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News for members of Coast Electric Power Association

Take refuge in nature National Wildlife Refuges preserve state’s wildlife heritage

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Mississippi Cooks: Comfort food from Moselle Methodists

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History, legends inspire tours at Rose Hill Cemetery

Periodical postage (ISSN 1052 2433)

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Seth Swafford


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September 2016

Electric cooperative careers offer paycheck and a purpose

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very day in this country, more than 75,000 men and women go to work at America’s electric cooperatives to keep the lights on for 42 million energy consumers in 47 states, including

Mississippi. It’s challenging work, but in addition to a paycheck, our electric power association employees go home each night knowing they’ve helped make their communities better places to live. Over the next five years, thousands of workers will get to experience that sense of purpose and pride as America’s electric cooperatives hire nearly 15,000 employees nationwide. These new hires will replace Baby Boomers reaching retirement age and accommodate organic growth in the energy industry. Despite competitive wages, benefits, job stability and rewarding work, electric cooperatives and other energy companies often have a difficult time attracting new employees. One reason for this recruiting challenge is a lack of awareness among potential new hires. To overcome this challenge, America’s electric cooperatives have joined forces with other energy companies to celebrate Careers in Energy Week. The event, which runs Oct. 17-21, is an opportunity for co-ops to promote their career opportunities. (Find job listings at careers.touchstoneenergy.coop.) A lineworker high atop a pole is the first image that comes to mind for most people who think about electric power association employees. It’s true that lineworkers make up the largest segment of the total co-op workforce—approximately 25 percent— but it takes a variety of talents to keep a cooperative running smoothly. Information technology and engineering are two rapidly growing career opportunities at Mississippi’s 26 electric power associations. Other in-demand career paths include finance, member services, equipment operators, energy advisors, communications and marketing, purchasing, administrative support and human resources. For people who enjoy the rural quality of life but want to explore other parts of the country, an electric cooperative career might be the perfect option.

On the cover Seth Swafford, a wildlife biologist by training, manages the Theodore Roosevelt Complex of national wildlife refuges in the Mississippi Delta. Fifteen national wildlife refuges statewide seek to restore and protect forests, swamps, prairies, marshes and other features of Mississippi’s diverse landscape. Their work is helping to preserve Mississippi’s wildlife heritage, including endangered species. Story begins on page 4.

There are more than 900 electric cooperatives in the United States, and combined they serve 75 percent of the nation’s land mass. Co-op lines stretch across every region, climate and geographic feature America has to offer, and each cooperative reflects the character of the community it serves. No matter what prospective employees might be seeking, they’re My Opinion sure to find it somewhere in Michael Callahan the electric cooperative netExecutive Vice President/CEO Electric Power Associations work. of Mississippi Although the national statistics are impressive, it doesn’t mean much to a job seeker if his or her local electric power association is fully staffed and doesn’t anticipate any openings in the near future. Many jobs—especially lineworkers, equipment operators and other similar roles—are available through regional and national contractors. These contractors are typically hired to supplement local utility crews to help build large projects, clear rights-of-way or repair widespread storm damage. They move from project to project over time, offering employees a chance to see different parts of the country. Electric cooperatives are also eager to hire military veterans and their spouses. Last year, America’s electric cooperatives launched a program called “Serve Our Co-ops; Serve Our Country” to honor and hire veterans and their spouses. More information about the program is available at www.ServeVets.coop. As not-for-profit, member-owned cooperatives, electric power associations offer careers that allow employees to make a difference in the communities they serve. Cooperatives are guided by a set of principles that put people first and offer fulfilling work to those who enjoy serving others.

Today in Mississippi OFFICERS Keith Hurt - President Tim Smith - First Vice President Barry Rowland - Second Vice President Randy Smith - Secretary/Treasurer

EDITORIAL STAFF Michael Callahan - CEO Ron Stewart - Sr. VP, Communications Mark Bridges - Manager, Support Services Debbie H. Stringer - Editor Elissa Fulton - Communications Specialist Trey Piel - Digital Media Manager Rickey McMillan - Graphics Specialist Linda Hutcherson - Administrative Assistant

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Our Homeplace

A monarch butterfly feasts on the nectar of a milkweed planted specifically for its use at Yazoo National Wildlife Refuge’s butterfly garden. Plants for the garden were chosen for their value to butterflies, humingbirds and other pollinators. Learn more about national wildlife refuges in Mississippi in our feature starting on page 4.

Mississippi is the Delta, the land of the Percys and Shelby Foote. Wisteria grows there, clinging and heavily scented. Sometimes, through fields of cotton, shallow creeks flow. One hears sudden winged thunder, a covey of quail in flight. They rise quickly to fly against a sun that guarantees for the Delta a bounty of white gold. Mississippi is the Hill Country, the land of a man named Medgar and a dreamer named Tennessee. Chickasaw and Choctaw paths crossed there in a time before Dancing Rabbit and Doak’s Stand. The Hill Country is an Indian trading pelts for flint, the shouts of bluecoats following Sherman and Grierson, and then the sound of sawteeth cutting ancient pines. Mississippi’s Gulf Coast is the land of Jeff Davis and Walter Anderson. In the wetlands, swamp mist forever pearls a spider’s web. A dragonfly’s wings catch the sunlight and a coiled cottonmouth asks only to be left alone. White sails are silhouetted against the distant blue, and the white foam of waves wash away the footprints of some small child. At night, neon glows where French and Spanish lanterns once aided in the discovery of this land called Mississippi. —Ovid Vickers, Decatur

JOIN TODAY IN MISSISSIPPI

ON FACEBOOK Vol. 69 No. 9 EDITORIAL OFFICE & ADVERTISING 601-605-8600 Acceptance of advertising by Today in Mississippi does not imply endorsement of the advertised product or services by the publisher or Mississippi’s Electric Power Associations. Product satisfaction and delivery responsibility lie solely with the advertiser. • National advertising representative: National Country Market, 800-626-1181 Circulation of this issue: 437,658 Non-member subscription price: $9.50 per year

The Official Publication of the Electric Power Associations of Mississippi Today in Mississippi (ISSN 1052-2433) is published eleven times a year (Jan.-Nov.) by Electric Power Associations of Mississippi, Inc., P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300, or 665 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland, MS 39157. Phone 601-605-8600. Periodical postage paid at Ridgeland, MS, and additional office. The publisher (and/or its agent) reserves the right to refuse or edit all advertising. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Today, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300

Visit us online at www.todayinmississippi.com

Mississippi to me is the beautiful aroma of at least 40 years ago that strikes my nostrils as I enter a familyowned grocery store in the middle of nowhere. The sharp slap of an old wooden screened door behind me says, “Hello, you’re where you are supposed to be.” I then resolve to get a candy bar and a Coke. I’m home. —Marion Brewer, Ovett

What’s Mississippi to you? What do you treasure most about life in our state? Send your thoughts to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158, or to news@epaofms.com. Please keep your comments brief. Submissions are subject to editing for length and clarity.

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Takerefuge in nature

National wildlife refuges protect Mississippi’s wildlife heritage while providing visitors safe encounters with nature By Debbie Stringer The value of Mississippi’s 15 national wildlife refuges is well known to hunters and fisherman. But you don’t need a gun or a rod or a four-wheel-drive to enjoy what they have to offer. All that’s required is a sense of wonder. The National Wildlife Refuge System began in the early 1900s as a means to conserve migratory bird resources. More refuges were established across the country to supply feeding and nesting sites for migrating birds as their routes, or flyways, became better understood. Today, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service has more than 560 wildlife refuges, at least one in every state. Each refuge seeks to protect, restore and manage habitat for fish, wildlife and plants—and show citizens how they can help preserve their wildlife heritage. “These are open refuges. We’re encouraging the public to see everything that we do. I want people to see our forestry program and our ag practices for waterfowl,” said Seth Swafford, project leader for the Theodore Roosevelt Complex, in the Mississippi Delta. Refuges are day-use lands that provide safe opportu-

nities for learning about and enjoying nature. Thousands of school children visit a Mississippi wildlife refuge each year, as well as countless photographers, birders, hikers, hunters, fishermen and nature observers. Budget constraints keep refuge staffs small, so volunteers, conservation organizations, landowners and universities help refuges meet Seth Swafford their objectives. Yazoo National Wildlife Refuge in Washington County, for example, gets a hand from Mississippi’s Lower Delta Partnership staffers in leading student groups through the refuge’s butterfly garden, itself created and maintained by volunteers. “Too many children today do not get out and explore nature as past generations did,” said Meg Cooper, LDP coordinator. “In fact, we’ve discovered that many children are scared of nature. By taking a field trip to a refuge where there is interpretation and safe opportunities to interact with nature, they are able to experience and learn about wildlife, habitats and

conservation first hand.” Each of the national wildlife refuges in Mississippi holds a unique place in the state’s diverse ecosystem. Our story takes a look at three of them, located in ecologically distinct regions of the state.

Sam D. Hamilton Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge “Even though we have endangered species like the red-cockaded woodpecker and the wood stork, it’s really our opportunity to connect people with nature that Noxubee is best at,” said Steve Reagan project leader at Sam D. Hamilton Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge, in Brooksville. This east-central Mississippi refuge serves as an outdoor classroom for Mississippi State University, and its education Red-cockaded woodpecker. center offers environmental edu- Photo: USFWS


September 2016

other wildlife. Alligator watching tops many visitors’ to-do list at this refuge. The biggest alligator measured here extended 14 feet 2 inches long. Among the most popular visitor activities at national cation programs for local elementary and middle school wildlife refuges are wildlife observation and photograstudents. A goal is to teach students about the conserphy. Only about 20 percent of Noxubee’s users are vation of natural resources. hunters or fishermen, Reagan said. “We really just hope that they take away how cool “As time goes on, the hunter numbers continue to nature is—seeing the birds and the frogs and plants decline every year, and more people are out just to and insects. And just how cool it is to get outside and experience nature,” he said. get dirty, interact with nature,” Reagan said. “Noxubee has always been known as one of the He believes kids spend too much time indoors doing places to go see wildlife. I think that still holds today. other things. “When I was growing up ... we were We have every native species other than black bear, at always poking and prodding at something outside.” this point. It’s really a pretty special place.” Established in 1940 as Noxubee National Wildlife Reagan worked at six other national wildlife refuges Refuge, this 48,000-acre refuge is dominated by botbefore coming to Sam D. Hamilton Noxubee. tomland and upland woodlands and lakes. Its lands “It’s the coolest job really. Probably 90 percent of span Okitbbeha, Noxubee and Winston counties. the time I can’t believe they let me come here,” he said “What’s neat about Noxubee is it’s very diverse. If with a laugh. you want to see it, Follow what’s happening at there’s some place on Sam D. Hamilton on Facebook the refuge we can show at NoxubeeNWR. it to you, everything from a wilderness area to a managed moist-soil unit. It’s all the extremes,” Reagan said. This refuge’s forest management practices cater to the needs of the Located west of Yazoo City, endangered red-cockaded woodpecker, which prefers open timber stands and mature pines for nesting cavities. Refuge waterways include two lakes, Bluff and Loakfoma, and wetlands that support wintering waterfowl, the wood stork, bald eagle, American alligator and This Mississippi sandhill crane nest was photographed in June in a pond at Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge. Photo: USFWS/Scott Hereford

Panther Swamp National Wildlife Refuge

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the 41,000-acre Panther Swamp National Wildlife Refuge is the largest of seven refuges making up the Theodore Roosevelt Complex, and serves as its headquarters. The complex encompasses a bottomland hardwood ecosystem, an ancient floodplain with wooded sloughs, wetlands and bayous. “This is characteristic of what the Delta used to look like [before agriculture]. The major difference now is that hydrology has been impacted. We don’t have the natural river flooding anymore,” Swafford said. The Theodore Roosevelt Complex is the most active of any refuge in Mississippi when it comes to hunting and fishing, Swafford said. “We’ve got some of the best fishing and hunting in the state. It’s really, really good here.” Panther Swamp is known for its huge numbers of migratory waterfowl in the winter. The refuge was established in 1936 to provide for the wintering needs of waterfowl in the Mississippi Flyway. “We can host, on a given day, greater than 100,000 ducks, not including geese or other birds that are using the refuge,” Swafford said. The numbers of mallards, pintails, wigeons and other migrating ducks start increasing in November; the timing varies depending on weather conditions in the north. Wood ducks and black-bellied whistling ducks are year-round residents. In the spring and early summer, herons, egrets and other birds nest in large established breeding colonies, called rookeries, at the complex. At Panther Swamp, visitors can see Far left, a proud young one of the rookeries from fisherman shows off his their car. first-ever catch at one of Land management pracPanther Swamp National tices including forestry are Wildlife Refuge’s annual returning former cropland youth fishing rodeos. Photo courtesy of Panand catfish ponds to a more ther Swamp NWR. natural state in order to supLeft, a fawn feeds on port the native wildlife and tender vegetation at Panther Swamp. Photo: migratory birds. Michael Kelly

Continued on page 12

Wildflowers, above, paint the landscape gold at Sam D. Hamilton Noxbubee National Wildlife Refube, in eastcentral Mississippi. In fall, a beautiful buck, left, emerges from the woods at the refuge. Photos by USFWS/Regina Snow


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Others’ views reveal what Deltans take for granted t was so many years ago that I don’t even remember whether I was going from Jackson back home to Greenville to get a washing machine stored at my parents’, or to take one there. Doesn’t matter. The washer isn’t the point. Harry Nelson and I worked at the same Jackson radio station and had become close enough friends that I could impose on him to help with this washing machine ordeal. Harry was from Hattiesburg and had never been to the Delta. So he was kind of looking forward to it. The gateway into the Delta back then was that dramatic drop from the top of Yazoo City at the high end of Broadway,

where you get to glimpse miles and miles past the town out into your destination just before you drop rollercoaster-like, ears popping, down into it. Broadway is so steep the Mississippi houses seem Seen to be tilted as you drive past. by Walt Grayson At the foot of the hill, once you went through a couple of traffic lights and crossed the railroad tracks and then hopped the Yazoo River, you

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were in it: The Delta, where hills are just a memory and Indian mounds and the levee are the only rises of any significance until Memphis. We drove west past those woods where the palmettos grew and on toward Louise. In a few miles the scenery broadened into open cotton fields broken only by occasional cypress lined lakes and bayous. Presently, I asked Harry what he thought of the Delta. “It sure is flat, isn’t it?” was his reply. Having grown up in the Delta, it had never crossed my mind what an outsider might think of it when seeing it for the first time. It was just home to me. I knew the roads and knew of the people living along them, and of those who lived in the towns and how to relate to them and they to me. It was second nature. Even the flatness of it had never seemed odd to me. It had always been flat. But I guess it could be taken as a “wonder” by someone like Harry who was used to creeks that actually had a current, cutting through bluffs in pine forests. I mention all of that to pass along a recently published book of observations of the Delta by another outsider. His craft with words is only matched by his keen sense of observation and ability to describe the obvious yet oblivious: how Delta life is lived and plays out on all the many interlocking but independent planes on which it is thatched, things that are natural to people living it but become fascinating when defined.

Sometimes, a Delta sunset can make you lonesome and homesick, even though you are at home. Other times, it is an invitation to a Delta night, which can hold anything! Such is the Delta. It can be everything at once, and sometimes nothing at all but empty promises. It’s why people stay there and why they leave. And why they come back. And why it is so difficult to define. Photo: Walt Grayson

“Dispatches from Pluto, Lost and Found in the Mississippi Delta” by Richard Grant held my interest from the moment I picked it up until I finished it—in record time, I might add. It reminds me a great deal of David Cohn’s 1948 book, “Where I Was Born and Raised.” Only difference, Cohn was a Deltan but possessed a poet’s ability (although he didn’t write poetry) to take two steps back and observe life right around him. Then he’d write his conclusions with such clarity that those unmindfully living it recognized it. Richard Grant has written the modern-day version with his “Dispatches.” The Delta is almost one of the newest habitable places on earth, having gained popularity mostly since the end of the Civil War. It is a mystical place in a sense, still resolving itself. Hopefully aiming in the right direction. “Dispatches” gives us an idea where it’s at, as observed by Richard Grant. Walt Grayson is the host of “Mississippi Roads” on Mississippi Public Broadcasting television, and the author of two “Looking Around Mississippi” books and “Oh! That Reminds Me: More Mississippi Homegrown Stories.” Contact Grayson at walt@waltgrayson.com.


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‘Picture This’ aims for silhouettes and country churches What makes a great silhouette? Your creativity! Our next “Picture This” theme is silhouettes. Submissions must be emailed or postmarked by Sept. 15. A few photos that best illustrate the theme will appear in our October issue. The theme for our January issue is country churches. Deadline for submissions is Dec. 5. Photographers whose photos are selected become eligible for a $200 cash prize, to be awarded in a random drawing in December. These are the submission guidelines:

• Photos must be in sharp focus and relate to the given theme. • Photos must be accompanied by identifying information: photographer’s name, address, phone and electric power association (if applicable). Include the name(s) of any recognizable people or places in the picture. Feel free to include comments. • Photos must be the original work of an amateur photographer (of any age). • Photos may be either color or black and white, print or digital.

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• Digital photos should be high-resolution JPG files, at least 1 MB in size. If emailing phone photos, choose the “Actual Size” setting or equivalent before sending. • Please do not use photo-editing software to adjust colors or tones. • Photos with a date appearing on the image cannot be used. • Prints will be returned if accompanied by a selfaddressed, stamped envelope. We cannot, however, guarantee their safe return through the mail. Both prints and digital photos are acceptable. Mail prints or a photo CD to Picture This, Today in

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Ornamental peppers offer beautiful heat n the past, I’ve expressed my love for chili peppers, the hotter the better. But there are only so many ghost, Trinidad Moruga and Carolina Reaper peppers I can eat. Lately, my gastrointestinal tolerance for their heat is waning. So in these circumstances, what’s a hot pepper lover to do? In my case, it’s growing ornamental peppers, because they love our hot and humid summers. I’m not alone in this. Gardeners all across the United States are going crazy for ornamental peppers, and the plant breeders and growers are responding to the increased interest. Every year, there are more new introductions available in a dizzying array of options for the home garden and Southern landscape. They Gardening range from big to small, with green, by Dr. Gary Bachman purple and variegated foliage, as well as multicolored fruit. What a fun and unique way to add interest to your garden.

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The plants themselves seem to be proud of their fruit, as many hold the pods high above the foliage for our viewing pleasure. Whenever we use the word “orna-

Ornamental peppers typically have peppers in various stages of coloration on the same plant. The best show is late summer through fall. Photo: MSU Extension/Gary Bachman

mental” to describe any vegetable, many folks automatically assume the fruit is not to be eaten. Generally, this is true because the plants have been selectively bred for color. However, ornamental peppers can be used to spice up a dish, but they tend to be very, very hot. You can see my reaction to eating an ornamental pepper in the “Southern Gardening” TV segment, “Ornamental Peppers” at http://goo.gl/R4fuvH. Purple Flash, which was chosen as a Mississippi Medallion winner for 2010, is an example of the versatility and value of ornamental peppers. With its purpleand-white variegated leaves, it is one of the showiest peppers available on the market. Mississippi State University has grown trials of some great ornamental varieties from the Chile Pepper Institute at New Mexico State University. NuMex April Fool’s Day, NuMex Chinese New Year, NuMex Cinco de Mayo and NuMex Easter all provide colorful additions to any garden. In fact, NuMex Easter was named an All-America Selections winner a couple of years ago. This group is actively breeding new and interesting ornamental peppers that are perfect for our Mississippi landscapes. I’m going to secretly let the cat out of the bag: Some of the NuMex

ornamental peppers will be named Mississippi Medallion winners in the near future. When the pepper plants are producing fruit, it is very common to have peppers in various stages of coloration on the same plant. This is a fantastic feature and provides for an ever-changing look in the landscape. Once fruit has set, it is common for it to remain on the plant for a few months, maintaining the beautiful colors. The colors start to fade only when the fruit begin to dry. Ornamental peppers prefer to grow in consistently moist soil, but don’t be overly generous with the water, as the plants don’t tolerate waterlogged soil. Fertilize with a good slow-release fertilizer early in the season, but once fruit starts to set, there is no need to add additional nutrition. Most ornamental peppers begin setting fruit as the temperatures heat up. The best show is saved for late summer and lasts through fall as the plants keep producing. This means you should plant your ornamental peppers in late spring. I realize it’s too late for plantings this year, but you can consider now what varieties to plant next year. You can buy seeds at many of the online seed houses for an early start. Dr. Gary Bachman is an associate Extension and research professor of horticulture at the Mississippi State University Coastal Research and Extension Center in Biloxi. He is also host of “Southern Gardening” radio and TV programs.

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Month of magic and skyrockets

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t is finally here—that month of pure magic. September seems a unique time in the transition of seasons. It is no longer summer but not quite fall. The mornings can be crisp; afternoons can be close to sweltering. So, it is a time with perhaps no clear designation. Be assured, however, that it is alluring. September is that mystical time when you will clearly notice that slant in the shadows, a mark quite removed from that blinding angle the sun possesses in July and August. No, September sunshine is not summer sunshine. Detecting the change is practically subliminal. Rarely intrusive as would be a strong wind or thunderstorm or snowfall, that angle and slant in shadows eases gently into the awareness. Surroundings simply look different and enough different to suggest something has happened. Perhaps as if someone moved a decorative pillow in your living room from the sofa’s back to its arm while you were away. You may not know immediately what, but you will know something has changed. And the sky will become more distant. Not really; it will be no farther

away than it was in June, but it will appear as such. This is best detected under controlled conditions. You may not walk into the yard and see it immediately. But take a clear morning, maybe a half-hour or so after sunrise. Look to the east. There you will see the distance. Scattered clouds may appear drawn to the sun in an engulfing, alluring portrait of far away. Only a little imagination is demanded before you find yourself by Tony Kinton drifting upward and eastward and distant from your earthbound spot on the lawn or in the field or from the encapsulated cubicle of a vehicle. If it is the latter, don’t drift too long. You are, after all, driving! Another September change that has always captured me is a black gum leaf, one of the first to dress in a hint of autumn. This connection comes from

Outdoors Today

childhood. The specific black gum tree that initially introduced me to this metamorphosis in attire and invited me to step outside myself and into a world apart from that sheltered and often egocentric core still stands—sturdy and picturesque. The September change in that tree worked a pronounced alteration in that core. Leaven entered the dough. The resultant eruption spilled out juvenile presumptions and allowed in a thirst for knowing and growing. I visit that tree multiple times each September. Growing up a hunter and still afflicted with that primal push, I enjoyed dove hunting. September was and is the month for that activity. I never was much good at it. Left handed but righteye dominant, I found it difficult if not impossible to be a reliable practitioner of the shotgun arts. These rigs are to be used instinctively and with both eyes open. As a result of my being born in disarray regarding hand and eye collaboration, I was never the one to take my limit of those skyrockets with a mere box of 25 shells. Still, I liked the regimen and went regularly during many Septembers. Now, here it is again—that month of magic. So if you are a dove hunter or

While scenes such as this are not yet common across Mississippi, September promises them soon. Photo: Tony Kinton

simply a hopeless romantic—or both for that matter—your month has arrived. Hot or cool, not summer or autumn— these are immaterial. The overriding factor is that it is simply too good to miss.

Dove Delight Thoroughly clean a dozen dove breasts. Place them in a container that can be sealed and marinate them in the refrigerator for a half day or so with Zesty Italian dressing. A touch of Worcestershire, Dale’s or soy sauce is permitted, if you like. After marinating, place the breasts on a grill over medium heat. If you choose, you can wrap the breasts in bacon. Be advised, however, that the breasts will likely cook before the bacon, and bacon should be thoroughly cooked before eating. Consider partially cooking the bacon in the microwave or in a pan before wrapping, leaving it flexible enough to encircle the dove breast without crumbling. Watch the breasts carefully, for they are basically ready when beads of moisture begin to form on the outside of the breasts. Tony Kinton has been an active outdoors writer for 30 years. His newest book, “Rambling Through Pleasant Memories,” is now available. Order from Amazon.com or Kinton’s website: www.tonykinton.com.


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September 2016

Member equity

Where our members have the power

This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

CEO’s message

keeps the lights on! Over the past few years, some out-of-state cooperatives have been accused of holding on to too much patronage capital, often referred to as capital credits. Mississippi electric cooperatives, as do other cooperatives across the country, utilize this credit – margins after operating costs and expenses are Robert J. Occhi deducted from electric revenues President and CEO – to benefit their members. While cooperatives are able to borrow much of the needed money to expand and operate, member equity is also required. Cooperatives use this equity to lower debt which keeps the cost of energy as low as possible, which in turn benefits all members. By purchasing and paying for electricity, members contribute to that required equity. Such equity is the lifeblood that enables cooperatives to satisfy the future growth and power needs of its members. However, some members believe they should receive affordable and reliable service without con-

tributing toward the equity and have demanded greater retirements than co-op boards believe to be prudent. Such practice is not feasible and is asking for the cooperatives to operate in a way that would only lead to higher rates and instability. Each cooperative has a local board of directors. These directors, who are themselves rate-paying members, are charged with the financial well-being of the cooperative. This responsibility includes making decisions concerning capital credit allocations and retirements. The board periodically determines, based on the financial condition of the cooperative, when and how much of the capital credits can be retired to their members. In fact, Coast Electric has retired more than $50 million to our members and will be announcing another capital credit retirement at our Annual Meeting in November. Should you have any questions about your capital credits, we encourage you to reach out to me or any of our board members and we will be happy to talk to you about your capital credits and how they make our co-op stronger.

Communicators: Melissa Russo and April Lollar For Today in Mississippi information, call 877-7MY-CEPA (877-769-2372) www.coastepa.com

Watt’s up this month

10a PAGE

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 Learn about energy myths

 Where are

they now?  Meet your board

representatives 

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Annual Meeting is Nov. 3 – join us!

 Are you are card-carrying

member?  Did you know?

Household Hazardous Waste Day

October 1st

 Labor Day  

Coast Electric WILL BE CLOSED Monday, September 5



in observance of

Crews will remain on call and dispatchers will remain on duty throughout the holiday weekend. Call 877-769-2372 or use our free CE on the Go mobile app for Apple and Android devices to report outages.

Have a safe and happy holiday weekend!


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September 2016

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Ask the EXPERT!

There is so much information out there about energy efficiency. What are the most common misconceptions?

A: Eating carrots will greatly improve your eyesight, cracking your knuckles leads to arthritis, watching too much TV will harm your vision. We’ve all heard these old wives’ tales, but did you know there are also many misconceptions about home energy use? Don’t be fooled by comSenior Residential Energy mon energy myths. Management Representative Myth: The lower the ther- Scott White answers this month’s mostat setting, the faster the question about energy myths. home will cool. Many people think that walking into a hot room and lowering the thermostat to 65 degrees will cool the room quickly. This is not true. Thermostats direct a home’s HVAC system to heat or cool to a certain temperature. Drastically adjusting the thermostat setting will not make a difference in how quickly you feel cooler. The same is true for heating. The Department of Energy recommends setting your thermostat to 78 degrees during summer months and 68 degrees during winter months. Myth: Opening the oven door to check on a dish doesn’t really waste energy. While it can be tempting to check the progress of that dish you're cooking in the oven, opening the oven door does waste energy. Every time the oven

door is opened, the temperature inside is reduced by as much as 25 degrees, delaying the progress of your dish and, more importantly, costing you additional money. If you need to check the progress of a dish, try using the oven light instead. Myth: Ceiling fans keep your home cool while you’re away. Believe it or not, many people think this is true. Ceiling fans cool people, not rooms. Ceiling fans circulate room air but do not change the temperature. A running ceiling fan in an empty room is only adding to your electricity use. Remember to turn fans off when you’re away and reduce your energy use. Myth: Reducing my energy use is too expensive. Many consumers THIRTY-TWO believe that reducing energy use requires expensive up-front costs, like purchasing new, more efficient appliances or construction upgrades

to an older home. But the truth is consumers who make small changes to their energy efficiency habits, such as turning off lights when not in use, sealing air leaks and using a programmable thermostat, can see a reduction in energy consumption. Remember, energy efficiency doesn’t have to be difficult. Focus on small changes to save big. Learn more about ways to save energy by visiting www.coastepa.com or calling 877-769-2372.

September 1984

YEARS AGO


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Today in Mississippi I September 2016

Youth Tour:

Where are they now?

Each year, the top high school juniors in Hancock, Harrison and Pearl River counties vie for coveted spots as representatives for Coast Electric in the Electric Power Associations of Mississippi Youth Leadership program. These students are not

1998

Justina Merwin Lee Hancock High School

Justina is an experienced dental hygienist who has spent the past 12 years working on the coast and now works at Picayune Smiles. Justina is also a busy mom of four. Justina was grateful for her opportunity to participate in the Youth Leadership program because for her, as for many Youth Leadership students, the program was an opportunity to take the trip of a lifetime. “I can tell you that to date, D.C., Youth Tour has been my favorite “vacation,” says Justina. “I learned and experienced so much of our nation’s heritage. One of my favorite parts was see-

2005

only at the top of their classes academically, but are also leaders in their schools and communities. The Youth Leadership program gives them the opportunity to enhance their leadership skills and to meet similarly successful students from across

ing the Korean War Memorial. My grandfather was a Purple Heart and Bronze Star Recipient and it was amazing being there. I was able to go on this trip because Coast Electric had an essay contest. Our family would not have been able to afford this trip otherwise so I used my writing skills to earn my way there. I would definitely recommend this program to anyone who has the opportunity to participate. Being at our nation’s capital with so many smart and determined students surrounding me was an accomplishment. I was proud of it at the time. Looking back, I’m grateful for it and will always be!”

Crista Hartenstein Picayune High School

After the Youth Leadership program, Crista received her bachelor’s degree in International Relations and Spanish and an MBA in Tourism and Leisure Management from IMC University of Applied Sciences in Austria. She is currently the programs manager for Friends of the Hunley in Charleston, S.C. The Hunley is the world’s first successful submarine. Crista serves as the organization’s volunteer coordinator, group tour manager and event planner. She is an active part of her community and volunteers for Chase After A Cure and Charleston Area Therapeutic Riding. According to Crista, “Being part of the Youth Tour program was an incredibly rewarding experience. Not

only was I able to travel to our capital and make new friends, it was also a chance to meet and Former Youth Tour student Crista talk to like- Hartenstein now has a successful career as an event planner in minded Charleston, S.C. individuals, learn from them and grow with them. Traveling with Youth Tour gave me the chance to truly get to know energetic and motivated young people whom I could learn from and share experiences with. While the travel

Mississippi and our nation. But what happens after the program is over? We wanted to catch up with our students from past years and asked them to let us know what they have been up to recently.

aspect of Youth Tour was an amazing journey, the people who I traveled with made it an unforgettable experience. Youth Tour opened my eyes to so

2007

many possibilities of what the future might hold, where I could go and what I could do. Everyone had different experiences and I think we were all able to learn from each other.”

Caroline Williams Shaw Pass Christian High School

With a chemical engineering degree from the University of Mississippi, Caroline joined GE Power and Water’s Operations Management Leadership Program after graduation. Caroline held positions as a quality engineer, operations leader and project manager for various projects in GE’s gas turbine and onshore wind supply chains in South Carolina, New York and even Germany. Caroline is now part of GE’s Renewable Energy team in Pensacola, Fla., where she leads a team of 74 assembly technicians who build and ship wind turbines to sites in North and South America.

According to Caroline, “I have some of the best memories from Youth Tour and can Caroline participated in Coast Electric’s Youth Leadership definitely thank Coast program in 2007 and has since begun a successful career in the Electric for energy industry. piquing my interest in the energy industry. Youth Tour was the first time I had been exposed to the industry and even thought about how energy was produced, managed and marketed. It opened my eyes to an industry and careers that I did not know existed.”

Do you want to j These are just a handful of the outstanding students who have come through our Youth Leadership program. We are so proud of them and of all they have accomplished in their professional and personal lives. They remain dedicated to service and to leadership.


September 2016

2011

2008

Cady Reinhart Wolf Our Lady Academy

Cady, a University of Southern Mississippi graduate, is inspiring our next generation of leaders. Cady teaches English II at Biloxi High School and recently received certification to teach AP Literature. Even though she only began teaching a few years ago, Cady is already having an impact on her students who nominated Cady for the Very Important Teacher Contest. She was one of 25 national finalists. She has used her leadership skills in all Cady and her husband, Glenn, on his aspects of her life from graduation from the police academy. her time as an assistant hall director for her dorm in college to her role as a Walt Disney World Cast Member and as one of Biloxi High School’s Interact Club spon-

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Joseph Yott Long Beach High School

Joseph Yott and fellow Coast Electric Youth Tour student David Webb in D.C. in 2011.

Joseph’s mom, Lynn, and sister, Jaycie, during his commissioning service for the U.S. Navy.

Joseph Yott served as one of Coast Electric’s Youth Leadership representatives in 2011. Joseph recently received a Bachelor of Science from LSU in Coastal Environmental Science and was commissioned as a Naval Ensign. Joseph is kind enough

to credit Coast Electric for helping him along the way. In his time since the program, Joseph has been a model student who spends time volunteering with worthy causes. We are proud of Joseph and his service to our country.

2015

Erin Geist Harrison Central High School

Coast Electric Youth Tour representatives Stevie Cantrell, Cody LeBlanc and Cady Reinhart in front of the Capitol during their week in Washington.

sors. “Being a part of the Youth Tour impacted me tremendously,” says Cady. “On the Youth Tour, I was molded into an effective leader. I was taught how to talk to people, relate to people, motivate people, and more. In my current career as a teacher, I use all of the skills that I was taught on the Youth Tour. I use these skills to help understand my students so that I can create a system of rapport and respect. The Youth Tour definitely helped prepare and make me the teacher that I am today.”

join their ranks? Do you want to be one of our next Youth Leadership representatives? Counselors at each school in our three-county service area will be selecting two of the best and brightest from this year’s junior class to be interviewed for the program. If you would like to be considered, visit your school counselor ASAP!

Erin, center, with fellow 2015 Youth Tour students Savanah Rupkey, Tommy Duong and Beth Shiyou at the Jefferson Memorial.

Erin and her college roommate, Malea Mansel, met when they were both participants in the Youth Leadership program. Now they are freshman at Ole Miss.

One of our most recent program participants, Erin just moved into her dorm at Ole Miss where she is double majoring in political science and Spanish with a minor in history. Erin met her roommate, another Youth Leadership participant, on the group’s trip to Jackson. Their friendship is a testament to the close bonds built during the program. Erin’s goal is to attend law school and pursue a career in politics. If her college career is as successful as her high school resume, we are sure to be marking her name on ballots soon! “What impacted me the most on the Youth Tour was the sincere respect of

the military and profound knowledge of my country’s history I received,” Erin said. “One glance at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier reminded me how lucky I am because unlike many kids, my father, who served in the Navy, returned home safely. In the Smithsonian National Museum of American History, I was brought to tears while standing in front of the Greensboro sit-in display. The courage and bravery those four students displayed was always an inspiration and seeing that exhibit was life changing. These are the memories that I could never repay the Youth Tour for giving me.”


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Coast Electric values its Board of Directors Gil Arceneaux

Douglas Mooney District 3

Teri Eaton District 2

Gil Arceneaux District 2

Frank McClinton District 2

James Baldree Charles Lopez District 1

2

Richard Dossett District 1

Elected to board in 2003; Retired Paint Trades Superintendent of Northrop Grumman; Member of Union Baptist Church (Hancock County District 2)

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Elected to board in 1998; Education Director of Gulf Oaks Hospital; Member of Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (Hancock County District 1)

Richard Dossett

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Elected to board in 1980; Cattle Farmer; Member of Nicholson Old Palestine Baptist Church (Pearl River County District 1)

James Ginn Elected to board in 2002; Retired executive vice-president of Hancock Bank; Member of Central Bible Church, Bay St. Louis (Hancock County District 3)

Teri Eaton Appointed to board in 2015 to fill unexpired term of retired board member; State Farm Insurance Agent; Member of Grace Memorial Baptist Church (Harrison County District 2)

1

Charles Lopez

James Ginn District 3

James Baldree District 1

Gordon Redd District 3

Annual Meeting Notice The annual meeting of the members of Coast Electric Power Association will be held on Thursday, Nov. 3, 2016.The following information is provided in accordance with Association bylaws. Committee on Nominations; Credentials and Elections It shall be the duty of the Board to appoint no less than 40 days nor more than 90 days before the date of the meeting of the members at which directors are to be elected, a committee on nominations consisting of not less than five nor more than 11 members who shall be selected from different selections so as to insure equitable geographic representation. The committee shall receive and consider any suggestions as to nominees submitted by members of the Association. The committee shall prepare and post at the principle office of the Association at least 30 days before the meeting a list of nominations for board members. The Secretary must mail with the notice of the meeting or separately a statement of the number of board members to be elected and the names and addresses of the candidates nominated by the Committee of

Nominations. Any 25 members acting together may make other nominations by petition and the Secretary shall post such nominations at the same place where the list of nominations by the committee is posted provided same is filed with and approved by the Committee on Nominations at least 40 days prior to the Annual Meeting. Any petition for nominations shall be submitted on a form designated and provided by the Association. Each member signing such petition shall place thereon the date of signing, address, account number and service location of the member. No nomination by petition will be accepted by the Committee on Nominations which are not filed with such committee at least 24 hours prior to the meeting date and time, if such a petition is timely filed, such person shall be a write-in candidate. A complete copy of the Association bylaws is available upon request at all offices of Coast Electric Power Association.

Elected to board in 2002; Retired fire service battalion chief; Member of Michael Memorial Baptist Church (Harrison County District 1)

Frank McClinton Elected to board in 2005; Former owner and manager of M&M Industries; Member of Serenity Baptist Church (Pearl River County District 2)

Douglas Mooney Elected to board in 1986; Retired partner in Sun Coast Business and Industrial Supplies; Member of Salem Baptist Church (Pearl River County District 3)

Gordon Redd Elected to board in 2002; Co-owner and president of Redd Pest Control; Member of Orange Grove Church of Christ (Harrison County District 3)


September 2016



Today in Mississippi



11

Your membership has benefits

As someone who receives electric service from Coast Electric, you are not a customer of the cooperative, you are a member. Being a member means you have benefits. One of the tangible benefits of membership is your membership card. It will be mailed along with proxy cards this October.

Why should you carry your card? • It’s useful. It is a great way for you to access your account number without having to keep up with your monthly bill. That means if you have to report an outage or need to access information to log into your online account, or CE on the Go app and use at our kiosks to access your account, your information is at your fingertips. • Using it might just mean you win a prize. We have membership contests from time to time and showing a member service rep your card just might get you a little something extra. (Hint: Co-op Month is coming up in October and we might be doing something fun for those who can show us their cards!) Make sure you are a card-carrying member of your electric cooperative and learn about all of your membership benefits at www.coastepa.com. Did you know that calling 811 before you dig could save your life? If you are planning on planting or doing some home improvement projects this fall, be sure to call 811 before you dig to identify any underground utility wires. Calling 811 is also now the law. Those who fail to call may be responsible for paying fines. Do the smart thing to keep your property and yourself safe and call 811!

Household Hazardous Waste Day is back in Hancock County

OCTOBER 1 Coast Electric, the Hancock County Board of Supervisors, the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality and Mississippi Power are once again sponsoring a Household Hazardous Waste Collection Day. When: Saturday, Oct. 1 from 8 a.m.- 1 p.m. Where: Coast Electric’s Kiln Headquarters Facility at 18020 Highway 603. For more information call the Hancock County Road Maintenance Department at 228-255-3367 Collection stations include:

 Scrap Metal and Car Batteries • Refrigerators, grills, lawn mowers, washers, dryers, metal fence material, bicycle parts, stoves, ranges

• Metal construction material, pipes, AC parts, etc. • Car batteries

 Waste Oil

Cooking oil, motor oil, antifreeze, transmission fluid

 Household Hazardous Waste • Paint, paint thinner, wood finish, varnish, turpentine, tub and tile cleaners, upholstery cleaners, oven cleaners, bleach, detergents, ammonia, drain openers, silver polish, etc. • Gasoline, lighter fluid, butane, propane • Insecticides, pesticides, rodent poisons, snail/slug killers • Fluorescent bulbs and household batteries



Waste Tires (25 tire limit)

 Old Electronics • Computers, monitors, TVs, microwaves, computer mice, keyboards, etc.

 Safe Transportation

• Leave products in their original containers and make sure the containers are properly sealed. • Transport the containers in the trunk or in the back of the vehicle away from passengers. • Do not transport more than five gallons or 50 pounds at one time. It is dangerous – and illegal – to discard household hazardous materials in the trash or down the drain. We encourage you to bring your products to this event on Oct. 1 in Kiln.


12 I Today in Mississippi I September 2016

Take refuge in nature

Continued from page 5

“We don’t manage timber from a timber production standpoint, like a private landowner might try to generate the most revenue possible. We’re putting the wildlife purpose first,” Swafford said. Former catfish ponds are managed to provide food for waterfowl and the wet conditions they prefer. Water also provides recreation for human visitors to the refuge. Canoeists and kayakers have discovered the quiet beauty of cypress-lined Deep Bayou, where the only sounds are fish jumps or bird calls. Even the alligators are mellow; these shy creatures tend to swim away when paddlers approach. “We’ve had zero problems with alligators,” Swafford said, noting that swimming is not allowed. Construction will begin this year on a new visitors center for the complex. Located on Highway 61, south of Onward, the building will have an educational room for group use and provide visitor information on public lands in the Delta. News of special events, road conditions and hunting information for the complex are posted on Facebook at TRComplex.

Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge This 19,000-acre refuge, located north of Gautier, protects and seeks to restore populations of two of the most endangered species in North America, the Mississippi sandhill crane and the dusky gopher frog. “The entire ecosystem here, this wet pine savanna, which is a cool mix of carnivorous bug-eating plants and prairie grasses, is also very rare,” said Jereme Phillips, manager of the Gulf Coast National Wildlife Mississippi sandhill crane. Photo: Stephen Refuge Kirkpatrick Complex. “There is only 2 to 3 percent of that habitat type left in the United States, and most of it is on this refuge.” The refuge was established in 1975 for the protection of the Mississippi sandhill crane, a nonmigratory subspecies of sandhill crane. By the 1960s, its numbers had plummeted to about 30 birds, all of them isolated in Jackson County. The wet pine savanna habitat where they once thrived succombed to pine plantations and other development. Soon after the refuge was established, a captive flock program was begun. The goal is to boost the crane pop-

A pair of Mississippi sandhill cranes moves through the prairie grasses at Mississippi Sandhill Crane NWR, top. Photo: Stephen Kirkpatrick A volunteer, top right, shows a youngster a monarch caterpillar from the butterfly garden at Yazoo NWR, and a couple launch their boat, above, at Stricklin’s landing in Panther Swamp NWR. Photos courtesy of Theodore Roosevelt Complex

ulation to a point where it will become self-sustaining. “Sandhill cranes typically lay two eggs,” Phillips said. “We take one of them into captivity and raise the crane to a juvenile stage, and then release it back on the refuge. That increases the numbers that survive, because typically when they lay two eggs in the wild, at best only of them is going to make it.” Captive-reared Mississippi sandhill cranes have been released on the refuge every year since 1981. The cranes continue to breed in the wild and today number more than 100. At least 30 sandhill crane nests had been found at the refuge by mid-June this year. The birds can live 20 or more years and mate for life. The dusky gopher frog also veered close to extinction due to habitat loss. Once abundant along the coast, these small, spotted frogs are now known to live only in Harrison County. Since the refuge started a reintroduction program, more than 1,200 dusky gopher frogs have been reared and released on the refuge. Prescribed burning is used to help restore habitat on this refuge. Frequent wildfires were once a natural occurrence in this area; every few years the savannas were set ablaze by lightning. Native Americans used fire

to improve the soil, open the pine forest to aid hunting and promote the growth of grasses. The result was a moist, light-filled grassland with tall pine trees. Today’s refuge visitors will see a similar landscape, and they may even see a fire. “When you come to this refuge, you are literally going into a time capsule, where you’re seeing what the entire Mississippi Gulf Coast would have looked like a hundred, two hundred, a thousand years ago,” Phillips said. Visitors may also spot the rare Mississippi sandhill crane. Volunteers lead crane tours in the winter, when the birds are feeding in flocks. During the nesting season, spring through summer, the birds are more isolated and territorial, and thus harder to spy upon. The refuge visitors center can help with tips on places to look. To get information about tours and special events, view photos and post questions, find the refuge on Facebook at MSSandhillCraneNWR. Complete details on all national wildlife refuges, including maps, hunting regulations, permit and visitor information, can be accessed through links at www.fws.gov.


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World’s Best Cookies 1 cup butter or margarine 1 cup granulated sugar 1 cup brown sugar 3 ½ cups sifted all-purpose flour 1 egg 1 cup vegetable oil 1 tsp. salt

RECIPES FROM:

‘Cooking Through the Ages’ When Moselle United Methodist Church was organized in 1879 as Hopewell Methodist Church, the women of the church probably tucked their children in at night beneath handmade quilts. Today, 137 years later, they still make quilts—and other items of comfort, all for charitable donations. Members of the church’s Susie Long Circle last year provided 150 decorative pillowcases and knit hats for young patients at Children’s Hospital, in Jackson. Their current projects include making quilts and blankets for sick children in the Laurel/Hattiesburg area, as well as for adults suffering from chronic illness. Sales of the church cookbook, “Cooking Through the Ages,” funds these good works. The cookbook was published to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the church building in 2014 and to help fund efforts to restore the aging structure. The work done, cookbook proceeds now help the women of the church help others through their handwork. The cookbook offers favorite recipes enjoyed by generations of southerners: cornbread, honey biscuits, cheese grits, chicken casseroles, sweet potato pie and peach ice cream. Tex-Mex, Greek and Cajun flavors also make appearances. To order the cookbook, send send check or money order for $25 per copy to Susie Long Circle, 18 Rommels Point, Moselle, MS 39459. For more information, call 601-297-1198.

German Chocolate Upside-Down Cake 1 cup flaked coconut 1 cup chopped pecans 1 (18 ¼-oz.) pkg. German chocolate cake mix 3 large eggs

1 ¼ cups water ¼ cup vegetable oil 1 (8-oz.) pkg. cream cheese ½ cup butter or margarine 1 (16-oz.) pkg. powdered sugar, sifted

Grease a 9-by-13-inch pan. Line with wax paper; grease paper. Sprinkle coconut and pecans in the bottom of prepared pan; set aside. Combine cake mix, eggs, water and oil in a large bowl; mix according to package directions. Spoon batter over coconut and pecans. Combine cream cheese and butter in a saucepan; cook over low heat, stirring often, until butter melts and mixture is smooth. Stir in powdered sugar. Spoon mixture evenly over batter. Bake at 350 F for 55 minutes.

1 tsp. baking soda 1 tsp. vanilla extract 1 cup regular rolled oats 1 cup crushed cornflakes ½ cup coconut ½ cup chopped walnuts or pecans

Cream butter or margarine with sugars until light and fluffy. Add egg and mix well. Add oil and mix well. Add flour, salt and baking soda; blend well. Add oats, cornflakes, coconut and nuts. Stir in well. Drop by teaspoonful onto an ungreased cookie sheet. Bake at 325 F for 10 to 12 minutes. Let cool a few minutes before removing from cookie sheet. Cool completely before storing in covered container. These cookies freeze well.

Vegetable Casserole 1 (20-oz.) pkg. frozen mixed vegetables Small can whole kernel corn, drained ¼ cup finely chopped onion ¼ cup finely chopped celery ¼ cup finely chopped water chestnuts

1 cup mayonnaise 1 cup grated Cheddar cheese 1 stack Ritz crackers, crushed 1 stick margarine, melted

Cook mixed vegetables according to package directions and place in a 9-by-13-inch baking dish. Sprinkle corn, onion, celery and water chestnuts over mixed vegetables. Combine mayonnaise and cheese; spread over vegetables to seal. Sprinkle cracker crumbs on top. Pour melted margarine over crumbs. Bake at 350 F until crackers are golden brown.

Chicken with Mushrooms 4 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves 2 eggs, beaten 1 cup seasoned bread crumbs

2 Tbsp. butter 3 cups sliced mushrooms 6 oz. mozzarella cheese, sliced ¾ cup chicken broth

Preheat oven to 350 F. Dip chicken into beaten eggs, then roll in bread crumbs. In skillet, melt butter over medium heat. Brown both sides of chicken in skillet. Place half of the mushrooms in a 9-by-13-inch baking dish. Place chicken on top of mushrooms. Arrange remaining mushrooms on top of chicken and cover with mozzarella cheese. Add chicken broth to pan. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Polynesian Chicken Salad 3 cups chopped, cooked chicken 2 Tbsp. vinegar 2 Tbsp. oil 2 Tbsp. orange juice 3 cups cooked rice ½ cup chopped green grapes

1 (13-oz.) can pineapple chunks, drained ½ cup chopped celery 1 cup mayonnaise 1 (11-oz.) can mandarin oranges, drained

Combine chicken, vinegar, oil and orange juice. Marinate overnight in refrigerator. Add rice, grapes, pineapple, celery, mayonnaise and oranges. Serves 8.

Chicken Corn Chowder 3 Tbsp. butter 1 small onion, chopped 1 Tbsp. minced garlic 4 chicken breast halves, cooked and chopped 2 cups half-and-half 2 cups shredded Monterey Jack cheese

1 cup chicken broth 2 cans cream-style corn 1 can chopped green chilies ¼ tsp. salt ¼ tsp. pepper ½ tsp. cumin 1 Tbsp. chopped parsley or cilantro

Melt butter in a skillet, and sauté onion and garlic. Transfer to a Dutch oven. Add remaining ingredients. Cook until thick, about 30 minutes.


Rose Hill Cemetery September 2016

tales within Historical

abound

By Nancy Jo Maples A number of souls rest in the Rose Hill Cemetery in Meridian, but the most visited grave site belongs to the queen of the gypsy nation. Queen Kelly Mitchell’s interment in 1915 drew 20,000 gypsies to Meridian for the ceremonial parade and burial. The queen passed away Jan. 31 in Coatopa, Ala., just across Mississippi’s state line. She died at age 47 while giving birth to her 14th child. Her husband, King Emil Mitchell, took her body to Meridian because the city had an ample ice supply for preserving her body while bands of gypsies from across the nation travelled to pay their respects. The funeral took place 12 days after her death. Today, more than a dozen members of the Mitchell family rest at Rose Hill including the queen’s husband, who died in 1942 at age 85. To find the graves, follow the gravel entranceway uphill and look to the right just before the road curves. The queen’s tombstone is usually festooned with beads, coins, wine bottles, apples and assorted trinkets. Gypsies often pay their respects to the queen, leaving gifts in hope that her spirit will offer solutions to their problems by visiting them in a dream or somehow sending them a message. “I’ve been at the cemetery many times when a gypsy will come in to the cemetery, go straight to the grave, leave a trinket and spend a little quiet time,” Anne McKee, director of the Rose Hill Cemetery costumed tour, said. “They believe that she can lend them advice and help them in some way.” Some of the more unusual items McKee has found at the queen’s monument include a sack of fast food burgers and fries and a pair of purple slippers with a matching handbag. The term gypsy refers to the nomadic people of Romani who originated in northern India but migrated to Europe, South America and North America. In the previous century they

were known for traveling in groups and establishing temporary campsites between their moves from place to place. Today’s gypsies have melted into culture and are more stationary. The Rose Hill Company of Players offers a costumed, story-telling tour each fall that tells the story of the gypsy and several other prominent citizens and city leaders buried in the graveyard. It is not a haunting tour; instead, it is a heritage tour. The “marble orchard” as McKee calls it, has stones dating back to 1853. The most recent burial occurred two years ago and was a gypsy burial. The 10-acre cemetery, equipped with stadium lights, is never really dark. The tour, always set the last Saturday in September, is free and is suitable for all ages. “Our tour is a great way for school children to learn about their community because many times schools don’t have time to go into detail to teach students local history,” McKee said. The 90-minute enactment stops at 12 tombs, beginning at the grave of the landowner of the cemetery site and meandering amongst the resting spots of prominent citizens and key city leaders. The tour tells Meridian’s history including the yellow fever

epidemic and various wars. A hundred soldiers who died at the Confederate hospital during the Civil War are buried in a mound. The hospital was located at the site of the city’s high school, and bones of the Confederate veterans were discovered in the early 1900s during the school’s construction. According to local newspaper accounts, the gypsy queen was buried on a cold day and the funeral procession was not solemn. Multitudes of gypsies marched from the funeral at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church to Rose Hill amidst a lively local college band playing peppy music. Legendary tales claiming she was buried with thousands of dollars have attracted grave robbers through the years whose unsuccessful attempts have left the concrete slab atop the grave broken. Rose Hill Cemetery tours began in 2009 when Walton Moore, a member of Masonic Lodge No. 308, which owns and maintains the cemetery, approached McKee, a professional storyteller active in the Mississippi Arts Commission, about sharing its rich

Jamela Johnson portrays gypsy queen Kelly Mitchell in the 2015 Rose Hill Cemetery tour. Photo courtesy of Rose Hill Company of Players. Trinkets and even food are often left by visitors to the queen’s grave marker, right, in Meridian’s Rose Hill Cemetery.

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history. September 24 will mark the event’s eighth year. About 100 volunteers help with research, costumes, acting, script writing and security. In July the players gave the first stage production of the show at Meridian’s historic Temple Theatre. The stage show was developed to accommodate people unable to walk in the cemetery and those who simply wanted to hear the stories in an indoor setting. More information can be found at www.gypsiesonrosehill.org or on Facebook at Rose Hill Company of Players. Writer Nancy Jo Maples can be reached at 188 Ernest Pipkins Road, Lucedale, Miss. 39452 or via email at nancyjomaples@aol.com.


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September 2016

Type or print your ad clearly. Be sure to include your telephone number. Deadline is the 10th of each month for the next month’s issue. Rate is $2.50 per word, 10-word minimum. Mail payment with your ad to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300. Have any questions? Phone 601-605-8600 or email advertising@epaofms.com.

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September 2016

A special family here are a number of small towns in Mississippi that have exceptional families. And many families stick with the same line of work by passing it on to the next generation. In my hometown, Lucedale, I am acquainted with a husband and wife who were both in the medical profession. Their eight children chose the same profession. And guess what else? All but two of their wives are in the medical field. Their brood has several children and the majority old enough for college have followed in their parents’ and grandparents’ footsteps. I must start at the beginning. Keith Scott was a medical corpsman in the Navy for four years and worked in the operating room. After his discharge he trained to become a nurse anesthetist, during the years when very few men were in nurses training. He was made to feel uncomfortable so he finished his training at a hospital in the North. Keith began working as a nurse anesthetist at the Mobile Infirmary where he met and married Laverne Howell, a registered nurse, in 1958. The couple moved to Lucedale soon afterward and both worked at the George County Hospital. By the way, Keith was also a

T

part-time ordained United Methodist minister. Though he passed away in 2008, the family legacy lingers on. This was a superb match that has certainly been a blessing for George County. Their oldest son, Derrick, is a certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA) Grin ‘n’ at George Bare It Regional by Kay Grafe Hospital; his wife, Karen, a registered nurse, also works there. Mr. Roy and I are blessed to have Derrick as our Sunday school teacher at First United Methodist Church. Since it is difficult to corral the remaining seven children in one place— except on Thanksgiving and Christmas— Derrick pleasantly agreed to tell Mr. Roy and me their family story. Just the bare facts. There’s not nearly enough time for the extended version. Mark is the second boy. He was director of nursing at George Regional for several years and now works for a medical software company. His wife, Kim, is pur-

chasing director for a hospital in Perry County. Tara Mallett, the only daughter and the third Scott child, is a doctor specializing in pediatrics. She worked at Community Medical Clinic in Lucedale for 24 years, only recently leaving to enter semi-retirement. Presley Mallett, her husband, is an anesthesiologist at Cedar Lake in Biloxi. Seth Scott is the fourth child and a doctor of family medicine at George Regional. His wife, Carolee, is the daughter of the late Dr. Raymond Tipton. Rhett is the fifth child. He is a CRNA on staff at George Regional. Suzy, his wife, was a school teacher in George County before retiring. Brian, the sixth Scott child, is a registered nurse. He worked in the profession before he was called to the ministry. He and his wife, Charity, are now missionaries in Honduras. Paul, the seventh child, is a urologist with the Urology Group of Mobile, Ala. His wife, Shelly, is a registered nurse. Heath, the eighth child, practices family medicine in Yazoo City. His wife, Leslie, is a social worker. Most of Keith and Laverne Scott’s grandchildren have chosen the medical field. Heath’s children are young, therefore not ready for the big decision. Curiosity got the better of me, so I asked, “Derrick, did your parents

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Today in Mississippi

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encourage you and your siblings to enter the medical profession?” “No, they never encouraged us toward a specific career. But Daddy was adamant about the value of education. The thought of not attending college wasn’t an option. He wouldn’t tolerate what most families considered average grades. A’s were expected. Maybe a few B’s tolerated, but a C was like an F to him and unacceptable. My parents weren’t unkind, but loving parents. Daddy insisted on excellence and we got the message by his tone of voice.” “Was anyone athletic?” I asked. “Oh, yes. Daddy encouraged this. We were average or better athletes and my parents never missed a game. Another important fact Daddy made clear was that when we reached a sufficient age we must get a job. Each of us was expected to save half of our earnings. My parents opened a savings account at a local bank for each of us and deposited $100. By the time we began college my brothers and sister had accumulated a good sum.” “I can’t imagine who took care of eight children when your parents were called to the hospital,” I said. “Well, in my case, the ones close to my age were tethered to the hospital. My dad was the only anesthetist at George County Hospital and Mother the only operating room nurse. Remember, the hospital was small back then. When my parents left our house, they had to call the hospital and tell them where they could be reached. No cell phones available. They would drop us off at my grandparents’ house when we were young. I remember some nights I was put in the doctor’s lounge. Later, when I was older, I was expected to take care of my younger siblings at home. “A career in medicine seemed to be the logical choice for each of us. My parents were dedicated to medicine as well as their church. Guess it was natural that we all chose the medical field. Today, six of my siblings whose children are college age have children studying medicine,” Derrick said. There are so many wonderful stories this selfless family could tell. I am grateful for the example they set not only for their family, but their outreach to a multitude of people. Kay Grafe is the author of “Oh My Gosh, Virginia.” To order, send name, address, phone number and $16.95, plus $3.50 S&H to Kay Grafe, 2142 Fig Farm Road, Lucedale, MS 39452.


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Today in Mississippi

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September 2016

Events MISSISSIPPI

Want more than 400,000 readers to know about your special event? Submit it at least two months prior to the event date. Submissions must include a phone number with area code for publication. Mail to Mississippi Events, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300; fax to 601-605-8601; or send to news@epaofms.com. Events open to the public will be published free of charge as space allows. Please note that events are subject to change; we recommend calling to confirm details before traveling.

Hummingbird Migration and Nature Celebration, Sept. 9-11, Holly Springs. Hummingbird banding, wagon rides, live animal shows, kids’ activities, native plant sale, more. Strawberry Plains Audubon Center. Details: strawberryplains.audubon.org. Arts & Crafts Street Fair, Sept. 10, Oct. 8, Nov. 12, Dec. 10, Pontotoc. Pontotoc Artist Guild event with music, art, more; 8 a.m. noon. Farmers market. Details: 662-4199711, 662-419-9593. Library Book Sales, Sept. 12, Oct. 3, Starkville. Free admission; noon - 6 p.m. Starkville Public Library. Details: 662-3232766. Camp and Jam, Sept. 12-17, Polkville. The Music Barn. Details: 601-946-0280, 601-9559182. Faithful 4 Quartet 15th Year Celebration, Sept. 16, Puckett. Puckett Baptist Church; 6:30 p.m. Details: 601-8260199. South of the River Roux, Sept. 16-17, Walnut Grove. Friday: Sol Def Variety Band Concert, Roux Glow; Saturday: entertainment, 5K run/walk, arts, crafts, car show, kids fun zone, more. Details: 601-253-2321; roux.ms. Mississippi Gourd Festival, Sept. 16-17, Raleigh. Indoor festival with handcrafted gourds, ready-to-craft gourds, 21 classes, demonstrations, tools, supplies, more; 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Admission. Smith County Ag Complex. Details: 601-782-9444; mississippigourdsociety.org. Trailing Mississippi Barn Quilt Show, Sept. 17, Lucedale. Hosted by Melon Patch Quilt Guild; 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Admission. George County Middle School gym. Details: 601-947-8704. Tanglefoot Hub Bicycle Ride, Sept. 17, Pontotoc. Rides up to 100K; 1-mile ride for parents and children. Entry fee. Tanglefoot Trail. Details: 662-489-5042; bobmagee856@gmail.com; racesonline.com. Bluegrass, Country and Gospel Singing,

Sept. 17, Black Hawk. Featuring Ellis Family Bluegrass Gospel, Norman Stewart, Country Jack Harper & The Silver Eagle Band; 6 p.m. Black Hawk Old School. Details: 662-4530072; bobbykayalford@gmail.com. Share-with-MSers Fundraiser, Sept. 17, D’Iberville. Music, door prizes, silent auction; 5-8 p.m. Mississippi Gulf Coast Multiple Sclerosis Society event. D’Iberville Civic Center. Details: 228-374-7403, 228-3920919. Sunset Kayak Tour, Sept. 17, Moss Point. Rhodes Bayou; 5-8 p.m. Admission includes kayak rental; reservations. Pascagoula River Audubon Center. Details: 228-475-0825, ext. 4; eparker@audubon.org. 32nd Annual Diamondhead Arts and Crafts Fair, Sept. 17-18, Diamondhead. Outdoor arts and creative crafts show. Diamondhead Country Club. Details: 985-7686991; dhartsandcrafts.weebly.com. Messiah Sing-In, Sept. 18, Ocean Springs. Sing choruses from “The Messiah” along with the Messiah Chorus; 3-4:30 p.m. Free. Ocean Springs First Presbyterian Church. Details: 228-324-9292; ed.cake@yahoo.com. Lower Delta Talks: “Kin Growers: A Diversified Farming Operation,” Sept. 20, Rolling Fork. Presenters: Mindy Rutherford, Jenny Rutherford Murphy; 6:30 p.m. SharkeyIssaquena County Library. Details: 662-8736261; lowerdelta.org. 29th Annual Mississippi Pecan Festival, Sept. 23-25, Richton. Arts, crafts, traditional craft demos, draft horse farming, mule pull, blacksmith demos, bluegrass/gospel music, more. Admission. Details: 601-964-8222; mspecanfestival.com. 160th Annual Mid-South Fair, Sept. 23 Oct. 2, Southaven. Rides, carnival games, live entertainment, livestock and talent shows, food. Landers Center. Details: midsouthfair.com. Indian Bayou Arts Festival, Sept. 24, Indianola. Arts, crafts, live music, children’s art activities. Free admission. Across from B.B. King Museum. Details: 662-887-4454.

Fishing and Fun in the Forest, Sept. 24, Rolling Fork. Archery shoot, BB shoot, adventure trail with challenges, fishing at Blue Lake; 9 a.m. - noon. For ages 4-18. Delta National Forest. Details: 662-873-6261; lowerdelta.org. 13th Annual Wing Dang Doodle Festival, Sept. 24, Forest. Chicken wing team cooking contest, 5K run/walk, antique car/tractor show, arts, crafts, kids rides, inflatables, Jason Miller Band and Smiley & the Young Guns. Free admission. Gaddis Park. Details: 601469-4332; wingdangdoodlefestival.com. Bama Blu-Grace, Southern Heritage in Concert, Sept. 24, Newton. Love offering; 6 p.m. Ebenezer Baptist Church. Details: 601896-2249. I Love the 90s Tour, Sept. 25, Southaven. Featuring Vanilla Ice, Salt n Pepa, Coolio, more; 6 p.m. Details: 662-470-2131. Bluegrass and Southern Gospel, Sept. 25, Lucedale. Featuring Williamson Branch; 11 a.m. Love offering. Rocky Creek Baptist Church. Details: 601-947-4875, 601-5086660. Pumpkin Patch, Sept. 29 - Oct. 30, Hernando. Kids’ activities, produce stand, special events. Admission. Cedar Hill Farm. Details: 662-429-2540; gocedarhillfarm.com. Meet Graphic Novelist George O’Conner, Sept. 29 - Oct. 30, Hernando. Writer/illustrator of the “Olympians” series to draw, entertain all ages. Thursday 6 p.m.; Friday 10:30 a.m. Hernando Public Library. Details: 662429-4439. Up-In-Smoke for United Givers Cook-Off, Oct. 1, Osyka. Competition in chicken wings/thighs, jambalaya, chili. Osyka Fall Fest. Details: 601-248-8295. 38th Annual Oktoberfest, Oct. 1, Hattiesburg. German food and music, delicatessen, quilt raffle, silent auction, crafts. St. John Lutheran Church. Details: 601-583-4898; stjohnlutheranchurch@gmail.com. Craft/Yard Sale Extravaganza, Oct. 1, Biloxi. Joppa Shrine Temple; 8 a.m.- 4 p.m. Details: 228-392-9345; mcelroyjenn71@gmail.com. 39th Annual Zonta Festival, Oct. 1, Pascagoula. Arts, crafts, entertainment, food, classic/antique cars, children’s activities, more. Downtown. Details: 228-327-3635; zontapascagoula.info. 36th Fall Fest, Oct. 1-2, Osyka. Supports Breast Cancer Awareness Month with Pretty in Pink pageant, fun run/walk, “survivor” medals, lighted pink tree, children’s activities, more. Town Park. Details: 601-810-3953; Facebook: Osyka Civic Club. Hill Fire’s “Of Life and Lemons,” Oct. 1, 2, 6, 8, Winona. Original folk life play based on real stories of Southerners. Montgomery

County Arts Council production. Admission. Performing Arts Center. Details: 662-3100199; hillfire.org. Big Pop Gun Show, Oct. 1-2, Laurel. Door prizes. Fairgrounds. Details: 601-498-4235. Pumpkin Patch, Oct. 1-31, Taylorsville. Open weekdays to school groups by reservation and to public on weekends. Ford’s Farm. Details: 601-725-4326; Facebook: Ford’s Farm. Kids Market Consignment Sale, Oct. 6-8, Hattiesburg. Cloverleaf Mall. Details: 601467-5429; kidsmarketms.com. “Riding the Wind,” Oct. 6-7, 8-9, Hattiesburg. Play about first 100 years of Hattiesburg. Admission; reservations required. Meador Homestead Cabin. Details: 601-268-3236; dean@meadorhomestead.com; Facebook: Riding the Wind Hattiesburg. Six-Mile Community Yard Sale, Oct. 7-8, Kiln. Also, food booths, homegrown foods, crafts. Rocky Hill Dedeaux Road. Details: 228255-1038. Pine Belt Quilters Fiber Arts and Quilt Show, Oct. 7-9, Hattiesburg. More than 350 judged quilts, Hoffman Challenge exhibit, vendors, lectures. Admission. Lake Terrace Convention Center. Details: marthaginn@bellsouth.net; pinebeltquilters.com. Mississippi Numismatic Association Annual State Convention and Coin Show, Oct. 7-9, Southaven. Old coins, paper money, stamps, cards, other collectibles; appraisals; ANACS Grading Service. Free admission. Landers Center. Details: 601-624-9664. Bailey Haunted Firehouse, Oct. 7, 8, 14, 15, 21, 22, 27, 28, 29, 31, Meridian. Bailey VFD, 10116 Hwy. 495; 7 p.m. Details: 601479-4539; acjc@comcast.net. 90th Annual Sacred Heart Parish Bazaar, Oct. 8-9, D’Iberville. Food, games, music, bingo, silent auction; 11 a.m. til. Details: 228861-3692, 228-392-4527; jhsimmons@cableone.net. Blues Family Day, Oct. 9, Cleveland. Music, dance, arts, crafts, Stevie Ray Vaughan exhibit. Admission. Grammy Museum Mississippi. Details: 662-441-0100; grammymuseumms.org. Lower Delta Talks: “The Bear Hunter: The Life & Times of Robert Eager Bobo in the Canebrakes of the Old South,” Oct. 11, Rolling Fork. Presenter: Jim McCafferty; 6:30 p.m. Sharkey-Issaquena County Library. Details: 662-873-6261; lowerdelta.org. Delta Hot Tamale Festival, Oct. 13-15, Greenville. Literary and culinary festival with tamale vendors, art, music, authors, special events. Details: 662-378-3121; mainstreetgreenville.com.


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September 2016

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LIMIT 1 - Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or prior purchase. Coupon good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Offer good while supplies last. Shipping & Handling charges may apply if not picked up in-store. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 1/5/17. Limit one FREE GIFT Coupon per customer per day.

12,000 LB. ELECTRIC WINCH 4-1/2" ANGLE GRINDER ER N WITH REMOTE CONTROL AND SUP PO Customer Rating U AUTOMATIC BRAKE CO LOT 60625 shown

99 $399comp.99at

R PE ON U P S U CO

$

VALUE

Customer Rating

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 1/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$79

LOT 69488

Customer Rating

LIMIT 8 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 1/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

• 704 lb. capacity

$

19

1650 PSI PRESSURE WASHER

99

$ 97

ANY SINGLE ITEM

Limit 1 coupon per customer per day. Save 20% on any 1 item purchased. *Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or any of the following items or brands: Inside Track Club membership, extended service plan, gift card, open box item, 3 day parking lot sale item, compressors, floor jacks, saw mills,  storage cabinets, chests or carts, trailers, trenchers, welders, Admiral, Badland, CoverPro, Daytona, Diablo, Franklin, Hercules, Holt, Jupiter, Predator, Stik-Tek, StormCat, Union, Vanguard, Viking.  Not valid on prior purchases. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 1/5/17.

30", 5 DRAWER TOOL CART

SAVE $230

SAVE $70

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

I

WOW SUPER COUPON

650+ Stores Nationwide

How Does Harbor Freight Sell GREAT QUALITY Tools at the LOWEST Prices?

Today in Mississippi

$

2999 comp at

$49.21 LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 1/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

• HarborFreight.com • 800-423-2567

$69.99

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 1/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

At Harbor Freight Tools, the “comp at” price means that the same similar functioning item was advertised for sale at or above the price by another retailer in the U.S. within the past 180 days. Prices by others may vary by location. No other meaning of "comp at" implied. For more information, go to HarborFreight.com or see store

item or a "comp at" advertised should be associate.


Today in Mississippi September 2016 Coast  

Today in Mississippi September 2016 Coast

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