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THE NAVIGATORS’ CENTER at Kamaile Academy

October 2012 Report

85-180 Ala Akau Street Wai‘anae, HI 96792 808.697.7110 www.navigatorscenter.org


The Navigators’ Center at Kamaile Academy: October 2012 Report

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Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

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ABOUT THE NAVIGATORS’ CENTER

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THE SCHOOL: KAMAILE ACADEMY VISION MISSION VALUES LOGO GOALS FOUNDATIONS

6 8 8 8 10 11 14

THE CENTER’S WORK

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FRAMEWORK PROGRAM STRUCTURE ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE

17 18 19

PROGRAMS: STUDENT ACTIVITIES

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STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS PROGRAM FOR AFTERSCHOOL LITERACY SUPPORT (PALS) INTERCESSIONS NAVIGATORS’ SPACE THE KAMAILE CORE VALUES STORE OTHER STUDENT ACTIVITIES PROGRAMS

20 23 26 28 30 32

PROGRAMS: ‘OHANA PROGRAMS

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‘OHANA-CLASSROOM CONNECTIONS ‘OHANA LEARNING SERIES VOLUNTEER PROGRAM MCKINNEY-VENTO HOMELESS ASSISTANCE OTHER ‘OHANA PROGRAMS

33 35 37 39 41

PROGRAMS: OLAKINO MAIKA‘I CENTER

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KAMAILE HEALTH ROOM WAIANAE COAST COMPREHENSIVE HEALTH CENTER (WCCHC) PARTNERSHIP HEALTHY SNACK PROGRAM OTHER ‘OLAKINO MAIKA‘I CENTER PROGRAMS

43 44 48 50

PROGRAMS: CENTER-WIDE INITIATIVES

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COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (ECE) OUTREACH COMMUNICATION COMMUNITY SCHOOLS RESEARCH & COORDINATION

51 52 54 56

www.navigatorscenter.org


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THE STAFF

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APPENDIX A: STUDENT ORGANIZATION CONSTITUTION TEMPLATE

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APPENDIX B: WEBSITE URL’S

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APPENDIX C: SAIL PLAN FOR COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS

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APPENDIX D: LISTING OF COMMUNITY PARTNERS

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www.navigatorscenter.org


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Executive Summary The Navigators' Center at Kamaile Academy seeks to support  the whole child by providing meaningful student activities, rich  family programming, comprehensive health support, and deep  community connections. Largely based on the community  schools model, it is both a place and a system dedicated to the  academic success, social and emotional wellness, and physical  health of Kamaile Academy students. While the Center was  founded in the summer of 2011, the ideas and programs that  make up the Center have been supporting Kamaile Academy's  students for years. The Navigators' Center is meant to build  upon this work as a location and framework where all of these  efforts can come together to ensure that Kamaile Academy's  haumana (students) receive the aloha (love) they deserve.  This report details the efforts of the Navigators’ Center during the first quarter of its second year of  operation. Below are some highlights from the work within the main pillars of programming.   Student Activities  • Student Organizations: 70% of groups have made steps toward regular contact with a community  partner.  • After‐school: The PALS program will provide free after‐school programming to 96 Kamaile students in  grades 1‐8.  • Navigators’ Space: Each week, an average of 5 teachers and 2.5 community members utilized the  Navigators’ Center facilities.  • Kamaile Core Values Store: 34.8% of students in grades preK‐6 have “purchased” an item from the store.    ‘Ohana (Family) Programs  • ‘Ohana‐Classroom Connections: 7.4% of Kamaile students have had a family member attend an event.  • ‘Ohana Learning Series: 3.3% of Kamaile students have had a family member attend an event.  • Volunteer Program: 7.1% of students have a family member registered as a volunteer on campus, and  1376.25 hours of service have been logged thus far this year.  • McKinney Vento Homeless Assistance: 66.7% of identified students’ families have had a personal meeting  to learn about their rights and available resources.    Olakino Maika‘i Health Center  • Health Room: 97.4% of all students have met all basic health requirements for school entry.  • Medical Trailer: After 18 months of work, the school has secured full legal rights over the trailer.  • Vision: 250 students were screened in one day, accounting for 26.8% of our student population and just  over half of our K‐3 students.  • Dental: Dr. Dan Fujii has held dental health education sessions with all preschool and kindergarten  classrooms and has screened 38.4% of the kindergarten class  • WCCHC/ATSU Medical Students: Second year medical students have begun weekly health education  lessons with two 3rd grade classrooms as a part of their “Mini Docs” program.  • Healthy Snack Program: 75.7% of students are eating a healthy snack daily as reported by teachers.      www.navigatorscenter.org


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    Center‐Wide Initiatives  • Community Partnerships: 9 organizations have completed Sail Plans for Community Partnerships.  • ECE Outreach: 47.5% of K families have participated in at least one ‘Ohana Programs event   • Communication: 1,206 visitors from 242 cities and 15 different countries have accessed the Navigators’  Center website.    Last year was an exciting year of learning and exploration for the new Navigators’ Center. Though still young  and learning, the Center began its second year with the intention of substantiating the successes achieved  and deepening its core foundations. The summer months and beginning of the school were a rich period of  reflection. In terms of our actual work, we revised each of our programs’ strategic plans using our first set of  true baseline data and also developed and implemented a planning framework for our community  partnerships. All programs are now underway with lessons from last year in mind and clear paths to surpass  the results of last year. Community partners have now articulated their commitment to students and families  of Kamaile and are aligned with school wide academic wellness goals. Despite the normal obstacles  presented by the opening of the school year—including new staff in key positions—the Center has already  begun to see real gains among students, families, and the broader community.  As important as the actual work is, the Navigators’ Center is determined to remain true to and deepen is core  foundations. Perhaps most importantly, the Center aims to be the access point through which the school  community—students, families, staff, and community—take true ownership of the school. Great strides  have been made to substantiate the roles of the Student Government Association, Parent Council, grade  level teams, and Partners Alliance with Kamaile Academy. In addition, the Center looks to deepen its  connections with the broader community. We continually share our work with anyone interested and have  hosted visitors interested in all aspects of our work, ranging from homeless support to health services. At  the same time, we look to learn from others by attending multiple conferences and keeping up with relevant  research and projects. Finally, we have dedicated special attention to our vision, mission, and values, both to  reaffirm our commitment to those foundations and also to acknowledge that they are living principles,  which are constantly evolving to meet the promise and potential of our students and school community.     

The full October 2012 Report can be viewed  online at www.navigatorscenter.org. 

www.navigatorscenter.org


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About the Navigators’ Center Kamaile Academy believes fully in the infinite worth of every student. The traditional school environment,  however, often fails to provide opportunities for our students to discover, develop, and share their unique  gifts. Moreover, the health, family, and community support structures needed to foster such infinite worth  are often ignored or never established. The Navigators' Center seeks to support the whole child by providing  meaningful student activities, rich family programming, comprehensive health support, and deep community  connections.  Largely based on the community schools model, the Navigators’ Center is both a place and a system  dedicated to the academic success, comprehensive health and wellness, and community support of Kamaile.  While the Center was founded in the summer of 2011, the ideas and programs that make up the Center have  been supporting Kamaile Academy's students for years. On campus and throughout our community, many  individuals and organizations have made invaluable contributions to our students and school. The  Navigators' Center is meant to build upon this work as a location and framework where all of these efforts  can come together to ensure that Kamaile Academy's haumana (students) receive the aloha (love) they  deserve.  

 

The School: Kamaile Academy Kamaile Academy is a PreK – 11 public conversion charter school located on the Wai‘anae Coast of O‘ahu.  Wai‘anae is home to many of those socioeconomically and ethnically marginalized in Hawai‘i. Nationally in  2010, 15.7% of families with children under 18 and 13.8% of individuals fell below the poverty level, while in the  state of Hawai‘i those rates were 10.0% and 9.6% respectively. Rates in Wai‘anae eclipsed both of those  baselines as 20.0% of families with children and 15.6% of individuals were below the poverty level.1 Of the  13,177 residents of the community, the highest prevalence of any ethnic group2 is Native Hawaiian and other  Pacific Islanders at 69.4%.3 While poverty’s impact on educational attainment is similar across localities,  studies have shown that Native Hawaiians have performed especially low on most measures relative to  other ethnic groups.4   At Kamaile Academy, 78.7% of students live in economic hardship5 (compared to a statewide average of  46.9%6) while 58.9% of students identify primarily as being of Native Hawaiian ancestry.7 Moreover, 14.1% of  students at the school have been identified as homeless or residing in emergency/transitional housing.8 As  1 United States Census Bureau. (n.d.) SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5Year Estimates (Waianae CDP, Hawaii, and national reports). Retrieved from http://factfinder2.census.gov/ 2 Self-reported as “race alone or in combination with one or more races.” 3 United States Census Bureau. (n.d.) Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data, Waianae CDP, Hawaii. Retrieved from http://factfinder2.census.gov/ 4 Benham, M. K. (2006). Pacific Islander scholars: What the research literature teaches us about out work. Race Ethnicity and Education 9(1), 29-50; and Kao, G. & Thompson, J. S. (2003). Racial and ethnic stratification in educational achievement and attainment. Annual Review of Sociology, 29, 417–443. 5 As measured by those students qualifying for free or reduced meals as of October 1, 2012. 6 National Center for Educational Statistics (n.d.) State Education Data Profiles: Hawaii Elementary and Secondary Education Characteristics 2010-2011. Retrieved from http://nces.ed.gov/programs/stateprofiles 7 As reported on student registration forms as of October 1, 2012. Note that this percentage does not account for those students who identify with another race as their primary ethnicity but are still part Hawaiian. 8 These are students receiving special support from the Navigators’ Center after being identified under the McKinney Vento Act.

www.navigatorscenter.org


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would be expected from trends associating such socioeconomic and demographic factors with academic  achievement, results from state assessments clearly evidence the achievement gap that exists. While 70.4%  and 58.6% of students across Hawai`i met proficiency in reading and math respectively on annual statewide  standardized test in SY 2011‐2012, only 35.7% of Kamaile students were proficient in reading and only 23.2% in  math.9  Situated in what would conventionally be labeled a “high need” and “high risk” community, the school  community of Kamaile Academy deliberately chooses to focus on the talents, potential, and culture each of  our students possesses. The vision of our school is “where learning leads to endless opportunities and  infinite worth.” Faculty, staff, families, and community members are bound by the belief that education is  the path by which those positive assets of our children will lead to endless opportunities for their future and  the realization of each individual’s infinite worth. As the “Home of the Navigators,” Kamaile Academy  believes fully that with an appreciation for where they come from along with the proper training, they can  navigate their lives to wherever they want to go.  Our mission is “to prepare self‐directed, self‐aware, college‐ready learners who will embrace the challenges  of obstacles, experience the pride of perseverance and accomplishments, and demonstrate the strength of  ‘ohana (family) and community.” The school community at Kamaile Academy believes that our school must  foster in each child, from pre‐school through 12th grade, an intrinsic drive toward achievement and  betterment, enabling them to be become self‐directed learners. Throughout this process of growth, we also  seek to instill in each child a self‐awareness of her or his own academic, social, emotional, and physical  growth. In a community that has experienced years of academic underachievement, college‐readiness has  become the clear marker by which teachers, staff, and families will measure our school’s success. While all of  these are noble goals, we recognize the daunting challenges faced in our community. Rather than trying to  separate the child from this environment, we look to develop the ability of our students to embrace the  obstacles in life as opportunities for growth. In this way, we hope that each child experiences the pride that  comes with perseverance and eventual success. All the while, our school promotes the strength and support  that can be found in family and community. Keeping with the metaphor, we hope to see our students follow  the path of the traditional Polynesian navigators—disciplined training, cooperation with a crew, and respect  for one’s roots enabling one to cross oceans of great struggle toward new lands of discovery.                        9

Scores as reported on the Hawai‘i Department of Education’s online Longitudinal Data System.

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Vision Empowering students to navigate their infinite worth  The overall��vision of Kamaile Academy is “where learning leads to endless opportunity and infinite worth.”  The Navigators’ Center supports this vision directly by providing a broad set of support structures and  programs that are aimed at supporting learning in ways that reach beyond the walls of the classroom.  Through this support, we look to empower students to chart their own courses in school and in life, courses  that will enable each and every student to realize her and his own full potential. 

 

Mission The Kamaile Navigators’ Center will engage, support, and challenge students to connect with their community,  develop their whole selves, and contribute meaningfully to their world.   The broad mission of the Navigators’ Center is to support the education of Kamaile Academy students. To  promote learning, we believe students must be engaged by the content and instruction, supported by a  variety of individuals, and challenged always to push themselves further. For this to happen, we feel that  students must be connected to the broader community; must nurture their social, emotional, and physical  needs along with their academic selves; and must constantly be driven by a deeper sense of justice to give  back to their world. 

 

Values The guiding values of the Navigators’ Center were developed to align directly with the broader values of  Kamaile Academy. During the summer of 2012, the Navigators’ Center led an initiative to revisit the core  values of the school and explore how these values could play a primary role in driving the education students  receive at Kamaile. The Center organized and facilitated focus groups with students, family members, school  leadership, faculty, and community partners to draft and adopt a Graduate Profile that defines the  expectations of all students who seek to earn a high school diploma from Kamaile Academy. Throughout this  process, it was clear that the core values would be a foundation to drive all of our efforts at Kamaile, from  day‐to‐day instruction in the classroom to annual program planning in the Navigators’ Center.   The graphic that follows illustrates this progression from the school’s core values, to the vision of a Kamaile  graduate, to the academic objectives in the classroom, and finally to the role of the Navigators’ Center. All  efforts of the Center will find their purpose in supporting these student outcomes, and all programs will be  designed, evaluated, and modified to fit these criteria.         

www.navigatorscenter.org


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Logo             The Navigators’ Center logo was created to capture the essence of its vision, mission, and values. The center  of the logo features a traditional Polynesian wa‘a, or canoe, voyaging on the ocean. The canoe represents  our navigators, the students of Kamaile Academy, as they are currently finding their own paths to their  futures through education. They are at the center of the logo because they are at the center of everything  we do. As the apostrophe in our name suggests, the Navigators’ Center is truly their center. This metaphor  of navigation can also be taken literally as the image of the wa‘a was created from an actual photograph of  our Kamaile students training on the ocean with the Polynesian Voyaging Society.  Behind the canoe that symbolizes our students is the ocean that represents their lives. We believe that  education is the primary route by which young people can develop their full potential, encounter life  opportunities, and realize their dreams. Our role in the Center is to support them in this journey by nurturing  their potential on multiple levels, bringing opportunities to them, and encouraging them to follow their  dreams. In all of them we hope to instill the value of ‘imi ‘ike (to seek knowledge) while at the same time  encouraging them to learn the importance of olakino maika‘i (to live healthily). We seek to be the crew  backing our students as they navigate through their educational experiences.  The left hand side of the logo depicts the departure point of our students, the Wai‘anae Coast. We believe  firmly that we must honor our community’s deep values of aloha (love) and ‘ohana (family) through the  families, cultures, traditions, and values from which our students come. We want our students to develop a  sense of ha‘aheo (pride) in their roots and to carry that identity with them throughout their life journeys.  Moreover, the Navigators’ Center seeks to build off of the wonderful people, resources, and practices  already present in our community. Rather than duplicate services or create new programs, our aim is laulima  (cooperation)—bringing to our students that which is already present in their home community.  Finally, on the right hand side of the logo is our students’ destination point, that same Wai‘anae Coast. While  we would support any student who wants to stay in our community when they grow older (and hopefully  work in the Navigators’ Center!), we in no way mean to say that we expect our students to remain in the  Wai‘anae area for their entire lives. Rather, we hope that our students learn that their kuleana  (responsibility) is to never forget from where they came and to always give back to those that brought them  to where they are. Every student possesses a special gift, and it is the kuleana of each to give that gift back  to the world. Beyond academic success, social and emotional wellness, and physical health, we strive for our  students to develop na‘auao (to nurture a deep sense of enlightened knowledge and justice) in order to be  able to give back to their community. In the same way, the whole mission of the Navigators’ Center is to lift  up our students and their community. Our destination is the realization of every student’s potential as well  as the potential of this community as a whole.  www.navigatorscenter.org


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Goals To navigate successfully, a voyage must have a clear destination in mind. The Navigators’ Center finds its  destination in the success and wellbeing of our students. In the spirit of Kamaile Academy’s values and in line  with the Results Framework produced by the National Coalition for Community Schools10, the following  overarching goals serve as benchmark indicators for the Navigators’ Center:  1. Academics: Kamaile Academy students will successfully advance through all levels of school (PreK‐12),  demonstrate mastery at benchmark and graduation points, and enter into a post‐secondary education  program.  2. Health: Kamaile Academy students will achieve and maintain comprehensive health and wellness— physical, social, and emotional.  3. Community: Kamaile Academy students will enjoy the support, safety, and stability of involved families  and community.  In order to ensure that these goals remain the ultimate destination toward which all of our work is directed,  the Navigators’ Center utilizes the following long‐term strategies as a foundation for our work. 

  Goal #1 

Academics: Kamaile Academy students will successfully advance through all  levels of school (PreK‐12), demonstrate mastery at benchmark and  graduation points, and enter into a post‐secondary education program. 

  Strategic ("SMART") Goal Setting:  1. What is the specific goal to be  • reached in this area of growth?  • What will be done to grow in    this area?  2. What criteria will measure the  • progress and growth in this  area?  What will indicate the  goal has been attained?  3. What support, learning and  • dispositions will be needed in  • order to reach the goal? 

• •

Student academic success  Academic emphasis on all programming and partnerships  95% grade level passing rates; 75% proficient test scores; 80%  proficient benchmark performances; 100% graduation rate  Students are challenged and engaged  Opportunities for remediation/enrichment are provided  Community partners and families provide support for student  success  Teachers are provided support in creating meaningful learning  opportunities 

  4. How long will it take to reach  the goal?  What/when are the  key benchmarks that will show  progress? 

• •

3 years from Nav Center’s founding in summer of 2011  First high school graduating class in SY 2013‐2014 

 

10 Lubell, E. (2011). Building Community Schools: A Guide for Action. New York: The Children’s Aid Society, National Center for Community Schools. See the “Community Schools Framework for Student Success” on Page 19.

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The Navigators’ Center at Kamaile Academy: October 2012 Report

  Goal #2 

Health: Kamaile Academy students will achieve and maintain  comprehensive health and wellness—physical, social, and emotional. 

  Strategic ("SMART") Goal Setting:  1. What is the specific goal to be  • reached in this area of growth?  • What will be done to grow in  this area?    2. What criteria will measure the  • progress and growth in this  area?  What will indicate the  • goal has been attained? 

3. What support, learning and  dispositions will be needed in  order to reach the goal? 

• •

Student physical, social, and emotional wellness and health  Physical, social, and/or emotional components embedded  within all programming and partnerships  90% of students show satisfactory progress on Kamaile  Wellness Plan  80% positive feedback on Student Wellness Survey  Sustainable establishment of the Olakino Maika‘i Kamaile  Health Center  Student Activities must be piloted, scaled up, and maintained  with a focus on physical/social/emotional criteria in addition  to academic purposes  ‘Ohana Programs and community partnerships must be  piloted, scaled up, and maintained to support the  physical/social/emotional development of students  A close relationship with the Kamaile Counseling Center must  be maintained to monitor and address social/emotional needs  and concerns of students  Close relationships with the Kamaile Health Room and  WCCHC must be maintained to monitor and address physical  health needs and concerns of students  Collaboration must be achieved with Elementary Character  Education programs and Middle/High School Advisory  program  School staff, families, and community must collaborate to  meet physical/social/emotional needs of students  Appropriate surveys and date tools must be created,  administered, and maintained 

  4. How long will it take to reach  the goal?  What/when are the  key benchmarks that will show  progress? 

• • •

3 years from Nav Center’s founding in summer of 2011  First high school graduating class in SY 2013‐2014  Biannual survey administration (beginning and end of year)  will track progress   

    www.navigatorscenter.org

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The Navigators’ Center at Kamaile Academy: October 2012 Report

  Goal #3 

Community: Kamaile Academy students will enjoy the support, safety, and  stability of involved families and community.   

  Strategic ("SMART") Goal Setting:  1. What is the specific goal to be  • reached in this area of growth?  What will be done to grow in  • this area? 

Family and community involvement with, engagement in, and  ownership of students’ education  Family and community components embedded within all  programs and partnerships 

  2. What criteria will measure the  progress and growth in this  area?  What will indicate the  goal has been attained?  3. What support, learning and  dispositions will be needed in  order to reach the goal? 

• • • •

• •

50% of students have family participate meaningfully in  ‘Ohana Programs  10 meaningful community partnerships  80% Positive Feedback on Family/Community Surveys  Student Activities,  ‘Ohana Programs, Olakino Maika‘i Health  Center activities, and community partnerships must be  piloted, scaled up, and maintained to allow for family and  community involvement  Regular and meaningful communication mechanisms with  families and communities must be piloted, scaled up, and  maintained  School staff, families, and community must collaborate to  meet academic and health needs of students  Appropriate surveys and date tools must be created,  administered, and maintained 

  4. How long will it take to reach  the goal?  What/when are the  key benchmarks that will show  progress? 

• • •

3 years from Nav Center’s founding in summer of 2011  First high school graduating class in SY 2013‐2014  Biannual survey administration (beginning and end of year)  will track progress 

 

   

  www.navigatorscenter.org

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Foundations The Center defines its purpose out of inspiration from the local traditions of  Wai‘anae, Hawai‘i, and our school’s identity as the Home of the Navigators. The  navigation theme aligns the Center’s work with the experience of traditional  Polynesian voyagers.11 On one level, voyagers must rely on their environment  for all of their support and direction—the stars, the ocean, the birds, the winds. At Kamaile, we, too, must  rely upon our own environment, which is the families and broader community from which our students  come, to find our direction and steer the course. At the same time, the voyagers need to maintain  themselves—mentally, physically, socially, and emotionally—in order for the canoe to utilize those natural  guides. In order to utilize the richness of our environment, we, too, must engage and nurture the  comprehensive needs of our students. Furthermore, voyagers always navigate with a clear purpose and  destination, constantly checking their progress on that course. Through innovative, meaningful, and  comprehensive data collection, we must track our progress toward our goal of the wellbeing and success of  the whole child. Finally, in moving their canoe forward, the voyagers advanced not only themselves but their  entire people, allowing for even greater��understanding and utilization of those original natural foundations  in their environment. As we move toward every Kamaile student realizing his or her infinite worth, we see  their individual development promoting the development of our broader community.  The original plans for the Navigators’ Center came largely out of a formal research study conducted in 2009‐ 2010 by a Master’s student within the College of Education at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. The  purpose of this study was to gather insights of members of the Kamaile school community on the  implementation of plans to bring the community school model to Kamaile Academy, an idea very much in  line with the mission of the Navigators’ Center.  The community schools model is a clear fit for the work that has been occurring at Kamaile Academy for  years and for the plans that the Navigators’ Center has to continue this work. The Coalition for Community  Schools, which advocates for community schools across the nation, describes the model as such:  “A community school is both a place and a set of partnerships between school and community. It has  an integrated focus on academics, youth development, family support, health and social services,  and community development… The community school is uniquely equipped to develop an educated  citizenry, to strengthen family and community, and to nurture democracy in the twenty‐first  century.”12   The community schools movement has gained much momentum in the past couple of decades, spreading  across the United States and the globe. The National Center for Community Schools in New York City has  done a wonderful job documenting the origins, development, and spread of the model both in research and  in practice.13  Research has proven the positive impact that the core elements of the community school approach can have  on young people and their education. On the front of after‐school activities, multiple studies have illustrated  the positive impact structured programming can have on youth academically and beyond, including socially 

11 For one of many works detailing traditional Polynesian “wayfinding” and its modern-day practice, see the following: Kyselka, Will. (1987). An Ocean in Mind. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press. 12 From http://www.communityschools.org 13 Lubell, E. (2011). Building Community Schools: A Guide for Action. New York: The Children’s Aid Society, National Center for Community Schools.

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and behaviorally.  Likewise, focusing on the development of not just academic skills but the whole child— socially, emotionally, physically, morally, and vocationally—is shown to have long‐lasting benefits on  children.15 Community schools’ specific focus on physical health is further rooted in research that  demonstrates disparities in fundamental, education‐related health indicators among poor, minority youth  who as a group are also underperforming academically as is well known through the national achievement  gap.16 The model’s emphasis on schools involving families and communities in meaningful and substantial  ways is also shown to have significant positive influence on the development of youth and the success of  schools on the whole.17 Lastly, experts have recognized the community school pillar of partnering with  outside organizations and resources to support students as a key strategy in successful school  turnarounds.18 The evidence is there to support the importance of all the key components of the community  school.  Though all of the components of a community school have been supported, one could still ask the question  of whether those benefits would still occur if all of those individual aims were combined within one effort,  exactly as community schools set out to do. In this line of thinking, it is important to note that the notion of  community schools is by no means new. The great John Dewey recognized the potential impact of such an  effort at the beginning of the 20th century:  “We may say that the conception of the school as a social centre [sic] is born of our entire  democratic movement. Everywhere we see signs of the growing recognition that the community  owes to each one of its members the fullest opportunity for development… This is no longer viewed  as a matter of charity, but as a matter of justice—nay, even of something higher and better than  justice—a necessary phase of developing and growing life.”19  According to the National Center for Community Schools,20 the community schools model can be traced  back to the work of individuals like Jane Addams in the late 1800s in urban settlement houses for newly  arrived immigrants. As evidenced by the quote from Dewey above, advocates began calling for schools to  fulfill a larger purpose in society and to play a central role in the community in the early 1900s. Support from  actors like the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation in the 1930s and 1960s with their investments in community  education furthered the mission. The modern push for community schools can be attributed largely to the  work of groups like Beacons, Bridges to Success, Children’s Aid Society, and some university‐assisted efforts  in the 1980s and 1990s that were a response to the growing body of research on the education of children  living in poverty.  From these roots, various interpretations of the community schools model have arisen in locations across 43  states in the U.S. and 69 countries across the globe.21 The model has also been the subject of a breadth of 

Clark, R. M. (1988). Critical Factors in Why Disadvantaged Students Succeed or Fail in School. New York: Academy for Educational Development; McLaughlin, M.W. (2000). Community Counts: How Youth Organizations Matter for Youth Development. Washington, D.C.: Public Education Network; and Vandell, D.L., Reisner, E.R., and Pierce, K.M. (2007). Outcomes Linked to High-Quality Afterschool Programs: Longitudinal Findings from the Study of Promising Afterschool Programs. Washington, D.C.: Policy Studies Associates. 15 Eccles, J.S. (1999). The development of children ages 6 to 14. The Future of Children: When School is Out, 9(2), 30-44. 16 Basch, C.E. (2010). Healthier Students are Better Learners. New York: The Campaign for Educational Equity, Teachers College. 17 Bryk, A.S., et al. (2010). Organizing Schools for Improvement: Lessons from Chicago. Chicago: University of Chicago Press; Epstein, J.L. (1995). School/family/community partnerships: Caring for the children we share. Phi Delta Kappan, 77(9), 701-712; and Weiss, H. B., Lopez, M. E., and Rosenberg, H. (2010). Beyong Random Acts: Family, School, and Community Engagement as an Integral Part of Education Reform. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Family Research Project. 18 Pappano, L. (2010). Inside School Turnarounds: Urgent Hopes, Unfolding Stories. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press. 19 Dewey, J. (1902). The school as social centre. The Elementary School Teacher, 3(2), 73-86. (p. 86) 20 Lubell, E. (2011). Building Community Schools: A Guide for Action. New York: The Children’s Aid Society, National Center for Community Schools. 21 Ibid. 14

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research studies that have on the whole shown promising results in terms of both educational outcomes and  overall youth development.22  Educationally, the Center looks to the foundations laid by the likes of John Dewey23 who developed the idea  of educating young people by rooting learning in experience, appealing to all of the needs of the child, and  nurturing a drive within students to better themselves through learning. Within contemporary education  trends, the Center looks largely to the whole child approach, which declares, “Each child, in each school, in  each of our communities deserves to be healthy, safe, engaged, supported, and challenged.”24   In a very broad sense, the Center is driven by the conception of “development as freedom” championed by  the Nobel laureate Amartya Sen.25 This view posits that true human development provides the social  arrangements necessary for an individual to realize her full agency as a human being. The Center seeks to  provide the comprehensive support structure necessary for the students of Kamaile to discover, nurture,  and share their infinite worth. Ultimately, the students’ development may promote the similar development  of individuals in their families and the broader community.                 

Whole Child Tenets (www.wholechildeducation.org/about) • Each student enters school healthy and learns about and practices a healthy lifestyle. • Each student learns in an intellectually challenging environment that is physically and emotionally safe for students and adults. • Each student is actively engaged in learning and is connected to the school and broader community. • Each student has access to personalized learning and is supported by qualified, caring adults. • Each graduate is challenged academically and prepared for success in college or further study and for employment in a global environment.

    The Coalition for Community Schools (www.communityschools.org)

“A community school is both a place and a set of partnerships between school and community. It has an integrated focus on academics, youth development, family   support, health and social services, and community development… The community school is uniquely equipped to develop an educated citizenry, to strengthen family   and community, and to nurture democracy in the twenty-first century.”  

  Dryfoos, J.G. (1994). Full-Service Schools: A Revolution in Health and Social Services for Children, Youth, and Families. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers; Dryfoos, J. G. (1995). Full service schools: Revolution or Fad? Journal of Research on Adolescence, 5(2), 147172; Dryfoos, J. (2002). Full-service community schools: Creating new institutions. Phi Delta Kappan, 83(5), 393-399; Dryfoos, J. G. (2003). A community school in action. Reclaiming Children and Youth, 11(4), 203-205; Dryfoos, J. (2005). Full-service community schools: A strategy—not a program. New Directions for Youth Development, 107, 7-14; Kronick, R. F. (2005). Full Service Community Schools: Prevention of Delinquency in Students with Mental Illness and/or Poverty. Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas; and Robison, E. (1993). An Interim Evaluative Report Concerning a Collaboration between the Children's Aid Society, New York City Board of Education, Community School District 6, and the I.S. 218 Salome Urena de Henriquez School [and] The Community Schools P.S. 5 and I.S. 218 Spring 1994 Update. New York: Graduate School of Social Service of Fordham University. 23 For one of many examples, see Dewey’s Democracy and Education. 24 See http://www.wholechildeducation.org 25 Sen, A. (2000). Development as Freedom. Harpswell, ME: Anchor. 22

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The Center’s Work The Navigator’s Center roots all of its work in the foundation of the core values of Kamaile Academy and  aims all of its efforts at promoting the three overarching goals of the Center. While the Center is still very  new and many lessons are yet to be learned, the values and goals have mapped a fairly clear pathway by  which to navigate our work.   

Framework  The graphic below illustrates the broad structure through which the Navigators’ Center operates.                            First and foremost, located in the center of the graphic, is the primary focus of all of the Center’s work: the  students of Kamaile Academy. These are the Navigators to whom all of our efforts are directed, and every  project undertaken by the Navigators’ Center must be able to be traced back to them. The Navigators’  Center’s name is just that because it truly is the Center of the Navigators, the students of Kamaile.  Moving to the bottom of the illustration, the foundations of our work come from data and community  partnerships. By data, here, we do mean the conventionally conceived facts and figures derived from formal  measures, but we also value the more informal information generated from day‐to‐day experiences with  students and interactions with the community. To put it simply, all of the work of the Navigators’ Center  must align with a need or desire readily found in the school community. When working under such sweeping  banners of academic success, social and emotional wellness, and physical health, it is easy to validate the  existence of almost any program. By staying true to the information coming for the community, however,  we ensure that all of our work has real and reliable value. In addition, the Center seeks to root all of its work  www.navigatorscenter.org


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in community partnerships. Despite the high levels of need in our community, we firmly believe in the wealth  of support found in the organizations and individuals already working in our area. The Navigators’ Center  does not intend to create new projects in the community, but rather to connect our students and school  with the invaluable work already being done. Rather than compete or take away from other community  actors, all of our programs are designed to bring these wonderful resources to our school. Just as the  traditional navigators looked to their stars, traditions, and crew for direction, so do we find our course in our  school community.  Moving up the graphic, all of the data and community partners drive our various programs that fall into three  interrelated categories: Student Activities, ‘Ohana (family) Programs, and the Olakino Maika‘i Health Center.  Every program in each of these pillars must be targeted at students, and each must drive the three  overarching goals of the Center: academic success, comprehensive wellness, and community support. The  navigator must keep the crew focused on keeping the canoe on the right path, and our Center seeks to stay  true to our goals by supporting our students and families in their educational journey.  Finishing the upward progression through the graphic, in working toward these goals, the primary outcome  sought by the Navigators’ Center is the development of the whole child, thus empowering each and every  student of Kamaile Academy to achieve success down whatever path she chooses to steer her life. Once  theses children are able to realize their full potential, then their development will naturally spill over into the  broader community and truly bring to life the vision of an inclusive learning village at Kamaile Academy. The  data gathered from our successes and failures will then feed directly back into shaping the work of the  Center. When the destination is reached, the navigator’s experience does not fade but rather becomes the  guiding tradition for all the navigators who are to come.   

Program Structure  To promote our core values and work toward our goals, the Center designs, manages, and monitors  programs across three primary areas: Student Activities, ‘Ohana (or Family) Programs, and the Olakino  Maika'i Center  (Kamaile Health Center).                        www.navigatorscenter.org


The Navigators’ Center at Kamaile Academy: October 2012 Report

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Underlying our three primary pillars of programming are center‐wide focus areas. In the spirit of the  community schools model, community partnerships are sought to support Navigators’ Center programming  wherever appropriate. A strict commitment to transparency means that everything that happens in the  Navigators Center is communicated to the entire school community through our website, monthly  newsletters, quarterly reports, and various meeting structures. Furthermore, while the Center supports  students at all grade levels, the importance of providing all learners strong foundations has led us to adopt a  special focus on early childhood education (ECE). Finally, all programs are data‐driven, ensuring that our  efforts align with the assets and needs of our school community while maintaining a firm standard of quality. 

Organizational Structure The organizational structure has been continually reworked and developed to best fit the work of the Center.   Most of the Navigators’ Center work is overseen directly by the Center’s staff. Currently, a Director leads the  broad efforts of the Center including the development of Center aims and areas of focus, fostering of  community partnerships, tracking of progress, supervision of staff, and maintenance of communication  systems. The Center Coordinator oversees much of the Center’s day‐to‐day operations including facility  management, school community relations, and support of all programs. Program Coordinators are the direct  managers for the various programs run out of the Center. Various other staff members throughout the  school support this programming including the school health aides and some part‐time employees.   The Center is also directly linked with the school’s overall organizational structure. The Center Director is a  member of school’s leadership team, which consists of the school Principal, three Associate Principals, and  Counseling Center Director. This allows the Navigators’ Center to align directly with the work of the school  and ensure support for the Center’s programming. Moreover, the Center’s staff is linked to the various grade  levels throughout the school. The Director is a member of the Middle/High School Lead Team; the Early  Childhood Education (ECE) staff members work directly with grade PreK‐3 teachers; and another Center staff  member coordinates with the teams of grades 4‐6. These structures allow the Navigators’ Center to connect  directly with students, teachers, staff, and leadership throughout the school.  Outside of these direct school links, the Center also seeks the engagement and ownership of parents and  families from the school community. As the Center strongly supports all of the work of the school’s Parent  Teacher Organization (PTO), Center staff members sit on the PTO Executive Board. The Center has also  linked with the PTO to form a Parent Council made up of parent representatives from each grade level. This  Parent Council provides a forum for family members to become directly involved with the work of the Center.  Finally, the Center looks outside of the direct school  community for support and guidance. Currently, 14 various  organizations are listed as official Community Partners that  work directly with our students and families. Aside from the  regular communication that occurs with these partners, the  Center also engages them through the Partners Alliance, a  more structured setting that allows them to drive the work  of the Center and also explore areas to coordinate with each  other. Additionally, the Navigators’ Center has supported  the school Principal in her efforts to reestablish the school’s  Local Advisory Panel (LAP), which is a body made up of  various community members who oversee the work of the  school in an advisory capacity. The Center looks to utilize this  LAP as yet another mechanism by which the community can  direct, oversee, and own the work of the Navigators’ Center.   www.navigatorscenter.org


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Programs: Student Activities  This section begins the reporting on the progress of the various programs managed by the Navigators’  Center, starting with Student Activities. Launching into its second year of operation, the Center looks to  build upon the successes and lessons learned from last year. All goals have been established based on the  baseline data gathered at the end of last year. For each program, there will be a general overview, a strategic  planning framework similar to the ones used for the Center’s overarching goals, and a summary of any data  collected to this point in the year.  One of the three main pillars of the Navigators' Center’s programs is Student Activities. These co‐curricular  and extracurricular activities are meant to assist, enhance, and augment the instruction Kamaile Academy  teachers provided within the classroom. Maintaining our focus on the whole child and aligning with the  school's core values, each program is meant to support the academic success, comprehensive wellness, and  community support of every Kamaile student.    

Student Organizations Overview Coordinator: Director & Center Coordinator  Community Partner(s): PVS, LCC‐Wai‘anae, Grow Hawai‘i, Ka‘ala CLC  The Student Organization program serves as the official afterschool program for Kamaile Academy Middle  and High Schools. A student organization is a club, group, or team initiated, organized, and run by students  at Kamaile Academy. These can include (but are not limited to) special interest clubs, academic teams,  culturally based groups, and sports clubs. Membership consists of grade 7‐11 students and a Faculty Advisor  from the Kamaile teaching staff. All organizations are also encouraged to link with a Community Advisor  from outside the school and an outside organization that could serve as their Community Partner.  All organizations are designed to align with the core values of Kamaile Academy. Groups must promote  academic success, social and emotional wellness, physical health, community cooperation, and a deep sense  of justice. After filing an initial application online to form a group, all Student Organizations must work with  their Faculty Advisor to draft a Constitution that lays out the structure of their group [see Appendix A]. The  Navigators' Center is here to support students as they create and operate their organizations. 

Strategic Plan & Progress Report What is the specific goal to be reached in this area of growth? What will be done to grow in this area? This is what we want to see happen for our students.

Academics: involvement in a Student Organization (SO) will serve as an incentive toward academic achievement (AA); SO activities will promote AA Health: SO will provide a ‘safe space’ and network of support for students’ social and emotional well-being; SO will promote physical health and fitness on the campus Community: SO will connect with community members and community organizations www.navigatorscenter.org


The Navigators’ Center at Kamaile Academy: October 2012 Report

What criteria will measure the progress and growth in this area? What will indicate the goal has been attained? This hard data will tell us that our vision for our students has been realized.  PROGRESS REPORT

 

Academics: • Average 3.0 GPA of SO participants • Average 3.25 GPA for SO officers The first quarter was used to begin establishing the individual SO, so no specific data on membership is yet available. • 90% of SO abide by Constitutions that reflect a commitment to academic achievement (e.g. through the values of ‘Imi ‘Ike, Ha‘aheo, etc.)  All SO from last year are in the process of updating their Constitutions f from last year, and new groups have begun initial drafts. Health: • 10 SO are in regular operation and open to all MS/HS students 10 SO have made initial steps toward official operation. • 40% of MS/HS students are members of a SO  No specific data on membership is yet available. • 80% positive feedback on Social/Emotional Survey from students and Advisors  Social/Emotional Surveys are still being developed. • 30% of SO will have a primary emphasis on some form of physical health 40% of proposed SO plan to have a primary emphasis on some form of physical health (i.e. Dance, Future Navigators, Gardening, and Paddling). • 90% of SO abide by Constitutions that reflect a commitment to health/wellness (e.g. through the values of Olakino Maika‘i, Aloha, etc.) All SO from last year are in the process of updating their Constitutions from last year, and new groups have begun initial drafts. • Community: • 60% of SO have regular contact with a community partner 70% of SO have made steps toward regular contact with a community partner (i.e., Eco-Tech with 4-H Hawai‘i, Future Navigators with Polynesian Voyaging Society, Gardening Club with Grow Hawai‘i, Ka‘ala and Mauna Farms, Na Alaka‘i Hoe with Makaha Canoe Club, Navigator Records with Boys & Girls Club, Wayfinders with LCC-Wai‘anae, and Tech Club with VEX). • 30% of SO will hold some event to connect with school community 10% of SO have held event to connect with school community (i.e., Wayfinders organized Student Involvement Fair) • 80% of SO will create and maintain websites to connect with the school community Website development will begin once all SO are in regular operation. • 90% of SO abide by Constitutions that reflect a commitment to community (e.g. through the values of ‘Ohana, Laulima, etc.) All SO from last year are in the process of updating their Constitutions from last year, and new groups have begun initial drafts.

 

www.navigatorscenter.org

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The Navigators’ Center at Kamaile Academy: October 2012 Report How will this data be tracked? This is how we will measure and keep track of that hard data.  PROGRESS REPORT

How long will it take to reach the goal? What/when are the key benchmarks that will show progress?

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Database for SO will track all of the indicators above. The Center will need to initiate the following: • SO Constitution template Developed and available to all interested students and faculty • Social/Emotional Survey for students and Faculty Advisors at beginning, middle, and end of school year In development; to be administered before end of Quarter 2 • Faculty Advisor Feedback Form (weekly) Developed and will begin use by end of Quarter 2 • Monthly Faculty Advisor Meetings One held in Quarter 1; regular schedule set for Quarter 2 • Website support Will be initiated in Quarter 2 • Connections with community partners Great progress already made (see above under “Community”) Goals to be achieved by end of 2012-2013 SY. Benchmarks will be tracked in reports to be compiled at the end of every school term.

 

Progress Details In the beginning of the school year, efforts were made to inform students and faculty of the student  organization program and guide them through the process of getting involved. Most of the organizations  from last year are already active again and working on plans for the coming school year. A Student  Involvement Fair was organized during a Middle and High School Community Meeting to allow all grade 7‐11  students the opportunity to learn about the groups already in existence and sign up with those in which they  were interested.  The following 10 groups have made initial steps toward operating as official student organizations (focus in  parentheses if needed):   • • • • • • • •

 

• •

Dance Club  Eco‐Tech Science Mentors  Future Navigators of Kamaile (traditional  Polynesian voyaging)   Gardening Club  Graffiti and Mural Club  Life in Still Photography Club  Na Alaka‘i Hoe (canoe paddling)  Navigator Records (music composing and  recording)  Student Wayfinders (mentoring)  Tech Club (robotics and broadcasting) 

The Future Navigators were invited by the  Polynesian Voyaging Society in August to lead a  welcoming ceremony for Nobel Peace Laureate  Archbishop Desmond Tutu and his family as he  came to bless Hōkūle‘a before her Worldwide  Voyage.   

 

www.navigatorscenter.org


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Program for Afterschool Literacy Support (PALS) Overview Coordinator: PALS Site Coordinator (hired from Kamaile Faculty, funded by PALS); After‐school Academic  Coordinator (hired from Kamaile Faculty, funded by Kamaile)  Community Partner(s): Program for Afterschool Literacy Support (PALS) The Program for Afterschool Literacy Support (PALS) is a program offered through the University of Hawaiʻi  at Mānoa to provide learning opportunities for a predominantly Native Hawaiian population of children on  the Wai’anae coast of Oahu, Hawaii. This partnership served as the primary afterschool program for grades  4‐6 at Kamaile Academy for years. In SY20111‐2012, PALS agreed to train at no cost the Kamaile teachers who  would lead the grades K‐3 afterschool program modeled directly off of the successes of PALS named Ka Ulu  Pono. After last year’s exciting collaboration, the partnership deepened further this year as PALS agreed  once again to train our K‐3 teachers while also identifying Kamaile as the first site to pilot a PALS program for  grades 7‐8.   Set to begin at the end of October, the Navigators’ Center will now be offering 3 levels of this reputable  after‐school model to our students: 2 PALS Jr. courses for grades 1‐3 (with a kindergarten course planned for  the second semester), 3 PALS courses for grades 4‐6, and 1 PALS Sr. course for grades 7‐8. Classess are  offered at no cost to families for 90 minutes 3 days per week.  Below is an overview from their website, which you can visit at www.palshi.org.   "PALS uses a place‐based cultural project (PBCP) curricular framework that embraces the multiple cultural  locations��in which the children exist and utilizes community and place as the springboard for learning.  PBCPs  engage real‐life, ways of knowing and doing and provide integrated opportunities for literacy teaching and  learning across the curriculum.  “Students in PALS engage with teachers and other community members in projects that have relevance to  their own lives and that nurture children’s identities as learners, community activists, and as stewards of the  environment. PALS partners with multiple cultural and educational organizations and individuals including  the Polynesian Voyaging Society (PVS), the Honolulu Academy of Arts, Ka’ala and Hoa ‘Aina O Makaha farms,  and numerous local artists, engaging these community partners as both co‐planners and co‐teachers within  the projects.”   

Strategic Plan & Progress Report What is the specific goal to be reached in this area of growth? What will be done to grow in this area? This is what we want to see happen for our students.

Academics: Students will experience rich educational experiences after school that directly support academic achievement in school. Health: Students will enjoy safe, positive after-school activities that increase health and wellness directly and through education. Community: Family and community will be given regular opportunities to engage with the after-school program.

www.navigatorscenter.org


The Navigators’ Center at Kamaile Academy: October 2012 Report

What criteria will measure the progress and growth in this area? What will indicate the goal has been attained? This hard data will tell us that our vision for our students has been realized.  PROGRESS REPORT

Academics: • 100% of classes will be guided by project-based plans that incorporate academic content standards, 21st Century Learning Skills, and the Kamaile Core Values Teachers will have plans finished by the end of their PALS training in late October. • 70% of students involved in program will earn proficient grades in school Classes for students begin in late October. • All students will receive an average of 1 hour per week dedicated to homework support Plans are for students to receive 1.5 hours per week dedicated to homework support. • 80% positive feedback for academic items on Student Survey • 80% positive feedback for academic items on Family Survey Student and Family Surveys are being developed. Health: • 30% of students in grades K-3 will be enrolled in program • 20% of students in grades K-3 will regularly attend program (80% daily attendance) Present staffing allows for 32 students in grades 1-3, or about 10.6% of students in those grade levels. Attendance data will be available once program begins in late October. • 30% of students in grades 4-6 will be enrolled in program • 20% of students in grades 4-6 will regularly attend program (80% daily attendance) Present staffing allows for 48 students in grades 4-6, or about 17.2% of students in those grade levels. Attendance data will be available once program begins in late October. • 20% of students in grades 7-8 will be enrolled in program • 15% of students in grades 7-8 will regularly attend program (80% daily attendance) Present staffing allows for 16 students in grades 7-8, or about 18.4% of students in those grade levels. Attendance data will be available once program begins in late October. • All students will receive an average of 1 hour per week dedicated to physical health through physical activity or health education Data will be available once program begins. • 80% positive feedback for wellness items on Student Survey • 80% positive feedback for wellness items on Family Survey Student and Family Surveys are being developed. Community: • 50% of students will have family members involved at least once per term • All classes will incorporate a community partner at least once per semester Data will be available once program begins

  www.navigatorscenter.org

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The Navigators’ Center at Kamaile Academy: October 2012 Report How will this data be tracked? This is how we will measure and keep track of that hard data.  PROGRESS REPORT

How long will it take to reach the goal? What/when are the key benchmarks that will show progress?

Database for KUP will track all of the indicators above. The Center will need to initiate the following: • Project Overviews for each class Teachers will have plans finished by the end of their PALS training in late October • Student Surveys at middle and end of year • Family Surveys at middle and end of year Student and Family Surveys are being developed. • Teacher Feedback Form (weekly) Form being developed in conjunction with PALS. • Connections with community partners Teachers are currently receiving support through PALS training. Goals to be achieved by end of 2012-2013 SY. Benchmarks will be tracked in reports to be compiled at the end of every school term.

 

Progress Details 6 training sessions for all PALS Jr., PALS, and PALS Sr. tutors are currently underway at Kamaile Academy  (which is hosting the sessions that are organized for all PALS tutors along the coast). 9 Kamaile faculty  members and 3 outside certified teachers will be leading the courses, with 2 Kamaile faculty members  serving as coordinators of the program. Classes for students are set to begin by the end of October.             

Kamaile Academy is hosting the training  sessions for all PALS tutors from along the  Wai‘anae Coast. Six 90‐minute sessions are  being held to introduce the staff to the  placed‐based cultural project philosophy of  PALS, train them in specific strategies to  enhance literacy with students, and allow  time for them to begin planning their  courses. 

         

www.navigatorscenter.org

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The Navigators’ Center at Kamaile Academy: October 2012 Report

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Intercessions Overview Coordinator: Center Coordinator  Community Partner(s): Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR), City and County of Honolulu  The Navigators’ Center oversees the education programs at Kamaile Academy offered during the winter,  spring, and summer break periods. Intercessions are designed to be both academic in nature but also highly  engaging for students. Teachers are given the freedom to design project‐based units that are rooted in  standards, focused on some topic interesting to students, and aimed at some culminating product or  performance. The Center assists teachers in creating these plans, linking with outside organizations that can  augment the project units, and purchasing the supplies necessary for the projects. The Center also handles  all of the logistics of running the school during these breaks. 

Strategic Plan & Progress Report What is the specific goal to be reached in this area of growth? What will be done to grow in this area? This is what we want to see happen for our students.

Academics: Students will be able to learn content and skills rooted in academic standards but in a fashion much more engaging and application-based than in a conventional classroom setting. Health: Students will have a safe and positive experience during their academic break that includes activities focused on physical health and healthy meals. Community: Students will be able to connect with community members and locations that hold some expertise in the field they are studying, and families will have the opportunity to experience the student learning.

Approximately 45% of Kamaile Academy  students enrolled in either the Winter,  Spring, or Summer Intercession program  in SY2011‐2012. Activities ranged from a  project unit on local watersheds designed  by the Pacific American Foundation to a  Wa‘a (canoe) Camp organized by the  Polynesian Voyaging Society.   

www.navigatorscenter.org


The Navigators’ Center at Kamaile Academy: October 2012 Report What criteria will measure the progress and growth in this area? What will indicate the goal has been attained? This hard data will tell us that our vision for our students has been realized.  PROGRESS REPORT

How will this data be tracked? This is how we will measure and keep track of that hard data.  PROGRESS REPORT

How long will it take to reach the goal? What/ when are the key benchmarks that will show progress?

Academics: • 100% of academic classes will be guided by project-based plans that incorporate academic content standards, 21st Century Learning Skills, and the Kamaile Core Values • 70% of students involved in program will show some growth in academic skills through a pre/post-test • 80% positive feedback for academic items on Student Survey The first intercession program of the year will be held in December. Planning for the Winter program has already begun with these targets as guidelines. Health: • 50% of Kamaile students will enroll in an intercession program during the year and regularly attend classes (80% attendance) • 20% of students in grades K-3 will regularly attend program (80% daily attendance) • 100% of students will receive a healthy meal daily • 80% of intercession programs will feature 1 hour of some physical activity per week • 80% positive feedback for wellness items on Student Survey The first intercession program of the year will be held in December. Planning for the Winter program has already begun with these targets as guidelines. Community: • 50% of academic classes will connect with some community expert or location • 10% of students in program will be represented by a family member at culminating events The first intercession program of the year will be held in December. Planning for the Winter program has already begun with these targets as guidelines. Database for Intercessions will track all of the indicators above. The Center will need to initiate the following: • Intercession Project Overviews for each teacher’s class • Academic pre/post-test system for each intercession • Enrichment plans for each EA’s activities • Student Surveys for each intercession program • Connections with community partners • Logistical support for culminating events The first intercession program of the year will be held in December. Planning for the Winter program has already begun with these targets as guidelines Goals are to be achieved by end of 2012-2013 SY. Benchmarks will be tracked in reports to be compiled at end of every school term.

www.navigatorscenter.org

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The Navigators’ Center at Kamaile Academy: October 2012 Report

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Navigators’ Space Overview Coordinator: Center Coordinator  Community Partner(s): All partners are invited to utilize the Navigators’ Center facilities  The physical location of the Navigators’ Center is also meant to function as a program in and of itself. This  Navigators’ Space features educational and meeting equipment such as a SmartBoard, a large television with  a DVD‐player, iPads, laptops, conference tables, comfortable sitting areas, educational games, art supplies,  and more. The Space is really meant to serve as a community center for our school community. Hours are  posted to allow for different groups (i.e., students, teachers, and community members) to reserve the space  to fit their own needs. The Center’s website allows groups to see the calendar for the space and request a  reservation during any available times 

Strategic Plan & Progress Report What is the specific goal to be reached in this area of growth? What will be done to grow in this area? This is what we want to see happen for our students.

Academics: The Space will be a place where students can work on and display their academic work, as well as a place where families can develop their ability to support their students’ academic achievement. Health: The Space will be a consistently positive space where students can take part in positive experiences. Community: The Space will be a consistently positive space where families and community members can take part in positive experiences.

The Navigators’ Center has become a hub on the Kamaile campus for all members of the  school community—students, staff, families, and community member.   

www.navigatorscenter.org


The Navigators’ Center at Kamaile Academy: October 2012 Report What criteria will measure the progress and growth in this area? What will indicate the goal has been attained? This hard data will tell us that our vision for our students has been realized.  PROGRESS REPORT

How will this data be tracked? This is how we will measure and keep track of that hard data.  PROGRESS REPORT How long will it take to reach the goal? What/when are the key benchmarks that will show progress?

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Academics: • An average of 5 teachers per week will utilize the Space with their students for academic purposes. In the month of September, an average of 5.0 teachers held academic activities in the Center per week. • 60% of Kamaile teachers will use the Space throughout the course of the year 23.9% of faculty members have utilized the Center thus far. • 83% of grade levels (10 out of 12) will display student work in the Space at some point during the year 25% of grade levels have had work displayed thus far. Health: • 60% of Kamaile students will utilize the Space at some point during the year A check-in system for visitors is currently being developed. Community: • An average of 3 family or community events will take place in the Space each week An average of 2.75 events per week were held in the Center in the month of September. • 20% of students will have family members visit the Space at some point during the school year A check-in system for visitors is currently being developed. Database for the Space will track all of the indicators above. The Center will need to initiate the following: • Marketing strategies to advertise facilities to students, faculty, families, and community • System for displaying student work in the Space • System for tracking visitors to the Space All of these systems are currently in development. Goals are to be achieved by end of 2012-2013 SY. Benchmarks will be tracked in reports to be compiled at end of every school term.

 

Progress Details The Navigators’ Space has picked up where it left off last school year in serving as a hub for the school  campus. Students are regularly seen using the space with their teachers for academic activities or just as a  place to hang out during the morning, lunch, or afternoons. Teachers have consistently used the Center to  hold class, host incentive‐based activities for students, or run their team meetings. Family members are  frequent visitors to ask general questions about the school, consult Center staff for specific referrals, or  attend events like Parent Council meetings or ‘Ohana Learning Series installments. Finally, community  organizations have used the Space to conduct meetings like our Partners Alliance or Early Childhood  Articulation meetings. The Space has already been booked in October to hold vision and dental screenings  for Kamaile Students. 

www.navigatorscenter.org


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The Kamaile Core Values Store Overview Coordinator: Store Manager (part‐time employee of Kamaile Academy)  Community Partner(s): Various donors from the community  The Kamaile Core Values Store has been successfully operating for years on our campus and in 2011 was  placed within the structure of the Navigators’ Center. As a component of the school‐wide Positive Behavior  Support system, students are issued “Core Values.” These paper slips are given whenever a student is  observed doing something that models the behaviors promoted by our school’s core values. These slips then  serve as currency for our Kamaile Store where students redeem their Core Values for various goodies. The  Navigators’ Center has supported this year by buying all new items for the store’s inventory to ensure that  all goods promote the Center’s goals, by supporting the Kamaile Store clerks in composing a detailed  inventory, and by assisting in creating a data system to track the Store’s operations.   

Strategic Plan & Progress Report What is the specific goal to be reached in this area of growth? What will be done to grow in this area? This is what we want to see happen for our students.

Academics: Students being rewarded with Core Values are upholding the values of the school and thus will be performing well in the classroom. Health: Students are positively recognized for good behavior and also earn items that contribute to their social/emotional wellness and physical health. Community: The Store will offer a venue through which families and community members can directly reward students for their achievements.

The Core Values Store enables students to earn tangible rewards for their positive behavior at school. Stocked largely  through generous community donations, the program is a wonderful manifestation of our community’s support.   

 

www.navigatorscenter.org


The Navigators’ Center at Kamaile Academy: October 2012 Report

What criteria will measure the progress and growth in this area? What will indicate the goal has been attained? This hard data will tell us that our vision for our students has been realized.  PROGRESS REPORT

How will this data be tracked? This is how we will measure and keep track of that hard data.  PROGRESS REPORT How long will it take to reach the goal? What/when are the key benchmarks that will show progress?

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Academics: • 25% of the goods “purchased” in the store in some way promote academic achievement. 88.8% of goods students “purchased” were school supplies. Health: • 70% of students will earn enough Core Values to purchase an item from the store. 34.8% of students in grades preK-6 have “purchased” an item from the store (program will be rolled out to grades 7-11 in late October). • 100% of goods “purchased” in the store promote social and emotional wellness All items in the store promote wellness. • 25% of the goods “purchased” in the store promote physical health, and 0% of goods impact physical health negatively (i.e., nothing is unhealthy!) 11.2% of goods students “purchased” directly supported physical health and hygiene (mostly in the form of new slippers and uniform shirts). 0% of goods were unhealthy. Community: • Family and community will volunteer 100 hours of service to the store Volunteers have worked 20 hours in the store. • 20 community donors will contribute goods to the store Database for the store will track all of the indicators above. The Center will need to initiate the following: • Store inventory The inventory is complete and updated regularly. • System for marketing store as an opportunity for a community donations In development Goals are to be achieved by end of 2012-2013 SY. Benchmarks will be tracked in reports to be compiled at end of every school term.

Progress Details With the installation of new classrooms on the Kamaile campus, the school store had to operate on a limited  basis in the first term, focusing mainly on the most needed types of items in a “drive‐thru” system.  Nevertheless, as see in the figures above, the store has maintained its key role in the school’s Positive  Behavior Support system. Children regularly visit the store to redeem their Core Values, and teachers have  been scheduling visits to take their entire classes down to see what is available. A new system to be  launched in late October will hopefully make the store more accessible to our middle and high students.   www.navigatorscenter.org


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Other Student Activities Programs Advisory The Navigators’ Center has provided assistance to the Middle and High School Advisory Program. In this  structure, all Kamaile students in grades 7‐10 are assigned one Advisor who oversees their overall progress  and functions as the primary advocate for the small number of students in his or her group. These groups  also meet for 75 minutes, 4 days a week, to work on character development, keep track of academic  progress, and connect with outside resources. The Navigators’ Center has linked Advisors with opportunities  for students in their groups, such as guest speakers, scholarship opportunities, and educational supports.   

Student Opportunities The Navigators’ Center also serves as a link for students to various outside enrichment activities. For  example, the Center supported students in applying to the College Horizons program. College Horizons  supports the higher education of Native American students by providing college and graduate admissions  workshops to American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian students/participants from across the  nation at weeklong summer programs on mainland university campuses. A Kamaile 10th grader was accepted  into the highly selective 2012 summer program. Another summer program was organized for 20 high school  students through a partnership with 4‐H. These students will spend 5 days and nights on campus at UH  Mānoa being trained by university science instructors to become science mentors for younger students at  Kamaile next year.   

www.navigatorscenter.org


The Navigators’ Center at Kamaile Academy: October 2012 Report

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Programs: ‘Ohana Programs  The second of the three main pillars of the Navigators' Center programs is 'Ohana (family) Programs. Parents  and families are essential to a student's success and wellness. Kamaile Academy and the Navigators' Center  hope to provide meaningful opportunities for families to get involved with the school and strengthen their  support for their students. Maintaining our focus on the whole child and aligning with Kamaile Academy's  core values, each program is meant to support the academic success, social and emotional wellness, and  physical health of every Kamaile student.    

‘Ohana-Classroom Connections  Overview Coordinator: ‘Ohana Programs Coordinator  Community Partner(s): Envision Learning Partners  The purpose of 'Ohana‐Classroom Connections (OCC) is to connect families with the experiences of their  students in the classroom. Throughout the course of the year, each grade level at Kamaile is expected to  host two of these events with the support of the Navigators' Center. For example, families may be invited  for an evening of playing math games with their students. On another day, the community may be asked to  observe benchmark portfolio defense presentations from our high school students. The goal is to have  everyone in the school community involved with our students' education as a true learning village. 

Strategic Plan & Progress Report What is the specific goal to be reached in this area of growth? What will be done to grow in this area? This is what we want to see happen for our students.

Academics: Parents/guardians (p/g) will realize the value of quality education in their students’ lives AND be able to support their academic achievement. Health: P/g will realize the value of social, emotional, and physical health in their students’ lives AND be able to support their students in achieving such wellness. Community: P/g and community members will directly involve themselves in the education of their children.

           

Among the most popular ‘Ohana‐ Classroom Connections events of last  year were the Exhibition Nights organized  by the middle and high school teams last  year. Inspired by similar functions at our  partner Envision Schools, these evenings  allow students to present their projects  to family and community members while  being graded in an authentic setting. 

www.navigatorscenter.org


The Navigators’ Center at Kamaile Academy: October 2012 Report

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  What criteria will measure the progress and growth in this area? What will indicate the goal has been attained? This hard data will tell us that our vision for our students has been realized.  PROGRESS REPORT

How will this data be tracked? This is how we will measure and keep track of that hard data.  PROGRESS REPORT How long will it take to reach the goal? What/when are the key benchmarks that will show progress?

Academics: • 100% of grade levels will host an OCC event. 2 grade levels, or 16.7% of grade levels, have held an OCC event thus far this year. • 80% of grade levels will host at least 2 OCC events. No grade levels have held multiple events yet. • 80% of attendees will report that the event will have a positive impact on the academic achievement of their students Surveys are in development. Health: • 80% of attendees will report that the event will have a positive impact on the social, emotional, and physical health of their students Surveys are in development Community: • 40% of students will have a family member represent them at least one OCC event 7.4% of Kamaile students have had a family member attend an OCC event. Database for the OCC program will track all of the indicators above. The Center will need to initiate the following: • Logistical support for grade levels in planning events • Simple and basic OCC Event Planning form to store in an online archive for future reference In development • Survey for attendees on academic and health impacts In development Goals are to be achieved by end of 2012-2013 SY. Benchmarks will be tracked in reports to be compiled at end of every school term.

Progress Details 2 OCC events have been held thus far this year. The first was an orientation evening in July for the family  members of all incoming kindergarten students. More than half of all enrolled students had a family member  attend the event to learn about general expectations of students at Kamaile, the special services offered by  the school, and specific instructions for the opening of the school year. The second event was organized by  the 11th grade staff to introduce families to their option for their students to take dual‐enrollment courses  through LCC‐Wai‘anae.  66% of students had a family member present to learn about the details of the  opportunity offered through our community partnership. 

www.navigatorscenter.org


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‘Ohana Learning Series  Overview Coordinator: ‘Ohana Programs Coordinator  Community Partner(s): INPEACE, HCAP, PACT  The ‘Ohana Learning Series (OLS) features a series of learning opportunities and workshops throughout the  year. These events are all focused on helping parents and families contribute to the academic success, social  and emotional wellness, and physical health of their students and themselves. ‘Ohana Learning Series events  rotate focus between the various age groups represented on our campus, from young children to  adolescents. The Center has invited various experts and organizations from our community to lead these  opportunities for families. 

Strategic Plan & Progress Report What is the specific goal to be reached in this area of growth? What will be done to grow in this area? This is what we want to see happen for our students.

Academics: Parents/guardians (p/g) will realize the value of quality education in their students’ lives AND be able to support their academic achievement. Health: P/g will realize the value of social, emotional, and physical health in their students’ lives AND be able to support their students in achieving such wellness. Community: P/g and community members will directly involve themselves in the education of their children.

The “Helpful Hearts: Volunteer  Workshop” allowed Kamaile family  and community members the  opportunity to learn some basic  teaching strategies and tips for  keeping their students healthy and  happy. This was the year’s first  installment of the ‘Ohana Learning  Series.   

www.navigatorscenter.org


The Navigators’ Center at Kamaile Academy: October 2012 Report

What criteria will measure the progress and growth in this area? What will indicate the goal has been attained? This hard data will tell us that our vision for our students has been realized.  PROGRESS REPORT

How will this data be tracked? This is how we will measure and keep track of that hard data.

How long will it take to reach the goal? What/when are the key benchmarks that will show progress?

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Academics: • 8 OLS events will be held with a focus on student academic achievement. 1 OLS event has been held with an academic focus. • 80% of attendees will report that the event will have a positive impact on the academic achievement of their students. Surveys are in development. Health: • 8 OLS events will be held with a focus on student social, emotional, and/or physical health. 1 OLS event has been held with a focus on wellness. • 80% of attendees will report that the event will have a positive impact on the social, emotional, and physical health of their students. Surveys are in development. Community: • 15% of students will have a family member represent them at least one academic-focused OLS event. 3.3% of students have had a family member present at an academic-focused OLS event. • 15% of students will have a family member represent them at least one health-focused OLS event. 3.3% of students have had a family member present at an health-focused OLS event. Database for the OLS program will track all of the indicators above. The Center will need to initiate the following: • Strategies for involving parents, families, community, students, and faculty in planning and facilitating OLS events • Simple and basic OLS Event Planning form to store in an online archive for future reference In development • Survey for attendees on academic and health impacts In development Goals are to be achieved by end of 2011-2012 SY. Benchmarks will be tracked in reports to be compiled at end of every school term.

Progress Details The first OLS event of the year was held in September and was aimed at supporting those family and  community members enrolled in our Volunteer Program. The “Helpful Hearts: Volunteer Workshop” was an  incredibly positive experience for all those who attended, leaving them with insights and resources to  support both the academic successful and overall wellness of their students. www.navigatorscenter.org


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Volunteer Program Overview Coordinator: ‘Ohana Programs Coordinator  Community Partner(s): INPEACE, HCAP, PACT  While our school has always welcomed the support of community volunteers, the new structure  implemented through the Navigators’ Center at the beginning of SY2011‐2012 strives to serve as the central  support system for everyone volunteering on our campus. A website allows anyone interested in  participating in community service at our school to review the volunteer policies, submit a detailed  registration form, and then log their hours once they have been approved by the school’s administration. A  parallel online system allows faculty and staff members to request volunteers for various duties around  campus. Teachers, office staff, and facilities personnel have all utilized this program to receive assistance  with tasks ranging from reading with students in the classroom to helping paint the exteriors of new  classroom buildings. Many volunteers have been involved family and community members, but we have also  been able to support individuals earning hours for the First‐to‐Work state assistance program, education  programs at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, and programs through other local nonprofit organizations.    

Strategic Plan & Progress Report What is the specific goal to be reached in this area of growth? What will be done to grow in this area? This is what we want to see happen for our students.

Academics: Family/community involvement at school will make them feel more connected to the school, thus more engaged with their students’ learning, thus leading to academic achievement. Health: Family/community involvement at school will contribute to their own and to their students’ social and emotional wellness. Community: P/g and community members will directly involve themselves in the education of their children.

In addition to continuing the success  of community volunteers in the  classroom and around campus, this  year the Navigators’ Center brought  back the morning E Ola program.  Scores of students have had family  members register to read and work on  schoolwork together while their  student eats their breakfast every  morning.   

www.navigatorscenter.org


The Navigators’ Center at Kamaile Academy: October 2012 Report What criteria will measure the progress and growth in this area? What will indicate the goal has been attained? This hard data will tell us that our vision for our students has been realized.  PROGRESS REPORT

How will this data be tracked? This is how we will measure and keep track of that hard data.  PROGRESS REPORT

How long will it take to reach the goal? What/when are the key benchmarks that will show progress?

Academics: • 80% of students whose relations volunteer will receive proficient grades in school • Students who have a relation volunteer on campus will average a 3.0 GPA  Academic tracking is in development. • 80% of volunteers will report that their service has had a positive impact on the academic achievement of their students Surveys are in development. Health: • 80% of volunteers will report that their service has had a positive impact on the social, emotional, and physical health of their students Surveys are in development. Community: • 15% of students will have a family member volunteer on campus 7.1% of students have a family member registered as a volunteer on campus. 9.5% of students have a family member registered as a volunteer in our morning E Ola program. • 10% of students will have a family member volunteer at least 20 hours on campus 2.1% of students have a family member that has volunteered at least 20 hours on campus. 1.2% of students have a family member that has volunteered at least 80 hours on campus. • Family and community members will volunteer a total of 7000 service hours throughout the course of the year 1376.25 hours of service have been volunteered thus far. Database for the Volunteer Program will track all of the indicators above. The Center will need to initiate the following: • Strategies for recruiting volunteers from families and community Multiple recruitment efforts are in effect including fliers, events, and connecting with community networks. • Survey for volunteers on academic and health impacts Surveys are in development. Goals are to be achieved by end of 2012-2013 SY. Benchmarks will be tracked in reports to be compiled at end of every school term.

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Progress Details The volunteer program, one of the Center’s highlight successes from our first year, has picked up right  where it left off. Numerous family members can be found on a daily basis giving their time in classrooms, the  cafeteria, the library, and offices around campus. The Center is looking to progress the program by offering  opportunities for volunteers to expand their skill sets, as evidenced by the ‘Ohana Learning Series event  aimed at volunteers. Also new this year is the E Ola Morning effort, falling under the broader Volunteer  Program. Family members have been invited to read and assist with schoolwork each morning as their  students eat their breakfast. Now the village school philosophy can be seen in action every morning in the  cafeteria. 

McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance   Overview Coordinator: Center Coordinator  Community Partner(s): U.S. Vets, Waianae Neighborhood Place, Wai‘anae Coast Comprehensive Health  Center  Details:  Under the McKinney‐Vento Homeless Assistance Act of 1987, students and families identified as homeless  are federally entitled to certain rights and protections. Thus far in SY 2012‐2013, 14.1% of the student  population has been identified as qualifying for services. The Navigators’ Center works with the school  community and identified families to ensure the proper supports are in place and accessible. The Center is  very proud of the close relationships and trust built with these members of our school community and is  honored to offer them a safe place to turn whenever they are in need.    

Strategic Plan & Progress Report What is the specific goal to be reached in this area of growth? What will be done to grow in this area? This is what we want to see happen for our students.

Academics: Students will be relieved of the basic barriers to academic success presented by their homeless situation. Health: Basic physical, social, and emotional needs (e.g., hygiene, clothing, etc.) will be met. Community: Students’ families will be supported on a personal level and will be connected with resources in the community.

     

www.navigatorscenter.org


The Navigators’ Center at Kamaile Academy: October 2012 Report What criteria will measure the progress and growth in this area? What will indicate the goal has been attained? This hard data will tell us that our vision for our students has been realized.

 PROGRESS REPORT

How will this data be tracked? This is how we will measure and keep track of that hard data.

 PROGRESS REPORT

How long will it take to reach the goal? What/when are the key benchmarks that will show progress?

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Academics: • 60% of MVA-identified students will make proficient progress in school.  Academic tracking is in development. Health: • 30% of MVA-identified students’ families will receive some form of material support to address basic health needs. 8.3% of identified students have received some material aid. Community: • 80% of MVA-identified students’ families will have a personal consultation with Nav Center staff to discuss rights and available resources.  66.7% of identified students’ families have had a personal meeting to learn about rights and resources. • 25% of MVA-identified students’ families will be connected with a community resource  5.2% of MVA-identified students’ families have been referred to a community resource. Database for the MV program will track all of the indicators above. The Center will need to initiate the following: • Personal consultations with identified families  In progress • Reliable stock of basic material supports for wellness (e.g., hygiene products, clothing, etc.) Present and regularly stocked through donations and school E Ola funds • Maintained database of community resources available  Continuously being developed with the support of community partners Goals are to be achieved by end of 2012-2013 SY. Benchmarks will be tracked in reports to be compiled at end of every school term.

 

Progress Details The Navigators’ Center drove the school’s effort at the beginning of the year to identify students and  families whose situations qualify them under the MVA guidelines. As mentioned, 14.1% of the student  population was identified, and efforts were made to meet with each one of these families to explain to them  their rights under the law. The Center has been recognized by managers of the state‐level program for doing  exemplary work in terms of fulfilling the school’s legally mandated requirements but for also going far  beyond these set standards. More telling than this recognition or any of the statistics above, however, have  been the number of cases of families turning to the Center’s staff for assistance that cannot be captured in  the data. The Center is very proud to offer this support to our children and families finding themselves in  difficult circumstances. 

www.navigatorscenter.org


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Other ‘Ohana Programs  School Community Events The Navigators’ Center has taken a lead role in organizing many of the large events that have traditionally  taken place on campus. The school tentatively plans on hosting at least one large event each quarter of the  school year that is open to everyone in the school community.   In conjunction with the exciting developments for the Navigators’ Center with the development of the  health center (see next section), the first major event of the year was the Olakino Maika‘i ‘Ohana Fest held  on October 12. The entire afternoon was filled with a series of events to celebrate health and wellness in our  school community. The 1st grade opened with a song and dance sending a message of healthy living. Dr.  Makini from Eyes Plus, Inc., then presented to families on the importance of vision screening. The festivities  then moved outside for a ribbon‐cutting ceremony for  the medical trailer, a Zumba demonstration that brought  attendees of all ages to their feet, and then a beautiful  hula performance. All the while, a dozen community  providers had stations set up at which family could  receive free information and services including vision  screenings, blood tests, and blood pressure checks. The  entire evening was made possible by the support of  amazing community volunteers, many of whom are  members of the Parent Council. Nearly 400 members of  the school community were able to attend the event,  which may become an annual tradition given its great  success. 

Parent Council To facilitate true family ownership of all of its efforts, the Center formed a Parent Council made up of parent  representatives from each grade level. This Parent Council provides a forum for family members to become  directly involved with the work of the Center. Launched last March, this body has become an important  driver of much of the Center’s work. The Council has met weekly this school year, focusing their attention on  three primary goals: increasing parent involvement; fostering better communication at the school; and  promoting a culture of positivity across the campus. During these meetings, the Council also provides  guidance on the Center’s programs and partnerships. Though few in numbers, the Council has cemented its  place at the school through these meetings and incredible willingness to support events like the Olakino  Maika‘i ‘Ohana Fest and school‐wide vision screenings.   

Technology Lab The Navigators’ Center is looking to support family and community members by increasing access to and  developing skills with technology. Currently the Center offers free access to Internet, laptops, and iPads to  anyone in the school community. Personnel around campus have volunteered to be present during these  www.navigatorscenter.org


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times to offer support, assistance, and instruction to anyone in need.  Though still in its early phases, the  Center has already support family members in creating email accounts and performing online job searches.   

English Language Learners (ELL) Support The Center is working with the school’s ELL Department to find ways of supporting our ELL families on  campus. Plans are underway to bring back the Sundays Project, a series of workshops offered by Hawaii  Parent Information Resource Center (HPIRC) and Parents and Children Together (PACT) aimed at supporting  Marshallese and Chuukese parents to ensure the success of their children in school. The Center and ELL  Department are looking at having this program flow into free computer language courses on campus for  interested families. 

www.navigatorscenter.org


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Programs: Olakino Maika‘i Center  The third and final major category of programs within the Navigators’ Center framework is the Olakino  Maika‘i (“healthy life and body”) Center, which consists of the efforts and plans to establish a health center  at Kamaile Academy. As one of the three primary goals for the Navigators’ Center, we view physical health  and a healthy environment as being absolutely essential to the academic success and social and emotional  wellness of our students.    

Kamaile Health Room Overview Coordinator: Kamaile Health Aides  Community Partner(s): WCCHC  In fall 2011, Kamaile Academy was proud to bring on two highly qualified medical assistants with years of  professional health care experience in the Wai‘anae community to staff the school health room. Verna  Agoan and Ronnie Samoa have become invaluable resources in ensuring the physical health of students on  campus. 

Strategic Plan & Progress to Date What is the specific goal to be reached in this area of growth? What will be done to grow in this area? This is what we want to see happen for our students. What criteria will measure the progress and growth in this area? What will indicate the goal has been attained? This hard data will tell us that our vision for our students has been realized.  PROGRESS REPORT

Academics: Basic health issues will be addressed in a timely and comprehensive manner so that students are able to remain present and active within the classroom. Health: Basic health needs of students will be monitored and addressed. Community: Family members will remain informed of any health issues that may be affecting their students in school. Academics: • Track time spent in health room  In development Health: • 100% of kindergarten students will meet the health requirements for entry into school (i.e., immunizations, TB clearance, and physical exams)  96.4% of K students have met all health requirements. • 95% of all students at Kamaile will meet the basic health requirements for school enrollment  97.4% of all students have met all health requirements. Community: • Track parent/family contact  In development

  www.navigatorscenter.org


The Navigators’ Center at Kamaile Academy: October 2012 Report

How will this data be tracked? This is how we will measure and keep track of that hard data. How long will it take to reach the goal? What/when are the key benchmarks that will show progress?

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Database for the Health Room will track all of the indicators above.  In development Goals are to be achieved by end of 2012-2013 SY. Benchmarks will be tracked in reports to be compiled at end of every school term.

 

Progress Details At this time last year, 40% of students in preschool and kindergarten along with 13% of the general student  population faced some deficiency in the basic health requirements needed for school entry (i.e., tuberculosis  clearance, physical examination, and immunizations). After intense efforts last year and the remarkable start  to this year, both of those rates have dropped below 5% as seen above. The health aides have also made a  pointed effort to update the contact records for the entire school to ensure that the guardians of as many  children as possible can be reached in the case of an emergency. Additionally, the health aides continue to  remain vigilant over the pediculosis (i.e., head lice) situation that has been a chronic problem within our  school community. Perhaps most importantly, all of this work has been completed while the health aides do  an incredible job of meeting the everyday basic health needs of students with a level of professionalism and  care that could rival that of any other health room in the state.   

Waianae Coast Comprehensive Health Center (WCCHC) Partnership Overview Coordinator: Director  Community Partner(s): WCCHC  For years, Health Center (WCCHC) has been a trusted and respected health care provider in our community.  Thus for the Navigators’ Center, reaching out to them for support was natural. Graciously, Dr. Ricardo  Custodio, Medical Director and Pediatrician at WCCHC, offered to support our efforts at Kamaile through the  medical students they host on their campus from A. T. Still University in Arizona. Additionally, Dr. Dan Fujii  has become an invaluable partner in delivering dental care to our students and in bringing our medical trailer  closer toward operation.   

Strategic Plan & Progress to Date In terms of goals and planning, last year a report was formed by the visiting medical students that will be  used by each 4th‐year on a rotation to track progress on the development of the Olakino Maika‘i Health  www.navigatorscenter.org


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Center. As this work is still in the developing stage, it is not possible to set clear targets as with other  programs. Rather, general updates and, wherever available, data will be provided for the major categories of  the partnership.       Medical Students  Dr. Custodio arranged for 4th‐year medical students to spend a month at Kamaile as a community health  rotation to help us formulate and implement our plans for the health center. Going into SY2012‐2013, two 4th‐ year students are scheduled to complete a 4‐week rotation at Kamaile. Additionally, WCCHC has assigned  Kamaile as a community health service site for their 2nd‐year medical students. Five of these students will be  volunteering on a weekly basis throughout SY2012‐2013.     Medical Trailer  More than three years ago, a medical trailer was donated to our school. After years of inattention, the  Center began a concerted effort to make the facility a centerpiece of the Olakino Maika‘i Health Center. Last  year, we initiated discussions with WCCHC to explore what services could be held in the trailer. Multiple  workdays over the spring and summer were dedicated to getting the trailer ready for operation, from firing  up the diesel generator to scrubbing the interior with school volunteers. Behind the scenes, Associate  Principal Paul Kepka was working with the Kamaile facilities team  and multiple partners to finalize the school’s legal ownership of  the trailer.   On October 19, after more than 18 months of working on it, Mr.  Kepka secured the full legal rights to our medical trailer. Final  preparations are currently underway for Dr. Fujii to bring his dental  equipment into the facility and begin delivering services to Kamaile  students. Plans are also being explored to replace the power from  the diesel generator with solar panels to make it a fully self‐ sustaining facility.    Needs Assessments  Last spring, the medical students used their rotation month to conduct a formal needs assessment. First,  school staff was consulted to develop an inventory of health education programs currently underway on  campus and determine any significant gaps. Next, three separate online surveys were administered to  elementary student parents, 6th grade students, and high school freshman [a link to the results of those  surveys online can be found in Appendix B]. All of these findings were then compared to key health  benchmarks the medical students identified throughout the PreK‐12 career of a young person. In early  October, a similar needs assessment was conducted to survey 3rd grade students.  While the survey will continue to be developed and expanded into the future, initial findings suggest the  following:  ∙   Older students especially demonstrated need for attention to mental health areas such as depression,  stress management, and bullying.  ∙   Nutrition and fitness are among the highest need areas for students especially at lower grades.   ∙   Parents and students alike expressed interest in bringing more direct health services to the Kamaile  campus.          www.navigatorscenter.org


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  Dental Health  Dr. Dan Fujii has committed to return to Kamaile to perform basic dental education and screenings with all  students. At the release of this report, Dr. Fujii has already held dental health education sessions with all  preschool and kindergarten classrooms and has screened 38.4% of the kindergarten class. He will move  upward through the grade levels, offering his services to all students. Beyond basic screenings, Dr. Fujii plans  to deliver more comprehensive services to students on site at the school. To facilitate this work, he will bring  dental equipment to the campus with the intention of it finding a permanent home in the medical trailer.    

               Vision Health  The Navigators’ Center and the WCCHC students have reached out to various providers across the state to  support the vision health of our students. Dr. Makini of Eyes Plus, Inc., quickly became a natural partner for  the Center with his focus on vision health from a comprehensive lens, looking deeply in vision’s connection  with academic performance. In this vein, Dr. Makini presented to the entire Kamaile faculty and then at an  open community event on the importance of vision in students’  lives. He then coordinated with the Lions Club of Ewa Beach and  Project Vision: Hawai‘i to provide free vision screenings to our  entire K‐3 population along with older students on a referral basis.  In an incredibly orchestrated morning, Parent Council volunteers  and Lions Club members enabled the three organizations to  screen 250 students in a matter of hours, accounting for 26.8% of  our student population and just over half of our K‐3 students.  Students flagged in the initial Lions Club screening were able to  go directly to the Project Vision van and equipment to consult  with Dr. Makini. We look forward to making this an annual event.      Health Education  For their weekly service hours, the 2nd‐year medical student volunteers  from the ATSU program at WCCHC have designed a "Mini Docs"  program. For the rest of the year, medical students plan to educate 3rd  grade classrooms on basic health topics such as nutrition, hygiene,  disease, and fitness. The intention is that these new young health  professionals will share their knowledge with family and friends at  home. The medical students have begun with 2 classrooms in October  and by the end of the year will spend an academic quarter with each of  the 6 classrooms in the grade level.      www.navigatorscenter.org


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  Health Career Guidance  Another exciting area of development in the partnership has been through the WCCHC Youth Health Corps.  For years, this program has allowed high school students on the coast to explore careers in the health field  through shadowing actual health professionals during their school day. Discussions have begun that will  hopefully open this opportunity to Kamaile Academy High School students in the near future. Affiliated with  this program is the Youth Health Academy, a six‐week summer program that gives similar opportunities to  10th‐12th grade students. This summer, 2 Kamaile students took part in the program. In addition, the 2nd‐year  medical students on campus have become college and career mentors for the high school. After finishing  their “Mini Doc” classes, the medical students invite high school students to join them for their lunch period  to discuss college, careers in the health field, and any other topics that may arise.    Reproductive Health  For reproductive health, the 4th‐year medical students last year linked our middle/high school with Musu  Maneafagia, a wonderful community member who has worked for more than 30 years in the Preventive  Health Department at WCCHC. The Department arranged for Musu to be on campus every Friday morning to  provide support to middle and high school students in the areas of family planning and reproductive health.  Musu is available to students for individual consultations on reproductive health issues on an open‐door  basis. To date, her presence on campus has led to at least 4 students seeking referrals at WCCHC on serious  personal health issues.    This support from WCCHC is in addition to the partnership secured last year with Pono Choices: A Culturally  Responsive Teen Pregnancy and STI Prevention Program. As described on their website, this is “a ten  module curriculum that provides young adolescents with the knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and skills  necessary to reduce their risk of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and pregnancy by incorporating  medically accurate information, character education, and Hawaiian cultural values. It is based on social  learning, self–regulation, and developmental assets theories and the researchers’ extensive experience  working with youth.” The curriculum will be presented to all 7th grade classes this year.    Health and Wellness Plan  Work has begun on developing a comprehensive “Health and Wellness Plan” that would guide the delivery  of health services to all Kamaile students from preschool through high school graduation. The hope is that a  working document and tracking system can be completed by the end of SY 2012‐2013.    Formal WCCHC Partnership  For the long‐term, the medical students and other WCCHC  representatives continue to investigate the possibility of  the Kamaile Olakino Maika‘i Center becoming an official  Health Center Service Site of WCCHC. The realization of  this goal may take time, but even the potential of this  development is incredibly exciting. Initial steps taken  toward pursuing this status have been promising.          www.navigatorscenter.org


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Healthy Snack Program Overview Coordinator: Snack Manager  Community Partner(s): Sodexo  Four afternoons per week for the past couple of years, every student on campus has been treated to a  healthy fruit or vegetable snack. From juicy green grapes to exotic mangosteen, the young people of  Kamaile have had the opportunity to sample treats from around the globe. The Navigators' Center is  supporting this program this year by giving students and teachers a chance to learn about what they are  putting into their bodies. At the beginning of every week, Daily Snack Cards are posted online that provide  nutritional information and interesting facts for the snacks of that week. Teachers can use this information in  their lessons or turn it into a fun activity for their classes during snack time. At the end of every week, the  Navigators’ Center coordinates an online survey that teachers use to give feedback on their experience with  the snacks for the week.    

Strategic Plan What is the specific goal to be reached in this area of growth? What will be done to grow in this area? This is what we want to see happen for our students.

Academics: Students will have first-hand nutritional learning experiences and learn about healthy eating Health: Students will develop healthier eating habits Community: Students will enjoy the snack as part of a healthy, positive community

What criteria will measure the progress and growth in this area? What will indicate the goal has been attained? This hard data will tell us that our vision for our students has been realized.

Academics: • Snack cards with nutritional and educational information on foods will be distributed to teachers every week.  Snack cards are being developed and distributed to teachers on a weekly basis and are available online. • 60% positive feedback from teachers on whether something is learned by students from the snack experience.  28.6% of teachers report that their students learned “very much” from the snacks. Health: • 80% of students (~800) will be reported by classroom teachers as eating snack daily.  75.7% of students are reported by teachers as eating the snack daily. Community: • 80% positive feedback from teachers on whether the snack provided a positive experience for classroom community 57.1% of teachers report that the snack is contributing positively to health and wellness of their students.

 PROGRESS REPORT

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The Navigators’ Center at Kamaile Academy: October 2012 Report

How will this data be tracked? This is how we will measure and keep track of that hard data.  PROGRESS REPORT

How long will it take to reach the goal? What/when are the key benchmarks that will show progress?

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Database for the Snack Program will track all of the indicators above. The Center will need to initiate the following: • Distribution system so that snacks reliably reach all classrooms  Snack manager has consistently delivered snacks to all classrooms. • Volunteer system whereby 7th and 9th grade students assist Snack Manager with distribution  Students assist on a daily basis • Weekly Snack Cards  Consistently developed and available online • Snack Weekly Teacher Feedback Form  Developed, available online, and emailed weekly Goals are to be achieved by end of 2012-2013 SY. Benchmarks will be tracked in reports to be compiled at end of every school term.

 

Progress Details The addition of a Snack Manager this year has added a degree of reliability to the snack program not seen  before at the school. Students can be seen enjoying their snacks on a daily basis. Another exciting addition  this year has been the 7th and 9th grade volunteers. In line with the core value focus outlined in the Kamaile  Graduate Profile, 7th graders are promoting their value of olakino maika‘i (to live healthily) while 9th graders  are practicing their value of laulima (cooperation).                 

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Other ‘Olakino Maika‘i Center Programs  School Garden While a number of gardens have been started over the years around campus, the largest garden in the back  of our campus has received special attention over the past few years. Last year, that garden became a  central component of the 7th‐8th grade Global Studies course taught by Mr. Michael Washington. The course  this year has been turned over to Ms. Kimberly Crawford who has picked right where Mr. Washington left off  last year and brought the garden program to a whole new level. The Navigators’ Center continues to work  with Ms. Crawford and student leaders throughout the year in linking with community partners such as  Grow Hawai‘i, securing resources for the garden, and connecting with learning opportunities. After  presenting at a side booth at last year’s Schools of the Future Conference, Ms. Crawford, Mr. Washington,  and two middle school students were invited back to this year’s conference in October actually to co‐lead a  conference session with Punahou School. In addition, 9th grader Daniel Corpuz was invited to share the  Kamaile garden successes as a member of a keynote panel at September’s Hawai‘i Food & Wine Festival. The  teachers and students have impressed the entire school community with their dedication and hard work,  and the garden is now as large and as green as it has ever been! The Center will continue the support of this  program immediately by supporting the development of partnerships with Grow Hawai‘i and Ka‘ala Farms.  In the long term, plans will be explored for connecting the garden more closely with our health center and  school cafeteria.                 

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Programs: Center-Wide Initiatives  In addition to the three main pillars of Navigators’ Center programs, there are a few initiatives that span  across our program categories and even the programs themselves. As with each of our individual programs,  these efforts are designed to align with our core values and are evaluated on the basis of our three primary  goals of academic achievement, social and emotional wellness, and physical health.   

Community Partnerships Overview Coordinator: Director (Kenny)  The Navigators’ Center was founded on the premise that wonderful resources for our students and families  already exist in our community, and that the primary role for the Center is to link our school to those  resources. While there are a wide array of organizations and individuals we connect with to support our  efforts, a number of those actors play a special role in the success of the Center and our entire school. We  show our appreciation for the special contribution of these groups by recognizing them as our official  community partners.  

Strategic Plan For SY2012‐2013, each official community partner will work with the Center to create an individualized “Sail  Plan for Community Partnerships.” [See Appendix C.] This document will directly align the activities of all  community partners on campus with the established goals of Kamaile Academy. While all partners are  encouraged to align their work with as many goals as possible, each is required to commit to aligning with at  least two goals. The school goals are as follows:  Goals 1 & 2‐ Academic: Kamaile Academy students will successfully advance through all levels of school  (PreK‐12), demonstrate mastery at benchmark and graduation points, and enter into a post‐secondary  education program. [Goal 1 will be a school‐wide goal while Goal 2 represents each of the individual PLC  goals created by each grade level.]  Goal 3‐ Readiness to Learn: Kamaile Academy students will attend school, ready to learn, on a daily basis.  Goal 4‐ Health: Kamaile Academy students will achieve and maintain comprehensive health and wellness— physical, social, and emotional.  Goal 5‐ Community: Kamaile Academy students will enjoy the support, safety, and stability of involved  families and community. Our goal is to create and implement a Sail Plan for at least 10 different Community Partners this year, while  gathering together all of them quarterly with Partners Alliance meetings.  PROGRESS REPORT: Sail Plans have been drafted with 9 Community Partners [See Appendix D for a listing of these partners], and the first quarter Partners Alliance meeting was held.    www.navigatorscenter.org


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Early Childhood Education (ECE) Outreach Overview Coordinator: ECE Outreach Coordinator  Community Partner(s): HCAP, PACT, INPEACE, U.S. Vets  The Navigators’ Center is largely supported through the Ho‘okahua Project, a grant program dedicated to  strengthening Early Childhood Education (ECE) in the Kamaile Academy community. While all of our  programs are designed to benefit our PreK‐11 students and families, a special emphasis is placed on early  childhood. The Center firmly believes that if students and families are engaged in the earliest years of  schooling, then such engagement will become the norm for them throughout the child’s educational  experience. The ECE Outreach program is being designed in that spirit of building relationships in the earliest  years to set students on the path of long‐term and lasting success, wellness, and health.   The Center collaborates closely with the overall grant managers, our affiliated Kamaile pre‐schools, and the  Kamaile kindergarten team as a member of the School Transition Planning Team. This group seeks to create  coherent educational and support experiences for students and families as they transition from one of  Kamaile Academy’s feeder pre‐schools to our Kindergarten.  In addition to supporting the work of this team, the primary role of the Navigators’ Center in the Ho‘okahua  Project is to offer family development services. Staff and parents collaborate on individualized family plans  that focus on the child's developmental needs and the family's social and economic needs. Such support is  already a part of our affiliated Head Start and Early Head Start pre‐school programs, so the Navigators’  Center’s role is to provide coherence to students and families by offering them the same type of assistance  once they reach kindergarten at Kamaile Academy.  In large part, these child and family development services are already present within the Navigators’ Center’s  structure. Parenting education comes through our ‘Ohana Learning Series, and parent‐child interaction is  facilitated through our ‘Ohana‐Classroom Connections and various Student Activities Programs. Our Health  Room and WCCHC Partnership can address many health services, while other health and social service needs  can be referred to our various community partners. The opportunities are already there for families to  engage with the school and access support resources.  ECE Outreach is being designed as a program to bring Kindergarten families into all of these support  structures. Rather than relying solely on the programs themselves to draw in families, ECE Outreach will  focus on building relationships among students, teachers, and families to explore how our programs can  best support them. Since the goal of the program is to build relationships, we expect the exact nature of the  work to constantly shift to be meet the needs of everyone involved. 

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The Navigators’ Center at Kamaile Academy: October 2012 Report

Strategic Plan What is the specific goal to be reached in this area of growth? What will be done to grow in this area? This is what we want to see happen for our students.

What criteria will measure the progress and growth in this area? What will indicate the goal has been attained? This hard data will tell us that our vision for our students has been realized.  PROGRESS REPORT

Academics: Strong relationships with families along with direct classroom support will bring about student success in the kindergarten (K) classroom. Health: Families will feel that they and their students have access to the health and wellness resources they need and will be successfully linked with those resources. Community: Families will be in communication with the school, engaged in campus activities, and satisfied with their relationship with the school. Academics: • 80% of students identified as in academic need will receive support (either direct or family contact) from ECE Outreach Coordinator.  Academic tracking is in development. • 80% K students whose families are engaged on campus (i.e., attend more than one event) will achieve at benchmark in the classroom.  Academic tracking is in development. • 60% K students whose families are in communication with the school will achieve at benchmark.  Academic tracking is in development. Health: • 80% K families who request a health service are matched with a provider.  21.3% of K families have been referred to a community resource. • 80% positive feedback on survey items dealing with health access.  Survey is in development. Community: • 90% of K families will be contacted by the ECE Outreach Coordinator more than once throughout the year.  9.0% of K families have been contacted more than once; 36.1% of families have been contacted at least once. • 50% of K families will participate in an ‘Ohana Programs event/activity.  47.5% of K families have participated in at least one ‘Ohana Programs event; 2.5% have participated in more than one event. • 80% positive feedback on survey items dealing with school’s interaction with family and community.  Survey is in development.

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The Navigators’ Center at Kamaile Academy: October 2012 Report

How will this data be tracked? This is how we will measure and keep track of that hard data.  PROGRESS REPORT

How long will it take to reach the goal? What/when are the key benchmarks that will show progress?

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Database for ECE Outreach will track all of the indicators above. The Center will need to initiate the following: • General Feedback survey for K families In development • Individualized Support Plan for K students identified as in need of support In development • Regular communication plan for all K families In development Goals are to be achieved by end of 2012-2013 SY. Benchmarks will be tracked in reports to be compiled at end of every school term.

Progress Details The ECE Outreach program strategy was revised from last year in an attempt to provide more direct support  to kindergarten students and families. The ECE Outreach Coordinator now aims to spend about 50% of her  time actually in the kindergarten classroom, assisting teachers with instruction and observing student  development. The other half of her time is dedicated to addressing the items observed in the classroom by  communicating with families, connecting with community resources, and planning engagement activities.   Given that this is the first attempt at such a strategy, the system is still in development. The Coordinator has  become a consistent presence in the classrooms, especially for situations involving students needing  individual social and emotional support. Plans are now being discussed for the Coordinator to lead the  kindergarteners on a weekly basis through the Second Step curriculum to promote social and emotional  wellness. Outside of the classroom, the Coordinator has busied herself with meeting families, supporting  programming, and addressing the individual needs of students that arise. She was vital in supporting the  recent dental and health screenings at the lower grade levels, and has done a wonderful job in assisting a  few specific families with situations that would have simply gone ignored if not for having such a position at  the school.  

Communication Overview Coordinator: Director   A primary reason why the Navigators’ Center was formed was to link the various actors within our school  community: students, teachers, administration, staff, families, and community members. If these groups are  to be linked, then effective communication strategies are absolutely essential. Unfortunately,  communication has been identified a number of times as a school‐wide area of concern. While positive steps  have been taken on campus to address these concerns, the Navigators’ Center sees communication,  especially with families and community members, as one of its priority areas.  www.navigatorscenter.org


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The Center’s efforts on communication will be focused on the following outlets:  • Website (www.navigatorscenter.org): In addition to providing information on all of the programs included  in this report, the website serves as an interactive tool for all groups within our school community.  Students can use the website to apply to become a Student  Organization, reserve the Navigators’ Space for a meeting,  or display their work. Teachers can view a constantly  updated master calendar, access all materials needed to  organize field trips and assemblies, and request volunteer  support. Community members can apply to the PTO, access  an events blog and electronic versions of the school  newsletter, watch videos from recent workshops, and find  contact numbers to various service providers across our  community. Here a few pieces of data that illustrate the  website’s success to date:  o1,206 visitors from 242 cities and 15 different countries have accessed the site  oThere have been 3,676 visits and 12,073 pageviews  oVisitors have spent an average of about 4.1 minutes on the site with each visit    • Kūkuni Newsletter: The Navigators’ Center will continue to publish  monthly newsletters for the school community. Recurring sections of  the newsletter include Principal’s Place, the PTO Post, Counselor’s  Corner, Kamaile Core Value Students, and the ELL Leader for English  Language Learners. Electronic versions of each newsletter will be  available online along with an events blog that includes those stories  which do not fit in the printed.    • ‘Ohana Board: The Navigators’ Center maintains the large bulletin  board facing the campus entrance with school announcements,  community activities, and resources of interest to students and  families.    • Social Media: The Center maintains an announcement and feedback  Facebook page.    • Other initiatives: While the approaches listed above have brought  reasonable success, there remains much room for improvement. The Navigators’ Center is constantly  seeking new ways to effectively communicate with family and community members. The school recently  purchased an automated communication system that will allow the Center to deliver messages through  mass phone calls and cellular text messages. More ideas have been as grand as to purchase electronic  display screens, while others have been as simple as greeting parents as they pick up their students or  canvasing the neighborhood. Attending conferences and workshops around the community has allowed us  to learn from the work of others, and we are constantly exploring new methods of communication.       

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Community Schools Research & Coordination Overview Coordinator: Director (Kenny)  The Center’s commitment to staying true to the needs of the community and basing its efforts in data  require that a strong relationship with the direct school community must be maintained. In order to best  address these needs and support the community, though, the Center must also look to the outside to learn  from best practices.   As mentioned earlier, the community schools model captures most of what the Center has set out to do. The  Center will constantly monitor the research and news coming out of forums like the Coalition for Community  Schools (www.communityschools.org). The Director will also look into connecting with and visiting models  similar to the Navigators’ Center in different geographic locations.  The Navigators’ Center is also working closely with other organizations to spread the community schools  model beyond Kamaile Academy. The Center continues to support the efforts of a coalition of organizations  for the Ke Ala Hānau Moku (KAHM) project, a plan for a Promise Neighborhood on the Wai‘anae Coast.  Kamaile Academy has submitted a letter of support for the project and has agreed to participate in the  development of a shared database among organizations in the project. Furthermore, the Center is currently  supporting the efforts of this same KAHM coalition working in conjunction with the Hawai‘i Department of  Education and Kamehameha Schools Ka Pua initiative in bringing wraparound services to all schools along  the Wai‘anae Coast.                    

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The Staff    Staffing for the Navigators’ Center is financed by two sources. The Director position, Center Coordinator  position, two health aides, two part‐time employees,  and 0.5 Program Coordinator position are covered by  the school’s general budget as Student Support Services. 1.5 Program Coordinator positions are provided  through the Ho‘okahua Project ECE grant.

Lovelyn Ampeloquio Center Coordinator Programs: Student Organizations, Navigators’ Space, Intercessions, School Community  Events, McKinney Vento, Center Clerical Duties  Contact: lampeloquio@kamaile.org     

Marcia Tagavilla ‘Ohana Programs Coordinator Programs: ‘Ohana‐Classroom Connections, Volunteer Program, ‘Ohana Learning Series,  Parent Council Support  Contact: mtagavilla@kamaile.org     

JoJo Suan ECE Outreach Coordinator Programs: ECE Outreach  Contact: jsuan@kamaile.org     

Verna Agoan Health Aide Programs: Kamaile Health Room  Contact: vagoan@kamaile.org              www.navigatorscenter.org


The Navigators’ Center at Kamaile Academy: October 2012 Report

 

Ronnie Samoa Health Aide Programs: Kamaile Health Room  Contact: rsamoa@kamaile.org     

  Chantelle Bayes Kamaile Store Manager Programs: Kamaile Core Value Store  Contact: cbayes@kamaile.org     

  Chantelle Sholtis Snack Manager Programs: Healthy Snack Program  Contact: csholtis@kamaile.org    

Kenny Ferenchak Director Contact: kferenchak@kamaile.org                       

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Appendix A: Student Organization Constitution Template  Student Organizations: Your Constitution

The constitution is the main guide of a Student Organization, so it is meant more than anything to  help the organization. The constitution sets the basic principles and structure of the organization,  and it gives the rules for how members will run the organization. Organizations should be careful in writing and updating this constitution so that all of their needs  are met. Each member should be familiar with and have access to the document. Please use the outline below for your organization’s constitution. You can copy and paste the text  below, simply replacing all shaded areas with your content. Your Faculty Advisor must approve  the document, then you must submit an electronic copy to the Navigators’ Center. Please have your  Faculty Advisor email it as an attachment to kferenchak@kamaile.org with “Student Org  Constitution” as the subject line. ‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐ CONSTITUTION Article l ‐ Name, Purpose, Values, and Non‐Discrimination Policy of the Organization.  Section 1: Name: ________________________________________________________________________________ ‐Your organization’s Name must somehow communicate the purpose of your organization.  For example, “Kamaile Kids” is not acceptable because it tells us nothing about your group.  “Kamaile Rugby Club” would be accepted because it tells us what your organization does. Section 2 ‐ Purpose: _____________________________________________________________________________ ‐Your Purpose must be 3‐5 sentences long and include the overall focus and the objectives  of your organization. Section 3 – Alignment with Kamaile Core Values ‐3(a) ‐ Aloha: _____________________________________________________________________________ ‐1‐2 sentences on how your organization will be based in a spirit of love ‐3(b) ‐ ‘Ohana: _____________________________________________________________________________ ‐1‐2 sentences on how your organization will operate on the idea of family and spread that  value to others ‐3(c) ‐ Olakino Maika‘i:________________________________________________________________________ ‐1‐2 sentences on how your organization will promote physical health within its members  and at the school. ‐3(d) ‐ ‘Imi ‘Ike: ________________________________________________________________________________ ‐1‐2 sentences on how your organization will support academic achievement. This may be  a direct support, such as offering tutoring services or participating in academic projects.  Or the support may be indirect, such as requiring a certain GPA for membership in the  organization. www.navigatorscenter.org


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‐3(f) ‐ Laulima: ________________________________________________________________________________ ‐1‐2 sentences on how your organization will cooperate with the outside community.  Please include who your Community Advisor and Community Partner will be. ‐3(g) ‐ Ha‘aheo: ________________________________________________________________________________ ‐1‐2 sentences on how your organization will promote social and emotional wellness  within its members and at the school. ‐3(h) ‐ Na‘auao:_____________________________________________________________________________ ‐1‐2 sentences on how your organization will promote justice in the school or community. ‐3(i) ‐  Kuleana: ____________________________________________________________________________ ‐1‐2 sentences on how your organization will help you find your personal gift in life  and/or help you to share that gift with the world. Section 4 ‐ Non‐Discrimination Policy: ________________________________________________________ ‐All student organizations must state that they will avoid all forms discrimination. You can use the  following statement or something similar: “This organization and its members shall not  discriminate against any individual(s) for reasons of age, color, disability, gender identity or  expression, national origin, race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, or veteran status.” Article II ‐ Membership: Qualifications and categories of membership.  ‐Describe here who is eligible to be a Voting Member of your organization. Remember that  organizations should be initiated, led, and run by students. Your eligibility requirements could  include the following: grade level, GPA, recommendation by faculty, parent/family approval, etc. Article III ‐ Organization Leadership: Titles, terms of office, type of selection, and duties of  the leaders.  ‐Describe here your leadership. Your organization needs at least 5 officers: President, Vice  President, Treasurer, Webmaster, and Secretary. For each of these officers (and any other  positions you choose), state how they will be selected and what their duties will be. Article VI – Method of Selecting and/or Removing Officers and Members.  ‐Describe here how officers and members will be selected. Also include the steps that will be  followed to remove an officer/member if they fail to live up to their eligibility requirements or  duties. Article VII – Faculty and Community Advisor(s)  ‐Describe here the responsibilities and expectations of your Faculty Advisor and Community  Advisor. Faculty Advisors must be teachers at Kamaile. Community Advisors must be approved by  the Navigators’ Center. Article VIII – Meetings of the Organization: Required meetings and their frequency.  ‐Describe here your meeting/activity schedule. All organizations are required to hold at least one  meeting/activity per week during the academic calendar. Exceptions are allowed for weeks  shortened due to school breaks.

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Appendix B: Website URL’s  The Navigators’ Center Website www.navigatorscenter.org or www.navigatorscenter.com  

Kūkuni Newsletter https://sites.google.com/a/kamaile.org/the‐navigators‐center/kukuni‐‐events‐page    

Kamaile Academy Homepage www.kamaileacademy.org or www.kamaile.org 

  10th Grade Benchmark Portfolio Defenses https://sites.google.com/a/kamaile.org/kamaile‐middle‐high‐schools/10th‐grade‐benchmark‐portfolio‐defense     

  Responses from Elementary Parent, Grade 6 Student, and Grade 9 Student Health Needs Assessments https://sites.google.com/a/kamaile.org/the‐navigators‐center/programs/health‐center                                              www.navigatorscenter.org


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Appendix C: Sail Plan for Community Partnerships

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Appendix D: Listing of Community Partners    

Center for Research on Education, Diversity & Excellence Hawai'i Project (CREDE) www.coe.hawaii.edu/departments/projects/CREDE The Center for Research on Education, Diversity, and Excellence (CREDE) Hawai‘i Project promotes  educators’ use of research‐based strategies of effective practice for culturally and linguistically diverse  children and students. The project offers professional development to educators who want to improve the  learning and engagement of children and students from diverse backgrounds.     A number of Kamaile Academy teachers across all grade levels have enrolled in the CREDE training and use  the CREDE standards to guide their instruction. 

Envision Schools www.envisionschools.org “To close the academic achievement gap and improve outcomes for underserved students, redesign the  entire high school experience.” Envision Schools was founded in 2002 on this simple idea. We believe the  current achievement gap reflects a systemic failure to understand how kids learn, what motivates them to  learn, and what they need in order to learn well. We employ the best practices of high school design — rigorous college‐preparatory curricula, small and personalized learning environments, and a focus on  measurable results—and add a truly innovative model that emphasizes project‐based learning, development  of Deeper Learning skills, integration of arts and technology into core subjects, real‐world experience in  workplaces, and a uniquely rigorous assessment system.    Envision Schools is working directly with the faculty and staff of Kamaile to bring the model of their Bay Area  schools to Kamaile Academy Middle and High Schools.  www.navigatorscenter.org


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GROW HAWAII www.growhi.org GROW HAWAII is a project of the Hawaii Association of Independent Schools (HAIS) in partnership with the  Hawaii State Department Agriculture and the Ulupono Initiative. Over the next three years, GROW HAWAII  will use a variety of strategies to significantly enrich the educational dialogue in all private and public schools  statewide concerning the urgency for growing food in the islands. Beginning with the belief that the  betterment of humankind is inherently possible and that schools are a prominent force for good, GROW  HAWAII and its partners aspire to create lifelong “buy local, eat local” consumers by engaging students,  starting in elementary school, in exploration, experimentation, and action‐oriented problem‐based learning  that will foster consideration of the origins of and their relationship with island grown food and the social  systems and values we will need to create a more sustainable way of life. Simultaneously, we aspire to  document this story and share it with all who are interested, allowing the voices of students to chart a  course to the future and be in the vanguard of those leading the way.    GROW HAWAII has been a strong source of support to Kamaile students, teachers, and kitchen staff.  Invitations to conferences, technical assistance and equipment for garden projects, and trainings for our  cafeteria cooks have all been welcome opportunities for our school community. 

Honolulu Community Action Program, Inc. (HCAP) HCAP Head Start www.hcapweb.org and www.hcapweb.org/headstart.html We are a federally funded program that provides quality services to qualifying preschoolers and their  families. From our humble beginning as a summer project in 1965, we have grown to become the largest  early childhood program in the State of Hawaii serving over 1,659 children and their families each year. Head  Start offers an early childhood program for children 3 to 5 years of age whose families qualify for our Head  Start services.     Three HCAP Head Start sites in the Wai‘anae community that offer full‐day services are directly affiliated with  Kamaile Academy and collaborate closely with multiple actors on campus. 

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INPEACE (The Institute for Native Pacific Education and Culture) www.inpeace.org Since 1994, INPEACE has been working to educate and empower Native Hawaiian communities. INPEACE has  emerged as a local and international leader in early childhood education, workforce development and  cultural land stewardship.    For years, Kamaile Academy has enjoyed a close relationship with INPEACE, serving as a host to a number of  its highly acclaimed early childhood education programs.

Leeward Community College – Wai‘anae www.leeward.hawaii.edu/leewardccw Leeward Community College Wai‘anae (LeewardCCW) is a satellite campus in the University of Hawai‘i  Community College system located on the beautiful Wai‘anae coast of Oahu. It offers a variety of first and  second year college credit classes in liberal arts, education, business, and career and technical areas.  Students can complete a majority of the course requirements for an Associate of Arts or an Associate of Arts  in Teaching degree at LeewardCCW.    Kamaile Academy’s partnership with LeewardCCW is young but has already produced many promising  results including college counselor visits to high school classrooms and collaboration among instructors at  the two sites.         

Parents and Children Together (PACT) Family Centers www.hawaiipirc.org PACT is one of Hawaii's leading private non‐profit family service agencies and is a leader in the design and  delivery of a broad range of innovative social and educational services. PACT is an active partner with  www.navigatorscenter.org


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numerous community efforts, coalitions, initiatives, schools and other providers, and is a prominent  advocate for the needs of Hawaii's most socio‐economically challenged citizens.    PACT’s Family Center is working with Kamaile Academy to better engage families in their children’s  education through the Sundays Project (http://www.hawaiipirc.org/sundays/index.html ). Families learn from  one another successful ways to help their children succeed in school and how to make education a priority in  their lives, while having fun. Classes are conducted in English, Chuukese and Marshallese.    

Polynesian Voyaging Society http://pvs.kcc.hawaii.edu/index.html The Polynesian Voyaging Society (PVS) was founded in 1973 to carry out an experiment that would help  answer some questions: how did the Polynesians settle the far‐flung islands of the mid‐Pacific – by accident  or by design? Did their canoes and their knowledge of navigation enable them to sail purposefully over the  vast sea distances between Pacific islands? PVS began with the building of a replica of a Hawaiian voyaging  canoe, Hōkūle‘a, launched in 1975, to explore the seafaring heritage and the voyaging routes of our  ancestors. Since its first voyage to Tahiti in 1976, PVS has explored the ocean of our ancestors in order to  rediscover and perpetuate through practice Hawaiian voyaging traditions and values and to bring together  communities throughout the Pacific. With a legacy of ocean exploration as its foundation, the Polynesian  Voyaging Society is committed to undertake voyages of discovery (Holokai); to respect, learn from, and  perpetuate through practice our heritage and culture (‘Ike); and to promote learning which integrates  voyaging experiences and values into quality education (Ho‘ona‘auao). We are committed to nurturing  communities and the leadership therein that values learning and sharing knowledge in order to foster living  well on islands.    PVS has provided a number of invaluable experiences and resources for the students of Kamaile Academy  over the past few years. From working with PALS afterschool classes and giving inspiration speeches to high  school students, to taking students on 3‐day coastal voyages and weekend training camps, PVS has had a  major impact on many young people at Kamaile. 

PONO Choices www.cds.hawaii.edu/ponochoices The overarching goal of Pono Choices will be to reduce the number of teenage pregnancies and incidences  of STIs; increase positive bonding in the school and community; increase sense of self‐identity and self‐ www.navigatorscenter.org


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efficacy; and improve expectations for the future. Pono Choices: A Culturally Responsive Teen Pregnancy  and STI Prevention Program is a ten module curriculum that provides young adolescents with the knowledge,  attitudes, beliefs and skills necessary to reduce their risk of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and  pregnancy by incorporating medically accurate information, character education and Hawaiian cultural  values. It is based on social learning, self–regulation and developmental assets theories and the researchers’  extensive experience working with youth. It is intended for students aged 11‐14 in the state of Hawai‘i.    Kamaile Academy will take part in the Pono Choices research study and the curriculum will be used in 7th and  8th grade classrooms.

Program for Afterschool Literacy Support (PALS) http://palshi.org The Program for After‐School Literacy Support (PALS) provides learning opportunities for a predominantly  Native Hawaiian population of children on the Wai’anae coast of Oahu, Hawaii. PALS uses a place‐based  cultural project (PBCP) curricular framework that embraces the multiple cultural locations in which the  children exist and utilizes community and place as the springboard for learning.  PBCPs engage real‐life, ways  of knowing and doing and provide integrated opportunities for literacy teaching and learning across the  curriculum. Students in PALS engage with teachers and other community members in projects that have  relevance to their own lives and that nurture children’s identities as learners, community activists, and as  stewards of the environment. PALS partners with multiple cultural and educational organizations and  individuals including the Polynesian Voyaging Society (PVS), the Honolulu Academy of Arts, Ka’ala and Hoa  ‘Aina O Makaha farms, and numerous local artists, engaging these community partners as both co‐planners  and co‐teachers within the projects.    PALS has overseen the after‐school program for grades 4‐6 at Kamaile Academy for years, and more recently  provided training and support to bring the PALS model to our K‐3 students through the Ka Ulu Pono after‐ school program. 

Sodexo http://sodexousa.com Sodexo, Inc. is a world leader in Quality of Daily Life Solutions in the U.S., Canada, and Mexico, serving 10  million consumers in 6,000 locations every day. Our dedication to excellent service, corporate citizenship,  and fighting hunger all come from one goal ‐ to make every day a better day. As the leading provider of  integrated food and facilities management services in the U.S., Canada, and Mexico, we set out each  morning to treat every person we encounter with the highest level of respect and service. And when you put  www.navigatorscenter.org


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that effort, expertise, and enthusiasm together, it adds up to “a better day” for our clients, their customers,  and our people.    Sodexo manages the Kamaile Academy school cafeteria and has been a great support to our school  community by serving healthy breakfasts and lunches daily to all students, managing the distribution of our  Healthy Snacks program, and servicing community events.         

Waianae Coast Comprehensive Health Center (WCCHC) www.wcchc.com We are a Community Health Center that serves over 27,000 patients, with more than 139,000 visits annually  through our six service sites. We are proud to consider ourselves pioneers in Community‐governed  healthcare, Telemedicine and Hawaiian and other Traditional Healing Arts in an Integrated Healthcare setting.    WCCHC has worked with Kamaile Academy in various ways through the years. The partnership currently  allows for a representative of the Preventive Health Department to visit campus weekly to provide Family  Planning instruction and consultations to high school students. Medical students from the WCCHC have also  been working with Kamaile to develop its health center. 

Wai'anae Neighborhood Place www.wccmhc.org/wnp.htm Wai‘anae Neighborhood Place is a community based program that provides family strengthening and  support services to families and resources on the Wai`anae Coast. It is a place for `Ohana to work together  and acknowledge the unique cultures, values, contributions and strengths of everyone, building a nurturing,  stable and courageous community for all keiki to safely live the best lives possible‐culturally, spiritually,  academically and economically. Wai`anae Neighborhood Place strives to embrace parents by giving support,  assistance, resources, opportunities and encouragement to successfully raise their children. Through Family  Outreach and Community Outreach, Ka Wahi Kaiaulu – Wai`anae Neighborhood Place – builds the capacity of  at‐risk families to provide for the safety of children.  Serving as a neutral hub for service coordination and  community building, we work for positive changes that reduces environmental and social risk factors and  increases protective factors; while providing access to resources, both concrete and informational, and  support without judgment. We are open to all on the Wai`anae Coast and provide referral information of  service providers and other various resources.  www.navigatorscenter.org


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  Kamaile Academy has partnered with Wai‘anae Neighborhood Place as a vital link to service providers along  the Wai‘anae Coast who can support our students and families. The WNP staff has been an invaluable  resource for our school community through case referrals, program support, and regular consultations. 

United States Veterans Initiative www.usvetsinc.org U.S.VETS provides comprehensive services to the veterans we serve, including case management,  employment assistance, job placement, counseling, as well as drug and alcohol free housing.  At our facilities  veterans progress through a seamless continuum of services designed to help them increase their level of  responsibility and prepare them to live independently in the community. Waianae Civic Center is the only  U.S.VETS location that provides services to both veteran and non‐veteran men and women, families and  children. WCC began serving the Hawaii homeless population in March of 2007. Waianae currently serves 300  men, women, and children each day.    Kamaile Academy has worked closely with the staff of the Waianae Civic Center to coordinate the best  support possible to our students and families who are in their program.                                                    Many of our community partners serve multiple roles on campus, but the graphic above gives a general overview of the areas of  focus for each of our partners. 

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