive House Standard: Suitability for the Mainstream Market

The passive house standard is a new and important standard for building energy performance and sustainability. But is it suitable for mainstream construction? The presenters address this question by presenting one year of monitored performance data for two certified passive houses, and sharing progress on a 36-unit, clustered, pedestrian-based co-housing development built to the passive house standard. This project is potentially the largest passive house standard production housing development in North America.

Combined Heat and Power (CHP) for Multifamily Buildings

Want to know how well CHP works in multifamily buildings? Listen to owner/developers, experts and CHP technicians explain the ins and outs of how CHP works and why it works well in multifamily buildings. Speakers have years of experience operating CHPs in their buildings and will share why they chose it and how it has worked for their building.

Case Studies for Three Completed Commercial Passive House Projects

1. The Center for Energy Efficient Design: the first Passive House Public School, completed in November 2010, including 2 years monitored data. 2. The Malcolm Rosenberg Center for Jewish Life at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, VA: a mixed use assembly building with a complex usage pattern and significantly different zoning requirements. The final solution uses the elegant minimalism of German principles while maintaining the US comfort requirements. 3. Two 40,000 SF dormitories at Emory and Henry College in Emory, Virginia : Elm Hall, a standard construction building completed in 2010 and converted to Passive House, and Hickory Hall, now under construction on the same quad as Elm Hall.

Using LEED Neighborhood Development Standards to Drive Neighborhood Retrofits

The neighborhood serves as the context for what gets built. This session will demonstrate how LEED-ND standards are applied to do retrofits in neighborhoods. Examples include neighborhoods in Maine, Massachusetts, New Jersey and Ontario. The specific LEED standards we will examine in practice: Smart Location and Linking, Neighborhood Planning and Design, and Green Infrastructure and Building – including water and energy provision and discharge. Specific foci include: redevelopment, mixing uses, increasing density, transportation, energy grid and bringing nature into the city.

Acting Like It’s Tomorrow Today: The Future as our Client

History is filled with futures that never were, based on the momentum of the present. The future is notoriously fickle to predict, so let’s experiment. Bring your creativity to paint some desirable, dynamic, and resilient futures together. What do they look like, and how do they work? We’ll then trace them back to our present selves and ask, “What can we do today to create that tomorrow?”

Stand-Alone vs. Grid-Connected PV Systems

With increasing frequency, severe weather events have been disrupting conventional electric service. How did actual PV systems perform during such events? We discuss the merits of PV systems operating when tied to the grid or independent of it; options for backup generators and energy storage; wiring schematics acceptable to electrical inspectors and the utility; and a summary of the current costs of alternative configurations.

The Green Architects’ Lounge – “Sprout Follies”

Doing something new often does not go perfectly the first time. That doesn’t mean you shouldn’t do it. Join the entertaining hosts of the Green Architect’s Lounge podcasts (sans cocktail recipe and song of the show) as they talk about beginner follies when building high performance buildings. Chris and Phil will discuss the fundamentals of “green” design for building and design professionals share how to avoid others’ mistakes, and answer many questions from the audience.

Heat Recovery Devices: Evaluation Criteria for Equipment Efficiency and Heating in a Passive House

For Passive House practitioners and others involved in high-performance buildings, evaluating the actual efficiency of heat- and energy-recovery ventilators has been a source of ongoing confusion and bewilderment, especially when trying to compare North American and European units. Eberhard Paul, one of Europe’s top authorities on Heat Recovery Ventilators, will delve in to their key elements in order to understand the parameters of efficiency and effectiveness. Understanding what makes an HRV or ERV efficient, as well as the requirements for Passive House (PHI) certification, will help to understand how and why the amount of energy recovered translates in to energy saved. Eberhard will also relate efficiency and design to the impacts of comfort and health in energy efficient homes.

Simplified Space Conditioning for Low-Load Homes

As home heating and cooling loads get smaller and smaller, can builders save on HVAC equipment costs? Does heating and cooling need to be delivered to all spaces in a very low-load home? Through modeling and field tests, researchers have investigated low-load homes with HVAC systems with limited or no distribution. Speakers will review findings including cost savings, comfort implications, and recommendations on when and how to implement simple HVAC strategies.

PACE Financing: Progress and Case Studies

Buildings use nearly half the energy we consume in the United States, and close to 75% of the electricity, so strategies to meaningfully reduce our reliance on fossil fuels must address our existing homes, commercial, and industrial buildings. PACE shows great promise as a financing strategy that can scale EE/RE upgrades to buildings, and PACE programs are launching nationwide to meet state and local government goals to conserve energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. David Gabrielson, the Executive Director of PACENow, a national non-profit advocate for PACE, and Jessica Bailey, who heads Connecticut’s state-sponsored commercial PACE program, will bring us up to date on the progress being made, address lessons learned in this dynamic market, and answer questions.

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nesea.org/buildingenergy 18

3/7/13 THURSDAY

session7 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM CLOSING FORUM: What will be the hot topics at BE25? TRACK AND SPONSORS

Room AND TRACK CHAIRS

SESSION SPEAKERS

CLOSING FORUM

CITYVIEW 1 & 2 Track chair

Session Speakers:

John Straube, Building Science Corporation Martin Holladay, Green Building Advisor and other experts

Paul Eldrenkamp, Byggmeister

SESSION DESCRIPTION What will be the hot topics at BE25?

The final session of the day will wrap up everything we learned at BE13 by forcing us to think out loud about where all our new-gained knowledge is taking us. The format: Six NESEA thought leaders will work within the pecha kucha framework to offer their predictions regarding what we’ll be grappling with in the sessions and workshops at Building Energy in March, 2025. This will followed by a period of quick-paced audience discussion. The 90 minutes will then wrap with a compelling preview of NESEA, 12 years hence. This closing session will offer an engaged response to the too-rarely asked question: “Just where are we going with all of this?”

Live Demo Stages at the Trade Show Wednesday March 6, 10:30AM –5:30PM | Thursday March 7, 10:00 AM –4:00 PM Complete descriptions at nesea.org/buildingenergy/tradeshow/demonstrations

Wednesday March 6, 2013

thursday March 7, 2013

stage 1 – off the 400 aisle

stage 2 – off the 1100 aisle

stage 1 – off the 400 aisle

stage 2 – off the 1100 aisle

10:30am – High Performance Strawbale Walls

9am – LED Lighting LM79 and LM80 Standards

9:30am – Dense Pack Cellulose

Jacob Racusin and Ace McArleton

Steven Rosen

11:30am – Penetration Air Sealing

10am – Infrared Diagnostic Imaging

10:30am – Penetration Air Sealing

11am – PV mounting on various roof materials

11:30am – DER Wrap n strap

Stage 1 begins at 11AM

11Am – Dense Pack Cellulose Installation Prep

Bill Hulstrunk and Chris White 12pm – Infrared Diagnostic Imaging

Flemming Lund

Ken Levenson

12:30pm – Duct sealing techniques

Eric Wilder and Will D’Arrigo

Flemming Lund

Chris White and Bill Hulstrunk

Ken Levenson

David Joyce and Gary Bergeron

1pm –Air Sealing Tapes and Compatible Substrates

1:30pm – Stump the energy nerds

Christopher Derby Kilfoyle and Phillipe Rigollaud

2:30pm – PV mounting on various roof materials

12pm – fluid applied window flashing to passive house standards

12:30pm – Stump the energy nerds

2pm – Data Loggers/Monitoring

1pm – LED Lighting – LM79 and LM80 Standards

3:30pm – DER Wrap n Strap

Steven Rosen

1:30pm – High performance strawbale walls

4:30pm – Cool Passive House Gadgets

2pm – Air sourced heat pumps

2:30pm – Duct sealing techniques

Peter Yost and Dave Gauthier Scott Ellis 3pm – TBA 4pm – Liquid Applied Weather Resistant Barrier

Joe Studer

5pm – Blower Door Rodeo

Craig Marden and Brad Cook

Martin Holladay

Christopher Derby Kilfoyle and Phillipe Rigollaud

David Joyce and Gary Bergeron Katrin Klingenberg

Rick Nortz

Martin Holladay

Jacob Racusin and Ace McArleton

Eric Wilder and Will D’Arrigo

3pm – Data loggers/monitoring

Scott Ellis

Demo Stage Coordinators – Thank you, Bruce Coldham, Coldham & Hartman Architects, and Ben Graham, Natural Design Build! 19

| BuildingEnergy 13

Featured Speakers at BuildingEnergy13 John Abrams, South Mountain Company and Marjorie Kelly, Tellus Institute Track 5 – Building the Generative Economy John Abrams is co-founder and CEO of South Mountain Company, a 37-year-old employee owned design/build and renewable energy company in West Tisbury, Massachusetts. John’s book “Companies We Keep: Employee Ownership and the Business of Community and Place” was published by Chelsea Green Publishing in 2008. Marjorie Kelly is a fellow at Tellus Institute in Boston, a 35-year-old nonprofit research and development organization, where she was co-founder of Corporation 20/20, a multi-stakeholder initiative to envision and advocate new kinds of enterprises where concern for sustainability and fairness is designed in. Ms. Kelly has a dual appointment as Director of Ownership Strategies with Cutting Edge Capital. She is author of “The Divine Right of Capital,” and “Owning our Future: The Emerging Ownership Revolution,” and will be signing books after her session. Chris Benedict, Chris Benedict RA Track 7 – Managing Heat, Water, Vapor, Air and Light Track 8 – Construction Matters: Enclosure design & commissioning through construction Chris Benedict is a licensed Architect in New York, New Jersey, North Carolina and Washington D.C. She is a graduate of the Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture at The Cooper Union in New York City. Before starting her own architectural firm in 1995, she managed retail, commercial and residential projects for four architectural firms in New York City. Chris is a sought after public speaker and has presented her projects nationally. She teaches about energy efficiency and sustainable practices to architects, engineers, students and Contractors.

Michael Blasnik, M. Blasnik Associates Track 8 – Measured Retrofit Results: 10 Simple Things that Work, 10 Simple Things That Don’t Michael Blasnik is an independent consultant who has been working for 30 years to improve residential energy efficiency. His work has focused on understanding the actual performance of buildings using measured data, including performing many large scale billing analyses of retrofit performance. Mr. Blasnik invented zonal pressure diagnostics, developed the SIMPLE building energy model, and is a member of the RESNET technical committee, ASHRAE, and the editorial advisory board of Home Energy Magazine. Jean Carroon, Fellow American Institute of Architects Track 4 – Efficiency, Durability or History: Pick Two? Jean Carroon is a tireless advocate for stewardship of buildings as the foundation of sustainability, both environmental and social. Jean is the 2012 recipient of The Harley J. McKee Award, the highest honor bestowed by the Association for Preservation Technology International (APT). The award recognizes her significant body of work as a preservation architect, and service as a pioneer in applying sustainabledesign technologies to historic buildings. Coreina Chan & Kendra Tupper, Rocky Mountain Institute Workshop – Trade Secrets for Getting to Deeper Savings in Commercial Buildings Track 3 – The Portfolio Challenge – how to scale DERs across multiple buildings Track 10 – The Power of a Good Story Coreina Chan is a Consultant within RMI’s Buildings Practice, currently focused on accelerating deep energy-saving retrofits in the nation,s existing commercial building portfolio sector. She has helped design teams in a wide range of project types to establish efficiency and design goals, and to ensure effective, integrated design processes.

Kendra Tupper is a Senior Consultant within RMI’s Buildings Practice, currently focused on deep retrofits of existing buildings, whole building energy analysis, energy efficient HVAC design, and life cycle cost analysis (LCCA). At RMI, Kendra has combined project management and technical expertise to drive many deep retrofit projects, including the Empire State Building and the Byron Rogers Federal Office Building. Eberhard Paul Track 8 – Heat Recovery Devices: Evaluation criteria for equipment efficiency and heating in a passive house With 40 years of experience on countless projects throughout Germany and 20 years at the helm of his own engineering firm, Eberhard Paul is a well-known and respected expert in heat recovery systems for Passive House designs. Marc Rosenbaum, South Mountain Company Track 1 – The Resilient Home Marc Rosenbaum is well known in NESEA circles as one who never lets ignorance stand in the way of expressing a firmly held opinion. He is a long time student of making good buildings and continues to be amazed that his clients put up with him. Alex Wilson, BuildingGreen, LLC Workshop – Skills for Building Resilient Communities Alex Wilson is founder of BuildingGreen, Inc., the Brattleboro-based publisher (since 1992) of Environmental Building News, the nation’s oldest and most respected publication on green building. He has written numerous articles on resilience and passive survivability. In 2012 he founded the Resilient Design Institute (resilientdesign.org) to advance the many facets of resilience at personal, community, and regional scales.

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nesea.org/buildingenergy 20

Trade Show Exhibitors

(as of January 18, 2013)

Wednesday March 6, 10:30AM –6:30PM | Thursday March 7, 10:00AM –4:00PM SPONSORS INDICATED IN BOLD

Booth Exhibitor

Booth Exhibitor

Booth Exhibitor

1014 808 755 1046

959 919 909 1014 642 911 935 713 624 450 612 622 1008

1038 1036 650 763 545 646 949 709 925 529 662 620 743 830 618 458 660 810 523 749 545 636 721 828 849 745 860

Affordable Comfort Inc. (ACI) Advanced Solar Products Andelman & Lelek Engineering American Solar Energy Society (ASES) 535 Andersen Windows 640 ATAS International Inc. 739 Berkshire Photovoltaic Services (BPVS) 727 Bieber Windows 654 Boston Architectural College 1020 Boston Society of Architects (BSA) 656 BuildingGreen 466 Building Science Corporation 814 Cantsink Manufacturing 630 Center For EcoTechnology 511 Clean Energy Finance & Investment Authority (CEFIA) 907 Comfort Line Ltd 521 ConEdison Solutions 513 Conservation Services Group 1107 ConVerdant Vehicles 1018 Co-op Power 941 Cotuit Solar LLC 418 Daikin AC - Altherma 638 Delta Products Corp. 614 EFI 644 Electrical Wholesalers Inc. 840 ELKAY 751 Enovative Group, Inc. 711 Enterprise Community Partners, Inc. 729 European Architectural Supply 759 475 High Performance Building Supply 1010 Foundation for a Green Future, Inc. 555 Froling Energy

735 1030 707 717 517 507 408 527 743 917 424 414 846 945 549 965

H. Window Co./Energate Hanley Wood High Profile Monthly Home Energy Magazine/ ACI Huber Engineered Woods LLC Icynene Spray Foam Infrared Diagnostic LLC International Cellulose Corp. Intus Windows KB Racking LED Waves Maine Green Building Supply Marlboro College MBA in Managing for Sustainability Massachusetts Clean Energy Center Massachusetts Multifamily New Construction Program Mitsubishi Electric National Fiber National Grid NESEA NESEA Emerging Professionals New England Concrete Supply LLC New England Fenestration/Unilux New England Homes by Preferred Building Systems New England Real Estate Journal New York State Research & Development Authority (NYSERDA) NextEnergy USA Next Step Living Northwest Manufacturing Inc. / WoodMaster Passive House Alliance United States (PHA-US)

856 852 563 428 559 864 628

Passivhaus Maine Passive House New England Phoenix Composting Toilets Pinnacle Window Solutions Precision Fitness Equipment Progressive Asset Management PROSOCO, Inc. RBI Solar Renewable Sales LLC Schletter Inc. Schock USA, Inc. SIGA Cover Inc. Solar Data Systems, Inc. Solar Design Associates SolarFlair Energy Inc Solar Industry Solaire Generation Solstice Manufacturing Spire Solar Systems Stiebel Eltron, Inc. Sustainable City Network Synergy Construction LLC Systemair The Energy Conservatory Transformations, Inc. Tremco Barrier Solutions Tremco Commercial Sealants & Waterproofing Ultimate Air, Inc. Vantem Panels Viessman Manufacturing Company, Inc. Wagner Solar Inc. Yaro DSI Zehnder America, Inc. Zola European Windows

Add YOUR NAME to our growing list of sponsors and exhibitors for BuildingEnergy14!

If you are interested in sponsoring or exhibiting next year at BuildingEnergy14, please contact NESEA today for our special show rates and early booth selection. Sponsors contact: Jennifer Marrapese, Executive Director 413 774-6051 ext. 23, jmarrapese@nesea.org.

Exhibitors contact: Jenny Spencer, Exhibit Sales Manager 413 774-6051 ext. 25, jspencer@nesea.org.

The electricity for this event has been matched by local, clean wind power through the New England Wind Fund.

21

| BuildingEnergy 13

The Northeast Sustainable Energy Assocation (NESEA) is the leading organization of professionals working in sustainability and whole-systems thinking in the Northeast. NESEA advances the adoption and practical application of sustainable, low carbon energy practices. NESEA accomplishes this through ongoing professional development programs, annual events and awards. To learn more and join the NESEA community, visit our booth or go online to www.nesea.org.

Platinum Sponsor

Created by the Green Jobs Act of 2008, the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) is dedicated to accelerating the success of clean energy technologies, companies and projects in the Commonwealth—while creating high-quality jobs and long-term economic growth for the people of Massachusetts. MassCEC is a partner, clearinghouse and connector for people in the clean energy sector, making direct investments in clean energy companies, building a strong clean energy workforce, and supporting responsibly sited renewable energy projects across the Commonwealth. MassCEC works with the entire clean energy community in Massachusetts to propel promising technologies from the drawing board to the global marketplace. Learn more at http://www.masscec.com/

Bronze Sponsors

Gold Sponsors

Silver Sponsors

Workshop Sponsors

Demo Stage Sponsors

Supporting Sponsors

Coffee Break Sponsor

Silver Trade Show Reception Sponsor Massachusetts Multifamily New Construction Program

Media Sponsors CSR Wire Eco-Home Eco-Structure Magazine ED+C

enerG Alternative Sources Magazine Fine Homebuilding Green Building Advisor

Green Living Journal Hanley Wood High-Profile Monthly

Home Energy Magazine New England Real Estate Journal Schein Media

Solar Industry Magazine Sustainable City Network Taunton Press

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nesea.org/buildingenergy 22

ZIP IT TIGHT

ZIP. THE FASTEST WAY TO THE PERFECT TIGHT HOUSE. Discover ZIP System® Sheathing and Tape. It’s a one-of-a-kind structural roof and wall system with a built-in energy-efficient barrier that keeps moisture out and reduces air leakage, while still allowing panels to properly dry. To save builders’ time and homeowners’ money, visit ZIPSystem.com/builder1.

©Huber Engineered Woods LLC. ZIP System, the accompanying ZIP System logo and design and AdvanTech are trademarks of Huber Engineered Woods LLC. Huber is a registered trademark of J.M. Huber Corporation. Huber Engineered Woods products are covered by various patents. See zipsystem.com/patents for details. HUB 6387 12/12

Get the performance you desire!

Do you want more energy efficiency in your multifamily project? We can help. Mass Save provides financial incentives and technical support (to architects, engineers and real estate developers) from the start of the design process, all the way through construction of your new or substantially renovated multifamily mid or high-rise building.

Let CSG help with the parts you can’t see. Our consulting and construction services include: n

Contact the Massachusetts Multifamily New Construction Program to learn more. multifhr@icfi.com | 1-800-628-8413 Visit us at booth #1030!

n n

Building performance diagnostic analysis Field inspections Quality control and more

Visit us at booth #513 or call us at 508-365-3214 to learn more.

Get thousands. Save thousands. NYSERDA’s improved Multifamily Performance Program makes it easier for you to slash your energy costs.

Mitsubishi Electric Heat Pump Technology . . . the best way to heat your Net Zero project!

And do it your way.

New choices let you customize a package of cash incentives and affordable loans.

Learn more at booth # 707 at the Building Energy 13 Conference or join us at the Demo Stage 1 at 2:00 pm on Thursday.

NYSERDA’s Multifamily Performance Program offers cash, low-interest financing, and expertise to help you stop energy waste in your buildings— existing or new. An expert Multifamily Performance Partner will help you at every step. Funding is limited. Your energy-saving options are not. Contact a Partner today to get started. Call 1-866-NYSERDA or visit nyserda.ny.gov/multifamily.

America’s #1 Selling Brand of Ductless Technology For more information go to: Mistubishicomfort.com Or contact: Susan Pickett, Regional Manager Cell: 508-954-8035 • spickett@hvac.mea.com

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For over 30 years, we have created opportunity for low- and moderate-income communities.

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And it all starts at home. Never before has our work been

with 30-day BuildingGreen Suite trial

as urgent. Together with our partners, we will continue to create vibrant communities, filled with promise and the opportunity for a good life.

Shola Olatoye, VP & Market Leader, NY 212.284.7186 solatoye@enterprisecommunity.org

www.EnterpriseCommunity.org

© 2013 Enterprise Community Partners, Inc. All rights reserved.

Join us.

www.buildinggreen.com/uc/BGI

Thank You, BE13 Planning Committee Helen Aki, Metropolitan Area Planning Council Robb Aldrich, Steven Winter Associates Mitch Anthony, Titanium, Inc Randall Anway, New Tapestry, LLC Bart Bales, PE, MSME, Bales Energy Associates Mary Biddle, NESEA John Carlton-Foss, Green Energy Global Warming Bram Claeys, MA Dept. of Energy Resources Bruce Coldham, FAIA, Coldham & Hartman Architects Patrick Coleman, MA Department of Energy Resources Caitriona Cooke, Conservation Services Group Mark Couet, Mark Couet Design Build Darien Crimmin, Winn Companies Paul A. Desjardins, PAD Designs Paul Eldrenkamp, Byggmeister Ian Finlayson, Massachusetts DOER Drew Gillett, PE, Solar Engineers Kate Goldstein, MIT PhD candidate Joel N. Gordes, Environmental Energy Solutions Richard Grabbert Benjamin Graham, Natural Design/Build Scott R. Greenbaum, PE, CEM, GBE, Greene Energy Consultants LLC Rayna Heldt, NESEA Brice Hereford, Fastenmaster Kelsey Hobson, NESEA Everett Hyde, Shelter Building LLC John Jacobson, JTJ Investments, LLC Jonathan Kantar, Sage Builders Satpal Kaur, Chris Benedict, R.A. Spencer Lawrence, EBI Robert Leaver, New Commons Jo Lee, Green Machine PR Joshua Lehman, EBI Jess Lerner, Green on the Inside Henry Maclean, Timeless Architecture Marie McMahon-Meehan, National Grid Jennifer Marrapese, NESEA Alexis Miles Kenneth Mirvis, The Writing Company Dana Mosher, Manchester Community College Karl Munzel, Real Goods Solar Rob Myers, South Mountain Company Travis Niles, NESEA Heather Nolen, Steven Winter Associates Laura Notman, Architect F. L. Andrew Padian, The Community Preservation Corporation James Petersen, PE, Petersen Engineering Duncan Prahl, IBACOS, Inc. Mark Price, Price Sustainability Bernice Radle, Buffalo Energy

Matthew Root, Conservation Services Group Marc Rosenbaum, South Mountain Company Kristen Simmons, Architect Ambrose R. Spencer, Sun Toys Jenny Spencer, NESEA Craig and Elizabeth Stead, Stead Consulting David Stecher, IBACOS, Inc. Marc Sternick, Dietz & Co. Architects William L. Stillinger, PV Squared Stephen Stuart, Sustainable Solutions Kurt E. Teichert, LEED AP, Brown University Peter Temple, Keene State College Thomas Thompson, GridWerks Consulting, a US Clean Power Company Fred Unger, Heartwood Group Inc. Henry K. Vandermark, Solar Wave Energy Inc. Jim Vann, RA Solar Company Rachel White, Greener Every Day Consulting Jamie Wolf, Wolfworks Inc.

| BuildingEnergy 13

USGBC MASSACHUSETTS CHAPTER is here to promote the design, construction, and operation of sustainable buildings and communities in Massachusetts through education, mutual support, and advocacy, enabling an environmentally and socially responsible, healthy and prosperous environment that improves the quality of life. CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE FOR EVENTS AND PROGRAMS!

website: www.usgbcma.org email: info@usgbma.org phone: 617-752-2422 fax: 866-879-9655

WE’RE BRINGING MASTER CLASSES TO YOU REGISTER NOW: Zero Net Energy Homes with Marc Rosenbaum, March 11 - May 17 See website for additional offerings Complimentary NESEA membership included with enrollment. Get started at nesea.org/be-masters-series

BUILDINGENERGY

MASTERS SERIES by the NORTHEAST SUSTAINABLE ENERGY ASSOCIATION

discover more 25

HELLO ENTHUSIASTIC GREEN BUILDING PROFESSIONALS! We have many program and opportunities to participate. We are a community of practitioners dedicated to transforming the built environment for sustainability. We have active groups in Western MA, Central MA, Cape & Islands, and Metro Boston. Let’s work together to make the world a better place!

#bems

Financing for Residential and Commercial Clean Energy We offer many financing options, loans, and leases to help your business or household take advantage of energy efficiency improvements and renewable energy systems. Contact us to learn more. Call 877-WISE-USE (877-947-3873) or visit EnergizeCT.com

Energize Connecticut helps you save money and use clean energy. It is an initiative of the Energy Efficiency Fund, the Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority, the State, and your local electric and gas utilities

REGISTER Basic Fees

REGISTRATION

ON SITE REGISTRATION

(FROM 2/6/13 TO 3/5/13)

(FROM 3/5/13 TO 3/7/13)

Conference: 2 Days (Wednesday & Thursday)

$599

$649

Conference: 1 Day (Wednesday & Thursday)

$399

$449

Tuesday Workshops • Full Day • Half Day

$299 $199

$349 $249

Emerging Professional • Conference: 2 Days (Wednesday & Thursday) • Conference: 1 Day (Wednesday & Thursday)

$239 $139

$239 $139

Full-time Student • Conference: 2 Days (Wednesday & Thursday) • Conference: 1 Day (Wednesday & Thursday)

$149 $89

$149 $89

Single Session • Wednesday or Thursday (including Trade Show)

$150

$170

Trade Show & Demo Stages Only

$49

$49

$55 member

$65 all others

NESEA Night Dinner Cruise

When you register, add membership and save! Register Online nesea.org/buildingenergy Questions? Email beregistration@nesea.org Call 413-774-6051 x14 Volunteer Work Scholarship Opportunities

If you are interested in a volunteer workexchange scholarship for the conference, please contact NESEA at bevolunteer@ nesea.org or 413-774-6051 ext 17. These slots are limited and offered on a first-come, first-served basis. Membership is required.

Refund Policy

Refund requests must be received no later than Thursday, February 16, 2013. A $75 handling fee will be charged.

Seaport Hotel and World Trade Center A block of rooms has been reserved at the Seaport Hotel directly across the street from the Seaport World Trade Center for a special rate of $194/night (+tax) for single or double occupancy. Call today 1-877-732-7678 and request the group rate for NESEA. Offer ends 2/2/13. For detailed information on the Seaport Hotel and World Trade Center, go to www.seaportboston.com.

We are committed to being an innovative leader in energy management, and to safeguarding our environment.

Let us help your business develop a plan to use less energy and reduce your energy bills. Generous incentives are available. Learn more at www.nationalgrid.com and like us on Facebook and Twitter.

www.MassCEC.com twitter.com/MassCEC facebook.com/MassCleanEnergyCenter MassCEC Clean Energy Group


BuildingEnergy 13 Conference Program