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INTRODUCTION

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

AUTOBIOGRAPHY RESUME


DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

IMPLEMENTED AREAS


AUTOBIOGRAPHY

My name is Neeyaz Angoshtari, I was born and raised in Iran. The Farsi to English translation of Neeyaz means your greatest “need” in life; or deepest desire. Education has always been my greatest “need” and desire in life. The desire to grow and improve has placed education as a central focus in life. I am fortunate that my continued commitment to education has enabled me to attend well-regarded schools over the course of my life. I dedicated time to study science and earned a Bachelor in Software Engineering in Iran. In 2003 I moved to the United

States of America where I continued my studies at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles. While studying at the University of Southern California I was awarded a teaching assistantship and research assistantship. This assistantship opportunity allowed me to realize my passion for teaching at the university level. After completing my Master’s in Computer Science in December of 2005 I worked as a programmer and analyst in both education and medical fields. While much of my education career has been dedicated to math and science, I have always been inspired by the beauty of nature and power of color and see my passion for art and science work together.


During a trip to Dubai in 2002 I visited the Burjolarab Hotel, the first seven-star hotel. I was mesmerized by the beauty, harmony, and elegance of the interior design. This was a transformative experience that inspired my to pursue a career in interior design. With this new desire and passion to learn the skills and tools of design, and transform ideas into reality I moved to San Francisco to study Interior Design. I feel so fortunate to study design in San Francisco as the city is brimming with inspiration and has further enriched my design education while bringing design into my daily life. Looking back at my journey and the various areas I have

worked in from computer science and research I see a continued use and application of these skills. My design approach is to create a functional space for the user that is inspired by nature, while applying geometric and mathematical rules. This diversity has greatly strengthened my artistic view. I have always created art, but interior design has my life in technicolor. The joy of doing what I am truly passionate about has given me the chance to fully express myself. I am full of anticipation as this journey has been full of excitement and this chapter of my life is just beginning as I start my career as an interior designer.


RESUME


West Coast Lady Butterfly


INTRODUCTION

Thesis summary Concept Services Clients User profile West coast lady ( W.C.L)


THESIS SUMMARY

Designing this rehabilitation center was an especially personal project as it is one I have wanted to work on after working with young kidney transplant patients. During that time I quickly saw the need for a center, a transitional space that serves young kidney transplant patients as they recover from surgery and their family. There are four primary hospitals within the San Francisco Bay Area that specialize in kidney transplant surgery. Many patients travel here from outside California to receive this specialized care. There are many steps that happen prior to receiving surgery, including ongoing sessions of dialysis, searching for a donor match (often with a wait list that can last years), and then preparing to have an invasive surgery. After surgery patients need to be monitored

and watched carefully and take special care for a few weeks to ensure the best result, and this is all happening when the support system is exhausted with the process. This is a physically and mentally exhausting time for patients and their friends and family that serve as support during this stressful journey through diagnosis to treatment. Often parents are required to return to work before the recovery period is complete and are unable to give the care needed to ensure a successful transplant. This facility will offer greatly needed clinical support as well as providing a “transitional space” for patients and give them the opportunity and inspiration to “transform” this difficult experience into a new chapter in life, with a new organ.

Right column shows some of the kids in Iran that had kidney transplant surgery and I have been in contact with. And below images are kids dealing with the same challenge here. My heart has always been with kids regardless of their race and geographical location


CONCEPT

The idea behind designing this center was to create a transitional place between hospital and home for children to recover from kidney transplant surgery. There is a goal and desire to transform a child’s vision for the whole experience before they start their new life with their new organ. Parents will also receive support and opportunity to create a positive experience in this new chapter in their life. All together this center is like a COCOON for children and their families. When the metamorphosis is complete the new butterfly will break its way out of the casing and spread its wings. I see recovered children coming out of the center and flying out to the new world of possibilities with their beautiful new wings.


SERVICES The mission of the proposed center is to support recovering children and their family as they recover from kidney transplant surgery. A variety of services will be offered in the center, including medical care, education, hospitality and entertainment.

Medical Care Post-operation routines focus on closely monitoring kidney function, observation for complications, signs of kidney rejection and transplant progress. Medication weakens the body’s immune system requiring special care and facilities. Nutrition and medication will be provided and monitored. Some patients may require dialysis sessions after surgery. Kids and their caregivers have access to therapy and consulting sessions as part of the medical care. Education Comprehensive education for patients, and their families after the procedure. Kids will be educated about different areas that matter most for their age range including nutrition, physical activity/ sports, skin care, fashion consultation, relationship advice and communication skills. Local hospitals with transplant departments will have access to W.C.L. for meetings and collaboration between physicians and nurses.

Hospitality Parents or caregivers have the opportunity stay with their children during recovery enabling those that would otherwise need to commute from their home (near or far) to now stay with their children at the W.C.L. Patients may also have guests come for hourly visits to enjoy the facilities. Entertainment A variety of entertainment services for patients and their families to enjoy on their own or with others (caregivers/other patients/ friends). Indoor activities include an indoor gym, game room, pavilion, music stage and dance floor. They may choose an outdoor activity in the healing garden or watch a movie at the dynamic roof theater in the pavilion. W.C.L has been designed and tailored to give different options to different personalities.


USER PROFILES AND CLIENTS User Profile This center provides different services including: medical, hospitality, entertainment and education. For each of these services the users of the space are children and adults. -Children age 12-16 range who have had transplant surgery and have been released from the hospital. -Adults will be the child’s parent or caregiver that will stay with them or come by for visit. -The other group of adult users of W.C.L are medical caregivers, resort employees (maintenance,administration, staff). -Kids may have guests for an hourly visit.

Client The Presidio Trust, a federal agency created by Congress helping preserve historic buildings in the Presidio and transforming existing space to serve a new national purpose.

SERVICES

MEDICAL CARE

ENTERTAINMENT HOSPITALITY

EDUCATION

USERS parents/ caregivers recovering children

medical caregivers visitors

resort employees


WHY WEST COAST LADY? You may be wondering where the name “West Coast lady” came from? In selecting a name for this resort I decided to choose a name that sounds neither like a medical or rehabilitation center, but instead a memorable name with intrigue. A unique name to elicit questions and encourage further inquiry to reveal the true beauty.

Butterfly from northern California with colors as the San Francisco Giants

West Coast Lady

Drawing inspiration from butterflies in the design of the medical center, a cocoon concept, and a biophilic design approach selecting a name from a butterfly specie from Northern California was a natural fit. While sifting through San Francisco butterfly names that matched my criteria the one that I kept coming back to and held my attention was “West Coast lady”. I was reminded of the famous “Painted ladies”, or fanciful victorian homes that border Alamo square and are one of the most photographed and recognizable landmarks in San Francisco. The “West Coast Lady” shares


Painted Ladies in san franCisCo

another recognizable symbol of San Francisco as the butterfly share the same colors as the San Francisco giants as they are both in black and orange. This name encompasses the transformation of a butterfly as it emerges from the cocoon, it’s place on the West Coast, and the true colors of this fare city by the bay. Now you know how West Coast Lady came to be, the lady she is today.


Photo by neeyaz angoshtari


Site & Buildings

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HISTORY OF PRESIDIO

West Coast Lady (W.C.L.) is located in California, in the city of San Francisco, in the “Presidio” neighborhood. Presidio History “The Presidio of San Francisco is a 1,491-acre national park site and is part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area. The Presidio was in continuous use as a military post from 1776 to 1994, spanning the Spanish, Mexican, and United States periods. From March 28, 1776, the Presidio of San Francisco was a military post with local, regional, continental, and global connections. The original el Presidio was established by the Spanish as the northernmost outpost of colonial New Spain (Mexico). With Mission San Francisco de Asis (Mission Dolores), and the later pueblo at Yerba Buena Cove, these three early settlements marked the genesis of the City of San Francisco. Before the arrival of the Eu-

ropeans, this northwestern corner of San Francisco was Ohlone territory for more than a thousand years. The Presidio in its entirety was declared a National Historic Landmark District for its importance to Spanish colonial settlement and its prominent U.S. Army history. In 1972, the Presidio of San Francisco - then an active installation - was included within the boundaries of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area. On October 1, 1994, after the post became excess to military needs, it was transferred to the national park service. In 1996, Congress created the Presidio Trust, a federal agency charged with preserving the natural, cultural, scenic, and recreational resources of the Presidio, and transferred administration of the park’s interior lands and more than 700 buildings to the Presidio Trust. Today, the Presidio welcomes local, national, and international visitors and is home to a community of residents and diverse organizations.”[1]


From the map we can see how the resort is accessible from 4 hospitals specialized in transplant. •

California Pacific Medical Center

UCSF Medical Center

Children Hospital & Research Center Oakland

Stanford Hospital & Clinic

Also it shows accessibility of different airports in bay area to the center.

RESOrT ACCESSIBILITY FrOM SPECIALIZED HOSPITALS AND AIrPOrTS IN BAY ArEA


WHY PRESIDIO?

SITE CRITERIA: • Sanitary area with fresh air The project is a design of a recuperating center, so it should be located in a place that serves this purpose. Patients who have had an organ transplant have a weak immune system, the fresh air and calming environment in the Presidio Park are ideal to serve this purpose.

There are also many places within or adjacent to the Park Presidio for patients and families to visit including: o The Walt Disney Family Museum o Bowling Center o Interfaith Center o Exploratorium

• Access to transplant hospitals The W.L.C. center easily accessible to UCSF Medical Center, Pacific Height Medical Group, Oakland Children’s Hospital & Research Center and Stanford Hospital and Clinics.

• Access to the Airports San Francisco International Airport, Oakland International Airport and Alameda NAS Airports are close and convenient.

• Well suited place for resort and recreational facility Patients and their families will come to this place for physical and emotional support and recovery. Park Presidio is a tranquil park with scenic views, an ocean breeze and the convenience of being close to downtown San Francisco without being in the city.

• Easily accessible from San Francisco Presidio is within the city, but distanced from city traffic and noise. Parents who need to take care of business in the city can easily commute. It is also very convenient for people who are visiting patients to commute to the Presidio with public transit.

In addition to the qualities above, I was looking for a place in San Francisco to contribute to improve the quality of life in my community.


eXisting BuiLding BLoCKs


EXISTING CONDITION


Currently the block is salvage and recycling area. Presidio Waste Reduction Department moves the park towards zero waste. Some of the buildings are used as storage or salvage space to reuse furniture, appliances and supplies. These pictures show exterior and interior of some of the buildings.


ARCHIVED IMAGES


ARCHIVED IMAGES


existing Floorplans

Building 1242


This picture shows building’s numbers

These are the original floor plans. Currently these warehouses are being used as recycling area and wood shops. Some part of the current floor plan is different with the original plans.

Building 1243


Design Development

DESIGN APPROACH INSPIRATIONS SPACE PLANNING MAIN RECEPTION/ EDUCATION CENTER Medical Care outdoor seating Physical therapy tea room/dining Area Game room dining area (launch/dinner) Pavilion ceiling & transformation site plan & floor plans Materials & Finishes site plan Development SITE SECTION elevations & top view


DESIGN APPROACH & INSPIRATIONS GOLDEN RATIO IN COLOR POSITION

NANO STRUCTURE OF THE BUTTERFLY’S WINGS

On righ is the mood board I made for the project. It shows the wing patterns of fifty different butterflies. BUTTERFLY COLOR THEME

BUTTERFlY lIFE CYClE

West Coast Lady is designed to bring the patient’s vision to life and enable transformation while they receive treatment and services, it was only natural that designing this center needed a transformed vision as well. The goal was not to solely design a rehab center, but to propose a prototype for a transitional space between hospital and home. The main objective was to look for a solution that can measurably improve patient health, clinical outcome and operating efficiency. These goals lead me to study Evidence Based Design (E.B.D), Biophilic Design and the Pebble Project. Terms and Definitions: “Evidence Based Design ensures compassionate, patient-centered care in an environment specifically designed for effective clinical operations.”[1] According to the Center for Health Design, “Evidence Based Design is the process of basing decisions about the built environment on credible research to achieve the best possible outcomes”.[4]


Biophilic design incorporates E.O. Wilson’s concept of biophilia. human beings’ innate attraction to nature, through natural and symbolic elements, to promote well-being of occupants. As defined by Stephen Kellert, there are two basic dimensions to biophilic design:organic or naturalist (represented in shapes or forms); and place-based or vernacular (connection of building and landscape to regional culture and ecology[7] Pebble Project :”The Pebble Project is a unique and dynamic collaborative, where forward thinking healthcare organizations, architects, designers and industry partners work together to identify built environment designs and solutions that measurably improve patient and worker safety, clinical outcomes, environmental performance and operating efficiency”. [6]

CONTINUITY OF THE LICHEN, INSPIRATION FOR CEILING DESIGN

INSPIRATIONS FROM NATURE While developing the desing I was inspired by: In designing interior: Butterfly color theme Stages of the butterfly metamorphosis Golden ratio in the color of the butterfly wings Nano structure of the butterfly’s wings For exterior Color and function of lichon

EXTERIOR OF THE BUILDINGS ARE COVERED WITH LICHEN


SPACE PLANNING To design an effective, functional, usable space I had to research guest “needs”, “challenges” and “favorite spaces”. Research included interviewing nurses, patients and few physicians. I also researched American culture and trends to better know teens here, as I’m originally from another culture.

To come up with the building’s design these questions were answered: -What type of services will be offered at W.C.L.? Medical care, education, hospitality and entertainment -How to assign building for different services based on traffic, sun light, space use frequency, use order of the space? -What does W.C. offer that makes it unique and different with other rehabilitation center? -What activities and spaces should exist in each of the buildings?

-How can the space accelerate kid’s recovery? -How can each specific space make a memorable vision for the kids? -What kind of choices will lead me to a more sustainable space? -How to provide different options for guests according to their different personalities and preferences.


To answer the questions above comprehensive research and interviews with users were needed. Factors that contribute to healing process Music Color and sound Having family with them Healing garden Having options(private, in a group, small community) Physical activity and motivations for it Natural light and view to nature When designing each of the spaces my effort was to make sure users would get enough natural light and that every place at the resort has a view to nature. Since the primary purpose of this center is to transform the vision, my goal was to prevent patients from being reminded of hospital rooms by using new styles for walls and material finishes. Guests with different preferences have options to choose from. There are different types of areas both indoor and outdoor for guests

BUBBLE DIAGRAMS, PART OF THE SPACE PLANNING

either individually, with other recovering kids, parents, or with their therapist.


DEvELOPING CONCEPT

MAIN RECEPTION To make the main reception more welcoming and homey a kitchen has been designed for guests and guest visitors to get light snacks and juice. They will be served first time they get to WCL. Also at the entrance guest will receive a package including shirts and some accessories with WCL logo.

1 RECEPTION | WAITING 2 PATIENT BATHROOM 3 MEETING ROOM 4 OFFICE 5 STAFF KITCHEN 6 NUTRITION ROOM 7 NUTRITION ROOM/ADA 8 GUEST KITCHEN 9 MAIN RECEPTION 10 I (EYE) SPACE

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MEDICAL CARE Design of main reception has changed few times and evolved. Since each building’s design gets inspiration from one part of the butterfly life cycle and this area is the place when the guests start their journey from, initially I was using the form of “egg” and growth within it for reception. I found original design more literal and less conceptual and abstract. I also had in mind to make a unique space which doesn’t resemble hospital entrances. In final design, I used inclined walls in different positions for rooms, so the view from reception resembles butterfly wings. Two hallways from the reception to the next building are aligned and get the light through these buildings. I used wall and floowirng finishes and materials for “wayfinding” which will be shown later.

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1 STAFF BATHROOM 2 TRASH / CLEANROOM 3 STORAGE 4 PHYSICIAN OFFICE 5 LABORATORY 6 DIALYSIS ROOM 7 PATIENT BATHROOMS 8 WAITING AREA 9 EXAM ROOM 10 SOLARIUM

9 EXAM ROOM 11 STAFF LOUNGE 12 MECHANICAL ROOM 13 CLEAN ROOM 14 STORAGE 15 NURSE STATION 16 SEATING AREA 17 RECEPTION


OUTDOOR SEATING This outdoor seating area is the pass through from medical care to the gym. Originally this space was open, but to make it easier for the guests and to carry on the design through buildings this area was designed.


PHYSICAL THERAPY Sketches show inspiration for both design and functionality of building is from caterpillar. Design of the rooms, was inspired by the repetitiveness of the same structure in caterpillar’s body. Room 7-9 belong to staff and the rest to the guests. Bathrooms are accessible from side rooms and hallway. Circulation and traffic in room 7 and 8 and room allocations are based on functionality and usability of spaces. 1 GIRLS MASSAGE ROOM 2 GIRLS BATHROOM 3 SOLARIUM 4 BOYS MASSAGE ROOM 5 BOYS BATHROOM

6 BOYS AROMA THERAPY 7 CLEAN ROOM 8 TRASH ROOMS 9 STAFF BATHROOM 10 GIRLS AROMA THERAPY

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11 GIRLS FACIAL ROOM 12 BOYS FACIAL ROOM 13 MANICURE CIRCLE 14 MECHANICAL ROOM 15 STAFF LOUNGE AREA 16 SPIRITUAL ROOM 17 YOGA/POLITY ROOM 18 WEIGHTING ROOM 19 TREADMILL/ELLIPTICAL 20 DAY SAP RECEPTION


BREAKFAST AREA Eating breakfast is important for kids and their health. Since one of the goal of staying in resort is also to get needed education for their diet, a specific space is dedicated for breakfast. This physical allocation will remind them of the importance of the meal. Also breakfast area is in north of the building, and they can enjoy northern and eastern light (on the deck), and start their day.

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1 TEA LOUNGE 2 BATHROOMS 3 KITCHEN

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GAME ROOM In the very first stages of space planning this area was the main reception and during the process main entrance was changed to southern part of the block and the lower building become all for dinner and entertainment. Sketches show some part of the process and also thinking of juice bar in the playroom.

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1 BATHROOMS 2 GAME STATIONS 3 PHOTO BOOTH 4 JUICE BAR

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5 SEATING AREA 6 TABLE GAMES 7 COMFY SEATING


DINING AREA

Dining area includes seating area, bar and music stage. There is also outdoor sitting option with the golden gate bridge view. The design of dinner area, furniture and finishes are same as breakfast area. just the color theme changes to show how same body structure has different color and ultimately this too again show transformation.

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PAvILION

Pavilion has a theater with dynamic roof, inspired by Santiago Calatrava’s design in addition to different activity rooms. The roof will be opened toward the stairs. Seats are cushions on the stairs. The stair case connects the game room to the pavilion. There is also a lift for people with disability that can use to go to the pavilion.

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1 DYNAMIC ROOF MOVIE THEATER 2 FASHION ROOM 3 GAME ROOM 4 LIBRARY/ STUDY ROOM 5 ACTING ROOM


KVADRAT CLOUDS

These pictures are “Kvadrat Clouds� fabric tile that can be attached by special rubber bands, formed a three_dimensional effect and hung from ceiling. Clouds was my solution for part of the ceiling design. Not only it is functional and beautiful, but simplicity, colorfulness and repetitive structure of Clouds reminds me of the butterfly wing nano structure and the continuity of connected tiles resembles the form of lichon which are shown in below pictures.

CEILING & TRANSFORMATION

INSPIRATIONS

The design of the ceiling is one of the efforts that meant to implicitly convey transformation and recovery of the kids. The design of the ceiling, as shown in the sketch in front page, starts with separate monochrome panels and then as the guests go further into the resort the number of colors increases. Finally it the last building which is served for dining purposes, the ceiling will be in the form of continuous sculptural hanging panels which are from class C fabric tiles. Colors of the fabric tiles in the east buildings are in-

CONTINUITY OF THE LICHEN

REPETITIVE TILE STRUCTURE


picture above, in second row, and in bottom of the left page were Revit generated drawings to show the tile structure of the ceiling. spired by the colors of three butterflies. (picture above) from north to south each of the spaces has the theme of earth, water and fire. Based on the Ayurvedic system everything on this planet including our bodies and minds consists of five elements: fire, water, earth, air, and space and each person have one of these elements dominant. I thought to include one element in each space so that there will be a connection for each individual with one color theme.The evolution in design of ceiling not only benefits guest in accelerating their healing process, but also is aesthetically pleasant and functional. Panels are used for different purposes in different area. Panels are used as sound acoustics, heater and also air purifiers.


SITE PLAN & FLOOR PLANS


INTERIOR MATERIALS & FINISHES Above is a color code map for flooring materials and finishes. Materials were chosen based on these criteria: -To have simple, minimal design and least numbers of used materials -To have a cohesive design through different buildings -To make a connection between all buildings Using few colors in design will keep the space soothing, while not boring.


SITE PLAN DEvELOPMENT Being inspired with the golden ratio in the color position of the butterfly wings and the urge to connect the buildings through walkways, I decided to apply golden ratio rule in designing the site. I used center of the block, vertical rectangle that covers all buildings and guest houses around the five warehouses, as starting point. And used width of the building, all building has the same width of 60’, to build up the golden rectangle. I continued the process till it covered all the properties inside the resort. Being inspired with the butterfly and how it extends its journey from inside out, I decided to continue these lines and connect the interior and exterior of the building, which resulted in blending the building design to the surrounding landscape.


EXTERIOR Above is a color map for exterior flooring materials and finishes of the site. guests have the option to walk between buildings or get resort carts. The pathways are from concrete grass paver, concrete or grass.


SITE SECTION Obove section through the site shows that the west buildings of the site, main entrance, medical care and physical therapy, have higher elevation than the dining areas and game room. The section from the entrance shows the hanging panels are district and mono chrome at the beginning of the patient’s journey in the resort. Section below is

Section through entrance lobbies


SECTIONS

To blend the design of the resort into the design of the city I used some of the features seen in the city including the green roof of pavilion similar to the green roof of the science museum, and using bio wall covered with lichen, similar to bio wall in de young museum. through the dining area shows how those hanging tiles became continuous colorful sculptural structures of fabric tile. It symbolically shows the transformation between first and last stop on the patient’s journey which is a manifestation of patients transformation during his/her stay in the resort.

Section through dining area


BUILDING ELEvATIONS FROM EAST

section; Looking west from down the hill Site section

Higher building’s elevation( elevation main reception, education and physical therapy center)

Lower building’s elevation ( dining areas and game room)

Images above show the block is almost symmetric and it look like a flying butterfly. Since the buildings are part of the national park the exterior finishes should look similar to other buildings.The pavilion has a green roof, so the top view of the site is the same and we didn’t change the view of presidio by adding a new building.


Above rendering shows top view of the outdoor seating area with hanging

Elevation of outdoor seating area between medical care and gym


IMPlEMENTED AREAS

RESORT MAIN RECEPTION NUTRITION ROOM MIDWAY OUTDOOR SEATING GYM/ RESTORATION AREA BREAKFAST AREA PLAY ROOM DINING AREA OUTDOOR SEATING


stops in journey!

How does it look like to walk through the resort? When the guests arrive they will be greeted in the main reception. The higher buildings are about taking care of mental and physical health of kids and lower building and pavilion are dedicated to nurturing and entertaining the guests. Implemented areas:

1 Entrance 2 Main reception 3 Nutrition room 4 Outdoor seating 5 Physical therapy/cardio area 6 Solarium 7 Day spa reception

8 Tea/breakfast room 9 Music stage 10 Game room/Seating area 11 Table game area 12 Dining-area 13 Outdoor seating


ENTRANCE

Main entrance is supposed to be welcoming, soothing and interesting. A place that intrigues guests the desire to explore more. Using wood for entrance, and bright and energizing colors, orange and green lime are in this regard. As a butterfly extends its wings out of the cocoon to reach out, in the design of the resort one of the main themes which can be seen frequently is extending from inside out and continuity of the design. In this area fiberglass seat can be brought as an example.

The beige wooden panels are sculptural and show the beginning of the transformation. Design of the ceiling is one of the efforts to carry on the evolution and stepping forward in the healing process.


MAIN RECEPTION Main reception of the resort is located by the entrance of the building. There are two seating areas in the main reception which can be used as waiting areas or as one of the options to meet with visiotors.As it’s shown in picture the colors has been chosen to be soothing, but the design is nothing to remind guests of hospital. The interior color of the staff cube and chairs are lime green which is refreshing healing and bring hopes. All the flooring is from Amtico and Spacia luxury vinyl flooring products that not only are beautiful and look like real wood, but also it has designed specifically for healthcare purposes. The wood looking flooring finish makes the space homier, welcoming and cozier.

Monocolor ceiling tiles in entrance lobby symbolizes the beginning of transformation in the resort. Lobby has view to nature and is a place to welcome new guests and visitors.


MAIN RECEPTION GIFT STORE When the guests arrive they will be greeted in the main reception. The higher buildings are about taking care of mental and physical health of kids and lower building and pavilion is dedicated to the nurturing and entertaining the guests.


Picture is view from education center shows: • Colors on ceiling tiles increased • View to nature from the space • Fiber columns resemble fibers inside the cocoon and show up everywhere for the continuity of design


ENTRANCE LOBBY In designing the space I try to make it interactive and intrigue questions for the visitor of the space, or try to inspire users to think. Having the cocoon as concept and trying to envision transformation in different forms, I used one of M.C. Escher’s painting, day and night, that always reminds me of transformation. Day and Night by M. C. Escher


NUTRITION ROOM One of the main areas that will be under supervision is guest’s diet. Not only as part of the post-surgery care, but also the fact the physical body and look is one of the main areas that teens are concern about. During their stay in the resort they will be educated as how to eat right and how to reach their ideal body shape. One of the efforts in keeping the kids inspired is to hang their image or their ideal image on the wall. With doing this action first we are personalizing the nutrition room and it makes them feel more comfortable and feel home. Also they can envision their goal every day.


The Olympic wall frame, relate healthy diet and exercise to reaching to their health goals. The glass in these rooms is smart glass, or switchable glass. Switching the glass provides privacy and save costs for heating, airconditioning and lighting and avoid the cost of installing and maintaining motorized light screens or blinds


OUTDOOR SEATING This outdoor seating area is the connection between medical care and gym. It is enclosed with shed and is equipped with heater panels. Lichen grows fast in this area and also it purifies the air., so I designed a bio wall from perforated metal covered with lichen as it helps to prevent wind and also clean the adjacent air.


Getting fresh air and being exposed to the sun accelerates the recovery. These kids shouldn’t be exposed to direct sun very often as their immune systems are weak for the medications they are taking. The tinted glass shed, bio wall covered with lichen, provide shaded space with purified air and also the space is warm because of the heater panels, so guests can enjoy fresh air with no worries.


SOLARIUM Each of the areas in the resort has been designed in a way that guests have view to the nature. So for those who are using cardio section this patio will be an awesome view. Solarium can also be a relaxing area if any of the guest choose to spend his time in more private space.


Natural light reach each room through windows and light tunnels. Changing the color of light tunnels also shows the transformation through colors in the “therapy and rejuvenating building�


PHYSICAL THERAPY

In the “therapy and rejuvenating building” guests will take care of their soul and body. There are different rooms for recovering teens and their parents to get massage, take care of their skin, nails and also aromatherapy rooms. There is also a spiritual room, for any kind of meditation or religious practice, yoga and weighting room in addition to the cardio therapy equipment. Guests don’t need to make appointment to use mentioned areas. Practicing light physical activity is one of the most important ways to have a faster recovery. Kids should at least walk for 20 minutes a day.


DAY SPA RECEPTION Skin care and physical look are of main concerns that teens are dealing with. Almost all of the teenagers who I interviewed and ask them about their concerns, they brought up their body shape and skin. In their stay they can get advice regarding the proper activities for them to get them to their ideal shape. Transition and transformation can be seen from the color of ceiling panels. The color changes from red to blue, based on the hanging location. In color psychology red means energy, action,passion, strength and excitement. The red color of panels changes to light orange

and then by getting closer to the end of the building the colors all become blue and in spa mood. Blue attributes a great deal of peace and serenity to the general surroundings which is the main purpose of day spa area. The glass hallway, with the caterpillar as design inspiration, lead the guest to the reception desk. Guests can make appointment and use different personal care services. They can get massage, use aroma therapy room, do facial or make their nails.


TEA/BREAKFAST ROOM Breakfast is one of the most important meals in the day, but most of the kids don’t have them in their diet. As the stay in WCL is considered as a transformational trip, specific space has been allocated for breakfast to implicitly teach kids the place and importance of the breakfast. There are different seating options for guests. They can enjoy their breakfast inside or eat their breakfast out in the north light and outdoor seating. Purpose of having a music stage in breakfast room is to create motivation for kid’s to go for breakfast, eat, play and enjoy other friends company.

Music stage for motivating kids to go for breakfast

Structure of the ceiling has transformed in this building and it became continuous colorful panels. inspiration for colors are butterfly colors and for structure’s inspiration is lichen Three seating options under one roof for breakfast -sit with family or other guest patient -sit individually listening to music -sit on deck and enjoy the sun


GAME ROOM

In the game room there are different types of entertainment including table games, photo booth, video game stations and a juice bar. Based on the interviews and research kids like to be treated as adults and having a juice bar in game room makes them feel like they are in a casino. It will be also a good time for kids to get juice, fruit and get and healthy snacks and nutrition.

Part of the play room is seating area. Hanging out, talking, sharing and playing with other kids who have gone through the same path is supposed to be healing. Sound of water is tranquilizing and soothing, but not to deal with side problems of having water structure, fiber-optic cable, lighting and sound of water were used to make a faux water structure.


Dining area can also be an educational place for kids. Table tops have been designed to have the images of five food categories. Kids will learn gradually what to eat and how to be choose their food in the duration of the time they are in WCL. They can also enjoy outdoor seating with the bay view after their dinner.

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West Coast Lady Medical Resort  

West Coast Lady Medical resort was designed for teenage patients who had kidney transplant surgery and have been released from hospital head...

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