Echo (Winter 2020)

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Winter 2020

ALUMNI MAGAZINE

BGA CELEBRATES 40 YEARS OF COEDUCATION

SPOTLIGHT

2019 HOMECOMING WEEKEND

STRATEGIC PLAN

TRANSFORMING EDUCATION

WILDCAT ROLL CALL

CLASS NOTES

ADDITIONAL CONTENT

CREATING OUR FUTURE The Campaign for Battle Ground Academy


Reunion& Alumni

F R I DAY

MAY

WEEKEND

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SAT UR DAY

A LU M N I A ND F O R M ER FACU LTY & STA F F LU N C H E O N F O R AL L ALU MNI

11: 30 A.M. - 1 P.M. | Cherry S p orts Ce n te r

MAY

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REUNION CLASSES AND B LU E & G O L D B R U N C H 10 A. M . - 1 2 P. M . Up p e r S ch ool Lib rar y Pat i o

Both events F O R AL L ALU MNI ve sbeeen haHou 5: 30 P.M. - 7 P.M. | Fleming postponed until the 2020-2021 school year. A LU M N I CO C KTA I L PARTY

THURSDAY, JUN E 4, 2020 VA N D E R B I LT L E G E N D S CLU B 2020

The 2 019 B G A G ol f C l as s i c w as a s uc c e s s !

OV ER $ 3 6 ,0 0 0

ra ised fo r t h e A l um ni A s s oc i at i on Fina nc i al A i d Fund

If you a re inte re ste d in be ing a t ournament sponsor, please contact Jonas.Rod riguez@my bga . o rg.

To reg i ster for the 2 0 2 0 G o l f C l a ssic , p l ea se visit:

B AT T L E GROUNDACAD EMY.ORG/ALUMN I/GOLF- CLAS SI C


Around Campus GIRLS SOCCER WINS STATE CHAMPIONSHIP

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FROM THE

Head of School At the founding of Battle Ground Academy, the dedication speakers included the hope that the school would be a place where “the history of the past and the hope of the future [would] unite as kindred drops that mingle into one.” In other words, sometimes you have to look back to know where you are going. Recently in discussing the strategic direction of Battle Ground Academy, I made the assertion that we must be informed by the future of education more than the past. While I stand by that statement, I certainly do not mean that we should overlook our past and recognize all the iterations of our school that have brought us to where we are today. As BGA marks its 131st year, it also celebrates 40 years since the return to coeducation. Interestingly, this was not the beginning of coeducation at the Academy. In the fall of 1979, females were welcomed back to campus as students for the first time in 50 years. So if you are keeping score, BGA has been a coed school for 80 of its 131 years. Why does that timeline matter? It is simply another example of the school looking back to its roots to find its future. Many of our biggest changes and boldest innovations are a return to our roots. BGA, a school founded by educational entrepreneurs, focused on educating the youth of Franklin to address the challenges of a world torn apart by division, now looks to embrace that same entrepreneurial spirit and that same inspirational calling. Our mission to ignite and nurture student curiosity, intellect, and character is simultaneously forward-facing and timeless. As you read about our Strategic Plan, our growth as a school, our plans for the future, and our celebration of a variety of anniversaries, you will see a school grounded in the fundamental belief that the character traits of respect, compassion, accountability, and resilience are the necessary foundation on which our intellectual achievements are built. Those characteristics, however, are not transmitted through the building and grounds, and they are not simply bestowed upon acceptance to the school. Those traits are developed over time from countless interactions with caring and dedicated educators who want to see students thrive here at BGA and beyond.

The Winter 2020 edition of Echo is published by the Battle Ground Academy Office of Advancement for alumni, parents, grandparents, students, and friends. HEAD OF SCHOOL William F. Kesler CHAIRMAN, BOARD OF TRUSTEES Kurtis J. Winstead 2019-20 PRESIDENT, ALUMNI ASSOCIATION W.O. Brent Bowman ’93 DIRECTOR OF ADVANCEMENT Tom Evans DIRECTOR OF ALUMNI RELATIONS Kristin Napier WRITERS Shelly Robertson Birdsong Melonee Hurt Lauren Ward CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Leah Handelsman

The coming years will bring new buildings, programs, approaches, and people, and with all that change, it will be critical that we understand where we’ve been and who we are now in order to get to where we are going.

Will Kesler Head of School

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PHOTOGRAPHERS Tim Jones Christian Headden Glen Rose Adam Sain


CONTENTS

TA B L E of CO N TENTS

AROUND THE QUAD 10 SPOTLIGHT: 6

2019 Homecoming Weekend

8

Alumni Hall of Fame

18

The Giving Garden

19

1889 Society

6

COVER STORIES 22 22

40 YEARS OF COEDUCATION

26

STRATEGIC PLAN

30

CREATING OUR FUTURE

Transforming Education The Campaign for BGA

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WILDCAT ROLL CALL 35 36

Class Notes

39

Get Involved

30

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HOMECOMING WEEKEND 2019 BGA celebrated Homecoming Weekend in 2019 with a student spirit week, a groundbreaking, senior athlete recognition, a packed house for the football game, our wonderful alumni, and the Hall of Fame Induction. On Thursday, September 26, alumni, students, parents, and faculty gathered on the Fine Arts lawn and joined Head of School Will Kesler, Trustees, and donors to launch the school’s new Strategic Plan; kick-off Creating our Future: the Campaign for Battle Ground Academy, a $24 million Capital Campaign for facilities and endowment; and break ground on the Sondra Morris and Robert N. Moore, Jr. ‘52 Center for Arts & Entrepreneurship. Following the groundbreaking, guests enjoyed a pep rally in the Jewell Athletic & Wellness Center and recognized our senior fall athletes on the Stewart Campbell Track & Soccer Complex. On Friday, September 27, more than 40 alumni and their guests gathered in the lobby of the Cherry Sports Center for the annual Blue & Gold Lunch honoring BGA alumni who have celebrated their 50th reunions. That evening, before the Wildcat football team took on the East Nashville Magnet High School Eagles, the Alumni Office and the Alumni Board hosted alumni and their families at the Fleming House for the annual Alumni Tailgate party. At halftime, BGA’s Hall of Fame inductees (read more about them on pages 8 & 9), the 1993-94 state championship basketball team, and the 2019 Homecoming Court were recognized. 2018 Homecoming Queen Ella Rose Gallimore ‘19 was there to crown Senior Paige Shea the 2019 Homecoming Queen.

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Left to right: O.J. Fleming ‘94, Jay Wilkes ‘96, Tutt Hightower ‘95, Alex Gregg ‘94, Coach William Belliford, Lamont Turner ‘96, Mike Vaughn ‘96, Michael Trailov ‘95, David Hedge ‘96, Jarron Springer ‘95, Bennett Wood ‘95, Kathy Smith, Coach Gary Smith

Sophomores Mary Courtney Finn and Julia Weber welcoming guests to the groundbreaking for the Center for Arts & Entrepreneurship


HOMECOMING WEEKEND

Former Chair of the Board of Trustees Tyler Berry '87, Director of Entrepreneurial Leadership Program Hallie Heiter, Chair of the Board of Trustees Kurt Winstead, Head of School Will Kesler, Sondra Morris, and Fine Arts Chair Jennifer Helm '84

First Grader Mattie Wallin, Head of School Will Kesler, Preston Shea, Senior and Homecoming Queen Paige Shea, First Grader Jameson Frazier, and Ella Rose Gallimore '19

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HALL OF FAME INDUCTION Back row, left to right: BGA Head of School Will Kesler, Matt Ridings ‘06, Brandon Jones ‘89, Brad Jones ‘86 Front row, left to right, Candy Anderson (widow of Allen Anderson ‘68), Tara Hodgson Moseley ‘05, Ronald Ligon ‘55

On Saturday, September 28, BGA inducted new members into the Alumni and Sports Hall of Fame and honored its Distinguished Young Alumna at the Hilton Franklin Cool Springs. “The induction of these deserving men and women is a reminder to our students, families, and alumni that BGA graduates really can do anything with their education,” BGA Head of School Will Kesler said. “Whether prepared for medicine, commerce, athletics, or community service, our graduates excel in every field possible.”

ALUMNI HALL OF FAME Dr. Allen French Anderson, Class of 1968 – Fittingly enough, as captain of his varsity football team, Dr. Anderson received the designation “most athletic” as his senior superlative. Following BGA, he attended the University of Tennessee-Knoxville with a double major of economics and pre-med. After his undergraduate studies, he went on to earn his MD at UT’s Medical School in Memphis. He completed his orthopedic surgery residency at Vanderbilt University from 1976-81. Dr. Anderson’s tradition of success did not end with his formal schooling. After his residency, he began a 37-year career at the Lipscomb clinic which later became TN Orthopedic Alliance. Dr. Anderson passed away in 2017. He is survived by his wife, Candy, as well as their three sons and two daughters-in-law: Bri-

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an Anderson, David and Laura Anderson and Chris and Jeanna Anderson. They also have six grandchildren: Eleanor, Caroline, Frances, Evelynn, Benjamin and Allen. Ronald Sanders Ligon Sr., Class of 1955 – Ligon was senior vice president of his class at BGA and a member of the student advisory committee his senior year. He was vice president of the Student Council, Honor Council, Greer Society and Beta Club during his time at BGA. Ligon played varsity football for three years and received All-Midstate honorable mention as a guard. He earned the superlatives “most dependable,” “friendliest” and “most energetic” as a senior. Upon graduation, Ligon received the Durwood Sies Leadership Award and the Spanish Award for First in Class. Ligon went on to attend Vanderbilt University and became a brother of Kappa Sigma Fraternity. Ligon has worked in the banking, real estate and travel industries throughout his professional career. Ligon married his wife, Marty, in 1977, and together they have five children and seven grandchildren. Ligon is part of a long lineage of BGA alumni including brother, H. Winston Ligon, Class of 1944; son, Sandy Ligon, Class of 1980; daughter-in-law Susan Cone Ligon, Class of 1985; daughter-in-law, Stacey Dell Ligon, Class of 1986; son, Matt C. Ligon, Class of 1987; granddaughter, Jessica Ligon, Class of 2015; and Matthew C. Ligon Jr., Class of 2018.


HOMECOMING WEEKEND

SPORTS HALL OF FAME Bradley Kenneth Jones, Class of 1986 – A veteran in the professional sports league industry, Jones has been employed by the National Basketball Association for 17 years. Jones got involved in sports during his freshman year at BGA. He contributed to the success of BGA’s basketball team his junior and senior years. After graduation, he continued his studies at Lambuth University and earned a biology degree before receiving his master’s degree in kinesiology from the University of Memphis. While at Lambuth, Jones was named to the Tennessee Collegiate Athletic Conference All-Academic team twice. He received NAIA’s designation of a National Scholar-Athlete in 1990 and was also elected “Lambuth Athlete of the Year.” Jones combined his deeply rooted school pride with his affinity for sports when he became an assistant basketball coach at Lambuth University. He was promoted to head basketball coach in 1997. In 2007, Jones became the head coach of the D-League Utah Flash. In 2010, Brad was hired by the San Antonio Spurs to coach their D-League team, the Austin Toros. He led the Toros to the D­ League championship in 2012. Jones joined the Utah Jazz as an assistant in 2012. Over the next five years, he worked with the Jazz and served one year as player personnel scout for the Minnesota Timberwolves and as the general manager of their G-League team before his journey brought him back to Tennessee. In 2018, he was named head coach of the Memphis Hustle. In July 2019, Jones was hired as assistant coach of the Memphis Grizzlies. He and his wife Lori live in Lakeland with their three children, Justin, Isabella and Jackson. Brandon Scott Jones, Class of 1989 – Jones epitomizes the idea of the dedicated student-athlete. During his time at BGA, he earned 12 letters and served as captain on the football, basketball and baseball teams his senior year. He is the only BGA athlete to be named “Most Valuable Player” in three sports in one year — football, basketball and baseball — during the 1988-89 school year. During his time at BGA, Jones was named to numerous All-County, All-District, All-Mid State and All-Region teams. Brandon earned First Team All-Metro honor his senior year when all public and private schools were included for honors. His legacy continued at Lambuth University, where he was named Lambuth “Male Athlete of the Year” in 1992 and again in 1993. Jones found his niche outside of sports in 2006 when he became a State Farm Insurance agent. Brandon developed and administered the Madison County AAU organization for nine years. He organized and supervised a sanctioned AAU tournament for seven years. He and his wife, Ranee, and three daughters, Anna, Emily and Olivia, live in Jackson, Tennessee.

Matthew Ryan Ridings, Class of 2006 – Among other accolades, Ridings divided his time at BGA between the baseball and basketball teams. In baseball, he was named to the All-State team and was a two-time Region Player of the Year. He was also a member of the National Honor Society, an officer with the Fellowship of Christian Athletes and he received the Nashville Sports Council Foundation’s scholarship his senior year. After BGA, he attended Western Kentucky University and earned a degree in business management. He was a member of Chi Alpha Sigma and the Beta Gamma Sigma Honor Society for Athletic and Academic Accomplishments, as well as a President’s Scholar. He holds Western Kentucky baseball’s record of 34 wins and 354 strikeouts. He’s also the Sun Belt Conference Career Leader in wins. He was drafted by the Washington Nationals in the 2009 MLB Draft, and later by the Kansas City Royals in the 2010 MLB Draft. He played three seasons in the Kansas City Royals Minor League system, reaching AA. After a successful professional baseball career, Ridings became the Patient Care Coordinator at 4UMD, LLC before leaving to pursue a project management role with Schneider Electric’s Data Center Solutions Department. Ridings currently lives in Spring Hill with his wife, Christian “Blakely,” BGA Class of 2008, and two children, Ryan Grace and Landrie. They are also expecting a baby boy in February.

DISTINGUISHED YOUNG ALUMNA Tara Hodgson Moseley, Class of 2005 – During her time at BGA, Moseley was a member of the soccer team and a four-year letter winner. She was named to All-State, All-County and All-Region all four years. She was All Offensive Player of the Year as a Senior. Moseley led the team in both goals and assists all four years. She also lettered in swimming during her freshman and senior campaigns, earning team MVP honors as a freshman. She was a member of the Greer Society. After BGA, she went on to attend the University of Washington on a soccer scholarship, where she made the Dean’s List before graduating from the University of San Diego with an English degree in 2009. Moseley received a Division I scholarship to play soccer at UW and later transferred to USD. She was offered a spot in the WPSL, at the time the highest level of women’s soccer in the United States, and one of the top leagues in the world. However, after graduating with honors from USD, she started an international wedding photography business based out of Newport Beach, California. Moseley lives in Franklin with her husband, Clint, and their three children, Maxx Pride, Bayylor Sierra, and Boone Wylder. The above profiles appeared in the programs provided at the Induction ceremony, and do not follow our usual editorial standard of using the Oxford comma.

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AROUND

The Quad SCHOOL NEWS & U PD ATE S

Around the Quad : Academics (Christian)

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AROUND the QUAD

Academics

NEW ALYNE Q. MASSEY HONOR SCHOLARS Catherine Lydia Schreiber, Head of School Will Kesler, Iris Rubyclaire Carter

HONOR SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS

Battle Ground Academy is pleased to announce the recipients of its Alyne Q. Massey Honors Scholarships for Ninth Graders new to BGA for the 2019-2020 school year: The Alyne Q. Massey Honors Scholarship was established in 2015 by L.H. (Bill) Armistead III, a member of BGA’s Board of Trustees and a 1969 graduate, in memory of his mother. The scholarship provides partial tuitions for high achieving students with strong grades and Independent School Entrance Exam scores. Candidates for the Alyne Q. Massey Honors Scholarships are selected annually from the applications for Ninth Grade. Echo AL U M NI M AGAZI NE

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INTRODUCING

DR. MICHELLE ARNOLD Battle Ground Academy is pleased to welcome Dr. Michelle Arnold as its new Director of Equity & Inclusion. She replaces O.J. Fleming ’94, who retired in May after 19 years on the school’s faculty and staff. “Dr. Arnold brings with her a variety of experiences that will enable her to work with students and families across our community to help them succeed at BGA and beyond,” said Head of School Will Kesler. “Building on the excellent work of O.J. Fleming, she has the foundation in place to enhance our work in areas of equity and inclusion internally and externally. We are delighted to welcome her and her family to BGA.” As Director of Equity & Inclusion, Arnold will oversee BGA’s programs designed to prepare its students for the diverse world in which they study, work, and live. She joins BGA from Middle Tennessee State University where she served as a lecturer in the College of Education’s Department of Educational Leadership since 2011. Previously, she served as the associate director of admissions at MTSU from 20082011. She received her undergraduate, Master of Business Education and Education Specialist degrees from MTSU and her Doctor of Education from Trevecca Nazarene University. Over the years, she has conducted research and made presentations on a variety of topics related to education and student behavior.

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AROUND the QUAD

KINDERGARTEN PARK DEDICATION

LITERARY PUMPKINS

Kindergarten students unveil their plans for "Tennessee Park" to the City of Franklin - Municipal Government Parks Department and classmates. Each year, our youngest students embark on a project to design a new park for the City of Franklin. They learn how to formulate and express ideas while also learning how to work in teams. The lesson ends with a presentation of the new park

Ms. Leah Handelsman's Junior and Senior AP English classes again helped put us in the Halloween spirit with their creative adaptations.

CONVOCATION

On the first Friday of the school year, all BGA students and faculty gathered on the Glen Echo Campus to kick off the school year with Opening Convocation. We welcomed new students and celebrated kindergartners and 5th graders as they begin their transformative, transitional academic

years. Selected by the senior class to speak, English Department Chair Leah Handelsman encouraged students to recognize, embrace, and celebrate our new students and our own differences.

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Arts

FIRST SEMESTER MARY CAMPBELL EASEL AWARD WINNERS

Senior Rebecca Steynberg

Senior Katelyn Helberg

PILGRIMAGE FESTIVAL BGA students were invited to get a behind-the-scenes tour of the 2019 Pilgrimage Festival in Franklin. The Contemporary Music Ensemble performed on stage as part of the Americana Music Triangle.

VISUAL ARTS MTRA EXHIBIT Four art students were accepted in the Middle Tennessee Regional Art Exhibition hosted by Belmont University: Sophomore Sophie Bruff, Senior Annie Clendenin, Seventh Grader Rachel Horner, and Senior Rebecca Steynberg.

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AROUND the QUAD

THEATRE PRODUCTIONS

FALL PLAYS 2019 Rumors by Neil Simon (for the US play) Above

Circus Olympus (for the MS play) Left

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Athletics

WILDCATS WINNING

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AROUND the QUAD

FALL SPORTS HONORS

(all students are Seniors unless otherwise noted) TSWA Division II-A All-State Cross Country Trace Alexander (Sophomore) Tennessee Titans Mr. Football Division II-AA Finalist Nick Semptimphelter TSWA Division II-AA All-State Football Nick Semptimphelter Tony Stevens TNFCA Division II-AA All-State Football Briston Bennett Nick Semptimphelter Tony Stevens All-Midstate Football Garnett Hollis, Jr., Second Team Nick Semptimphelter, Second Team Tony Stevens, First Team All-Region Football Briston Bennett, First Team Jo Cantrell, Second Team Jad Diab, Scholar-Athlete Garnett Hollis, Jr., First Team, Defensive Player of the Year Iman Lohrasbi (Junior), Second Team Zion Morris (Sophomore), First Team Kaleb Seay, First Team Nick Semptimphelter, First Team, Co-Offensive Player of the Year Xavier Shaw (Junior), First Team Tony Stevens, First Team, Middle Region MVP Sean Williams (Sophomore), Second Team

10 SENIORS SIGN NATIONAL LETTERS OF INTENT Nick Semptimphelter, Football Bucknell University

Front Row (L-R): Briston Bennett, Football UNC - Charlotte

Jordan Warzynski, Softball Eastern Illinois University

Piper Dambach, Softball Lehigh University

Scout Speer, Soccer Columbia State Community College

Garnett Hollis, Jr., Football Northwestern University

Tony Stevens, Football Purdue University

Aidan McLay, Baseball Rhodes College

Duke Waldrop, Golf Berry College

Mitch Petzelt, Baseball Lincoln Memorial University

Back Row (L-R):

TSWA Division II-A All-State Golf Will Rieck Tennessean Boys Golf Will Rieck, All Mid-State, First Team THSSCA Division II-A All-State Girls Soccer Kennedy Price (Sophomore) Eva Schreiber (Freshman) Scout Speer Alyssa White (Sophomore) Tennessean Girls Soccer Keaton Mitchell (Freshman), All Mid-State, Second Team Kennedy Price (Sophomore), All Mid-State, First Team All-District Volleyball Ally Newkirk (Junior), 2nd Team Hana Robertson, 1st Team All-District Volleyball Tournament Team Abby Robertson (Sophomore) Hana Robertson Kearstyn Seay (Junior), Tournament MVP All-Region Volleyball Tournament Team Ally Newkirk (Junior)

LITTLE DRIBBLERS Once again, our Lower School Little Dribblers delighted and excited our Mack Hatcher Mob on Senior Night. This coming school year, 2020-21, marks the 20th anniversary of the Little Dribblers. Plans are being made for a special night in January 2021 for alumni who participated in the Little Dribblers program when they were students and their parents. Look for details this fall. Echo AL U M NI M AGAZI NE

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Character and Service

Around the Quad : Character and Service (Christian)

THE GIVING GARDEN Sophomore Kate O’Hara proudly shows off the “fruits” of the school’s Sustainability Club. Last year, the club gave over 200 pounds of vegetables to GraceWorks Ministries in Franklin. This year, the club has added to its list of goals incorporating sustainable practices around campus.

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AROUND the QUAD

1889 SOCIETY On Sunday, August 18, 2019, BGA honored 1889 Society members with its annual recognition event. Hosted by BGA parents Brian and Lucibeth Mayberry, guests were thanked by Head of School Will Kesler and members of the Board of Trustees who had just wrapped up their annual retreat at the school. Mr. Kesler shared with guests that 78% of last year’s BGA Fund was the result of gifts at or above the 1889 Society level and that the Society had a 10% increase in the number of donors over the prior year. Additionally, guests were able to tour the new Center for Arts & Entrepreneurship via virtual reality.

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Veteran's Day Parade 20

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A

s we celebrate 40 years since the return of coeducation at Battle Ground Academy, we want to reflect on how our institution impacted students before coeducation and after. We spoke with several former students and have chronicled their stories below. When Eddie Roberts ‘69 came to BGA in 1966, it was a small boarding and day school for boys. As he entered the 10th grade, his study habits weren’t great, and he had fallen behind in some subjects. Roberts remembers his parents sent him to BGA to develop a stronger work ethic and better study habits. They also hoped he would develop life routines like making his own bed every morning. Roberts learned these lessons and carry them with him today. “I have often said that even into my middle age, BGA continues to educate me,” he said.

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ALUMNIFEATURES FEATURES ALUMNI

our girls to BGA. This young man impressed us so much. When we got home, I looked at Donna and said, ‘That’s what I’m talking about.’” In the 1990s, when his daughters Shelley, Leigh, and Cackie attended BGA, the family had to arrange transportation for the girls from Lewisburg. The commute, 45 minutes each way, was challenging. Roberts’ wife Donna not only loaded up her three girls, but actually transported 10-15 Lewisburg-based students – most of them girls -- every day. “I think all of it inspired the girls,” Roberts said. “Nothing was ever taken for granted around our house. It was hard for the girls and challenging on the financial side for us and it was a tremendous effort on Donna’s part seeing that they got back and forth to school. But it was a great thing to see that many students driving that far to get to BGA. The girls left there with a real appreciation of what it takes to get an education.” Roberts’ daughter Leigh Lambert ‘95 is now part of the teaching staff at BGA. She works as the Director of International Students, helping to serve the school’s New Oasis International Program and the students it brings to BGA each year. Lambert says she has seen nothing but improvements in the school since her graduation in 1995. Although the BGA today looks very different from its predecessor in the 1960s, what Roberts gained from his time here inspired him to send his three daughters to the very same school, with the return of coeducation. When Eddie Roberts went back to his alma mater decades after his own graduation to consider enrollment at BGA for his daughters, it wasn’t the school’s college admission rate that solidified his decision. It was a random student they encountered in the hallway. “When Donna and I went to BGA to look at the school, there was a young man that was an eighth or ninth grade student. He stopped us in the hall and introduced himself. He stuck out his hand and said, ‘Can I help you find something?’ That was kind of a defining moment for us to send

“The support we have in place for the students is so good,” she said. “And I think on the academic side, our teachers are always willing to go the extra mile. Not that they weren’t that way before, but now they really strive to champion these kids on their academics. I think we are at the next level now.” Lambert switched schools from a public school in Lewisburg to BGA when she was in the eighth grade. She left the same group of children she had gone to school with her entire life, to commute every day. “It felt like a really big deal driving those 45 minutes up to Franklin to go to a school that had a dress code and the homework was all pretty intimidating,” she remembers. “But I got involved pretty quickly. I did cheer and played softball. Our class was so small at the time we all got to know each other fairly quickly. The teachers were so welcoming, and they

got to know you so quickly, so it felt like the right place to be pretty soon after I started.” Roberts’ oldest daughter, Shelley McLay ’93, graduated from BGA and after college came home to teach at BGA for several years. She said BGA was always a place that challenged her to push boundaries. “It was OK to be smart at BGA. It was also OK to have diverse interests,” McLay remembers. “My sisters and I did everything. We participated in plays, sang in the choir, and played sports. We were not limited.” And the life skills she derived from going to BGA have made a lasting impression on her. “BGA taught me to compete,” she said. “We were never going to be in a singlesex situation in life. We were always going to have to compete in boardrooms, in business, and in life. We were taught to get in there and show off a little and that it’s OK to be a smart woman. Women were still in very traditional roles in my hometown. I feel like none of my teachers at BGA ever limited the girls. We were absolutely championed by our teachers whether they were male or female.” NEW OPPORTUNITIES Sheila Alley Allison ‘82 was one of only a handful of girls in 1979 when she switched to BGA the very first year it went coed after many years as an all-boys school. Her younger brother Richard ’84 was attending BGA and her parents asked her if she would like to go to the same school as her brother, now that she had the opportunity. “Our parents wanted both their son and daughter to be ready for college-level work,” she said. “He had started in the Seventh Grade and so I made the switch in Tenth. Even at that age, I liked the idea of being challenged.” While she was familiar with attending school alongside boys from growing up in the Franklin Special School District, the boys at BGA were the ones who had some adjusting to do. “There were times when we were mean to each other,” Allison remembers. “But the

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guys learned we could be friends. We knew this was new for them and so a lot of times we didn’t try the dating thing right off. We’d just be friends.” She says she never remembers feeling out of place at BGA. Except maybe in biology class. “I was the only girl in my biology class when we were learning about reproduction. Even the teacher got a little embarrassed.” But what Allison took away from BGA didn’t have much to do with the school being coed. It had everything to do with what was instilled in her by her teachers, coaches, and staff. “Being a product of BGA had the most influence on me wanting to be a teacher. I learned how important your education is and that you can have fun and work hard. It really is a preparation ground. As a public school teacher, I try to bring some of that understanding of how important this preparation is for the rest of your life.”

Sheila Alley Allison '82

Tiffany Hall Alday '85 grew up in Franklin and went to Franklin Elementary through the Fifth Grade. Because BGA wasn’t an option for students before the Seventh Grade, she went to Harpeth Hall for Sixth Grade. She transferred her Seventh Grade year and was one of only 40 young women who attended BGA from Seventh through Twelfth Grade. “Some of the older girls had a hard time with the guys not liking it so much,” Alday said. “But the guys in my class never went there when it wasn’t coed, so they didn’t know any different. I loved it from the get-go.” So much so, in fact, that all three of her children also attended BGA. “The education was great, and the teachers were great,” she remembers. “I am still friends with our art teacher, Carol Lea-Mord. She came when the girls came and has since retired. She was wonderful. You had a connection with all of the teachers that was amazing. I am still friends with my high school friends. I really wanted my children to go where I went.” Her daughter Savannah Alday had an opportunity that her mother didn’t have. She started her education at BGA in the First Grade. “Going there the entire time was great,” she said. “I grew up with kids who are still my best friends today. The teachers really cared about you being successful, whatever that meant to you. The emphasis was on being well-rounded and highlighting all different types of kids and skills. You may have been on the basketball team, but maybe you were also in the band. Or you did AP art and you were a cheerleader.” 24

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Carol Lea-Mord & Tiffany Hall Alday ' 85


ALUMNI FEATURES

Savannah, who graduated from BGA in 2012, also had Ms. Lea-Mord for art and she says she loved having some of the same teachers her mother did when she was a student. “One of the things I loved most about BGA was the size,” she said. “I graduated with 89 kids and we were all so close. We were so lucky to have those smaller classes. We got more one-on-one time. Everyone was able to have a voice.” Now working in New York City as an account executive for Frame Denim, Alday said what she learned at BGA helped her excel while at The University of Tennessee. “At BGA, we were taught how to learn, not just to be test-takers. That was so helpful. It helped my critical thinking skills.” REAL-LIFE SITUATIONS Tiffany added that BGA being coed, in fact, helped her learn to feel comfortable having a voice among men. She knew girls who struggled in coed situations after graduation from all-girl schools. “Going to a coed school helped me be able to have a voice and not be intimidated,” she said. “I was the first female president of BGA’s alumni association. Before me it was all men in that role. I was used to being around guys, so it made me more comfortable.”

says she will always choose a coed situation for her children because it replicates real-life situations, and BGA gives students not only the content knowledge, but vital skills such as public speaking, entrepreneurship, and leadership. “I want my daughters to know they will have to be confident in a room full of men sometimes,” she said. “BGA gives girls an opportunity to show how intelligent they are before they get out into the world and might have their confidence broken by the nature of society. These kids are learning to be leaders and that is so much more than an ACT score or a college acceptance letter. She added that developing character continues to be an important focus at BGA. As an independent school, BGA can ask its students to maintain a certain level of behavior, which stems from the intentionality of building better people. “BGA is creating young men and young women who are comfortable talking to adults, challenging authority when necessary, and who are good citizens in their communities,” McLay said. “The true path to success is building leadership skills in boys and girls, and I think BGA does that extremely well.”

Her daughter Savannah agrees. “Growing up going to a coed school, most of my friends were the guys from BGA,” she said. “I have two brothers, so it never was an issue. Mom is a strong woman and a great role model, which I’m sure ties back to BGA. We were outnumbered by the boys, but we learned to work with them. They respected us. We shut anything other than that down. I’ve kept that mentality going through college and even in New York.” Just like many BGA graduates whose children have followed in their parents’ footsteps, McLay

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Strategic TRANSFORMING EDUCATION

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Plan

I

n September, BGA’s Image Administration andfor this article? Board of Trustees, with the partnership of a steering committee and research and planning firm Ian Symmonds & Associates, unveiled the school’s next strategic plan: Transforming Education. With this dynamic plan, BGA continues to evolve and demonstrate its commitment to being the academic center of Williamson County. As the Middle Tennessee boom and growth continues, the Board remains dedicated to its mission to ignite and nurture student curiosity, intellect, and character, and position itself to be at the forefront of education in the region.

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THE NEW STRATEGIC PLAN HAS FOUR TENETS: 1. 2.

ic program m e d a c a D L Foster a BO ELL-BEING in W T N E D U T Ensure S lassroom c e h t f o e id s and out IVERSITY D f o l e d o m Elevate the ITY and INCLUSIV nances, and fi , s ie it il c a f e STEWARD th able future in a t s u s a r fo relationships

3.

4.

I

n formulating these goals, the steering committee, which consisted of a wide range of members of the BGA community, intentionally listened to opinions, studied academic trends in the independent school space, and established these four priorities based on research, feedback, and collaboration. At first, these goals and the commitment to the future may seem familiar but there is a thread that runs through all of these points, weaving together the fabric of this 28

BATTLE G R OUND A C ADEMY

strategy: in the life of a student, there are moments that serve to inspire, enrich, encourage, and energize. What happens in these moments can change a student’s direction or dreams, and these moments are what they will remember long after their student days at BGA are over. These occurrences serve as natural connection points where futures are shaped and encouraged to grow. Recognizing them as consequential and actively fostering them are what will organically drive the core structure of BGA’s excellence in academics,

sports, diversity and inclusivity, and it will all set the foundation for a sound financial and sustainable future. How are these moments being cultivated and encouraged? In the Fall, Head of School Will Kesler explained the strategic plan succinctly: “BGA is uniquely positioned to be the flagship institution for education in Williamson County.” It starts with the school day itself. BGA’s academic program is built around student schedules mindful of well-being and providing for attention to the individual. Combine strong academics with a


STRATEGIC PLAN

K-12 character education program, and BGA is continuing to produce citizens who are prepared for future challenges, energized to think critically, and empowered to be the innovators and thought leaders of tomorrow. Kesler continued, “The power of these defining moments is that it stays with you longer than simply the study of academic pursuits. How to create and capture more and more of these moments is the goal of the new Strategic Plan.” Defining moments are not limited to classrooms. Learning happens everywhere, and tapping into that spark of wonder happens in an instant.

Alumnus Wes Sellers ‘96 recently came back to campus for a visit and had such a moment. He was so impressed with what he saw happening that he created an internship at his own office and is now considering BGA for his children. Sellers experienced the modern BGA, saw that it is thriving, and recognized the value in being a part of the school’s future. Ultimately, the strategic plan will be enhanced by the involvement of the greater BGA community - adults who can offer internship positions for recent BGA graduates; sharing professional expertise with students; and BGA alumni joining the school’s

networking platform BGA Connects. BGA continues to set the standard with innovative educational opportunities, an intentional student well-being focus, and more learning opportunities outside of the classroom. Ancillary learning is ongoing as more students take advantage of internships, travel, and experiential learning. The new Center for Arts & Entrepreneurship will engage current and future students as they are encouraged to think beyond their present walls and imagine their future selves in roles perhaps not yet created.

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Creating Our Fu THE CAMPAIGN FOR BATTLE GROUND ACADEMY

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uture

View of the Center for Arts & Entrepreneurship from the top of the Cherry Circle

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View of the Center for Arts & Entrepreneurship from Echo Lane

“It’s a great time for BGA,” states Capital Campaign Chairman and long-time Battle Ground Academy Board of Trustees member, Bill Armistead ‘69. Armistead is correct. It is a great time for BGA, as the Capital Campaign, born from the 2015 strategic plan for the school, officially launched in September 2019 as part of the school’s Homecoming celebrations to provide funding for specific initiatives and projects of the school. In September, during Homecoming spirit week, BGA announced Creating Our Future: The Campaign for Battle Ground Academy, a $24 million comprehensive campaign to build the Sondra Morris and Robert N. Moore, Jr. ‘52 Center for Arts & Entrepreneurship, enhance the Lower School, renovate spaces on the Glen Echo campus, and increase the school’s endowment. Construction on the Center for Arts & Entrepreneurship started in October and the new space is scheduled to open in the spring of 2021. “This building is the center point of this campaign,” says Head

of School Will Kesler, “and the immediate benefits of this building and its uses will be felt by everyone who attends and who has attended Battle Ground Academy.” Benefiting all members of the BGA Community is the underlying driving force behind the Capital Campaign. Campus construction and enhancements of this scale exceed the normal operating budget, and campaign funding provides the necessary income to foster major changes for the entire campus. As BGA families and alumni are solicited for Creating Our Future, some may wonder: “I give to the BGA Fund. How is this different?” The BGA Fund is the school’s most important fundraising effort each year, providing BGA with the resources to offer students an outstanding educational program. It is a critical component of the annual operating budget. To maintain and improve current annual programs, it is imperative that support does not wane. “Think of it as the bank account versus the savings account of an endowment fund,” says Will Kesler. “We need both initiatives

to continue to grow and improve each year.” Kesler goes on to explain that one fundraising effort does not supersede another, but rather they all complement and work in tandem towards becoming even more of an exceptional and exemplary institution for learning that will enhance the legacy of those who came before and for all those student graduates to come. In fact, it’s a credit to the legacy of giving by BGA supporters in the past that projects such as the Center for Arts & Entrepreneurship can become a reality. That legacy of giving when needed and when the time is right for donors has given the school an endowment which distributes funds annually to the school’s operating budget AND provides the school with the financial stability to look to the future. Prudent investment of endowment donations has helped grow the endowment to its current total of $16 million, but that total is far below what one would expect from a school of BGA’s age and legacy. Increasing the endowment is important to influencing the school’s ongoing programs including financial aid, salaries, profes-

CAMPAIGN GOALS AND INITIATIVES The Sondra Morris and Robert N. Moore, Jr. ’52 Center for Arts & Entrepreneurship Enhancements to the Harpeth Campus (Lower School) Renovations to the Glen Echo Campus (Middle and Upper School) Endowment for Current Operations Endowment for the Center for Arts & Entrepreneurship

$14 million $3 million $2 million $3 million $2million

$24 million

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2nd floor view

sional development, and maintenance of facilities. With a $5 million goal in Creating Our Future, the endowment provides long-term stability that BGA sustains well into the future while immediately reducing dependence on tuition. “It will take everybody,” Kesler says regarding the Capital Campaign. “We have never done a campaign of this scope before – which does not negate the history of generous philanthropy and support from our alumni and donors. It is our hope and our goal for this current, comprehensive project of fundraising, towards very specific goals, to build a culture of philanthropy that doesn’t just affect the school, but also, very much impacts and provides value to the community overall,” Kesler concludes. “The school has to grow along with the county. Williamson County growth is huge and ongoing, and BGA must grow alongside that in order to sustain the reputation of academic success it has always provided,” says Armistead. Armistead, who has served on the Board of Trustees for twenty-nine years, knows a little bit about fund-raising for the school he holds so dear. He was part of the fundraising and planning for moving the campus from Columbia Avenue in downtown Franklin to its current location. It was a huge project not only in fundraising for a new campus, but also a philosophical one, as many alumni and families resisted the idea of moving their beloved school. Twenty-five years later, it is clear that the move allowed BGA to sustain beloved traditions while growing and enhancing its programs.

Building new structures like the Center for Arts & Entrepreneurship is essential to the student experience. The building will provide a space the school has never had, for public programming and daily function within the current activities of the school. With this new addition to the campus, existing campus buildings will be immediately impacted. Moving Entrepreneurial Leadership classes out of the Middle School Academic Building frees up space which may be used to house Middle School administrators, increasing their interactions with students. The Cherry Sports Center will no longer have to serve as a concert hall on Grandparents and Special Friends Day, and the Harlin Student Center can become a true dining hall. Students in the performing arts will benefit from first-class on stage and backstage experiences, as will our audiences. With a goal of $2 million for renovations to the Glen Echo Campus the Campaign impacts the daily life of each Middle and Upper School student and teacher. Armistead also notes that improvement to the Lower School campus on Franklin Road is a very important aspect of the Capital Campaign’s overall initiative. “In order to advance and improve, we start with the buildings,” he says. There are a lot of improvements and updates to the Lower School Campus that can be made. The Capital Campaign will make that possible. The Campaign has a $3 million dollar goal towards Lower School renovations to give the school new space to compete with new county schools being built. Additionally, the Lower School will get to add more natural light and

enhancements to the common spaces, cafeteria and library. BGA believes that a strong graduating class starts with a strong Kindergarten class – and this project will help continue to attract even more students and families to an already strong academic program. Early donors like Sondra Morris have been essential to helping launch the campaign. Through her legacy gift on behalf of the late Robert Moore ‘52, a longtime trustee and supporter of the school, the school was able to break ground on the Center for Arts & Entrepreneurship this fall. “Sondra immediately saw the value and vision for the new building as a direct example of the school’s growth into the future and building on the legacy of the past,” explains Kesler. "I have had the pleasure of meeting so many BGA alumni over the years, all of whom credit the school for their successes and being so well prepared for college and life,” says Morris. “With the Jewell Athletic & Wellness Center and the Mary Campbell Visual Arts Center, the school has two facilities that inspire and match the quality of the work being done by students. It's time for the performing arts to have the same. The challenges and opportunities all of us face in the future are unimaginable! I see the BGA Entrepreneurial Leadership program as giving BGA students an opportunity to experience and learn about how ideas can change the world.” The Yarbrough family’s name will forever be synonymous with the Entrepreneurial Leadership (“EL”) program at the school. Jon Yarbrough was an early member of

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Theatre

CAMPAIGN

LEADERSHIP COMMITTEE Bill Armistead ‘69, Chair Tyler Berry ‘87 Hamilton Bowman ‘93 Ward Brown David Jackson John Jewell ‘86 Will Kesler Lucibeth and Brian Mayberry Eddie Roberts ‘69 Joe Torrence ‘61 Kurt Winstead Lobby and 1st floor the program’s Advisory Board and Amy (BGA Class of 2019) was in the first class of students to benefit from a full four years of the EL Program. The Yarbrough Entrepreneur Center - space dedicated to EL classrooms, offices, and collaborative work spaces - will be housed in the new Center for Arts & Entrepreneurship. The generosity of early contributors to the campaign and donors who have pledged multi-year payments is recognized by both Kesler and Armistead as the bedrock for a continued strong campaign. As of December 2019, donors have committed more than $16 million towards the Campaign’s goal of $24 million. With 100% of the Board of Trustees having made their commitments, the school is embarking on the community phase of its fundraising 34

BATTLE G R OUND A C ADEMY

efforts. Over the next 18 months it aims to raise the remaining $8 million from alumni, current and past parents, and other members of the BGA community who want to see BGA continue to provide students with educations and experiences that will last them a lifetime. “We would not be in a position to do this campaign without strong BGA Fund support and 100% participation from the Board of Trustees,” says Kesler. “This kind of internal support has given us the confidence to embark on Creating Our Future, and we know that current families and other alumni and community supporters will see the value here, join our initial donors, and help us raise the remaining dollars.” For more information about the goals and initiatives of Creating Our Future, includ-

ing naming opportunities, please contact Director of Advancement Tom Evans or Director of Leadership Gifts Jason Gregg ‘90. Tom Evans tom.evans@mybga.org (615) 567-8309 Jason Gregg ‘90 jason.gregg@mybga.org (615) 567-8311


WILDCAT Roll Call ALUMNI NEWS

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CLASS NOTES 2000’s Jamie Lynne Sullivan ‘02 married Dallas Richard Carlson on October 18, 2019 in Houston Hall in New York City. Rachel McGee '02 was Jamie’s Maid of Honor.

Rebecca Cunningham ‘04 was recognized with the company she works with, Red Seal Homes, for their community service and generosity in donating food to Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee every time they sell a property.

Mary Nelle Hall Karas ‘07 and her husband Nick welcomed their daughter Mary Brynne on October 29, 2019.

Sarah McGee Lipman ‘07 and her husband Marshall welcomed their son Thomas Meyer Lipman on July 12, 2019.

Emily Thomas Isom ‘07 and her husband Steven welcomed their daughter Mattie Marie on September 16, 2019. Mattie has a big brother, Ollie.

Julianne Isaacs Cantey ‘08 and her husband Steele welcomed son Charles (Charlie) Morgan Cantey on April 6, 2019. Charlie’s grandfather and aunt attended BGA - Chuck Isaacs ‘75 and Elizabeth Isaacs ‘10.

Libby Adgent Daughdrill ‘04 and her husband Jim welcomed their son John Worthington on September 24, 2019.

BGA’s mailing address: As of October, BGA is no longer using the PO Box 1889 in downtown Franklin. All mail should be sent to the Glen Echo campus at 336 Ernest Rice Lane, Franklin, TN 37069.

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WILDCAT ROLL CALL

M. Campbell Harlan ’08 and his wife Lindsay welcomed daughter Emerson Gray Harlan on September 7, 2019.

Laine Milam Arnold ‘09 and her husband Sammie welcomed daughter Magnolia (Maggie) Mae Arnold on Tuesday, December 17. Maggie’s grandfather, greatuncle, and uncle also attended BGA - Jack Milam ‘67, Roger Milam ‘63, and Jansen Milam ‘03.

Rachel Carter ‘09 won the 2019 Materials Research Society (MRS) Postdoctoral Award which recognizes postdoctoral scholars who are showing exceptional promise that may include, for example, excellence in scientific research, leadership, advocacy, outreach, or teaching, during their postdoc assignment. Rachel works at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory and was recognized "for contributions to the design of safe battery materials and systems, leadership of students and advocacy for women scientists and engineers.”

Laine Carrigan Mitchell ‘09 and her husband Franklin welcomed son Sullivan Franklin on October 3, 2019. Big sister Elouise is excited to have a brother.

2010’s Joel Parker ‘14 completed his first year as a graduate assistant on Derek Mason’s Vanderbilt football staff. He focused on Commodore special teams, working with coordinator Devin “Fitz” Fitzsimmons. In 2018, he contributed as a special teams intern with Mason’s program.

Benjamin Ball ‘17 attended oral arguments regarding DACA in the United States Supreme Court on behalf of his university newspaper, the Daily Princetonian. His article regarding the hearings was published in the Daily Princetonian on December 12, 2019.

About Class Notes: The BGA Alumni Association strives to promote BGA alumni and their achievements. We encourage all alumni to share news with us about milestones in their lives so that it may be shared with the BGA alumni community. Please note that mentions about alumni endeavors do not constitute a review or opinion from the school.

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CLASS NOTES Matthew Keith ‘17 His script “Studio Session” was one of two plays debuted during New Works November at LAB! Theatre Company at UNC/Chapel Hill. Harris Cavin ‘18 Harris has been hired as a flight instructor at Middle Tennessee State University.

Young Alumni Networking Event Over 65 alumni from the classes of 2008-2019 gathered on Tuesday, December 17, to network and catch up. Sarah Sanders Steinlein from the Class of 1997, Principal and Executive Recruiter at Harpeth Search, LLC., was this year's special guest. Sarah talked to the alumni about the importance of using social media in a positive way, keeping professional networks and resumes up to date, face-to-face interactions, and asking questions.

L ike Lin kedIn , b ut be tt er.

That ’s becau se it ’s exc l u sive t o B G A Al u m n i. N e t w ork directl y wit h peo pl e w h o u n der st a n d t h e a d van tage a n d va l u e o f a B G A dipl o m a .

BGA Connects w w w.bg a c o n n ec t s.c o m

E XCLUSI VE J O B L I STI NGS

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ALUMN I DIRECTORY

IN DUSTRY IN SIGHTS


WILDCAT ROLL CALL

GET INVOLVED - STAY INVOLVED THERE HAS NEVER BEEN A BETTER TIME TO CONNECT WITH BGA! You are a vital member of our community, and we would like to know all the amazing things happening in your life. There is always a place for you at the Academy. We hope you continue to make lifelong connections by networking among our alumni family. You are always welcome to visit the campus and in fact, we encourage it! Contact Director of Alumni Relations Kristin Napier for a tour or join her for lunch in the cafeteria. ALUMNI VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES BGA's alumni and development programs are only successful with the help of our countless volunteers. If you would like to volunteer for any of the alumni programs listed below in Nashville, Franklin, or in your home city, please contact Kristin Napier.

• Alumni Guest Faculty/Speaker - Come

back to campus and be a guest speaker in a class related to your professional field. • BGA's Alumni Board - The Alumni Board connects alumni to each other and to the school. They raise money by reaching out to their classmates for gifts to the BGA Fund and by finding sponsors for the annual BGA Golf Classic. They also share the alumni perspective with the administration and the Board of Trustees with the hope of advancing BGA's mission. Meetings are bi-monthly during the academic year. • Class Representatives - This is an area we need to develop. Class reps have one important job: CONNECT. Keep class spirit alive through calls, emails, social networking, thank you notes and/ or class notes; send an annual letter to classmates; actively seek to find lost alumni/ae, and capture email addresses for all classmates. Coordinate class involvement with alumni events in the towns where you live. • BGA Fund / Class Agents - Reach out to fellow alumni and encourage them to participate in the BGA Fund. Make your own contribution (remember, the gift, not the amount is what matters) and then use social media, emails, phone calls, and old-fashioned letters to get as many alumni as you can to participate.

Dyan Damron ‘98 meets with members of the Future Alumni Club to discuss her work in engineering and nutrition. IN OCTOBER, AS PART OF THE FOUNDERS' DAY ASSEMBLY, a panel of alumnae answered student questions about what it was like to be in the first coed classes at BGA after 50 years and how the school has changed over the 40 years as it relates to coeducation.

BGA alumnae from left to right: Leigh Roberts Lambert ‘95, Anna-Gene Chalfant O’Neal ‘84, Melissa Savage ‘82, and Sheila Alley Allison ‘82 Kristin Napier, Director of Alumni Relations (615) 567-8472, kristin.napier@mybga.org

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IN MEMORIAM

Buford B. Pearson 1941

Edward Douglass 1943

John M. Green Jr. 1945

Vinson Stanley Cobb 1947

James Willis Jacobs 1949

Thomas M. Robinson, III 1949

Gerald W. Bennett, Sr. 1950

George O. Trabue, Jr. 1951

Parker F. Wilson, Jr. 1953

Boyce Cooper Magli 1961

Ralph D. Bennett, Jr. 1970

Gilliam Otis Traughber, III 1973

Allison Ray Shelton Rogers 1995

THE CARNTON ENSLAVED MONUMENT UNVEILING

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In December and January, the BGA community lost several alumni including Clay Beathard ’16, Eddie Lunn ’67, and Paul Trapeni ’16. We will memorialize them in the next issue of Echo.

Dr. Eleanor Fleming '96 and Lamont Turner '96 participated on November 6, 2019, in the Carnton Enslaved Monument unveiling. This monument was erected to honor the enslaved people who were buried in the McGavock cemetery at Carnton in Williamson County.


Homecoming

Weekend 2019

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At a school with a history as rich as ours, you

ARCHIVES

can be sure that our Archives are full of wonderful photographs from the past. Here are two photos we’ve recently pulled out.

A PRIZE FROM THE BGA ROAR STORE TO:

the first person who can correctly identify these four young men.

the first person who can tell us what parade these students are riding in.

Email your answer to alumni@mybga.org. Correct answers, the names of the winners, and two more photos will be shared in the next issue of Echo. 42

BATTLE G R OUND A C ADEMY


ALL IN ARE YOU

FOR THE BGA FUND?

Affecting each and every aspect of a BGA education, the BGA Fund is vital to succeeding in our mission to ignite and nurture student curiosity, intellect, and character. We cannot do it without you.

3 EASY WAYS TO GIVE MOBILE

ONLINE

BATTLEGROUNDACADEMY.ORG/GIVE

MAIL

336 ERNEST RICE LANE FRANKLIN, TN 37069

@BGA-FUND

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Nonprofit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Nashville, TN Permit No. 4135 336 Ernest Rice Lane | Franklin, TN 37069 (615) 794-3501 battlegroundacademy.org