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CATALYST

PLANNED PARENTHOOD WALL PREVIEWS

DECEMBER 2, 2015 VOLUME XXXIII ISSUE X

A student newspaper of New College of Florida

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Faculty passes motion to change narrative evaluation policy

graphic courtesy of Zoe Heuermann

BY SYDNEY KRULJAC Every student is familiar with the feeling of anxiously waiting for narrative evaluations to be submitted by professors at the end of the semester. However, starting with the cohort of 2016, the school will introduce more structure to the unique and holistic academic system: evaluations will be split into two narrative sections allowing for more clarity and consistency. The first narrative section will be released in the official evaluation, only by request of the student. “What’s in the first section is what is eligible to go to other institutions,” said thesis student Ganga Braun. “What is placed there is at the discretion of the faculty. They may choose to put the entirety of your evaluation there, or just a few lines. If they only put a few lines there, they will likely be putting the bulk of your evaluation in the second section.” The second section is for added comments used only for internal review and will be treated as evaluations have been in the past. This section is optional for professors and will not be sent to any institution. The feedback provided here may not be relevant to institutions, Braun said, but it is still important for

WHAT’S INSIDE

students and advisors to read. “I think the new policy will be tremendously beneficial to future students,” said third-year Kira Rib. “It will likely improve their graduate school applications and push professors to think more thoroughly about what they choose to put in our evaluations, and how they frame our performance.” On Nov. 20, student representatives of the Educational Policy Committee gathered outside of ACE to discuss the narrative evaluation policy change passed by faculty in order to make sending transcripts easier for students. On Nov. 18, professors discussed the changes to the evaluation system including possible issues, and how this will benefit students applying to graduate schools. “Students currently have no way to officially, through the Registrar’s Office, send their evaluations to other institutions,” thesis student Ganga Braun said. “When students do go through SES to print out their evaluations, it’s kind of messy and definitely a pain in the ass.” Some students noted that they still have unfinished evaluations in their records. Additionally, many students have received narrative evaluations

6 CLIMATE MARCH

from professors that were inappropriate to send to graduate schools. “Other professors have sloppy mistakes such as misspellings of student names,” Braun said. “This change will hopefully result in certain professors taking a bit more care and time to consider the audience of the evaluations.” Other students have had similar experiences with less than satisfactory evaluations. “I guess as a literature student, I’m used to getting late evaluations,” second-year Lily Solomon said. “I have one professor at least every semester who doesn’t turn in my evaluation ever. I’ve taken to lying and telling them I have to apply for an internship soon and could they please hurry up with my evaluation, and they do. I’m worried if I don’t do that, I’ll literally never get it.” Professor Susan Marks who is on the committee to reform the evaluation system explained that the current narrative evaluations were not written to be officially shared, and therefore may not be officially shared by the school. “Some people voice the concern that it would be too light and fluffy, that it might just become another

8 THE END OF STAR WARS

recommendation letter,” Marks said. “[…] It’s too bad that all these big bureaucracies need to have all these things in front of them. The reality is nobody who is considering you for graduate school is going to read 30 evaluations, but do they want them? Yes? Does that mean anybody will look at them? How do they look at them?” Marks is unsure of how the new evaluation system will be portrayed to graduate schools. “I think that our students do wonderful work, and it’s important they get taken seriously by grad schools,” Marks said. “Those of us who are on the committee, and those of us who voted in favor, wanted to see it made easier for the graduate schools to take our students’ applications seriously.” Every student is familiar with the feeling of anxiously waiting for narrative evaluations to be submitted by professors at the end of the semester. However, starting with the cohort of 2016, the school will introduce more structure to the unique and holistic academic system: evaluations will be split into two narrative sections allowing for more clarity and consistency. The first narrative section will be released in the official evaluation, only by request of the student. “What’s in the first section is what is eligible to go to other institutions,” said thesis student Ganga Braun. “What is placed there is at the discretion of the faculty. They may choose to put the entirety of your evaluation there, or just a few lines. If they only put a few lines there, they will likely be putting the bulk of your evaluation in the second section.” The second section is for added comments used only for internal review and will be treated as evaluations have been in the past. This section is optional for professors and will not be sent to any institution. The feedback provided here may not be relevant to institutions, Braun said, but it is still important for students and advisors to read. “I think the new policy will be tremendously beneficial to future students,” said third-year Kira Rib. “It will likely improve their graduate school

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12 SARASOTA SUSHI


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BRIEFS PAGE 2

Adam Sandler’s ‘Chanukah Song’ updated after 13 years BY DYLAN PRYOR Jewish actor and comedian Adam Sandler’s original “Chanukah Song” is arguably his claim to fame as a musician. The song aims to sympathize with Jewish children feeling left out during the Christmas season by listing many Jewish celebrities for comedic effect. Last week, he updated the song yet again with a new list of both real and fictional celebrities at the New York Comedy Festival.

In a number he introduced as “the fourth list of people who are Jewish,” Sandler referenced such names as Adam Levine, Drake and even Elsa from the movie Frozen. The song also includes many allusions to historical and cultural events throughout history. As one line mentioned, “We may not have a cartoon with a reindeer that can talk, but we also don’t have polio thanks to Dr. Jonas Salk. Smart Jew.” Another lyric quipped, “It’s too bad Santa Claus makes Christmas so merry,

but we get two jolly fat guys: ice cream’s Ben and Jerry, both Jewish!” The first iteration of the song was initially performed on Saturday Night Live on Dec. 3, 1994, and has since gained three succeeding variations. Celebrities that have been referenced on previous versions include Captain Kirk, Calvin Klein and Gwyneth Paltrow. The most recent update came 13 years after the third song in 2002 as part of a live Judd Apatow & Friends event at the Comedy Festival.

Wales adopts opt-out consent system for organ donation BY KAYLIE STOKES Following suite of other European countries such as Spain and Croatia, Wales became the first country in the United Kingdom to switch from an opt-in consent system for organ donation to a "soft opt-out" system. All Welsh citizens over the age of 18 will automatically be placed on the organ donor register, unless they have actively decided to opt-out by phone or online.

This change in law hopes to see a 25 percent increase in the number of organs available, welcome news to the 7,000 patients currently on the waiting list across the U.K. Last year 14 people died waiting for a transplant. Because organs must be removed so soon after death, only around one percent of people who die are able to have their organs donated. Other countries who have put in place an opt-out system have seen increases in organ donation. Whether

donations increase in Wales will be carefully watched by Scotland and England as they contemplate making changes to their own laws. While the majority have welcomed the change, some remain skeptical. The Church of Wales argued that the law change could undermine the positive image of organ donation. So far 86,000 people, around three percent of the population, have optedout.

photo courtesy of Taylor Meredith “Literally it can all be wingdings. Goodbye Catalyst. ” © 2015, the Catalyst. All rights reserved. The Catalyst is available online at www.ncfcatalyst.com, facebook.com/NCFcatalyst, @ncfcatalyst The Catalyst is an academic tutorial sponsored by Professor Maria Vesperi. It is developed in the New College Publications Lab using Adobe Photoshop and Adobe InDesign and printed at Sun Coast Press with funds provided by the New College Student Alliance.

General Editor Managing Editor Copy Editor Online Editor Layout Editors Staff Writers & Photographers

Kaylie Stokes Pariesa Young Yadira Lopez Caitlyn Ralph Haley Jordan & Audrey Warne Bianca Benedí, Katelyn Grimmett, Giulia Heyward, Sydney Kruljac, Jasmine Respess, Ryan Paice, Dylan Pryor, Angela Duda

Therapy dogs coming to campus BY KAYLIE STOKES As exam week fast approaches and deadlines loom in the near future, it is easy to feel overstressed. Six dogs want to help. In an event coordinated by the Counseling and Wellness Center (CWC) and the Positive Programming Committee – formed after the task force recommendations – certified therapy dogs of a variety of sizes and ages will be coming to Z-Green on Thursday, Dec. 4. The dogs are being brought to campus by the Humane Society of Sarasota County. The therapy dogs are not adoptable; they are pets who have gone through a course to become certified for therapy. Part of the agreement with the Humane Society was that New College would give a $100 donation that will go towards future training for the dogs. Therapy dogs are trained to provide affection and comfort and are usually taken to places such as hospitals, nursing homes or recent disaster areas. In 2009, therapy dogs were first brought to a college campus at UC San Diego to help students de-stress around finals. Similar events have since spread to campuses across the country. “They’re going to bring toys so they can play frisbee and stuff,” Campus Health Coordinator Amanda “Mandy” Parente said. “Or you can just lay in the grass and have a puppy lick your face, it’s whatever you want.” There will also be snacks and a coloring station under a tent for students who might be allergic to dogs. Though these dogs are specifically trained to comfort, pets in general play a significant role in reducing stress. Studies have shown that pet owners tend to have significantly fewer stress symptoms than those with no pets. In fact, owning a pet can reduce stressrelated blood pressure more than medication. Alum Hannah Rivers (‘08) petting a golden retreiver (left) and Chrissy (right) the 13 year old 1.8 pound poodle. in March 2014 during midterms week. Direct submissions, letters, announcements and inquiries to: The Catalyst 5800 Bay Shore Road Sarasota, Florida 34243 ncfcatalyst@gmail.com The Catalyst reserves the right to edit all submissions for grammar, space and style. No anonymous submissions will be accepted. Submissions must be received by 12:00 p.m. Friday for consideration in the next issue.


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NEWS PAGE 3

Golden State Warriors set NBA record for best start to a season BY RYAN PAICE After winning the NBA championship last year, beating LeBron James’ Cleveland Cavaliers 4-2 in the series, the Golden State Warriors are back at it this season – and they might even be better. Off to the best start in the history of the National Basketball League at 18-0, and showing no signs of slowing down, the Warriors are setting the new standard for excellence in the modern NBA. The Warriors win in completely unconventional ways, and their success has only convinced other teams to follow their lead, reshaping the way the sport is played. They have the sixth best defense in the league with a defensive rating of 99.7 – how many points the opponent scores on average in 100 possessions – largely due to their versatility, which allows them to switch on every screen. While opponents often use screens in order to take a defensive player off of the ballhandler and possibly create a mismatch in order to score, the Warriors have a roster of athletically versatile players where evey player can guard just about every position on the court and not compromise their defense, allowing them to switch on every screen and refusing to be interrupted defensively. In last year’s NBA Finals against the Cavaliers, the Warriors made a

Wikimedia Commons

splash by benching their oft-starting seven-foot center Andrew Bogut in favor for utilizing a small ball lineup, where almost every player on the court was around 6’8”. This allowed them to smother the Cavaliers with uncompromising defense and an endless barrage of shooting, and so far this year, the same Curry-ThompsonIguodala-Barnes-Green lineup has still been incredibly effective, leading them to their historically great season start. Breaking the previous record of 15 straight wins to start a season with a 111-77 win over the Los Angeles Lakers

on November 24, and continuing to beat the Phoenix Suns and the Sacramento Kings by 19 points apiece, the Warriors have been unstoppable. Many experts compare the team to the 1995-1996 Chicago Bulls – widely considered the best team in league history finishing the season with an unprecedented 72-10 record – and perhaps no team has ever been more deserving of such incredible comparisons. With perhaps Coming off of winning last season’s Most Valuable Player award, Steph Curry has discovered a new level of stardom. Leading the league easily

in points per game at 31.9, while still shooting an unbelievably efficient 51 percent field goal percentage, 44 percent three-point field goal percentage and a 93 percent free throw percentage, Curry is thoroughly dominating the league with an efficiency even Michael Jordan would envy. In addition to the shooting that is already garnering him “greatest shooter of all time” attention, Curry is dishing out 6.1 assists, 5.1 rebounds, and 2.6 steals per game – good for the second-best mark in the league. While many might call Klay Thompson – Steph Curry’s backcourt mate at the shooting guard position and the other member of what many call the “Splash Bros” – Curry’s Scottie Pippen to his Michael Jordan, that honor should instead be given to Draymond Green. Perhaps the most versatile player in the league, in addition to being in the running for best defensive player in the league, Green is the perfect glue guy for the Warriors, and a huge reason for their success. Having put up back-to-back triple doubles against the Suns and Kings, Green impacts the game in every way as Pippen once did, even if he is not tasked with the responsibility of being the primary scorer. Curry – like Jordan

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Submission: Faculty statement and petition Submitted by Patrick McDonald, on behalf of the undersigned faculty The faculty is acutely and painfully aware of the breakdown of communication on campus, and as members of the NCF community and educators, we stand ready to play an active role in engaging in productive and healing conversation. While it is difficult to foresee precisely what these conversations will look like or what outcomes will result, there are some clear requirements for difficult and honest exchange. In particular, we need open and honest dialog in which all parties have a voice, and we should have rational expectations for outcomes. Any dialog must preclude anonymous threats of violence by community members against community members and be founded in recognizing that we are ALL part of a larger community, and that such membership comes with both rights and responsibilities that frame our work and lives together. Our obligations to one another begin with mutual respect. Our various perspectives will sometimes lead us to view the same situation very differently, even as we share the goal of making New College a place in which each student can feel safe and welcome to pursue her/his/their priorities for learning and personal growth. We make our community through our actions—for good or ill. Let it be for good. The above statement was prepared by McDonald and a group of faculty members to provide context to the petition. The following petition was signed by 60 faculty members as of December 1, 2015. We, the undersigned faculty of New College of Florida, affirm • Anonymous threats of violence are an act of cowardice and a threat to all, not just the intended target, and we cannot tolerate them. • Dealing drugs on campus undermines the security and integrity of the community and we cannot tolerate it.

Pat McDonald Aron Edidin Sandra Gilchrist Eirini Poimenidou Necmettin Yildirim Jocelyn Van Tuyl Karsten Henckell Paul Scudder Travis Lee Susan Marks George Ruppeiner Malena Carrasco Cathy Cottrell Sherry Yu Caroline Reed

Uzi Baram Amy Reid Glenn Cuomo Carrie Beneš Alberto Portugal Thomas McCarthy Carl Shaw Cris Hassold Tony Andrews Rick Coe Suzanne Sherman Gary Kalmanovich Justin Saarinen Miriam L. Wallace David Gillman

Brad Oberle Richard Herzog Amy Clore Harvey Hyman David Harvey Anne Fisher Thom Olshewsky Gordon Bauer Don Colladay Barbara Hicks Frank Alcock Michelle Barton Charla Bennaji Tracy Collins Emily Fairchild

Emily Saarinen Mathis Hodge Keith Fitzgerald Jing Zhang Steve Shipman Jack Reilly Matthew Lepinski Queen Zabriskie Mike Sutherland Erin Dean Sarah Hernandez Mark Dancigers Katherine Walstrom Elzie McCord, Jr. Tammera Race


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NEWS PAGE 4

Marta Moreno resigns, the search for a new Registrar continues BY ANGELA DUDA Marta Moreno, beloved registrar and previous admissions representative for five years, will resign at the end of this semester, effective Dec. 31, 2015. She began a three-year tenure in 2010 and dedicated two extra years to improving the student application process, student deadlines and recruitment. With laughter, she spoke of her foreseeable plans: “I’ll be able to read every single book I’ve missed. There’s a lot! But the real reason [that I am resigning] is that I want to spend some time with my husband.” Though Moreno was born and raised in San Juan, Puerto Rico, comparing life in her hometown to her 15 years spent in the States had little to do with which was better or worse. Simply different. Still, some similarities – like the palm trees – comfort her. She began her career on campus in the admissions department, but upon the sudden resignation of former Registrar Lynn Lynch, Moreno transferred from executive assistant for enrollment services to acting registrar. Moreno began at New College as an application reader for the admissions office and was later promoted to campus visit coordinator. Moreno had

Kaylie Stokes/Catalyst

Moreno, after years of being a beloved part of the New College community, is resigning at the end of this semester.

three years of experience behind her, making the transition as smooth as possible. Still, that didn’t make it easy. “The first day working as registrar – I was hyperventilating. It was scary. Spelling and pronouncing everyone’s names correctly, not wanting to mess something up.” Unlike her hectic first day, a typical day as registrar is spent digging through tons of emails and answering any phone calls. “But what do I enjoy the most? Putting faces to names.

Sometimes I even remember students by what courses they’re taking.” During lunch, Moreno can often be found in her office building architectural creations out of legos or enjoying her meal at the bay. She hopes to continue these hobbies after resigning. “I’ll still be around, even if I’m not working here. New College is a part of me.” With the approval of a national search from President Donal O’Shea, a committee chaired by Dean of Studies Robert Zamsky is currently looking for

someone to fill the soon-to-be open position. This committee, which also consists of Sonia Wu from Enrollment Services, Corey Kleppinger from the Business Office and Bob Schaedel from Information Technology, will conduct public interviews for faculty, staff and students to attend. They interviewed the first candidate on Nov. 20. Though the position will not be vacant for over a month, hiring a Registrar before next semester is paramount. “I think I’ll miss the students the most...and the bayfront view,” Moreno said. “And there was our pet rat in admissions – his name was Elvis – who would come by at 3:45 every day. The lizards, too. There are too many favorite memories to pick just one.” From a student perspective, some might argue that New College has changed immensely over the years. But despite a shift in campus and faculty climate, Moreno notes a more significant difference from 2010 to the present. “I don’t think New College has changed as much as I have changed. I think New College has changed me...for the better in the sense that I’ve come into contact with people I wouldn’t normally. It’s opened my eyes and made me more sensitive to issues I hadn’t thought about much before.”

Mauricio Macri poised to end 12 consecutive years of rule in Argentina BY HALEY JORDAN Two-time Buenos Aires mayor Mauricio Macri was elected Argentina’s next president after a runoff vote, marking the end of a political dynasty. “Thank you for believing in me. ... I am here because you have decided,” Macri said from his campaign headquarters on Sunday, Nov. 22. “Today is a historic day, a new era.” According to elections officials, more than 98 percent of votes were counted. Macri, a center-right candidate, won 51.4 percent with his Let’s Change coalition. Shortly before Macri spoke, Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner’s handpicked successor, Daniel Scioli, conceded defeat, but vowed to keep pushing for the ideals of Fernandez and her husband. His somber speech from his campaign headquarters acknowledged that the margin between him and his opponent was too large to overcome. “I have given the best in me, with passion, as I usually do, convinced that our proposal to the Argentine people was the best option. The people, in this runoff, have chosen differently,” Scioli said. “Now I, from wherever it may be, will still defend an ideal, a country project that started 12 years ago.” Fernandez is scheduled to leave office on Dec. 10, ending 12 consecutive years of rule by the Kirchner family. Fernandez held office for eight years,

while her late husband Nestor Kirchner served as Argentina’s leader for four years before her. Since taking over in late 2007, Fernandez has seized pension fund assets while increasing welfare programs and battling U.S. hedge funds over defaulted debt. Prior to ballot casting Scioli told journalists, in an attempt to persuade undecided voters, “We are going to vote with an unemployment rate of under 6 percent, with the lowest debt level in the world.” Experts say Macri’s administration is expected to introduce greater pragmatism to the country’s economic policies. “Next year’s economic prospects remain largely uncertain,” Mauro Roca, an economist at Goldman Sachs, said in a report. The sooner the implementation of the necessary policy reforms, the faster would be the materialization of the expected medium-term potential.” The election of Macri could signal a conservative shift away from Fernandez’s populist political legacy for Argentina. Macri will serve with a minority in both houses of Congress. Despite this, Macri’s campaign promised big changes for Argentina’s debt problems and overall economy. He also vowed to end currency controls and cut export taxes. In his victory speech, Macri promised he would work to eliminate poverty in Argentina. “I also want to say to our Latin

Photo Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

“We hope that tomorrow a new stage will start for Argentina” said newly elected Argentina president Mauricio Macri.

American brothers and our brothers around the world, that we want to have good relationships with all countries,” he said. “We want to work with everyone. We know that the Argentine people have much to bring to the world, and we hope to find an agenda of cooperation.” Before ballots were cast, Macri

told voters, “We hope that tomorrow a new stage will start for Argentina. We all know this is a historic day that will change our lives.” Info for this article taken from bloomberg.coms, nytimes.com


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Planned Parenthood shooting persists in placing organization in the political spotlight BY GIULIA HEYWARD On Friday Nov. 27, 57-yearold Robert Dear killed three people and injured nine more at a Planned Parenthood located in Colorado Springs, Colorado. This tragic event occurred in the midst of efforts by Republican officials to sever all federal funding to Planned Parenthood, an initiative that could lead to another government shutdown if Congress is unable to pass the bill by Dec. 11. Earlier in the year, the Center for Medical Progress released 10 videos of Planned Parenthood officials reportedly discussing the sale of fetal tissue for profit. Outraged Democrats claimed that the videos were obtained illegally and clearly edited by Republicans determined to end any funding that the organization receives from the government. “Our response as a people and a nation to these horrors shown in these videos is vital to everything those lying out in Arlington Cemetery died to save,” said Republican Congressman Trent Franks of Arizona, the bill’s sponsor. Many others, including students on campus who are involved with the local Planned Parenthood, find the recent negative attention the organization has received to be disheartening.

NCSA Weekly Updates BY CAITLYN RALPH

Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Planned Parenthood has been providing health services since 1916.

“Planned Parenthood is not an abortion clinic,” third-year and NCF Vox co-president Christina Harty said. “They do abortions and they do them proudly but they are a health center. The GOP cutting off funding is cutting off funding from birth control, breast cancer screenings, and general health for people. What they don’t really realize is that policies like that, especially when you are cutting off things like birth control access, are just going to create more unwanted pregnancies.” NCF Vox is a student-run organization that aims to educate and provide students with sexual health resources. In addition, the local Planned Parenthood works with students as patient-escorts on Fridays and employs several alums to work with them after

graduation. “We host different events that advocate for sexual health, health in general,” Harty said. “But mainly we are an advocate for Planned Parenthood. Those events are really designed to get people involved in the organization, they are supposed to be gateways to get people involved in Planned Parenthood.” The recent tragic shooting has demonstrated the negative outlook many have on the organization. NCF Vox does not have any events planned for the end of the semester. However, they do plan to host an event on destigmatizing abortion. Information taken from nytimes.com, nbcnews.com, and pbs.org.

79.1 million tourists in Florida break record in first nine months of 2015 BY KATELYN GRIMMETT Despite record high temperatures, Florida hosted 79.1 million tourists in the first nine months of 2015, the largest count of visitors in that time than ever before in the state’s history. Gov. Rick Scott has accordingly proposed a $6 million increase for the state’s tourism budget. The nine-month count saw an increase in Florida tourists by 5.5 percent from the same time period in 2014. Tourism-related jobs have seen a rise as well, up 5.2 percent from last year. On Monday, Nov. 23, Gov. Scott released his 2016-17 “Florida First” budget of $79.3 billion in which he recommended an $80 million investment in VisitFlorida, the state’s tourism agency. “Our growing tourism industry employs 1.2 million Floridians and is helping us meet our goal of becoming first for jobs,” Gov. Scott said in a statement released on Nov. 19. From July to September, 25.5 million tourists came to Florida – an increase of almost 7 percent from the same stretch of time in 2014. The growing tourism industry is nothing

NEWS

photo courtesy of flickr Creative Commons

Siesta Key Beach is a popular spot for tourists.

new for the Sunshine State, which has experienced five consecutive years of record-breaking tourism. “Maybe it’s all the baby boomers getting ready to die,” second-year Lily Solomon said. Sarasota County itself broke a record of more than 1 million visitors in paid lodgings, a reflection of Florida’s occupancy rate rising 3.6 percent. Over the past fiscal year, Sarasota County collected $19.02 million just from the 5

percent tax on overnight stays. State lawmakers will make a final decision on next year’s budget in January. Meanwhile, Gov. Scott is pushing Florida to bring in a goal of 100 million visitors by the end of the year. With a mid-November count of 79.1 million tourists, the state is not far from its goal. Information from this article was taken from heraldtribune.com

As the semester is coming to an end, the New College Student Alliance (NCSA) is starting to close up for Winter Break. The Auxiliary Cabinet is saying goodbye to thesis students and Speakers of the Towne Meeting McAlister Grant and Evann Soltys-Gilbert. Second-year Lara Herzog was voted at the most recent elections to take their place. This afternoon, Wednesday, Dec. 2, there will be the last Towne Meeting of the semester on Z-Green at 4:00 p.m. “We’d like to thank all the students who came out for the NCPD cookout – and we’d love to hear what you’d like to see for another community event with the NCPD,” thesis student and Police Liaison Bo Buford said in an email interview. “In light of recent events, please remember that state school policy cannot interfere with the enforcement of state laws. Please also remember the power we have as a community to communicate with each other and negotiate collective standards of conduct without inviting violence. “If you have comments or concerns about NCPD conduct or wish to file a formal statement, please reach out to your police liaisons, Bo Buford and Dominic Theofan.” Look out for November updates from the Executive Cabinet sent to the Students’ List. Weekly Cabinet Meetings will resume in the Spring. Starting Sunday., Dec. 6, the NCSA will once again be implementing Late Night Library hours. The normal hours at the Jane Bancroft Cook Library will be extended to 3:00 a.m., providing students a safe and nearby study spot during finals. Along with extending hours, the NCSA provides free snacks to students at around midnight each night in the Academic Resource Center (ARC) and also provides print cards for student use, located at the circulation desk. The Late Night Library program runs through Thursday, Dec. 10.


Sarasota Citizens march

BY KATELYN GRIMMETT

Signs reading “Go Green, Keep it Clean” and “Keep Florida Above Water” bobbed down the Sarasota Bayfront and up the Ringling Causeway during a climate change march this past Sunday, Nov. 29. SarasotaManatee residents joined in on one of more than 1,500 Global Climate March events organized by activism organization Avaaz.org on the eve of

the Paris Climate Conference. Honking cars, thumbs up from pedestrians and the record breaking November heat all blared the same message: climate change is real and it is here. The march was hosted by Lynn McGonagill and her daughter Jamie, both local residents. Signs were distributed among the participants as Lynn McGonagill gave a heartening

speech. “We don’t have to get hung up on what we can’t do because we can all do something,” McGonagill proclaimed to the gathered marchers. A 30-second video of the march was recorded by Lynn McGonagill and sent to President Obama with a message directly from the Sarasota people demanding action against climate change.

“I hope we spread awareness and I hope our public officials notice,” Jamie McGonagill said. “I think that the uprising of citizens around the world in a hundred different languages and a thousand different faces will bring some attention from the leaders.” With 785,000 partakers in 175 countries, Sunday’s marches broke the record as the largest climate mobilization in history. France’s intended march of

The group gathered underneath the historic statue to draw the attention of passing cars and pedestrians.

Sarasota citizens of all ages march in the hot sun, demanding action against climate change.

The climate march began at Marina Plaza and crossed the Ringling Causeway.


against climate change 500,000 people had to be cancelled for security reasons but activists collected more than 20,000 shoes belonging to those who planned to march and lined them up at the Place de la Republique. “Unfortunately I think Sarasota as a community has its head in the sand and I say that sadly as someone who grew up here,” Lynn McGonagill said. “I was born and raised in Sarasota and I love my town but the problem is we

are a Republican district and we still vote very much in that way. If we don’t change soon climate change is going to hit us in the face and we will have done nothing to prepare for it.” The overarching goal of the organized marches was to demand a commitment to 100 percent clean energy. Where the marches establish a need for action against climate change, scientists and politicians alike scramble

Jamie McGonagill (left) and the younger marchers led the way down Sarasota Bayfront.

The Sarasota marchers trek up the causeway, waving at honking cars.

to answer the question of how. “When [Bernie Sanders] declared his candidacy he said that we must combat climate change and reduce income inequality, so he started from these two major points” Sarasota resident Mirella Martinelli said. “He’s the only candidate willing to face corporations and regulate them. Without strong environmental regulations we are not going to combat

climate change.” Martinelli encouraged students interested in door-to-door lobbying for Bernie Sanders in New Town to email her at micaglasberg@ gmail.com. “I am very glad with how the event turned out, the weather is perfect, people are enthusiastic, and drivers are friendly – what’s not to like?” Lynn McGonagill said.

Par ticipants line the bridge with their signs in plain view.


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FEATURES PAGE 8

From celebrating to spending: Holiday consumerism BY SYDNEY KRULJAC It starts early: a grandparent calls in a panic mid-October to ask their grandchildren what they want for Christmas; shopping centers decorate their light posts with candy canes and shimmery plastic when Halloween has yet to arrive; when sticky-handed children arrive at Santa’s throne in the middle of a mall to whisper their greatest desires on Nov. 1. It is considered to be not only the most wonderful time of the year, but also the most consumerist time of the year. U.S. holiday spending is still going strong as a 3.7 percent rise occurred after this year’s Thanksgiving weekend and Black Friday. Not to mention, Cyber Monday had a considerable increase in shoppers this year, according to the National Retail Federation (NRF). The NRF estimated sales differently than past years, and did not take into account total sales of the four-day weekend. The wide-ranging conclusions showed in-store shopping was about the same as last year, however,

online shopping made a significant jump, which made total sales increase for the 2015 holiday season and surpassed last year’s holiday spending. From selecting the right gift for everyone on your list, to the unfathomable burden of the holiday expenses, the month of December can absolutely be overwhelming. Here are the statistics of this year’s consumerist rituals. $805.65: Average amount of money a person will spend during the holidays. This is about a $100 increase from 2010. 1.76 billion: Amount of candy canes produced each year. 275: Distance in miles the average person will travel during the holidays. 93 percent: Percentage of people to take advantage of free shipping. Women use it even more than men with an average of 95.3 percent as opposed to 90.8 percent. $480.28: Amount spent on family members alone. Friends get one-fourth the expense than family members. 26.3 million: Amount of real Christmas trees purchased.

Sydney KruljacCatalyst

Z dorm room belonging to author of this article Sydney Kruljac, Catalyst staff writer Haley Jordan, third-year Olivia Short and thesis-student Jazzlyn O’Reilly decorated for Christmas spirit.

38 percent: Percentage toy stores increase their staff by. 77 percent: Percentage of people who took advantage of deals for themselves, also known as “Treat Yourself.” 6 million: Amount of Christmas trees

harvested in Oregon. Florida only harvested 16,214. $118.82: Amount spent on food. People spend about six times more on buying

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Good riddance: George Lucas says he is done with Star Wars BY RYAN PAICE With “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” opening in theaters across the country on Dec. 18, many people, including this writer, have been stuck in a “Star Wars” phase as we anxiously await the arrival of the franchise’s new movie. One of the biggest questions “Star Wars” fans have for the upcoming film is whether or not the franchise will follow the direction George Lucas set it in, or whether Disney will return the franchise to the original trilogy’s glorious direction. Most – if not all – “Star Wars” fans are hoping that Disney and J.J. Abrams can redirect the franchise to the course it was following for most of the original trilogy: a gritty space opera unlike no other, with a litany of practical effects in order to bring the universe to life. “Star Wars: A New Hope” and “Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back” were cultural phenomenons back when they were released in 1977 and 1980, respectively, and garnered millions of fans all around the world. The original trilogy was a cinematographic masterpiece despite the final movie of the trilogy, “Star Wars: The Return of the Jedi” facing much criticism for its ludicrous ending battle and resulting celebration. The movie was the first sign that George Lucas had taken his creative liberties too far. And after a much lauded prequel trilogy – and remastered versions of the original trilogy with numerous cases of editing and injecting computergenerated special effects – “Star Wars” fans have been done with George Lucas

long before he declared that he was done with the franchise in an interview with Vanity Fair on Nov. 18. From editing the “Star Wars: A New Hope” Tatooine cantina scene so Greedo shoots before Han to paint Han in a more positive light, to injecting arbitrary CGI into numerous scenes in the original trilogy, George Lucas has not only created a prequel trilogy that shook the faith of the fanbase itself, but he has muddled up his old masterpieces to the point where they are questioned themselves. Let’s not forget Lucas’ creation of “Jar Jar Binks,” one of the most hated characters in movie history – whom George Lucas still stands by. George Lucas might be an experimental director, but his experimenting has permanently damaged the faith the fanbase has in the franchise. With the modern film industry implementing CGI – albeit much better CGI than the prequel trilogy was largely made up of – at a level higher than ever before, even hardcore fans worry that special effects will bring down the new movies like they did the rest of the franchise. Even if the new movies can get the visual effects right, which so far looks promising as they have made a big deal about using more practical effects, there are plenty of things for Disney to learn from George Lucas’ last involvements with the franchise. For starters, the convoluted choreographed lightsaber battles need to stop. They might look pretty and cool with the different colored lightsabers clashing and twirling, but some of the best examples of lightsaber battles in

Wikimedia Commons

the franchise are much less spectacular and much more emotionally impactful. Instead of all of the ridiculous spinning and clear choreography, the new movies should follow the example of the lightsaber duel between Luke Skywalker and Darth Vader in the final movie of the first trilogy, “Star Wars: The Return of the Jedi.” The battle encapsulated everything right about the franchise’s lightsaber battles: a great balance between tense and meaningful dialogue, and powerfully natural swordplay. Disney and J.J. Abrams have to avoid letting some of the best parts of the franchise get suffocated in meaningless spectacle, as George Lucas allowed throughout the prequel trilogies. Secondly, the new movies absolutely must step up the dialogue. While the prequel trilogy was abolsutely littered with laughably terrible lines,

the original trilogy was not particularly special dialogue-wise either. Besides just that, the acting behind the lines was lacking in almost every movie. I love Mark Hamill, but he was never a great actor, even as he matured. Hayden Christensen was even worse, and despite the franchise’s starpower with Natalie Portman, Samuel L. Jackson and more, the overall acting in the movies was subpar. Ewan McGregor and Harrison Ford were really the only consistently good actors in their respective trilogies. With a bevy of young and little-known actors to join the franchise’s original trilogy characters, there is both hope for progression and nostaligia – hopefully the dialogue can improve as well. Lastly, and perhaps most

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FEATURES

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AP Tour finished its comeback strong in Orlando BY CAITLYN RALPH Headlined by Mayday Parade, the 2015 AP Tour finished its sixweek journey through the nation last Wednesday in Orlando. Boasting a bright red logo and extensive coverage on youth underground culture, Alternative Press - coined AltPress or AP - is the one-stop shop for all scenesters. AP covers everything from style to activism, but not without losing sight of its central objective: music reporting. The brand started as a fanzine by current President Mike O’Shea in the 1980s and grew into one of the most popular music magazines in the world. Now – 30 years later – AP has expanded further than the traditional magazine format into an interactive website, high profile awards show, and popular tour. That tour, previously featuring acts such as Never Shout Never, Bring Me the Horizon, Four Year Strong and The Used, resurfaced this fall after a short hiatus. A band with a fair share of AP coverage, As It Is, the tour’s opener, recorded their debut album in the Kissimmee/St. Cloud area last year. Released this past April, “Never Happy, Ever After” cemented As It Is’ deserved place in the scene. The British newcomers went on to complete an impressive first run in the U.S. on the Glamour Kills Tour and an equally impressive full summer on Warped

Tour. To close their most successful year yet, As It Is stole an opening spot on the well-advertised AP Tour. As It Is’ live set is led by Patty Walters – easily one of the most passionate and involved frontmen in the scene. Walters began by posting covers on YouTube and slowly amassed a following with his endearing charisma and raw talent. Just as much of a fan of the bands his fans also love, Walters knows how it feels to be on the concert floor, overwhelmed with admiration, watching music come to life. This empathy translates into his performance style. By actively seeking out those singing back lyrics or simply having a good time, Walters eventually gets everyone off their feet with his infectious energy. As It Is have improved drastically since their already strong Glamour Kills Tour set from just a few months prior, leaving fans excited for what the quintet will accomplish next. This Wild Life followed As It Is, changing the mood in the room from jaunty to rhythmically mellow. The acoustic duo from Long Beach, California is signed to Epitaph Records and have toured with the likes of Pierce the Veil, Beartooth, Being as an Ocean, and New Found Glory. This Wild Life originated as a pop punk band, but when the lineup slimmed to just Anthony Del Grosso and Kevin Jordan, they, as their website puts it, “did the least “punk” thing possible… they got quiet.” Their unique “punk rock acoustic” style has

paid off – Del Grosso and Jordan have created an act no one in the scene has attempted in the past, leaving room for copycats to try but fail to emulate in the future. Putting together a setlist of sincerely heartfelt tracks, This Wild Life and Del Grosso’s smooth voice conjured an immensely enjoyable and memorable performance. As soon as This Wild Life finished their final chords, the crowd started pushing forward, with everyone aiming to steal the closest spot they could to the stage. Eventually, some fans were pulled out, some almost fainted, and some fell when most of the crowd slanted over. The excitement was for Real Friends. Despite being as pop punk as a band can get, the Illinois sad boys have toured with everyone from The Maine to Every Time I Die. Once Real Friends actually started, no one was in the same place for more than one song – everyone was constantly shifting, pushing, dodging crowdsurfers and avoiding moshpits. With a setlist of mostly older material, Real Friends continued their streak of strong performances, which put the music at the forefront and let the lyrics speak for themselves. An ideal follow-up to the previous performances, Mayday Parade convert pop punk tendencies into hard hitting alternative rock, but not without throwing in acoustic sing-alongs and piano ballads. The Tallahassee-natives’ first album, “A Lesson In Romantics,” was everyone’s go-to bus ride jam in

high school, securing their name as synonymous with scene and producing hits such as “Jamie All Over” and “Miserable At Best.” Ten years and five albums later and Mayday Parade aren’t showing signs of slowing down. Mayday Parade’s set opened with the first track from their most recent release “Black Lines.” Easily the most powerful moment on the record, “One of them Will Destroy the Other” features Dan Lambton, frontman of Real Friends, who joined Mayday Parade on stage to contribute his guest vocals for the song’s performance. By starting on a high note, the set fed on momentum, crashing into “Keep in Mind, Transmogrification is a New Technology” and “When You See My Friends.” After getting a break for three acoustic songs, the crowd tumbled back into the high energy “Black Cat” before finishing up the main performance with frontman Derek Sanders on the piano for “Stay” and, of course, “Miserable At Best.” The special encore included songs from Mayday Parade’s first EP “Tales Told By Dead Friends” and an appearance from We The Kings frontman Travis Clark, a good local friend of the band. While one of their most fun songs live, “Jersey” wasn’t the strongest finale track one would have hoped for, but it still rounded out the performance on a satisfying note. With

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Looking for home: John Crowley’s ‘Brooklyn’ is a period piece that rings true SUBMITTED BY DAVID CANFIELD “Brooklyn” is a masterful exercise in restraint, spare and funny and without a false note to ring. It builds, it reaches and it moves, flowing with a disarming balance of indie spunk and dramatic sweep. Powered by writer Nick Hornby’s smooth dialogue and elegant shaping, the film thrives as an understated period piece of profound emotional depth. “Brooklyn” is a post-war Irish romance, ostensibly in the vein of countless historical melodramas too bland to distinguish themselves. The key to the film is its insistent, downright direct dismissal of such clichéd material. Saoirse Ronan plays Eilis, a young immigrant in Brooklyn just departed from her home in smalltown Ireland. Without a chance to thrive occupationally, and without a penchant for the traditional or familiar, her cross-Atlantic journey is borne as much out of a taste for adventure as it is out of necessity. In Brooklyn, under the financial support of Father Flood (Jim Broadbent), Eilis snags a job at a department store, enrolls in bookkeeping classes at the local college and navigates the intimidating social terrain of her boarding house and the Friday night dance scene. It’s exciting and new,

but both Ronan and Crowley resist wide-eyed naiveté. There remains the obligatory image of a bewildered Eilis squirming her way through the bustling New York streets, but – thankfully – it’s an anomalous retread. Under Crowley’s direction, the camera often holds still on Ronan, an actress of impeccable timing and intense expressivity. This is one of her best performances, effortlessly enrapturing the audience in Eilis’ journey. She’s engrossingly lifelike – every conveyance of joy, worry, fear and excitement transfers from the screen to the audience without a drop of feeling lost. “Brooklyn” is not decorous or lavish; it’s all but disinterested in the vibrant energy of New York and the picturesque beauty of Ireland. So entrenched in Eilis’ experience are we that the push-and-pull between the two locations successfully emerges as the film’s central tension. Eilis does fall in love, though, with Tony (a charming Emory Cohen), an Italian-American plumber with an affinity for Dodger Baseball and dorky smiles. They meet at a dance, go on a few dates, eventually slurp pasta with Tony’s rowdy family – the romance is genuine, and even as it inches toward the middle of the action, the conflict escapes rigid convention. The narrative remains in Eilis’ hands: the great roadblock to

happily-ever-after resides in Ireland, and thematically, it’s characterized by the long, arduous path to finally letting go. “Brooklyn” is less about finding a partner than finding oneself. The film’s first half shows everything falling into place – good job, cute boyfriend, straight-A’s in college – and, thus, its turning point practically writes itself. A family member passes in Ireland, and Eilis returns to pick up the pieces. Suddenly, the dream job is there, waiting; a nice guy, measured and polite and smart enough, is throwing himself at her; and her lonely mother chats as if there will be no return to New York, even though she’s well aware that a boat ticket back was planned long ago. Crowley indulges cinematically just once here, as Eilis and a few friends head to a gorgeous beach on the edge of town. But there’s a strong purpose behind it: faced with a flurry of idealizations and uncertainties, Eilis is presented with a place she never expected to leave but now seems as far from “home” as anywhere else. There’s such poignancy in moments when Eilis looks her distant but loving mother in the eye, or when she listens to the “future” talk of her new suitor, the blazer-donning Jim Farrell (Domhnall Gleeson). Streaked with melancholy, these scenes expose a very specific type of identity crisis, one

themed by belonging and kept alive by the struggle to move on from the place she can no longer call home. Hornby structures the narrative with a deliberate focus, as his story comes full-circle with vivid accuracy. He frames “Brooklyn” around the first and (what’s likely to be) the last crossAtlantic boat ride in Eilis’ life. Twice in “Brooklyn” does a young Irish émigré rest on the boat’s ledge, and ask an Irishwoman-turned-New Yorker about life in Brooklyn. Big buildings? Overwhelming? Does it feel like home? In the film’s opening act, a timid Eilis asks the questions; later, in “Brooklyn’s” penultimate scene, she’s the one answering them. She turns around, looks her young mirror image in the eye, and responds to that last question with a comforting smile: “Yes, it feels like home.” Eilis doles out every bit of advice she can think of. She jaunts through customs and snags her luggage. And then, to finish, it’s one quick cut to Brooklyn that brings it all together. Crowley ends his film on a picture as lovely and romantic as it is warm and familiar – perfectly fitting for “Brooklyn,” it’s a picture that feels just like home. Solid Sat


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Wall Previews BY GIULIA HEYWARD Friday, Dec. 4 Early Wall Early Wall will be hosted by thesis student Nathan Dyjack. The Wall, as indicated by its title, will start no later than 7:00 p.m. so that everyone, according to Dyjack, can go to bed early. Wall attendees should still expect to come to the Nook on Friday night and get down. “Expect boogie music and trap,” Dyjack said. Saturday, Dec. 5 Gotta Catch ‘Em Wall Gotta Catch ‘Em Wall will be hosted by third-years Susan Gomes and Jessica Withers. The name of the Wall is a reference to the popular Pokemon franchise, which still remains in the hearts of many students. “We love Pokemon and hope everyone else does too,” Gomes said. Wall attendees are told to expect weird old music and three different types of punch. The Wall will take place in Palm Court, weather permitting. “We’d prefer not to be in Ham,” Gomes said.

The Old Bookstore recording space BY BIANCA BENEDI The Band Room and Recording Studio, a relatively under-utilized room, is tucked behind double doors in the mail room. It’s a space most students rarely enter, and its companions in the small hallway – the EQTA room and the NCSA storage room – offer a backdrop confirming that the room is part of a collection irrelevant to most students. But before it was the band room, it was the Old Bookstore. Sometime in the mid 1980s (NCSA archives regarding this space are scarce, and the few that exist are virtually completely undated), NCSA officials noticed an increasing presence of musical acts on campus with no designated place to go for practice. Bianca Benedi/Catalyst With limited student spaces available, the NCSA had to weigh the values of The announcement to discuss the changing use of the old bookstore was written the existing spaces. The Old Bookstore hastily on a sheet of paper and photocopied. was deemed least priority, and the room was temporarily designated as a shared space between bands and the for band room, general maintenance unattended, with keys available either bookstore. of the old bookstore, and anything from student government or the “ D u e else people care to campus police. “The old bookstore will Th e old bookstore to the happy be temporarily dedicated to music discuss.” preponderance “Th e meeting practice and performance,” the user will be temporarily of emerging will be held at the old agreement read. “This assignment of dedicated to music bands ... we bookstore,” the flyer space will remain in effect until such have decided time as the building is required for more announced. practice and that a meeting F o l l o w i n g critical needs.” will be in performance. the decision to A more critical need has yet to be order,” a handtemporarily convert identified. In the meantime, the band written flyer the book store, a room remains a feature available to states, signed by “Ezra in box 173, Ben user agreement was drafted, dictating students. The current band room TA is at box 272 or either of us.” “Things to be among a number of things that the Kamron Scruggs, available at kamron. discussed will be the ... scheduled times room would now remain locked when scruggs12@ncf.edu.

EVENTS: DEC. 2 - DEC. 8 On Campus

Wednesday, December 2 House • Fall classes end • January2016 ISP forms • 6:00 p.m. Build a critter @ due Ham • 2016 Spring registration • 6:00 p.m - 7:00 p.m. Mental due Health Alliance meeting @ GDC Saturday, December 5 • 8:00 p.m. Double Feature Thursday, December 3 Picture Show @ HCL 7 • 6:00 p.m. NCSA cabinet • 8:00 p.m. Critics’ Film meeting @ HCL 8 House • 7:00 p.m. Quiz Bowl practice @ X game room Monday. December 7 • 7:00 p.m. Quiz Bowl Friday, December 4 Practice • 12:00 p.m. Feminist Fridays @ ACE Lounge Tuesday, December 8 • 8:00 p.m. Double Feature • 9:00 p.m. Astronomy Club Picture Show @HCL 7 Meeting @ the Bayfront • 8:00 p.m. Critics’ Film

Off Campus

Wednesday, December 2 • 8:00 to 9:30 a.m. Free Yoga @ Siesta Key Beach • 6:00 p.m. Nokomis Beach Drum Circle @ Nokomis Beach on Casey Key • 7:00 p.m. Team Trivia @ Growler’s Pub

Saturday, December 5 • 7:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Dowtown Farmer’s Market • 8:00-9:30 a.m. Free Yoga @ Siesta Key Beach • 6:00 p.m. Nokomis Beach Drum Circle @ Nokomis Beach on Casey Key

Thursday, December 3 • 8:00-9:30 a.m. Free Yoga @ Siesta Key Beach • 5:00 p.m. Art After 5 @ Ringling Museum

Monday, December 7 • 8:00 to 9:30 a.m. Free Yoga @ Siesta Key Beach • 9:00 p.m. Karaoke @ Growler’s Pub

Friday, December 4 • 8:00 to 9:30 a.m. Free Yoga @ Siesta Key Beach

Tuesday, December 8 • Free meal @ Coffee Loft • 9:00 p.m. Open Mic @ Growler’s Pub


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Evaluations

Warriors

Star Wars

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applications and push professors to think more thoroughly about what they choose to put in our evaluations, and how they frame our performance.” On Nov. 20, student representatives of the Educational Policy Committee gathered outside of ACE to discuss the narrative evaluation policy change passed by faculty in order to make sending transcripts easier for students. On Nov. 18, professors discussed the changes to the evaluation system including possible issues, and how this will benefit students applying to graduate schools. “Students currently have no way to officially, through the Registrar’s Office, send their evaluations to other institutions,” thesis student Ganga Braun said. “When students do go through SES to print out their evaluations, it’s kind of messy and definitely a pain in the ass.” Some students noted that they still have unfinished evaluations in their records. Additionally, many students have received narrative evaluations from professors that were inappropriate to send to graduate schools. “Other professors have sloppy mistakes such as misspellings of student names,” Braun said. “This change will hopefully result in certain professors taking a bit more care and time to consider the audience of the evaluations.” Other students have had similar experiences with less than satisfactory evaluations. “I guess as a literature student, I’m used to getting late evaluations,” second-year Lily Solomon said. “I have one professor at least every semester who doesn’t turn in my evaluation ever. I’ve taken to lying and telling them I have to apply for an internship soon and could they please hurry up with my evaluation, and they do. I’m worried if I don’t do that, I’ll literally never get it.” Professor Susan Marks who is on the committee to reform the evaluation system explained that the current narrative evaluations were not written to be officially shared, and therefore may not be officially shared by the school. “Some people voice the concern that it would be too light and fluffy, that it might just become another recommendation letter,” Marks said. “[…] It’s too bad that all these big bureaucracies need to have all these things in front of them. The reality is nobody who is considering you for graduate school is going to read 30 evaluations, but do they want them? Yes? Does that mean anybody will look at them? How do they look at them?” Marks is unsure of how the new evaluation system will be portrayed to graduate schools. “I think that our students do wonderful work, and it’s important they get taken seriously by grad schools,” Marks said. “Those of us who are on the committee, and those of us who voted in favor, wanted to see it made easier for the graduate schools to take our students’ applications seriously.”

– bears that responsibility, while Green is often tasked with guarding the opponent’s best player, grabbing rebounds like a seven-footer, and dolling out assists like a primary ballhandler. All the while he is posting career-best shooting percentages from three point land with a scorching 42 percent as of November 30. As of November 30, the Warriors are undefeated at 18-0 and presenting a strong case for a championship repeat. The new record for most wins to begin a season will not be set until the team loses, and with an only moderately challenging upcoming schedule, this now historic team might just continue to redefine the way the game is played.

importantly, “Star Wars” absolutely needs to eliminate the wacky misadventures that distract from the central plot. Jar Jar Binks was beyond awful, not only as a character but also his involvement in the story: stumbling around and making mistakes that somehow led to victory for the good guys. George Lucas put so many wacky misadventures into the prequel trilogy that it dragged the first two movies of the trilogy down tremendously. I would love to see a “Star Wars” movie that is focused on the incredible story of the franchise and not be distracted from that story with stupid misadventures. I want to see the grit of the original trilogy in the new movies, not George Lucas’s phenomenalized side plots. With the new movie less than a month away, “Star Wars” fans are both excited and incredibly nervous to see the next generation of one of their favorite cinematic universes. Hopefully, Disney has learned a lesson from the fans’ responses to George Lucas’ creative decisions, and the movie succeeds. After having to stomach a mostly awful prequel trilogy, not many fans of the franchise are exactly confident for the new movies to be done right, but we just will not know until we see it for ourselves.

Holidays CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8 gifts than food during the holidays. 21 percent: Amount of shoppers going mobile. Smartphones will play a role in how people will purchase present this year. 1.6 billion: Number of cards purchased during the holidays, averaging about five cards per person in the United States. Christmas is by far the biggest holiday in terms of card spending. It trumps nearly every holiday by a long shot. 50 percent: Amount of people who ask for gift cards as gifts. 150 million: Amount of chocolate Santas made annually. 181: Amount of countries GDP the United States retail sales ($630.5 billion) will surpass. Among these countries are Argentina ($610 billion), Sweden ($580 billion), Poland ($526 billion), Belgium ($525 billion) and Nigeria ($522 billion). 94 percent: Number of Americans who celebrate Christmas. For every one American who celebrates Hanukkah, 14 Americans celebrate Christmas. For every one American who celebrates Kwanza, 49 Americans celebrate Christmas. Information for this article taken from aol. com, reuters.com, nrf.com.

AP Tour CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9 flawless instrumentals, its obvious a decade together has sharpened Mayday Parade’s musicianship. Like As It Is’ dual vocal work between Walters and singer/ guitarist Ben Biss, Mayday Parade adds a layer of interest by switching between three singers – Sanders as the primary, but also drummer Jake Bundrick and bassist Jeremy Lenzo. Eliminating humor-filled onstage banter, most of Sanders’ speaking outside of singing focused on emphasizing how important it was for each and every person in the crowd to be themselves no matter what.

Interested in joining the Catalyst? Attend our spring mini class and email ncfcatalyst@ gmail.com if you have any questions! Be a part of our staff!

Good luck on finals and have a safe winter break! from the Catalyst staff


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Sampling Sarasota Sushi BY PARIESA YOUNG If there is one thing the Sarasota culinary scene is not lacking, it’s sushi. Each week, it seems like a new sushi joint is popping up around town. With so many options, finding your favorite rolls may seem like a delicious chore, so here is your definitive guide to sushi in downtown Sarasota and near New College. Drunken Poet Cafe 1572 Main St. A favorite among New College students for its cozy atmosphere and water served in mason jars, the Drunken Poet recently closed for renovations. The Drunken Poet serves great Thai curries, stir fries and creative sushi rolls, featuring ingredients such as peanut sauce and goat cheese. Until they reopen (soon!), try Painter’s Palate, Drunken Poet’s sister restaurant which is even closer to New College and features late night sushi until 2 a.m. on Friday and Saturday Yume 1532 Main St Yume is a mainstay of Main Street sushi. A few years ago, it moved across the street into a larger, more modern location. Yume serves a classic sushi menu with some flair, with favorite rolls, tempura and big bowls of steaming udon in broth. Try the Homer roll, with steak and bacon, or the Sarasota fireman, which is topped with habanero roe.

Pariesa Young/Catalyst

Sushi at Tsunami Thai and Sushi Bar located on Lockwood Ridge. Pictured is the Mexican roll, scallop sashimi and sushi, masago, tobiko, tuna sashimi, salmon roe with quail egg and the Volcano roll.

Tsunami Sushi and Hibachi Grill 100 Central Ave #1022 Located downtown in the Whole Foods block, Tsunami Sushi is a modern, downtown sushi bar with cool cocktails, friendly service and delicious rolls. Tsunami serves sushi with a Sarasota twist. For a deal, try Happy Hour from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. and enjoy live music every Friday night. Make sure to order the Honeymoon appetizer – a fresh jalapeno stuffed with crab and cream cheese. They also offer delivery with a minimum order of $13.

Utamaro 1900 Main St Utamaro is my go-to for amazing, authentic sushi. Although it is a bit pricier than the other options, Utamaro wins in flavor. Try the agedashi tofu – nearly everywhere else offers this appetizer as a bland plate of fried tofu served with dipping sauce. Utamaro’s tofu is served crispy in a rich broth, sprinkled with bonito flakes. Sashimi and rolls here are classic and authentic, with a variety of cooked, raw and vegetarian options.

Tsunami Thai and Sushi Bar 8404 Lockwood Ridge Rd A recent discovery of mine – and not to be confused with the other Tsunami on Central Ave – Tsunami Thai and Sushi Bar is located off University, in the Walmart shopping center. The atmosphere has a typical sushi bar feel, but Tsunami beats out the others in freshness and quality of ingredients. If you sit at the bar, you can watch the chef filet fish to order. Because I was craving sushi, I didn’t try the Thai menu, but Tsunami offers up a variety of both Thai and Japanese entrees.

Pride of Jamaica BY YADIRA LOPEZ Make a left on Dr. MLK Way. Drive until you see the Jamaican flag. You can’t miss it. The locale is nothing special, but anyone who’s from South Florida knows the drill. Unassuming decor usually hides phenomenal flavors. Pride of Jamaica has been serving up Caribbean delicacies in Newtown since April. Owner Opal Belle cooks all the food – “All of it cooked countrystyle,” Belle said. Walk inside and be assaulted by the smell of spices. Oxtail, stewed chicken, curry goat. Belle scours neighboring Tampa for her herbs and spices. A toasty oven near the door warms up the Jamaican patties. And a nearby fridge contains favorite drinks from the island including Jamaican kola champagne and aloe juice. But if you’re looking for something different, try Belle’s homemade juice made from soursop, a sweet, green-fleshed fruit. Belle is generous with her portions. She’s also just plain generous. When a local student arrived a few minutes late for the discounted lunch, Belle decided to make the $5.99 chicken lunch special available for students with ID at all hours.

Yadira Lopez/Catalyst

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Issue 12, Fall 2015  

Issue 12, Fall 2015  

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