N MAGAZINE August 2023

Page 102

N MAKES ITS OPERA HOUSE CUP DEBUT AUGUST 2023 RANGER NEW COASTAL RESILIENCE COORDINATOR WILLIAM COHAN LEAH
INSIDE THE ON BILLIONAIRES BEHAVING BADLY
HILL HOUSING CRISIS AUTHOR

EXQUISITE CUSTOM, COMPLETELY RENOVATED HOME

An additional 14,781 sq. ft. lot is available for $3,500,000 CISCO | $11,985,000

5 Bedrooms, 5.5 Bathrooms

SWEEPING OCEAN VIEWS MADAKET | $4,550,000

4 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

PRIVACY AND CONVENIENCE MADAKET | $2,995,000

3 Bedrooms, 2.5 Bathrooms

EXCLUSIVELY SHOWCASED BY

2 N MAGAZINE GARY
gary@maurypeople.com 508.330.3069 Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated. Equal Housing Opportunity. MAURY PEOPLE SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY | 37 MAIN STREET, NANTUCKET, MA 02554 | 508.228.1881 | MAURYPEOPLE.COM NOTHING COMPARES
WINN, BROKER
3 N-MAGAZINE.COM We design and build your dream greenhouse. GLASSHOUSES alitex-greenhouses.com Joe Hickson: 413-530-6908
Kathleen Hay De signs nantucket • boston • beyond t 508.228.1219 www.kathleenhaydesigns.com
Photo by Wendy Mills

1610

N. Ocean Boulevard, Palm Beach

Stunning Lakefront 6BR/7.2BA home built in 2018. Gorgeous blue wide water views from all primary rooms. Beautiful courtyard entryway leads to oversized living room with fireplace. Gourmet chef’s kitchen with island overlooks family room. Highlights include library, elevator, home gym, full staff kitchen, and 4 car garage. Gorgeous tropical landscaping. Pool, spa, and loggia with fireplace overlooks Intracoastal. Dock with boat lift.

C 561.629.3015

T 561.659.6551

E cjangle@anglerealestate.com

Exclusive Offering - Christian J. Angle 561-629-3015

www.AngleRealEstate.com

179 Bradley Place, Palm Beach, Florida 33480

6 N MAGAZINE
Though information is assumed to be correct, offerings are subject to verification, errors, omissions, prior sale, and withdrawal without notice. All material herein is intended for informational purposes only and has been compiled from sources deemed reliable. Equal Housing Opportunity.

SITE VISIT

CHIP WEBSTER AR C HITE C TU R E CHIPWEBSTER.COM 508.228.3600
8 N MAGAZINE your possibilities Reimagine We’ve been redefining window design for almost a century. Book your free in-home consultation with a Pella Expert to discuss how we can bring your unique vision to life. Contact us today 508-266-8246 gopella.com/nantucket Visit our showroom 1600 Falmouth Road, Centerville, MA 02632
9 N-MAGAZINE.COM
in
& Enjoy Nantucket Living Discover year-round island living where you can escape the hustle and bustle of everyday life and experience all the beauty that Nantucket offers. Enjoy several months, weeks or even just days at this resort-like community featuring a Clubhouse, Pool, and more. Choose from several styles of new four-bedroom custom single family homes with open floor plans, large kitchen islands, and spacious living for relaxing or entertaining family and friends. All homes include a finished lower level with full bathroom, and private access. Conveniently located close to beaches, bicycle path, specialty restaurants, and shops. SandpiperNantucket.com | 888-375-1066 | 3 Honeysuckle Drive, Nantucket Prices Starting From $2,285,200 CUSTOM BUILT HOMES RESORT-STYLE LIVING FOR ALL SEASONS Renderings are an artist’s perception and are subject to change.
Move
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TEL. 203.622.7000 203.622.7000 WWW.VANDERHORNARCHITECTS.COM 41 WEST ELM STREET GREENWICH, CT
12 N MAGAZINE ELEISH VAN BREEMS HOME WESTPORT • NANTUCKET | EVBANTIQUES.COM
13 N-MAGAZINE.COM Pendleton Avenue Offered at $14,950,000 Renovated North End With Beach Parcel Offered at $10,995,000 Seminole Landing with Dock Offered at $12,500,000 Renovated Waterfront Ibis Isle Offered at $3,995,000 Modern In Town Residence Offered at $12,500,000 Renovated Northwood Pool House Offered at $2,750,000 © 2023 Sotheby’s International Realty. All Rights Reserved. The Sotheby’s International Realty trademark is licensed and used with permission. Each Sotheby’s International Realty o ce is independently owned and operated, except those operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. The Sotheby’s International Realty network fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. All offerings are subject to errors, omissions, changes including price or withdrawal without notice.
14 N MAGAZINE 508.228.9117 | 17 MAIN STREET | NANTUCKET | MA 02554 NY FL MA CT RI VT NH ME Number One TH E #1 IND E PE N D EN T FA M I L Y - O W N E D BROKER A GE I N T H E N O R T HE A S T AN D F L ORI D A 140+ OFFICES 4,500+ 8 STATES - CT, FL, MA, ME, NH, NY, RI, VT SALES ASSOCIATES
17 N-MAGAZINE.COM Summer REAL ESTATE COLLECTION Chandra Miller Your Island Broker LUXURY SALES & RENTALS 508.360.7777 chandra@maurypeople.com First and Second Rows (L to R): SCONSET VILLAGE 3 Beds + 1.5 Baths + Sea Views | $3,195,000 SCONSET ON OCEAN 5 Beds + 2.5 Baths + Direct Sea Views | $6,795,000 SCONSET VILLAGE 2 & 6 Center Street | $5,995,000 MADEQUECHAM 4 Beds + 4 Baths + Cabana + Pool + Tennis Court Price Upon Request CANNONBURY 4 Beds + 5.5 Baths + Garage/Studio | $6,250,000 Third Row (L to R): TOM NEVERS EAST Newly Constructed / Main House + 10 Beds + 11 Baths + Cottage + 2 car garage + pool/spa/firepit on 3 acres | $9,475,000 SCONSET CODFISH Newly Renovated Seaside Gem + Strong Rental Income 86K 1 Bed + 1 Bath • $2,195,000
18 N MAGAZINE THOM BROWNE FALL 2023 COLLECTION PRESENTED EXCLUSIVELY AT 9 SOUTH BEACH STREET NANTUCKET, MA 02554 508-228-3400 SERENELLAUSA.COM
19 N-MAGAZINE.COM Providing exceptional quality Nantucket construction services since 2005. CMC Construction | (508) 332-4757 | office@cmcconstructionnantucket.com justbuiltbetter.com
22 N MAGAZINE BRANT POINT 24 Walsh Street | $5,950,000 GREATPOINTPROPERTIES.COM 1 NORTH BEACH STREET NANTUCKET, MA 02554 508.228.2266 6 MAIN STREET SIASCONSET, MA 02564 508.257.6335 SALES \ RENTALS SCONSET \ TOWN TOM NEVERS 42 Chuck Hollow Road | $5,990,000 MONOMOY 26 Monomoy Road | $11,800,000 DIONIS 15 Swift Rock Road | $3,800,000 WAUWINET 137 Wauwinet Road | $4,895,000 CISCO 5 High Brush Path | $5,650,000 SQUAM 67 Squam Road | $12,350,000 QUIDNET 12 Sesachacha Road | $4,090,000 MADAKET 36 Tennessee Avenue | $4,895,000
23 N-MAGAZINE.COM

THERE IS ANOTHER WAY TO FLY.

It is flying that is an extension of what you value not an interruption of it. Less harrowing than flying commercial. More intimate than flying private.

IT’S FLYING PERSONAL. And once you’ve done it, you’ll never want to fly any other way.

SCHEDULED SERVICE TO NANTUCKET FROM THE NEW YORK AREA.

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25 N-MAGAZINE.COM Nicholas H. Gavin, Licensed Real Estate Salesperson is affiliated with Compass. Compass is a licensed real estate broker located at 90 Fifth Avenue, 3rd Fl. NY, NY 10011 and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. Iconic New York City Real Estate Recognized for excellence in The Wall Street Journal, Variety, The Hollywood Reporter 425 W 50TH STREET, PENTHOUSE A | $10,995,000 Contact nick.gavin@compass.com nickgavinnyc
26 N MAGAZINE
27 N-MAGAZINE.COM Step into a different world—one of prestige, style and sophistication with unprecedented design details. The most anticipated new address in Naples and final ownership opportunity within its exclusive Pelican Bay enclave, Epique offers a limited collection of sixty-eight bespoke Gulf-front residences. Certainly not everyone can do this. But if you can, you should. A Bespoke Gulf-Front Address ORAL REPRESENTATIONS CANNOT BE RELIED UPON AS CORRECTLY STATING REPRESENTATIONS OF THE DEVELOPER. FOR CORRECT REPRESENTATIONS, MAKE REFERENCE TO THE DOCUMENTS REQUIRED BY SECTION 718.503, FLORIDA STATUTES, TO BE FURNISHED BY A DEVELOPER TO A BUYER OR LESSEE. Prices and availability subject to change without notice. The materials and features depicted in this rendering are based upon current development plans, which are subject to change without notice. All images, designs and features depicted herein are shown solely for illustrative purposes, and may differ in view, perspective or scale. No guarantees or representations are made that the materials and features depicted in this rendering will be provided, or if provided, will be of the same type, size or nature as depicted. Gulf Bay® Group of Companies. Creators of the Pelican Bay Skyline. Gulf Bay® Marketing Group, Inc. REALTORS®. ©Copyright 2023, Gulf Bay Development LV, LLC. All rights reserved. ESTATES FROM OVER $6 MILLION | PENTHOUSE PRICING UPON REQUEST epiquepelicanbay.com | 239.329.9362 | 6885 Pelican Bay Boulevard | Naples, Florida
28 N MAGAZINE 21 Main Street, Nantucket, MA | 508.228.4407 fishernantucket.com The best of Nantucket all in one place #1 NANTUCKET TRAVEL GUIDE LEADING MARKET INSIGHTS OVER 1,500 ORIGINAL BLOGS VIRTUAL NEIGHBORHOOD GUIDES SIGN UP: ack.fish/newsletter2023 Hummock Pond 47 HUMMOCK POND ROAD $5,895,000 Cliff 81 CLIFF ROAD $11,950,000 ‘Sconset 9 HYDRANGEA LANE $3,950,000

Founded in 1945, Allied Marine is one of the largest yacht brokerage and yacht charter companies in the world. Exclusive dealer for new Ferretti Yachts, Pershing, Riva and Itama and authorized dealer for CRN and Custom Line yachts. Allied Marine is a global leader in both preowned and new yacht sales. FY860

Composing a melody in which the notes of each individual instrument are beautifully orchestrated, Ferretti Yachts gears up to bring a new symphony to life: Ferretti Yachts 860. The flybridge yacht created by the Cattolica-based Shipyard features cutting-edge design and technology solutions, where the stylistic and architectural elements work together in harmony right down to the tiniest detail.

29 N-MAGAZINE.COM
LUXURY SUPERYACHT EXPERTS
EXCLUSIVE DEALER AUTHORIZED DEALER PLEASE CONTACT OUR LOCAL TEAM FOR A PRIVATE WALKTHROUGH OR FOR MORE INFORMATION. THE YACHT IS DOCKED AT THE NANTUCKET BOAT BASIN, AT CRU RESTAURANT PETER HOPWOOD \\\ +1.216.272.0095 SCOTT WEILAND \\\ +1.904.477.8600
NANTUCKET (508) 257-0384 // CONNECTICUT (860) 322-4228 // olsontwombly.com 35 OLD SOUTH ROAD // NANTUCKET

Michael Passaro

M 917.806.8213 | O 508.386.9733

Michael

M 917.806.8213 | O 508.386.9733

Michael

M 917.806.8213 | O 508.386.9733

4B Hawthorne Lane | Nantucket, MA $28,000 | 5 BR, 4.1 BA | Web# 73068855

Michael Passaro

M 917.806.8213 | O 508.386.9733

Michael

M 917.806.8213 | O 508.386.9733

31 N-MAGAZINE.COM Nantucket Rentals
Elliman 20 PARK PLAZA, SUITE 820, BOSTON 02116 | 617.267.3500 © 2023 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE. ALL MATERIAL PRESENTED HEREIN IS INTENDED FOR INFORMATION PURPOSES ONLY. WHILE, THIS INFORMATION IS BELIEVED TO BE CORRECT, IT IS REPRESENTED SUBJECT TO ERRORS, OMISSIONS, CHANGES OR WITHDRAWAL WITHOUT NOTICE. ALL PROPERTY INFORMATION, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO SQUARE FOOTAGE, ROOM COUNT, NUMBER OF BEDROOMS AND THE SCHOOL DISTRICT IN PROPERTY LISTINGS SHOULD BE VERIFIED BY YOUR OWN ATTORNEY, ARCHITECT OR ZONING EXPERT. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY. elliman.com 12 Pond View Drive | Nantucket, MA $30,000 | 6 BR, 4.1 BA | Web# 73046475 Michael Passaro M 917.806.8213 | O 508.386.9733 4 Mioxes Way | Nantucket, MA $30,000 | 5 BR, 6.2 BA | Web# 73080299 Michael Passaro M 917.806.8213 | O 508.386.9733 Carl Lindvall M 508.360.4323 | O 508.365.2833 30 Madequecham
By Douglas
Valley Road | Nantucket, MA $45,000 | 5 BR, 6.1 BA | Web# 73045314
Michael Passaro M 917.806.8213 | O 508.386.9733
66 Hulbert Avenue | Nantucket, MA $32,353 | 4 BR, 3 BA | Web# 72996064
Michael Passaro M 917.806.8213 | O 508.386.9733
53 Hummock Pond Road | Nantucket, MA $30,000 | 6 BR, 6.2 BA | Web# 73031197 33.5 Vesper Lane | Nantucket, MA $25,000 | 7 BR, 5.2 BA | Web# 73046483 Passaro 216 Cliff Road | Nantucket, MA $25,000 | 4 BR, 3.1 BA | Web# 73099218 Passaro 1 Pochick Avenue | Nantucket, MA $25,000 | 6 BR, 5.2 BA | Web# 73108691 Passaro
Citizens Bank, N.A. Member FDIC. © 2023 Citizens Financial Group, Inc. All rights reserved. High-touch. Client-centric. Service-focused. Citizens is tireless in our pursuit of providing the best private banking services and personalized financial solutions to meet your unique needs and goals. To learn more, contact Douglas M. Smith, Senior Managing Director, Relationship Management, at 617-821-2705 or douglas.smith@citizensbank.com. PRIVATE BANKING CAPABILITIES

CELEBRATE NANTUCKET LIVING

When we build a custom home on Nantucket, our mission is to develop a property that lives in harmony with the Island’s landscape and pays homage to the natural beauty of its surroundings. When you partner with Cheney Custom Homes, our primary goal is to create a home of unmatched quality that suits your function and style, while emphasizing the greatest aspects of the unique location.

33 N-MAGAZINE.COM
SAMEDELMAN.COM AT OUR NANTUCKET POP-UP THIS SUMMER AUGUST 16TH - 20TH FARAWAY NANTUCKET 29 CENTRE ST Join us

CONTRIBUTORS

Meet the talented group of writers and photographers who helped make this issue possible.

BY THE NUMBERS

A numerical snapshot of Nantucket this summer.

NTOPTEN

All the places you need to be and see this August.

NSIGHT

The do’s and don’ts of getting Nantucket.

NECESSITIES

Put these items on your summer wish list.

Beach Babes

KID’N AROUND

How to keep your kiddos entertained this August.

NEAT STUFF

Anne Kuszpa and Housing

Nantucket on the prescription for solving Nantucket’s housing crisis.

HEALTH N WELLNESS

In light of recent enactments against highly processed foods, one nutritionist gives tips on approachable steps for living a healthier life.

NTERIORS

Live above the clouds at Four Seasons Private Residences One Dalton.

NBUZZ

All the news, tidbits and scuttlebutt that’s fit to print courtesy of the Nantucket Current

NEED TO READ

Tim Ehrenberg gives his summer reading list.

CONTENTS / AUGUST 2023 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 60 62 64
142
JEWELRY: SEAMAN SCHEPPS
BATHING SUIT: VINEYARD VINES
37 N-MAGAZINE.COM 68 Nantucket’s Interior Design Is Evolving NSPIRE FIGHTING AGAINST THE TIDE How Leah Hill is fighting sea-level rise. THE GOOD DOCTOR Dr. Timothy Lepore received the inaugural Fred Rogers Good Neighbor Award. 76 82 NDEPTH CREATURE FEATURE A closer look at the Maria Mitchell Association’s vast species catalog. 88 NDESIGN IN CONTRAST A modern organic aesthetic washes over this Surfside home. 68 GOOD DIRT Nantucket’s only compost business. NVIRONMENT 102 GETTING IN GEAR If you are going to find yourself stuck in traffic on Nantucket, you might as well enjoy it. 94
38 N MAGAZINE NSTYLE BRANCH OF BURCH Neely and Chloe Burch make a stylish impact on Nantucket 136 NQUIRY BANKING ON THE FUTURE Cape Cod 5 CEO Matt Burke on the United States’ economic market and
on island. DESIGN ENVY We catch up with renowned designer and Nantucket by Design keynote Ashley Hicks. BILLIONAIRES BEHAVING BADLY Author William Cohan’s view on Nantucket’s uber-wealthy and beyond. 108 114 122 114
Design
the direct effect
Nantucket by
Keynote Ashley Hicks
& Video ON THE COVER NVESTIGATE IN THE SHADOWS An update on Nantucket’s housing crisis. 128 N MAKES ITS OPERA HOUSE CUP DEBUT AUGUST 2023 RANGER NEW COASTAL RESILIENCE WILLIAM COHAN LEAH HILL HOUSING CRISIS AUTHOR INSIDE THE now, including our Collection, available Island Boutique. Wharf (508) 325-9600 REFRESH August 2023 The Local Magazine Read Worldwide Nantucket Magazine BEHAVING BADLY
A sleek aerial view of the J-Class yacht, Ranger, during the Antigua Classic Yacht Regatta, 2004. Canon EOS 1Ds camera, Canon 70-200mm F2.8L lens, 1/1250 at F6.3 Photography by Onne van der Wal
Photography

172

Kate Healey and Theo Dewez

176

A

39 N-MAGAZINE.COM
NOT SO FAST
quick chat with fine carpenter and DJ, Sandy Kohner.
NUPTIALS
tie
the knot at The Wauwinet.
NVOGUE Dive into some of the island’s hottest beach fashions. 142 FOGGY SHEET A recap of Nantucket’s hottest events. 156 88
NHA From horse-drawn carriages to racing and leisurely strolls, Nantucket’s long been an island of equestrian connoisseurs. 165 94
Best Ways to Get Around Nantucket
Maria Mitchell’ s Species Catalog and the Stories It Tells
The

O n the Cover

sailors in the world,” says Diana Brown, president and chief executive of Nantucket Community Sailing.

This year’s race includes Ranger, the stunning J-Class sailboat featured on this issue’s cover. Designed by Olin Stephens and Starling Burgess, the 135-foot vessel is racing in the Opera House Cup Regatta for the first time this year. “Ranger is the embodiment of a golden period in nautical innovation, maritime engineering and sailing tradition that reflected the competitiveness among nations as well as the corporate titans of their day—Vanderbilt, Lipton, Sopwith,

This year’s Opera House Cup Regatta, taking place August 20, marks the annual event’s 51st anniversary. “This represents the longest continuous running classic wooden boat regatta on the East Coast, and probably the U.S.,” says Phil Smith, Opera House Cup Committee chair and owner of Annie, a 1957 Aage Nielsen classic wooden boat that competes in the regatta. The race’s tradition has remained mostly the same over the past 51 years, except for the adoption of the pursuit start, allowing competitors to start at different times based on their craft’s handicap. The regatta serves as the grand finale to Nantucket Race Week. “It is special to see so many beautiful boats together, sailed by families and some of the top

40 N MAGAZINE
A sleek aerial view of the J-Class yacht, Ranger, during the Antigua Classic Yacht Regatta, 2004. Canon EOS 1Ds camera, Canon 70-200mm F2.8L lens, 1/1250 at F6.3

etc.—but is part of a broader sailing tradition characterized by sportsmanship, the highest levels of competition and old-world elegance,” says the racing yacht’s current owner, who is also a longtime Nantucket homeowner. Ranger comes to the island with a successful 2022 season behind her, including first place in St. Barths Bucket, third in the Superyacht Cup Palma, second in the Maxi

Yacht Rolex Cup and the overall J-Class season winner.

This year’s race will bring 300 boats and 3,000 participants to the island. operahousecup.org

41 N-MAGAZINE.COM
The 50th Opera House Cup by Roger Vandenberg Opera House Cup 1998, an unidentified boat with unidentified people The International Twelve Meter Class yacht “Gleam” sailing in the Opera House Cup or another 12-meter sailing event between 2003 and 2005.

PUBLISHER & EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Bruce A. Percelay

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Antonia DePace

EDITORIAL ADVISOR

Robert Cocuzzo

ART DIRECTOR

Paulette Chevalier

DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING & PARTNERSHIPS

Emme Duncan

CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER

Kit Noble

FASHION PHOTOGRAPHER

Brian Sager

SENIOR WRITER

Jason Graziadei

CONTRIBUTORS

Rebecca Settar

Larry Lindner

Wendy Rouillard

Tim Ehrenberg

PHOTOGRAPHER

Matt Kisiday

Charity Grace Mofsen

ADVERTISING SALES

Fifi Greenberg PUBLISHER N. LLC

CHAIRMAN: Bruce A. Percelay

42 N MAGAZINE
©Copyright 2023 Nantucket Times. Nantucket Times (N Magazine) is published six times annually from April through December. Reproduction of any part of this publication is prohibited without written permission from the publisher. Editorial submissions may be sent to Editor, Nantucket Times, 15 North Beach Street, Nantucket, MA 02554. We are not responsible for unsolicited editorial or graphic material. Office (508) 228-1515 or fax (508) 228-8012. Signature Printing and Consulting 800 West Cummings Park Suite 2900 Woburn Nantucket Times 17 North Beach Street Nantucket, MA 02554 508-228-1515 N N E W Y O R K 4 8 0 P a r k Av e n u e 2 1 2 7 5 2 6 1 6 6 N A N T U C K E T 2 S . B e a c h S t r e e t 9 1 7 8 6 8 5 8 2 8 9 1 2 N C

ARE WE AT A TIPPING POINT?

Nantucket has generated more than its share of national press lately, not all of which has been positive. From the release of a boat at Old North Wharf to the clam shack war and the cutting down of mature trees on a ’Sconset property, the perception is being created that the island is rife with billionaires behaving badly. But the larger question is whether the powerful lure of Nantucket has begun to actually impact the island on a deeper level?

The lack of affordable housing, constant traffic jams and astronomically high food costs are further symptoms of an island that has become so popular that its success has begun to challenge the quality of life here. These are the tangible symptoms of an island whose growth may have exceeded its capacity, but there are more subtle impacts of the explosion of Nantucket’s popularity over the years.

There has always been, and still remains, a certain unwritten, understated sensibility about Nantucket that makes it so appealing, but that sensibility seems to be fraying at the edges. In many ways, the island has been a throwback in time where people are polite to one another, rally around those in need, protect its built and natural environment, and place humility above wealth. What we have seen lately in a series of highprofile transgressions are challenges to the notion of Nantucket being a refuge of decency in a world that is becoming increasingly divisive and confrontational.

But even with the unflattering press and seemingly ever-expanding summer population, Nantucket is still a remarkable gem that needs to be protected.

For example, while efforts are being made to increase affordable housing, the solutions need to be taken to a higher level. Property transfer fees could benefit more than the Land Bank and should help support those who are the backbone of this island. When firefighters, police officers, nurses and teachers struggle to afford basic necessities, priorities need to change if this island is to continue to function. While it is impossible to legislate behavior, summer residents and island visitors need to somehow understand that Nantucket’s difference is one of its greatest strengths. We all have the privilege of being in a place that is truly remarkable on multiple levels, and it is our obligation to be active stewards in keeping it that way.

A HEARTFELT THANK YOU TO ROB COCUZZO

Twelve years ago, I had the good fortune to meet Rob Cocuzzo as a contributor to N Magazine, and he was soon elevated to the position of editor. Holy Cross-educated with a quiet but tireless work ethic, Rob became my alter ego and helped guide this publication to its role as the leading magazine on the island. Indeed, many stories covered by N Magazine during his tenure went national, including a cover with Bill Belichick and Linda Holliday, which generated over 10 million views.

From the first magazine in the world to feature a newly elected President Joe Biden on the cover to a piece on the vandalism at the African Meeting House, under Rob’s leadership, we have won scores of awards for the quality of our written product. Rob’s new venture, Legacy Literature, will give him a new opportunity to chronicle fascinating people. At the same time, he will stay on as a consultant and contributor to N Magazine. He will be replaced by Antonia DePace from Modern Luxury Media Group, who oversaw both the Philadelphia and Boston market publications, producing approximately 30 magazines a year. Her youthful energy and vision will take N Magazine to an even higher level. Speaking for myself and our team, Rob’s contribution to this magazine and the deep friendships he created while being here cannot be quantified and we want to thank him for a job well done.

43 N-MAGAZINE.COM
Publisher’s Letter

Rebecca SETTAR

Although born in Pennsylvania, Rebecca Settar has unwittingly spent half her life in New England and lived on Nantucket Island for more than a decade.

Rebecca is a regular contributor to N Magazine , as well as Boston Magazine , Yesterday’s Island and more, and has recently published her first book, a collection of short stories called The List.

Charity GRACE MOFSEN

Charity Grace Mofsen captures the island of Nantucket in all its glory. With a particular affinity for astrophotography, she believes there is always light, if you have eyes to see it. From fine art landscapes to fun portrait sessions and creative product photography, she finds joy sharing her love of Nantucket with the hope that others will also cherish the island’s natural beauty. Featured in Framebridge’s “The Black Artists Print Shop,” her work speaks to [wo]man’s connection to the cosmos. Describing her style as meditative, Mofsen highlights the beauty of the island’s contrasts—the solitude of the off-season and the joy of summer, the colors of the light and the wisdom of the night.

Larry LINDNER

Larry Lindner is a New York Times bestselling author who also penned a nationally syndicated column for The Washington Post for several years. His writing has appeared in publications ranging from The Los Angeles Times to The Boston Globe Sunday Magazine, Conde Nast Traveler, and Reader’s Digest. His latest book, Forever Home, has received praise from such notables as Cold Mountain author Charles Frazier and Brooke Shields. Lindner is currently working on a novel.

44 N MAGAZINE
2
Contributors
2
1
3 3 1

When you live on an island, you look out for each other.

No one feels the weight of this responsibility more than Nantucket Cottage Hospital’s primary care providers. They are the orchestra leaders of your health and well-being. They’ll take care of all your routine needs such as annual physicals, vaccines and the care of common or chronic health issues. They will also guide you to a specialist if needed, on or off-island.

If you need to start a relationship with a primary care provider, we’re here for you. Call 508-825-1000.

45 N-MAGAZINE.COM
Annette Adams, NP Mimi Koehm, MD Derek Andelloux, MD Nancy Lucchini, NP Claire Conklin, NP Katie Miller, NP Molly Harding, NP Deborah Moss-Gail, NP Jayne Culkins, PA
nantuckethospital.org
Diane Pearl, MD

N UMBERS

70 -75

4

29

Since the last delivery of twins at Nantucket Cottage Hospital, which was broken June 14 by Robin and Chris Morris.

1,200 Pounds

The approximate amount of explosives on the steel barge for the Fourth of July fireworks.

115 Years

Goals scored by Nantucket junior midfielder, Bailey Lower, on the NHS girls varsity lacrosse team.

38.1 Million $

Amount paid for the most expensive home ever listed on Nantucket, breaking both the island and Massachusetts record for a single residential home sale.

10,000

Approximate number of species that the Maria Mitchell Association has in its research catalog.

48 Hours

Estimated wait time for standby lines at the Steamship Authority in June due to a worker shortage.

46 N MAGAZINE NANTUCKET BY THE
Number of auto inspections completed per day at Don Allen, according to Erik Evens. Number of orcas spotted 30 miles south of the island.

SOLD for $38 Million Your Asset is our Priority

Marybeth Gilmartin-Baugher and Shelly Tretter Lynch are proud to announce the highest price sale on Nantucket. This gorgeous compound has just sold at a record breaking price. We are available to assist you in your search for the perfect Nantucket home, whether to purchase or lease. Looking to sell? Let us use our world-class marketing strategies to help you navigate the sale of your home or investment property.

The Nantucket Advisory Group at Compass is your dedicated team of real estate professionals, representing the finest properties on island. By leveraging our deep island roots and understanding of the local market, we can help you make well-informed decisions that align with your real estate goals.

47 N-MAGAZINE.COM
The Nantucket Advisory Group
Shelly Tretter Lynch is a real estate licensee affiliated with Compass LLC, a licensed real estate broker and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. Marybeth Gilmartin-Baugher is a real estate broker affiliated with Compass LLC, a licensed real estate broker and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. Marybeth Gilmartin -Baugher Founding PartnerThe Nantucket Advisory Group Licensed Real Estate Salesperson marybeth.gilmartin@ compass.com 508-257-0888 Shelly Tretter Lynch Founding PartnerThe Nantucket Advisory Group Licensed Real Estate Salesperson shelly.tretterlynch@ compass.com 203-550-8508 Nantucket Nantucket Let us help you find your place on island NANTUCKET MA 4 5382 N 07 5990 W

2 1

MEET ELIN HILDERBRAND & CHRISTY CASHMAN

AUGUST 1

Kick off August with a stimulating dialogue between beloved Bostonian Christy Cashman and fellow author Elin Hilderbrand. Their conversation promises to delve into their latest books and creative journeys. Cashman’s debut novel, The Truth About Horses, hits the shelves August 15, and she’ll also be introducing her charity, YouthINK Boston Chapter, to the U.S. christycashman.com

67TH ANNUAL HOUSE & GARDEN WALKING TOUR

AUGUST 2, 11:30 AM-4 PM

Rediscover the beauty of Nantucket’s Orange Street as you meander through splendid architecture and vibrant gardens during the 67th annual House & Garden Walking Tour. Post-tour, refresh with complimentary tea at St. Paul’s Church, and explore unique finds at the boutique. All proceeds from the tours support the Nantucket Garden Club. nantucketgardenclub.org

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NiSHA GALA

AUGUST 4, 6 PM

Bartlett’s Farm

Get ready for a captivating evening at Bartlett’s Farm with the annual NiSHA Gala. This vibrant event, filled with scrumptious food, lively beats and the alluring Puppy Paw-lor, is a chance for animal lovers to unite in support of the local shelter. Co-chaired by Ann Davis and Katie Keith, the gala ensures all proceeds go toward our furry friends’ care and protection. And don’t miss the Vegas-style canine runway show— curated by TWN’s artistic director Justin Cerne. It’s guaranteed to mesmerize as the pups strut their stuff. nishanimals.org

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WILD RIVERS NANTUCKET DREAMLAND SERIES

AUGUST 7, 8:00 PM

Dreamland

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NANTUCKET PRESERVATION TRUST’S AUGUST FÊTE

AUGUST 10

India Street

Join the Nantucket Preservation Trust for its annual August Fête, an elegant affair celebrating the island’s rich architectural heritage, located this year on historic India Street. As the Trust’s largest fundraiser, the event offers attendees the unique opportunity to step inside well-preserved historic homes, explore beautiful gardens and visit landmarks. These architectural gems, typically off limits to the public, open their doors for this special occasion. Revel in the charm of Nantucket while supporting an important cause at this must-attend event. nantucketpreservation. org/events/august-fete/

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POPS ON NANTUCKET

NANTUCKET BY DESIGN

AUGUST 2-5

Dive into the captivating design world at Nantucket by Design, the Nantucket Historical Association’s premier summer fundraiser. Discover creative expression through engaging presentations by keynote speakers Ashley Hicks and Martina Mondadori, moderated by Stacey Bewkes of Quintessence. Delve deeper into design nuances during a panel discussion led by Veranda magazine’s editor-in-chief, Steele Marcoux. Add hands-on workshops by industry leaders to the mix, and this event becomes a must-attend for design, art and architecture enthusiasts. nha.org

Embark on an extraordinary musical journey at the Dreamland as talented band members Devan Glover, Khalid Yassein and Andrew Oliver of indie trio Wild Rivers set the stage ablaze. Riding high from opening performances for The Chicks during their international summer tour, Wild Rivers brings their thoughtprovoking lyrics and genre-fluid melodies to the Main Theater. Prepare to be captivated by their enchanting sound, seamlessly blending pop, rock, indie and folk elements. nantucketdreamland.org

TIMO & VIOLET TRUNK

SHOW

AUGUST 8-9, 10 AM-5 PM

Cartolina

Discover the eco-conscious elegance of Timo & Violet, a female-founded sustainable children’s linens company, at its Cartolina trunk show this month. Its consciously crafted collection displays timeless design and sustainability, from crib sheets and bathrobes to bibs and more. This exclusive trunk show invites you to experience its distinct offerings, championing the cause of independent designers while honoring sustainable fashion. timoandviolet.com

AUGUST 12

Jetties Beach

Gear up for a starlit evening with the Boston Pops Orchestra on Nantucket Island. This captivating outdoor concert, led by renowned conductor Keith Lockhart, promises worldclass performances. Special guest Michael Cavanaugh, lauded for his Elton John interpretations, will join the musical lineup. Proceeds from the evening support the Nantucket Cottage Hospital. nantuckethospital.org/ways-to-get-involved/ events/boston-pops/

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TIM RUSSERT SUMMER GROOVE

AUGUST 19, 6-11 PM

Join the 21st celebration of the Tim Russert Summer Groove, a significant fundraiser uplifting Nantucket’s youth through the Nantucket Boys and Girls Club. Honor the enduring passion of Russert, whose legacy continues to inspire. The evening, filled with camaraderie, offers an open bar, culinary delights from Island Kitchen, live auctions and the Spirit of Hope Award presentation. Dance the night away to Signature’s rhythms and relish late-night bites. Summer cocktail attire is suggested and valet parking is available. one.bidpal.net/summergroove/welcome

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Witness the prestigious Opera House Cup Regatta, one of the most anticipated sailing events on Nantucket. This annual race showcases a fleet of classic wooden sailboats competing in the waters surrounding the island. Marvel at the beauty of these historic vessels as they navigate the challenging course. operahousecup.org/page/ohc
EVENTS
HOUSE CUP REGATTA AUGUST 20
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6 6 2 2
OPERA
2 3
Steele Marcoux
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“Getting” Nantucket

While Nantucket is not a separate country, we have certain cust oms that are akin to traveling to a foreign land; we are different from life in “America” as the mai nland is known. Civility, courtesy and an understated sensibility are the language of Nantucket, and type A behavior is an unwanted import. We thought it would be instructive to offer a brief prime r to visitors and summer residents alike, as to how to practice the unspoken code of conduct that’s the essence of the island. For those new to the island, we offer 10 simple rules of engagement that will make your stay here happier and the island happier that you are here.

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Take your turn when entering a four-way intersection. Four-way intersections are not an Olympic event. Take your turn while entering the many confusing intersections on the island. Being first is not the goal. There are no traffic lights on the island, so people regulate themselves.

Wave a lot. When someone lets you go first in traffic or when you are passing another boat in the harbor, make a friendly gesture.

Visit the Whaling Museum. Not only is the museum beautifully presented, but it will give you an understanding as to what this island is all about and how it evolved.

Take two wheels instead of four . Rent a bike and not only will you get a better view of the island, but it will help reduce the traffic problem around the island.

Pick up trash on the beach—even if it is not yours. Our beaches are pristine, but leaving them better than you found them is a great rule. Also, try taking your own trash to the dump; it’s a “thing” every Sunday and you will be surprised who you see there.

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Abuse your car horn. The sound of horns is foreign to Nantucket and should be used sparingly. The only sound of horns that is appreciated on Nantucket are those that come from lighthouses. Also, most people don’t lock their cars here, and you don’t need to use car alarms because auto theft is almost unheard of on the island.

Mistreat waitstaff. Service people are the backbone of Nantucket and should be thanked for what they do. Generous tipping for those who provide great service helps support those workers who the island desperately needs.

Ignore boating rules. When you are boating here, learn the rules. Do not speed in the inner harbor; do not crowd the channel; and do not generate excessive wake when passing smaller crafts or sailboats.

Utter the words “Don’t you know who I am?”

If someone thinks they are a big fish at home, in Nantucket they are likely to be just one among a very big school. Humility is the best policy here.

Be flashy. Money is not the most valuable currency here as modesty is the best policy. Nantucket does not embrace showy anything—from the car you drive to the clothes you wear. On an island where some of America’s most successful people reside, the way in which you conduct yourself is your most valuable asset.

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DO…
DON’T…

BUCKETGOLF

The ultimate backyard golf game for seasoned pros all the way down to beginners, BucketGolf is the perfect addition to your summer lawn party lineup. Simply design your par 3 course in minutes and tee off for bragging rights!

BUCKETGOLF

@bucketgolfgame • bucketgolfgame.com

BROWN LEATHER WEEKENDER

Handcrafted in England from full-grain vegetable tanned leather, the Bennett Winch Weekender bag is set to become a companion for life, aging beautifully with every journey it takes. Features a protective laptop sleeve, dual waterproof compartments, and enough storage to last the most astute of travelers for a week.

BENNETT WINCH

@bennett_winch • bennettwinch.com

HOT

ITEMS FOR HIGH SUMMER

MORRELL GRADUATING CHAIN NECKLACE

Not your mother’s diamond necklace, this stunner from Walters Faith combines the elegance of timeless jewelry with the principles of modern design. The necklace’s unique synthesis of bold and fine epitomizes effortless luxury, allowing the wearer to pair with everything from a little black dress to a T-shirt and jeans.

MAGIC EYES BOOK

Based on a true story, Magic Eyes is an uplifting tale about a blind boy on Nantucket who discovers pictures in the clouds and forges friendships through the power of his imagination. Readers can feel good that their purchase serves a higher purpose because all profits benefit Perkins School for the Blind and support global disability education.

LAUREN FORNES & MEREDITH HANSON

@magiceyesbook magiceyesbook.com

WALTERS FAITH AT THE VAULT NANTUCKET @thevaultnantucket thevaultnantucket.com

REMY SHARK CASHMERE SWEATER

You’re gonna need a bigger boat! Whether you love JAWS or not, this iconic sweater in 100% cashmere comes in both women’s and men’s sizing and is sure to be a conversation starter.

REMY

@remycreations • remycreations.com

POCOMO BREEZE THC SELTZER

Hangovers are so 2021, and this pineapple-orange, cannabis sparkling water is the perfect choice when you want to enjoy the buzz without the booze. And at just 5mg per can, these slowbuilding seltzers make for easy sipping!

ACK NATURAL CANNABIS DISPENSARY @acknatural acknat.com

X SERIES 24 SMOKELESS FIRE PIT

For those who plan to host in their outdoor space, this pit elevates the campfire experience and creates a centerpiece to gather around. And with over-the-fire cooking capabilities–just add the grilling bundle–the X Series 24 is the ideal way to entertain guests and provide a multipurpose statement piece for your backyard.

BREEO • @breeo • breeo.co

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AROUND

SEA SHANTIES WITH NHA AND EGAN MARITIME INSTITUTE

The Nantucket Historical Association in partnership with the Egan Maritime Institute is presenting a free outdoor concert program, Sea Shanties: Maritime Music Series, this August. Bring your chairs, blankets and a picnic, and immerse your family in the captivating world of sea shanties. Don’t miss this chance to sing along and be part of a living maritime tradition on this memorable musical voyage. Performances will take place on Thursday, August 17 and 31, at NHA’s Old Mill on Mill Hill, and on Thursday, August 24 and September 7, at the Shipwreck & Lifesaving Museum. This program is generously supported by the American Troubadour Project and the Nantucket Cultural District. @ackhistory, nha.org

SUMMER FUN WITH BARNABY’S TOY & ART SHACK

Barnaby’s is in full swing this summer with more than 100 art classes for children ages two to 13. Kids can also drop in and create all day, every day! All Barnaby’s classes are taught by professional artists and educators who will guide each child’s technique and processes in an inspirational space in downtown Nantucket. Barnaby’s also has a variety of toys and art kits to go that have been hand-selected and designed for all ages. And in exciting news, Barnaby’s new store, Barnaby’s Beacon Hill Boston, will be opening this September! Be sure to follow @barnabystoyandart. 508.680.1553, barnabyack@gmail.com, barnabysnantucket.com

SUMMER AT THE DREAMLAND

The Dreamland is the perfect place for kids to have fun, learn and grow this summer. Dreamland always has a lineup of musicals, blockbuster films and much more. Tickets are available for Dreamland Stage Company’s live stage production of The SpongeBob Musical, running August 10-13. Don’t miss this brilliant, bright, hilarious and brand-new musical—perfect for the whole family! Registration is open for the August sessions of the Dreamland Kids (ages four to eight) weekly camps. Budding performers will rehearse, create magical crafts and props, and perform adaptations of popular stories; sessions run through August 11. And don’t miss their free Dreamland Kids weekly shows every Friday at 11:15 a.m. see you at the Dreamland! @dreamlandstagecompany, nantucketdreamland.org

THE NEW PEACHTREE KIDS

Open year-round on the sunny side of historic cobblestoned Main Street, Peachtree Kids has been a favorite one-stop shop for Nantucket’s locals and vacationers since 2004. The store carries timeless classics and on-trend clothing, shoes and accessories for infants and children through size 12. New brands in store include Sammy + Nat, Nanducket, Petit Peony and Joy Street Kids, all while continuing to carry coveted brands like Piping Prints, Barnaby Bear, Hatley, Busy Bees and Bailey Boys. Stop by after the puppet show for Nanpuppets merchandise. Open Monday through Sunday, 9 a.m. - 6 p.m., peachtreekidsnantucket, peachtreeskidsnantucket.com

EXPLORE AT THE LINDA LORING NATURE FOUNDATION

Head out to the Linda Loring Nature Foundation for an adventure this summer. You might see nesting ospreys, who are learning how to fly and fish this time of year. And be sure to attend one of the guided nature exploration walks throughout the summer— expect to explore Nantucket’s rare habitats! You’ll hike along gently rolling trails and stop to discover insects, birds and plants along the way. Plus, enjoy the Story Walk, where children can enjoy reading a new book each month while hiking the trails. 110 Eel Point Road, @loringnatureack, llnf.org

SUMMERTIME PROGRAMS WITH MARIA MITCHELL

One of the island’s must-do family activities is visiting the Maria Mitchell Association’s Hinchman House Natural Science Museum at 7 Milk Street. There, children of all ages can learn about the plants, animals and birds indigenous to Nantucket. Enjoy learning about the history of the island, explore hands-on activities, see live animals and discover more about Nantucket’s biodiversity. Throughout the summer, Hinchman House hosts a series of programs from Bug Bonanza, Ravenous Reptiles, and Nature Story Hour to Saturday Science programs. In addition to Hinchman House, be sure to visit the Loines Observatory, Aquarium, and Historic Mitchell House. @maria_mitchell_association, mariamitchell.org

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HOUSE CALL

What is the biggest challenge that Housing Nantucket faces right now while trying to help with housing, and how can it be resolved?

The biggest challenges we face are very limited land resources and very high real estate prices. There are 381 households on our rental waitlists, and very few turnovers per year. Over a hundred households are qualified to purchase a Covenant home, but there are currently none on the market. We meet these challenges by continuing to deliver new housing at a steady pace, building new partnerships, and expanding outreach efforts.

Tell me more about current projects and the difference they will make in the housing crisis on the island?

Our current projects include 22 rental apartments under construction at Wiggles Way, next to Faregrounds Restaurant. Wiggles Way is a creative partnership between the municipality, our nonprofit and the private sector. Thanks to grant funding from ReMain Nantucket and the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, the property will be entirely powered by an on-site solar photovoltaic system.

In addition to the multifamily rental units at Wiggles Way, we’re building three single-family homes on Honeysuckle Drive. Most households on Nantucket cannot afford to buy a home at the 2022 median home price of $3.36 million. The Honeysuckle homes will provide attainable housing for working families who exceed traditional affordable housing guidelines yet are priced out of the open market.

What are some other ways that Housing Nantucket plans on helping, even if they aren’t in fruition yet?

We recently held a housing summit where we convened municipal leaders, private developers, philanthropists, conservation- ists, and other local experts for a daylong discussion facilitated by a regional expert. Participants discussed the enormous challenges that must be overcome to meet the vast community need. By the end of the day, participants identified eight shortterm strategies, which we agreed would be collectively addressed. Some action items include strengthening collaborations with conservation groups and adopting an inclusionary zoning bylaw. These initiatives are all underway, and we welcome help.

Tell me more about the classes offered through Housing Nantucket. How does this help?

Buying a home on Nantucket can be stressful for anyone. Our course helps first-time homebuyers make informed decisions and gives them a road map to successful homeownership. Local professionals speak about how to deal with credit issues, working with a real estate agent, applying for a mortgage and more. Completing the class provides students with access to closing cost assistance and special mortgage products with local banks. Thanks to the generosity of our donors, we are able to offer this class free of charge to students, many of whom eventually do close the deal on a home of their own.

How can readers help?

Many Nantucket firefighters live on the mainland and commute to the island for their shifts. This is but one symptom of the island’s housing crisis and illustrates how inadequate workforce housing puts the entire community at risk. There are many ways to help contribute toward solutions. We’re always looking for creative new partnerships that achieve shared objectives. Financial gifts to our nonprofit over $1,000 are eligible for Community Investment Tax Credits, which is a special designation from the State of Massachusetts. Landholders can donate property or create a Covenant home on their land. I’m confident that with summer residents and year-rounders working together as an interconnected team, solving this problem is within reach.

Looking ahead through the end of the summer and into the rest of this year, what do you hope you will be able to accomplish by the end of 2023?

We expect to finish both the Wiggles Way and Honeysuckle builds by the end of this year. On September 7, Nashville singer and songwriter Maggie Rose will perform at the Chicken Box to help us raise funds for these exciting projects. Buy tickets at housingnantucket.org.

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n eat stuff
Anne Kuszpa and Housing Nantucket on the prescription for solving Nantucket’s housing crisis

Think Big

Discover Artists Association of Nantucket’s newest gallery on Straight Wharf

VISIT OUR DOWNTOWN GALLERIES

Open 10 am - 5pm, 7 days a week

BIG GALLERY 12 Straight Wharf

CECELIA JOYCE & SEWARD JOHNSON GALLERY 19 Washington Street

VISIT OUR ONLINE GALLERY

Open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week

www.nantucketarts.org/art

photo: Barbara Clarke Photography

If we are what we eat, then Nantucket Cottage Hospital nutritionist Suzanne Davis is deeply concerned as to the state of food in America. “I would encourage, as an American citizen, to address the fact with the powers that be, that Europe has [the ban on certain additives]. Those food additives aren’t in their food. … So that is a subject in and of itself,” says Davis, who focuses on patients with diabetes.

The Golden State was added to the list of those taking a stand against the nation’s ultra-processed foods— on April 11, the California State Assembly’s Committee on Health approved a bill to ban brominated vegetable oil, potassium bromate, propylparaben, red dye No. 3 and titanium dioxide for food use—five substances that may be linked to serious health problems like higher cancer risk, nervous system damage, hyperactivity and more. And they’re used much more commonly than you’d imagine—think many ultraprocessed brand-name breads, donuts, trail mix, candy and more.

The bill, which is the first in the nation, would make California the first

to Die For Food

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In light of recent enactments against highly processed foods, one nutritionist gives tips on approachable steps for living a healthier life.

state to target substances like these if enacted. And because of this, it brings some very important questions to light for the rest of America, including Nantucket, where access to groceries relies heavily on the nearest Stop & Shop or Bartlett’s Farm. Why were these ingredients approved for food use from the start? How do you identify them on the back of a food label? A deep dive into these topics can be overwhelming to the healthconscious reader, let alone someone who is trying to make a healthier life change from a beginner’s point of view. Davis approaches educating her patients differently, with a focus on incorporating highly nutritional foods, some of which may contain values that have otherwise been removed due to additives.

She uses fiber as an example. “It’s stripped from our diets,” she explains, “which is why we have all these unhealthy microbiomes, which could be leading to some of these chronic illnesses.”

According to the study, “The Health Benefits of Dietary Fibre,” published in the journal Nutrients in 2020, consuming the recommended daily intake for adults (30-35 grams for men, 25-32 grams for women) could help to improve gut motility, body weight, metabolic health and insulin sensitivity, all while possibly reducing the risk of chronic inflammation, depression, cardiovascular disease, colorectal carcinoma and more.

And this is only one nutritional value that’s been plummeted to the back of the line as haphazard ingredients are pushed to the front. Which brings us back to another question. Is there any way around truly removing harmful additives from the American diet without an enacted bill to prohibit them completely? For many people, it’s hard and not approachable in today’s world. Even then, there are tips that Davis follows and passes to her patients that help to navigate a better and healthier eating system. “My number one rule is if there’s one thing you can eliminate from your day-to-day life, it’s any type of sweetened beverage, whether it’s juice, soda, you name it, just get rid of it,” she explains.

“So I take an approach with people that is setting goals that are attainable.”

Other helpful steps include removing candy, shopping the perimeter of the grocery store where the most nutrient-dense foods live, and buying food that has a label consisting of five ingredients or less. Davis concludes, “Everybody wants a quick fix. It’s hard for people to buy in for the long run. And this is the long run. It’s your body. It’s like putting diesel fuel in a regular car. … If you did that, you’d end up with a problem. It’s a long-term change that needs to be incorporated.”

Eliminate sweetened beverages.

Shop the perimeter of the grocery store first for the most nutrient-dense foods.

Prioritize food that has an ingredient list of five items or less.

Be consistent—this is a long-term change, not a quick fix.

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THE BREAKDOWN Scan the Flowcode for healthy meal and snack ideas from Suzanne Davis.

ABODE AND BEYOND

LIVE ABOVE THE CLOUDS AT FOUR SEASONS PRIVATE RESIDENCES ONE DALTON

Four Seasons Private Residences One Dalton has set a new standard for luxury living in Boston. Rising 742 feet, One Dalton makes a lasting impression on the Boston skyline as the city’s tallest residential building and Back Bay’s most prestigious residential address. Residents enjoy an unmatched ownership experience provided by Four Seasons management, stunning panoramic views and 20,000 square feet of amenities, including a private resident lounge, award-winning Wellness Floor (complete with a spa and fitness center), golf simulator and more. Plus—sought-after food and beverage experiences right at their doorstep. The building’s elegant triangular façade seamlessly places One Dalton in a coveted location that is proximate to the city’s top dining, retail and leisure destinations, as well as in reach of the area’s prestigious cultural destinations and museums, institutions and universities. Developed by Carpenter & Company Inc. and designed by the late legendary architect Henry N. Cobb of Pei Cobb Freed & Partners, in collaboration with CambridgeSeven, no detail has been overlooked. Pictured below is Residence 5703, which has 3,264 square feet, two plus bedrooms with 3.5 bathrooms and southwestern exposure. 5703 represents one of the limited opportunities to purchase a residence direct from the developer of this esteemed property. Schedule your private showing today via info@onedalton.com | (617) 502-3700.

1

Above the Clouds

One Dalton’s signature curved glass windows provide panoramic views of Boston, its landmarks, glistening water bodies, historic architecture and far beyond. The floor-to-ceiling custom glass façade, with triple layer window system, is designed with UV filtration for thermal comfort, energy efficiency and noise reduction.

2 Outdoor Oasis

A private outdoor balcony with Ipe wood decking.

3 Infinite Space

Up to 11-foot cove ceilings to enhance natural light and views.

4 Spa

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SPONSORED CONTENT n teriors
Envy Spa-inspired bathrooms featuring silver wave marble flooring quarried in Greece and heated flooring. Primary bath complete with a freestanding soaking tub.
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5 Chef’s Choice Blue De Savoie marble countertops and sterling grey SieMatic cabinetry. State-of-theart kitchen appliances featuring Wolf, Sub-Zero, Miele and Asko.

3 Residence 5703 offers the ultimate exclusive entry experience. This residence provides private access directly into the home from two elevators. A dramatic entry gallery then leads to a custom-designed rotunda.

Tour One Dalton today by calling (617) 502-3700.

Virtual and in-person appointments are available.

Four Seasons Private Residences

One Dalton Street, Boston are not owned, developed or sold by Four Seasons Hotels Limited or its affiliates (Four Seasons). The developer, One Dalton Owner, LLC., uses the Four Seasons trademarks and tradenames under a license from Four Seasons Hotels Limited. The marks “FOUR SEASONS,” “FOUR SEASONS HOTELS AND RESORTS,” any combination thereof and the Tree Design are registered trademarks of Four Seasons Hotels Limited in Canada and U.S.A. and of Four Seasons Hotels (Barbados) Ltd. elsewhere.

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HOSPITAL SUES ARCHITECTS OF ITS NEW FACILITY FOR

Nantucket Cottage Hospital is suing CannonDesign, the architectural company responsible for designing the new hospital facility on Prospect Street, and is seeking $8 million in damages for an alleged breach of contract, negligence, and malpractice. According to a complaint filed in Suffolk Superior Court last Friday, Cannon’s plans for the new hospital, which opened in early 2019, violated a series of state regulations, costing NCH millions. Among the many violations outlined in the complaint, NCH claims that to appease the Historic District

$8 MILLION

Commission, Cannon designed non-loadbearing exterior walls with flammable cedar shingles—a clear violation of fire safety codes. This violation has prevented NCH from receiving full Medicare and Medicaid licensure, forcing them to apply for temporary waivers as they work to fix the problem. Ultimately, they claim, redesigning and rebuilding the walls will cost millions. With a final price tag of the new hospital at $89 million, the damages sought in the lawsuit would equal roughly 9 percent of the total project cost.

BEACHES HIT VEHICLE CAPACITY ON DEFACED

FOURTH OF JULY

Despite some clouds, fog and a little rain, people flocked to Nantucket’s beaches on the Fourth of July, with Nobadeer and 40th Pole once again the most popular destinations. The Nantucket Police Department closed 40th Pole to vehicles at 10:56 a.m. on the morning of the Fourth, stating it had reached capacity while allowing beachgoers on foot. Just over an hour later, they did the same at Nobadeer. But in the early afternoon, the people and cars were still coming to Nobadeer, so they took it a step further and closed the south shore beach to foot traffic.” Neighbors and surrounding streets could not support the volume of cars that wanted to park and walk to the beach,” Nantucket Police Lt. Angus MacVicar said. “That was becoming unmanageable, and it was restricting access to the side roads and preventing emergency access vehicles from passing by.”

PRIDE PAINTING

IN TOM NEVERS

The graffiti painting of two men kissing on the gatehouse of the former Tom Nevers Navy base gatehouse that had been completed to coincide with Pride Month was defaced in late June. Local photographer Mark Crosby painted “And Then...” on the small gatehouse structure—which already adorned numerous pieces of graffiti and artwork—earlier this month. At the time, Crosby told the Current “I hope that it might help those still unsure of what’s going on inside,” he said. “I hope it empowers them.” But less than a month later, the painting was defaced, as an unknown individual spray-painted over Crosby’s artwork, leaving many sad and outraged. “I’ve been inundated with messages of support from our community, from people wanting to donate money, to repainting the wall, to selling T-shirts in their stores, I’m blown away,” Crosby told the Current. “It’s a shame that there’s a minority that is so ignorant, so intellectually immature that they had to do this. It hasn’t hurt me, it has empowered me to continue to stand up for my LGBTQ+ friends. Love is love.”

THE SUMMER HOUSE SHUT DOWN

The Summer House has been in the news all summer after the town shut down the Sconset establishment following failed inspections in early June. It’s been a rollercoaster for The Summer House ever since, as a Nantucket Fire Department inspection report described the property as an “imminent danger” due to the improper gas work

that had been done over the offseason. A subsequent Health Department inspection ended with the discovery of dog feces in the commercial kitchen. The Summer House is working to reopen—potentially by the end of July—and owner Danielle deBenedictis has downplayed the significance.

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BY THE NANTUCKET CURRENT

PEDICABS ARRIVE ON NANTUCKET

Pedicabs are coming to Nantucket this summer. On a narrow 3-2 vote in early July, the Select Board endorsed a pilot program to allow two pedicabs to operate around a limited area of the core downtown district. If all goes according to plan, Michael Gormley, who first proposed the pedicab operation earlier this year, will have already begun running “NanTukTuk” as you read this. “I’m over the moon,” said Gormley,

NISSAN ROGUE GOES ROGUE

A car was discovered submerged at the Children’s Beach boat ramp in the early morning hours of July 2. The Nissan Rogue with Florida plates went into the waters of Nantucket Harbor sometime around 2 a.m. The driver was the sole occupant of the vehicle and emerged uninjured. Police do not believe drugs or alcohol were involved, and the woman is not facing any charges. “She’s new to the island and due to the extremely thick fog and her unfamiliarity with the area, she drove into the water mistakenly,” Nantucket Police Lt. Angus MacVicar told the Current. “It was just an unfortunate situation. I imagine she’ll be looking for a new vehicle.”

24, a New Hampshire native who grew up visiting Nantucket. “I’m hugely excited and eager to get out there. It’s really important to me that I’m an active and positive member of the community. I want this to be a collaboration with Nantucketers.” To start, NanTukTuk will operate with a fare system that is solely gratuity-based, meaning users will get to pay Gormley and his staff as much or as little as they want for a ride on one of their pedicabs.

CHANGE OF COMMAND AT STATION BRANT POINT IN NANTUCKET HARBOR

SHORT-TERM RENTAL

WORK GROUP SETTLES ON BYLAW PROPOSALS

Nantucket’s Short-Term Rental Work Group has finalized its proposal for new regulations on short-term vacation rentals on Nantucket, agreeing to put forward a series of bylaws for voters to consider at a special town meeting in November. The bylaws would limit short-term rental (STR operators to renting a single property, though they could rent multiple dwellings on the property as long as they are rented to the same party under the same contract. They would also block corporate ownership unless every shareholder or partner is a “natural person”—meaning an actual human being and not a corporate entity—and legalize STRs by right across the island. Additionally, the proposed regulations would block STRs in units that are deed restricted for affordable or attainable housing and limit STRs to a maximum of four weeks in apartments. In most cases, even if the bylaws are passed by voters, they won’t affect existing STRs as they would be considered “grandfathered.”

Master Chief Andrew Babione was honored by Station Brant Point Thursday morning at the station’s Change of Command Ceremony for his 27 years of service in the United States Coast Guard. As Babione was honored, the island’s Coast Guard also welcomed in their new master chief, Lance Wiser, who comes to Nantucket with over 20 years of experience. His previous assignment was as Officer in Charge Station Charleston, South Carolina. This will be the third island he has served on, with previous stops at Station San Juan, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

“Hopefully I fit in well. I am a big Red Sox fan,” Wiser said. “But just the history and the small-town community I mean, the Coast Guard here is the only show in town militarywise. Meanwhile, in these larger cities like Charleston, there is this massive military presence. It is exciting to be a part of a smalltown community, especially in the wintertime when I know it gets slow. We have been part of small towns before and always enjoy a small-town community feel.”

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Tim Ehrenberg from “Tim Talks Books” dishes on the hottest reads for summer.

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SCAN HERE to connect with @TimTalksBooks All books can be purchased at your two island independent bookstores, Mitchell’s Book Corner and Nantucket Bookworks, or online at nantucketbookpartners.com. For more book recommendations, follow @timtalksbooks on Instagram or visit timtalksbooks.com. PORTRAIT BY KIT NOBLE WRITTEN BY TIM EHRENBERG

SPEECH TEAM BY TIM MURPHY

I am speechless over how much I loved this novel and how easily and quickly I fell into the story and its characters’ lives. This is my favorite kind of novel, one that’s entertaining but filled with so much to discuss, apply to your own life and wonder about. When I turned the last page, I felt like one of the misfits in the novel, a part of their “speech team” and their story. Bravo, Tim Murphy! I can’t wait to see this novel in the world.

TOM LAKE

Readers, you are in for a treat with Ann Patchett’s Tom Lake. It’s as sweet as a cherry pie served on a hot August day. On page 233, Ann describes a character who is portraying the stage manager in a production of Thornton Wilder’s Our Town like this: “We knew he was trustworthy. He had seen the entire story and stitched it together for us.” This perfectly describes Ann as a writer. She’s trustworthy, and I always know I will get a perfect story elegantly told. Tom Lake is a meditation on youthful love, married love and the lives parents have led before their children were born. It’s also about theater, acting, celebrity, cherry farms and the beauty, pain and complexity of human nature. Subscribe to “Books, Beach & Beyond” wherever you get your podcasts and listen to Elin Hilderbrand’s and my interview with the incomparable and fabulous Ann Patchett! The episode drops August 2. booksbeachandbeyond.com

THE SECRET BOOK OF FLORA LEA

This historical novel is an ode to the origin of stories and their power. Remember that first book that made you fall in love with the power of storytelling? The Wonderful Wizard of Oz was mine or maybe it was The Chronicles of Narnia or maybe Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH Don’t make me choose! The Secret Book of Flora Lea has a similar magic to those favorite books from my childhood. Hazel and Flora are evacuated from their home in London to the English countryside during World War II. To cope, Hazel conjures up a magical land called Whisperwood, a place of imaginative wonder they can both escape to, but then Flora goes missing and is presumed drowned. Fast forward to the 1960s and Hazel stumbles upon a children’s book all about Whisperwood, her fictional haven from long ago. Does this book hold the answers to finding her long-lost sister?

Find out by joining Patti Callahan Henry and me on Tuesday, August 22, at 6 p.m. in the Nantucket Atheneum’s Great Hall for a conversation all about The Secret Book of Flora Lea. This event is free, and seating is first come, first served with a book signing to follow.

BROADWAY BUTTERFLY BY SARA

Historical fiction set in 1920s NYC. A murder mystery. Inspired by a true crime. Deeper themes. A cast of characters that would make a Broadway audience leap to their feet. These are all the ingredients for your new favorite summer thriller and Sara DiVello delivers with every twist and turn. In 1923, scandalous flapper Dot King is found dead.

(This month is the 100th anniversary of when the real Dot King murder case was officially closed without an arrest ) It’s up to a crime reporter, a detective, a maid, a political socialite, a bootlegger, a gigolo and a Broadway dancer to navigate the clues, suspects, secrets and issues of the day to solve the crime. The prose and story are as zippy as a flapper’s feet doing the Charleston, and I loved the summer day I read Broadway Butterfly. Yes, it’s a read-in-one-day thriller of an experience. Encore, encore, Sara DiVello! I can’t wait to see what you do next!

WHAT AN OWL KNOWS

Some of my favorite nonfiction narratives are the expertly researched, up close and personal exposés on specific animals. Think The Soul of an Octopus, H Is for Hawk or The Devil’s Teeth. Our lead characters here are one of the most fascinating and mysterious birds in the sky—the owl! With new tools and technology available, researchers are uncovering all their secrets: how they talk to each other, how they “see” sound, how they court their mates, how they protect their nests and why they are one of the most enigmatic and celebrated birds throughout all of history. You will be able to start the perfect summer dinner conversation with all your newfound knowledge. And you’ll sound as wise as, well, an owl. It’s a hoot of a book!

NANTUCKET NELLY AND THE RAINBOW BOAT RACE

I am always searching for new Nantucket children’s books to gift to the youngest bookworms in my life. Books were always my favorite gifts to give and receive, and they still are! Nantucket Nelly is the story of a spunky little Nantucket native who dreams of sailing in the annual Rainbow Boat Race with her sidekick dog, Beau. The only problem: She has no boat and doesn’t know how to sail! Through a series of misadventures her dream comes true, but with a surprise ending in which Nelly learns that honesty really is the best policy. The actual Rainbow Fleet Parade is the morning of Sunday, August 20, and kids should enjoy seeing this book and Nelly’s adventures come to life before their very eyes around Brant Point.

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67 N-MAGAZINE.COM FEATURED LISTINGS Kevin Sneddon is a licensed real estate broker. The Private Client Network is a nationwide referral network affiliated with Compass in New York and Compass Connecticut, LLC in Connecticut and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity Laws. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. This is not intended to solicit properties already listed. Photos may be virtually staged or digitally enhanced and may not reflect actual property conditions. COMPASS CT LLC: 200 Greenwich Avenue, 3rd Floor, Greenwich, CT 06830 | COMPASS NY: 10 East 53rd Street 16th Floor, New York, NY 10022 FEATURED LISTINGS *$8,464,780,389 IN COLLECTIVE SALES VOLUME, COMPILED FROM PARTICIPATING BROKER SALES METRIC REPORTING.
230 Long Neck Point Road – Darien, CT $15,950,000 Kevin Sneddon, Broker | M: 917-952-8329 kevin.sneddon@compass.com 44 Forest Road – Martha’s Vineyard, MA $14,000,000 Bill Rossi, Broker | M: 508-367-2918 bill.rossi@compass.com 11 Hidden Pond Drive – Old Westbury, NY $7,500,000 Melanie Cogan & Shawn Rogol, Broker | M: 516-319-1623 melanie.cogan@compass.com 143 Otter Rock Drive – Greenwich, CT $12,500,000 Kevin Sneddon, Broker | M: 917-952-8329 kevin.sneddon@compass.com 189 Moonpenny Lane $6,295,000 Chatham, MA Chris Rhinesmith, Broker | M: 617-967-0987 chris.rhinesmith@compass.com The Preserve at Fawn Lane Price Upon Request Nantucket, MA Kevin Caulfield, Broker | M: 617-501-3685 kc@compass.com 4 Ministers Lane $6,995,000 Chatham, MA Chris Rhinesmith, Broker | M: 617-967-0987 chris.rhinesmith@compass.com
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InContrast

A modern organic aesthetic washes over this Surfside home.

Nantucket homes have long been known for their bright, airy and coastal-inspired interiors, but more recent projects have shown a shift in the design community—one that brings a modern aesthetic to the island. Look at one Surfside project by Joe Olson and Clay Twombly of Olson Twombly Interior Design as an example. “The new home was a blank canvas on the interior,” Twombly says of the property.

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And rather than opting for the more traditional Nantucket aesthetic, the clients (who were a family of six) yearned for a home that was warm and homey with deep contrast. Olson adds, “She likes a lot of really beautiful textures and colors and materials that we don’t often get to do here on Nantucket. There was a much more urban perspective on it, which was a wonderful opportunity for us.”

The result is a beautiful home with five bedrooms and five full and two half baths, all highlighted by rich color contrasts, chic light fixtures and plenty of charm to show off to visiting family and friends. Walking through the front door, high ceilings and glistening white walls greet those who pass through, along with a painting by Audra Weaser that

Olson Twombly found for the space. To the right, a truly impeccable architectural element comes into play via the staircase, which Olson Twombly designed with a sleek plaster rail and floating wood treads—the typical stair runner is non-existent as to not distract from the beauty of the natural materials. It was perhaps one of the greater challenges of the project, but also one of the most beautiful.

On the same level, a multitude of community spaces exist, like the kitchen, which features a Caesarstone fresh concrete countertop—adding an organic element to ground the area. “It has this very warm, inviting color that isn’t your typical white,” Olson explains. Above the island, the

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designers opted for surface mount lighting from Urban Electric. Because the open concept room places the island close to the dining table, these lights keep the aesthetic clean by minimizing the amount of hanging fixtures. “The kitchen is mostly white with this neutral feel, and you have these big sculptural surface mounts that give you that sense of balance,” Twombly says.

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On the other side of the room, an oak wall anchors the space, along with a Nickey Kehoe sofa in Pierre Frey fabric, an &Tradition Wulff lounge chair, a custom Moroccan rug and a Sergi Cadenas painting provided by Quidley & Co.

A hidden door in the oak wall leads to the primary bedroom, where the client wanted to create a serene escape, all while keeping the contrast seen throughout the rest of the home. “We needed to find the right pieces to provide contrast and we chose to use a lot of light fabrics,” Twombly says, noting the upholstery that juxtaposes with the darker woods and metals seen in the nightstands and chair legs. Here, a truly special element stands out through vintage

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Italian pendants from the 1940s. The area also includes an office, dressing room and primary bath and primary closet.

Going upstairs, two bedrooms with en suite bathrooms provide ample space for visitors and the family’s children. On the same level, a den acts as the perfect area for reading or working. But it’s on the lower level where the true family room lies. “There’s a pool table. There’s a shuffleboard table. There’s another bar

NDETAIL

Primary Bedroom

BED: Custom

BED FABRIC: Larsen Fabrics

DRAPERY: Pierre Frey

SCONCE: Allied Maker

PAINTING: Hunt Slonem, provided by Quidley & Co.

Living Room

SOFA: Nickey Kehoe in Pierre Frey fabric

SERGI CADENAS PAINTING: provided by Quidley & Co

LOUNGE CHAIR: &Tradition Wulff

MOROCCAN RUG: Custom

Dining Room

TABLE: de la Espada

CHAIRS: de la Espada

PENDANTS: Allied Maker

Entry/Stair

PENDANT: Lindsey Adelman

and then there’s two more full en suite bedrooms,” Olson says.

Of note, the designers are still working to complete the home, which also includes the scope of a pool, studio garage, cabana, two-bedroom guest house and landscaping, but even then, the client has been ecstatic about what she’s seen so far. Twombly concludes, “She has been so complimentary. Genuinely grateful and thankful.”

Mudroom

CABINET AND DRAWER PULLS: Rocky Mountain Hardware

CABINET PAINT: Farrow & Ball No. 242

DOOR PAINT: Farrow & Ball Hague Blue No. 30

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508.844.9350 | WWW.ALEXANDRANUTTALL.COM NANTUCKET | VERO BEACH | PALM BEACH
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Nantucket’s new Coastal Resilience Coordinator Leah Hill took her post at the beginning of this year

FIGHTING

AGAINST TIDE the

How Leah Hill is combating sea-level rise

Leah Hill stands between a rock and a watery place. As Nantucket’s coastal resilience coordinator, the 36-year-old faces the herculean task of preparing the island for the inevitable onslaught of sea-level rise. Charged with implementing the Coastal Resilience Plan adopted by the Select Board last year, Hill needs to figure out how to pay for $900 million in proposed projects over the next 10 to 15 years. While that price tag might seem steep, the cost of failure is much, much higher.

Prior to being appointed to her post five months ago, Hill spent nine years serving as assistant biologist for Nantucket’s Natural Resources Department. With a degree in marine biology from Eckerd College in St. Petersburg, Florida, and a master’s in fisheries and aquatic sciences from the University of Florida, she earned her real education as it relates to Nantucket’s waters on the job by diving to restore eel bed habitats and dredging scallops to help revive the island’s marquee shellfish population.

“My background in ecological restoration has led me to this position because a lot of the projects within the town’s Coastal Resilience Plan are nature-based, or a hybrid of structural and natural,” Hill explains. “So I am still able to bring my former experience and put a twist on it in my new position.”

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WRITTEN BY ROBERT COCUZZO PHOTOGRAPHY BY KIT NOBLE

Nantucket is ground zero for sea-level rise. One only needs to drive up Easy Street during a storm when cars are often replaced by canoes in the flood waters to be made viscerally aware of what the future might eventually look like every day on Nantucket. This is no longer a matter of opinion, but a matter of fact. Since 1965, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has been tracking tides and collecting sea-level rise data from a gauge located adjacent to the Steamship Authority dock— and the numbers are staggering. According to extrapolated data, the waters around Nantucket have risen by 1.3 feet in the last century, but eight of those inches have come since NOAA began tracking in 1965.

“We are experiencing sealevel rise at a higher rate than other areas,” Hill explains.

“By 2100, it is projected that Nantucket will have 6.6 feet of sea-level rise. By 2030, or in seven years, we could lose service to the Steamship wharf at mean monthly high water. By 2070, thirty miles of our roads will be covered in six inches of flood water during regular high tides. The flooding we see today on the island will be the high tides of tomorrow.”

Along with flooding, Hill says that erosion, particularly on the South Shore, will increase, as will groundwater, which could turn dry areas into wetlands. Erosion along many of our coastlines has already proven cataclysmic. For instance, the town’s sewer plant located between Miacomet and Surfside beaches has seen 47 feet of beachfront devoured by the ocean in just two years. Arguably the most vulnerable waterfront area stretches from

Washington Street to Jetties Beach. When the road to the Steamship Authority dock gets cut off during high tides—an eventuality predicted for 2050—the island’s crucial lifeline will also be severed.

Addressing these threats, the Coastal Resilience Plan consists of 40 projects that run the gamut from updating town policies to plotting major relocations. One approach consists of the “nature-based” solutions Hill mentions. For instance, she is working on a project to create a “near-shore oyster reef” in Sesachacha Pond that will help buffer Polpis Road from the ocean.

“One of the [future]

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“We are experiencing sea-level rise at a higher rate than other areas.”
– Leah Hill
The iconic house on stilts in Madaket was lost to erosion in recent years. Extreme flooding has become commonplace on Easy Street. Experts say Nantucketers will need more than sandbags to thwart the damage of sea-level rise.

projects is the Downtown Neighborhood Flood Barrier that recommends a mixture of raised roads such as Easy Street, raised bulkheads and nature-based solutions from basically Children’s Beach to the Town Pier,” Hill explains. “Another project is to create a reinforced dune system in front of the sewer plant, the airport and in some areas on Coatue.” A more complicated proposal is to craft a retreat and relocation plan for structures to move inland as the water rises.

Although the town allocates a million dollars a year to coastal resiliency, it’s a drop in the bucket when the proposed projects cost upward of $170 million. As a result, Hill spends much of her time hunting down and applying for highly competitive state and federal grants. “We really can’t wait years to fund these projects because the water is coming whether we are ready for it or not,” she insists.

“We need to get creative and develop a self-sustaining funding source here on the island for the implementation and maintenance of these projects.”

While the $900 million price tag for the proposed projects might be hard to swallow, it pales in comparison to the projected losses due to sea-level rise. Downtown Nantucket alone could suffer nearly $3 billion in devastation, a figure that Hill indicates does not reflect the cost of personal property that might also perish. More existentially, Nantucket as we know it today weighs in the balance. “People can

feel hopeless and helpless when they learn about the projections of sea-level rise, flooding and erosion, but I see it as an opportunity to do what Nantucketers have always done: Be resilient and adaptable,” she says. “I may be an optimist, but I am hopeful that we can keep the culture and essence of Nantucket while adapting to rising seas and more frequent storm events.”

Prior to taking her current post, Leah Hill spent nine years serving as assistant biologist for Nantucket’s Natural Resources Department.

These heart necklaces were inspired by “needle holders” from the Nantucket and New Bedford Whaling Museums.

19th century shipboard sailors made the original pieces out of whale ivory for their wives and sweethearts at home. The tiny holes around the edge allowed the needle holders to be sewn on a smock or apron. a practical way to have a sewing needle always at hand.

Today, they symbolize keeping loved ones close!

www.katherinegroverfinejewelry.com (646) 896-4013

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GOOD DOCTOR THE

For many people, the late Fred Rogers represents something of a patron saint of Nantucket. The beloved children’s television host and Madaket summer resident exemplified the neighborly values that the island community still holds dear. Two years ago, the Dreamland sought to cement Mister Rogers’ legacy on Nantucket by erecting an original statue of him sculpted by Seward Johnson that sits outside of the theater. Last month, the Dreamland took its efforts to celebrate the values of Mister Rogers a step further by establishing the Fred Rogers Good Neighbor Award to recognize a Nantucket resident who contributes selflessly to the community. Of the nearly one hundred individuals who were nominated by the community for the award, this year’s inaugural recipient is an island icon in his own right, Dr. Timothy Lepore.

“As the first recipient of the Fred Rogers Good Neighbor Award, I feel quite humbled,” said Lepore. “Mr. Rogers certainly was an innovator and a creator, but he was much more than that.” The same could be said of Lepore who is much more than simply a doctor. His exploits as a marathon-running, antique-guncollecting, falcon-flying, country-style doctor are immortalized in the pages of Pam Belluck’s critically acclaimed biography Island Practice. “In a world of corporatized health care, where doctors’ time with patients is logged in ‘relative value units,’ Lepore is a never-say-no physician who accepts payment in oatmeal raisin cookies, lets patients bring themselves, or their animals, to his home at all hours, and makes house calls, even to a hermit squatting illegally in swampland whose house is a ‘twigloo’ made of vines,” Belluck wrote for this magazine in 2013.

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Dr. Timothy Lepore receives the inaugural Fred Rogers Good Neighbor Award
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Lepore stole hospital supplies to treat a horse with suspected cyanide poisoning in the middle of a field [and] commissioned a pot-smoking patient to illegally bake marijuana cookies for cancer sufferers.”

Many know the legend of Lepore more than the man. He first came to Nantucket to fill in at the understaffed emergency room, spending a month on

“As the first recipient of the Fred Rogers Good Neighbor Award, I feel quite humbled. Mr. Rogers certainly was an innovator and a creator, but he was much more than that.”

Dr. Timothy Lepore

the island in 1981 and 1982. At the end of his second stint, he realized he had fallen in love with Nantucket and didn’t want to leave. The next year, he moved to the island permanently. Since then, in addition to his work as a primary care physician, he has served as medical director and chief of surgery at Nantucket Cottage Hospital. He has been Nantucket’s medical examiner for many years, and for decades, he was the island’s only surgeon. Lepore has also become one

of the world’s leading experts on tick-borne diseases, penning dozens of peer-reviewed articles published in prestigious journals.

As intriguing as Lepore’s folkloric medical reputation might be, it was his many unsung contributions to the community that earned him the Fred Rogers Good Neighbor Award. Perhaps none of these contributions is more notable than his decades of service to the island’s public schools. Lepore has served as the medical advisor to Nantucket High School sports and as the football team’s physician, attending nearly every Whaler football game for years. More than once, he has run out onto the field at a high school sports game to help an injured student or provide assistance to an athletic trainer even though he wasn’t supposed to be working.

But he has lent more to the school system than just his medical expertise. He has also spent many years on the School Committee, well past the point when all of his children had graduated, taking on the roles of chair and vice chair as the situation demanded. Even now, Lepore remains on the committee, doing his part to help the students. Helping kids is just part of who Lepore is. Though it often goes unmentioned in the numerous profiles of his life on Nantucket, Lepore

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Dr. Lepore on the sidelines of the Whalers football team where he has served as team doctor for decades—completely free of charge. Photos courtesy of Dr. Timothy Lepore.

has opened up his home to many troubled children, fostering them and giving them a place to stay.

Lepore’s service extends well beyond the schools. For years, he has fought tirelessly against opioid

Mr. Rogers displayed courage by taking chances in exploring new ways to reach out and celebrate children through television. He made children feel important and respected. … His ability to educate without preaching and his genuine humanity are the things I would like to emulate.”

addiction. As Nantucket’s medical examiner, Lepore is often responsible for diagnosing overdoses on the island, and his voice has become a ubiquitous presence in the conversation about the opioid crisis. Lepore has spoken to local and regional news outlets about the crisis, but he wasn’t content with just warning others. He had to do something to solve the problem himself. So, he founded Addiction Solutions of Nantucket and became the island’s only licensed provider of suboxone, which is used to treat opioid addiction. Beyond opioids, Addiction Solutions of Nantucket also treats addiction to alcohol and other substances. Now, if an islander wants their addiction treated, Lepore is often the first person they turn to.

Sometimes, it seems

like Lepore is determined to do something to solve every problem facing the island, from the overpopulation of deer—he supports culling them and is an avid hunter himself—to the housing crisis. An outspoken advocate for affordable housing, Lepore has championed efforts to make it easier for middleclass families to buy homes on Nantucket. Lepore wants the island to be accessible for families like his, and he wants them to be able to stay on Nantucket, just like his family has for the last forty years.

When Lepore arrived on

Nantucket in 1981, he never meant to stay. But now, thankfully for the island he has come to call home, he never means to leave. Though he is no longer Nantucket’s only surgeon, his contributions to the island community remain unmatched, spanning from affordable housing to the football team and the School Committee to addiction treatment. As the first recipient of the Good Neighbor Award, Timothy Lepore furthers the legacy that Fred Rogers instilled in the island.

“Mr. Rogers displayed courage by taking chances in exploring new ways to reach out and celebrate children through television,” Lepore said. “He made children feel important and respected. …His ability to educate without preaching and his genuine humanity are the things I would like to emulate.”

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– Dr. Timothy Lepore

ROBIN 5K R u n F o r

A community event that brings everyone together to celebrate the life of Robin Harvey while supporting the Harvey Foundation. For more information visit: harveyfoundationnantucket.org

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NANTUCKET 9TH ANNUAL
HARVEY FOUNDATION
SUNDAY NOVEMBER
s c o n s e t C a s i n o I T ' S A B O U T C O M M U N I T Y
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N-MAGAZINE.COM 508.414.1878 sully@fishernantucket.com BRIAN SULLIVAN Exclusively Listed By: 20 MAIN STREET ‘SCONSET | 5+ BR | 8 BA 6 BR | 7 BA Shawkemo 1 SHAWKEMO HILLS LANE Polpis 59B POLPIS ROAD 8 BR | 7 BA Mid Island 27 TICCOMA WAY 6 BR | 7 BA Polpis 59 POLPIS ROAD SEWER ACCESS Cliff 81 CLIFF ROAD 6 BR | 7.5 BA

A closer look at the Maria Mitchell Association’s vast species catalog

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WRITTEN BY ANTONIA DEPACE PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE MARIA MITCHELL ASSOCIATION

he Maria Mitchell Association has long been known for helping to educate Nantucketers of all ages on the natural science of the island, but it’s in the Research Center at 2 Vestal Street that the true treasure trove exists. Here, over 10,000 species of birds, plants, insects, mammals and ocean critters scour the shelves—each telling a different story of the island.

“Although our collection is tiny compared to something

like the American Museum of Natural History … no museum could have everything, and ours is very local,” field ornithologist Ginger Andrews says of the countless drawers of preserved species displayed around me.

“[The collection] tells us about what was here at a particular time and place.”

An abundance of ocean creatures lines the shelves Mammal skulls are a part of the collection
– Ginger Andrews
[The collection] tells us about what was here at a particular time and place.”

ndrews uses the barn owl as an example. The medium-sized bird is known for its white heart-shaped face, but here on Nantucket, it has seemingly replaced the short-eared owl, which nested in the dunes and was more common when Andrews was growing up. “Barn owls, as far as we know, pretty much stay here. It would be interesting to compare them and see how isolated of a population we are, which has implications for adaptation to climate change, and what happens when you have remnant populations, which is one of the big concerns in biodiversity,” she explains. It’s the extensive species catalog at Maria Mitchell that helps to make these comparisons, as well as conclusions about how Nantucket’s habitat has changed and is changing. It even illustrates species density, which right now favors the yellow warbler, which the research center has drawers of.

Other species within the catalog tell other stories, like the golden eagle, which documents the only verified instance of the bird on Nantucket.

According to Andrews, it was seen alive November 14, 1962, only to be found dead the following day under a utility pole near Sesachacha Pond. Or there’s the white ibis, which was found in a patch of snow in the Mothball Pines in 1965. To this day, its appearance here is an unsolved mystery—none have been seen on the island since. Of course, the collection tells stories beyond birds. The spotfin butterflyfish, traditionally a

When it comes to collecting the specimens, Andrews and the team generally rely on the public and get calls from islanders and summer residents when they find anything interesting. But for the moment, this has been put on pause—at least for new ornithology finds—due to concerns over the bird flu. It doesn’t mean that research has stopped, though. The specific ornithology collection displayed on one large, long table during my visit was just used by college students at UMass, who studied the species to see the adaptations of birds’ bills and feet, as well as different plumages.

tropical fish, is one example. Andrews says that some tropical species are carried north as larvae, and then lack the strength to return south for the winter as adults. Patterns like this document ocean currents, as well as a way to track climate change.

“As you look at the change between the foot of a fish eater or a rabbit eater, you can see how plastic life really is—not plastic in the sense of the clothing we wear, but the ability to shift, change and grow,” Andrews explains. “And that is what gives me hope.”

The catalog, in general, is used constantly for different programming and reasons, whether for college students, research, children’s education or even art classes. But in all, the

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Different species of birds tell stories of the island
– Ginger Andrews
If we could preserve half of Nantucket, is that going to be enough? That’s the big question.”

feathers, fur and exoskeletons that are kept below the research center truly show how constantly life moves and adapts—and yet, with 10,000-plus species, there’s still so much to learn. Andrews adds, “[Nantucket] is basically roughly the size of Manhattan, if you count the sandy parts, and there’s still so much we don’t know

about it.” She references a saying from biologist E.O. Wilson, who thought that humans could continue to survive, but only if we preserved half of the biodiversity in the world. “If we could preserve half of Nantucket, is that going to be enough? That’s the big question,” she counters. “I don’t think half is quite enough. We have so much more to learn about the world, even just the world of Nantucket.”

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The catalog is used beyond research, including children’s education programs and more.
92 N MAGAZINE M A D E F O R S U M M E R S w i m , S w e a t , S u m m e r p r o o f s t y l e s @ g r e s h a m j e w e l r y w w w j e w e l r y b y g r e s h a m c o m TOMHANLONLANDSCAPING.COM • 508.325.0949 • OFFICE@TOMHANLONLANDSCAPING.COM • FOLLOW US @TOMHANLONLANDSCAPING

Blue Water. Cool Breezes. Warm Welcome.

Welcome to John’s Island. A sunny, cherished haven enjoyed by generations who have discovered the undeniable allure of life by the sea. With 1,650 pristine acres, miles of private beaches and a thriving community, this is ocean to river living at its finest. From sunrise to sunset, members of our by-invitation-only John’s Island Club enjoy a legendary lifestyle and world-class amenities - including three championship golf courses, 17 Har-tru tennis courts, pickleball, squash, croquet, an abundance of water activities, a health & wellness center, and the savory dishes served at any of our three Clubhouses. Indulge in gorgeous architectural details, tranquil living areas and lush grounds - all a stone’s throw from ocean, river or golf. We invite you to indulge in a life of bliss in John’s Island.

93 N-MAGAZINE.COM JI Club Members Enjoy: Miles Of Beach : 3 Championship Golf Courses : Tennis & Pickleball :
: Oceanfront Beach Club luxury estates : condominiums : homesites : townhouses : cottages 772.231.0900 : Vero Beach, Florida : www.JohnsIslandRealEstate.com
Squash
Ba Stone Bob Gibb Owner/Broker Jeannette Mahaney Judy Bramson Luke Webb Kristen Yoshitani Susie Perticone Cheryl Sangbush Rennie Gibb Rachel Hickman
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If you are going to find yourself stuck in traffic on

Beyond the obvious Jeeps, Land Rovers and Broncos, there are plenty of fun alternatives to navigate the island.

MOKE AMERICA

Brigitte Bardot, Princess Margaret and the Beach Boys are only a handful of well-known names spotted with a Moke—and now, you can add Nantucket’s residents to the list thanks to Tim Bruno, president of Moke America Kennebunkport. Bruno’s dealership marks the brand’s first New England expansion. “Mokes are for relaxing and savoring the summer, which in New England goes by far too fast,” Bruno says. The open-air car comes in a rainbow of colors, is fully electric (one single charge can last up to 40 miles), and can be customized from top to bottom. Also, the new 60 Years of Bond edition ensures that you’ll always travel in style thanks to a midnight blue exterior, mango tree wooden dashboard, wood steering wheel and more. mokeamericaofKPT.com

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PHOTOGRAPHY
in
Nantucket, you might as well enjoy it.

BMW ISETTA

Produced for the German market after World War II, the Isetta was designed to minimize gas usage and steel while providing practical and inexpensive transportation. These highly collectible, singledoor vehicles were designed by an Italian refrigerator company called Iso, and adapted into some of the most efficient cars of their time. Weighing approximately 750 pounds, and getting over 65 miles per gallon, the car operates on a one-cylinder, four-stroke motorcycle engine—and also happens to be perfect for parking. bmw.com

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MEYERS MANX DUNE BUGGY

What started as a stripped Volkswagen Beetle chassis with all-terrain tires created by California engineer Bruce Meyers has since turned into one of the oldest and most collectible all-terrain recreational vehicles available.

“[Meyers’] groundbreaking creation became an American classic for both its whimsical design and its remarkable performance,” says Hagop Kalaidjian, creative director at Meyers Manx. He notes the Manx 2.0 Electric as his favorite model due to its “authentic feel and heritage of the original Meyers Manx, reimagined for the contemporary age with an environmentally friendly ethos.” In general, all of the models are completely customizable and are made specifically with a lightweight body and engine over the back wh eel—perfect for cruising along the island’s notoriously deep sand beaches. meyersmanx.com

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SANDY PEDALS

Biking has been a staple on Nantucket for over a century, but adding electricity to the mix makes it even better for seeing all of what the island has to offer. “E-bikes are simply awesome for getting around Nantucket,” Thomas Holt, owner of Sandy Pedals Bicycles, says. “Think about it—you get to enjoy the island’s stunning landscapes, cool sounds and unforgettable scents while avoiding the hassle of heavy traffic.” And all at 15 miles per hour. The e-rental shop, which features a bike share program app for easy booking, is the largest on island. “Essentially, with an e-bike, you’re taking in the true vibes of Nantucket at the perfect pace,” Holt says. This summer, clients can check out the shop’s brandnew private rental fleet, which will deliver any number of cherry red bicycles directly to your doorstep. Plus, a new partnership with Bern, a well-known helmet company, is making the rental rides even safer. sandypedalsbikes.com

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Images courtesy of Sandy Pedals Bicycles

SEALEGS

It takes all the difficult things out of boating,” says Sealegs’ U.S. service manager Josh Bird about the line of versatile amphibious boats. Born from a cocktail napkin sketch, the Chitty Chitty Bang Bang-esque vessel has evolved over the past 20 years into one of a handful of amphibious craft on today’s market. The retractable wheels take the craft-like experience from land to sea, making the typical laborious boat launch from a trailer disappear. Of all the models available, the 12-meter Cabin RIB redefines cool. Think optional add-ons of kitchens, up to four berths and room for up to nine passengers—with optional twin 425-horsepower outboard engines. sealegs.com

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100 N MAGAZINE Providing a Higher Level of Service 508 325 5800 www.leerealestate.com 10 South Beach Street, Nantucket, MA

Road

One of the most exceptional turn of the century homes on the island, this timeless treasure is rich in character throughout. The porch is the hallmark of the house and the essence of summer in 'Sconset. The offering includes two additional conforming buildable lots abutting conservation land on the West side of Baxter Road

One of the most exceptional turn of the century homes on the island, this timeless treasure is rich in character throughout The porch is the hallmark of the house and the essence of summer in 'Sconset The

72 Pocomo Road

Rare private six acre sanctuary on the most spectacular part of Pocomo Point. Abounding views across Coatue and a beautiful vista over the Medouie Creek estuary The setting is unmatched on Nantucket with over 400 feet of coastal beach and your boat right out the door

Rare private six acre sanctuary on the most spectacular part of Pocomo Point Abounding views across Coatue and a beautiful vista over the Medouie Creek estuary The setting is unmatched on Nantucket with over 400 feet of coastal beach and your boat right out the door

101 N-MAGAZINE.COM B e o @leerealestatenantucket 10 South Beach Street, Nantucket, MA 508 325 5800 www leerealestate com JEFF LEE & CAROLYN DURAND 508.648.6987 | 508.566.4713 jefflee@leerealestate com CAROLYN DURAND 508 566 4713 carolyn@leerealestate.com
@leerealestatenantucket 10 South Beach Street, Nantucket,
508 325
www leerealestate com
LEE & CAROLYN DURAND 508 648 6987 | 508 566 4713 jefflee@leerealestate
carolyn@leerealestate.com CAROLYN DURAND 508.566.4713 carolyn@leerealestate
63, 64 & 66 Baxter
MA
5800
JEFF
com
com
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DIRT GOOD

Nantucket’s only compost business

Eric Rogers thinks of compost like a fine wine. “It gets better with age,” the director of Material Operations of Toscana Corporation says. Seven to 12 months, to be exact. This is the exact time frame it takes to create organic compost, a business that the Toscana team, including Carl Jelleme and Rogers conceptualized three years ago during the pandemic.

“We were always a materials yard, but small in volume,” Rogers says. “When [this opportunity] happened for us, we said, ‘Let’s really go at it with two feet.’” With the help of his team, right-hand man John Sherman as well as consultant R. Alexander Associates Inc., Rogers has created three products— organic compost, organic garden soil and organic lawn soil— all of which have been OMRI (certified organic) listed. The company’s chief operating officer, Jon Pierce, played a large role in the rigorous testing for this certification, as well.

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Not only is Toscana’s compost being used by at least 60 percent of Nantucket’s landscape companies, but more recently for homeowners thanks to its newly bagged soils. But there’s a lot more that goes into the product than what’s seen on the surface. It starts with the landscapers, who bring remnants of leaves, grass clippings, garden plant remains and more to the yard. Prior to Toscana’s

efforts, all of these “ingredients” were being brought to the local landfill.

“If you think about all the construction taking place on our little island, the landscape that goes into these properties is substantial. We’re talking tractor trailer loads of trees and plants and shrubs every day. … They need to be manicured, the material generated from these plants needs to be dealt with,” Rogers explains. “It’s not 1980;

you can’t just bury that material in the landfill because we’re on an island and that landfill can only get so big.” More recently, Toscana also started accepting green crabs, an invasive species on the island. Rogers and his team, lovingly known as the “Bag Boys” (John Paul Correia, Connor Pierce and Matt Finlay), are shoveling out 10 pallets a day, each of which holds 88 bags of compost.

When it comes to creating the mixtures, Rogers refers to himself as a “chef.” It starts with the materials brought by the landscapers and dropped at the main yard at 19 Arrowhead Drive, which is then transported to the company’s Bunker Road facility.

There, 10-foot-high, 80-to-150foot-long and 25-foot-wide piles are prepared for the aerated windrow process of composting, which involves forming the organic piles of waste in windrows and aerating them periodically by either manually or mechanically turning them. Rogers also keeps a large thermometer on hand to regularly check the temperature of the compost. An ideal temperature of 120 to 140 degrees kills off any weed seed and keeps the nutrients in the soil active.

From there, the piles are trucked over to another facility, where the

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Eric Rogers
“It’s not 1980; you can’t just bury that material in the landfill because we ’re on an island and that landfill can only get so big.”

compost goes through a trommel screener twice, before being mixed with Rogers’ secret ingredients (dependent on each type of soil) and packaged by the Bag Boys. Of course, New England’s unpredictable weather can create a few obstacles, but nothing that the team can’t fix. Rogers adds, “The majority of this material that’s breaking down is in the winter months. And it just rains. It’s not good for the processing procedure, but it’s good for hydrating my compost.”

Since starting, Toscana’s composting business has grown so large that the company just leased an additional parcel of land from Nantucket Airport. It will be used specifically for processing, recycling and producing locally sourced soil. “We have it right under our feet,” Rogers concludes. “It really struck: the idea that we can make this … a really good product and be sustainable on this island. Local is cool.”

To purchase the compost, go online at toscanacorp.com or on-site at 19 Arrowhead Drive.

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107 N-MAGAZINE.COM 17 MAIN STREET | NANTUCKET, MA | 02554 | 508.228.9117 RAVEISNANTUCKET.COM Town 15 North Water Street | 7 BR 7.5 BA $4,500,000 | John Arena Madaket 36 Tennessee Avenue | 3 BR 2 BA $4,895,000 | Deb Killen & Josh Lothian Shimmo - Pending 3 Moors End Lane | 3 BR 2.5 BA $2,999,000 | Robert Young Town 7 Easy Street | 2 BR 1.5 BA $4,295,000 | Deb Killen & Josh Lothian Official Real Estate Company of the Boston Red Sox #1 Family-Owned Real Estate Company in Florida and the Northeast 140+ Offices | 4,500+ Sales Associates | 8 States - CT, FL, MA, ME, NH, NY, RI, VT Palm Beach, FL 449 Australian Avenue| $19,750,000 Palm Beach Office | 561.655.6570 Explore a World of Luxury Living OUR LUXURY LISTINGS THROUGHOUT OUR FLORIDA FOOTPRINT Naples, FL 140 5th Avenue South | $19,995,000 Naples 5th Avenue S Office | 239.231.3380 Siesta Key, FL 265 Cedar Park Circle | $8,500,000 Siesta Key Office | 941.894.1255

BANKING ON THE FUTURE

Cape Cod 5 CEO Matt Burke on the United States’ economic market and the direct effect on island.

Could you explain your connection to Nantucket?

This is actually our first time staying overnight, but I come here often for the bank. This is a very special place for us in terms of the market, so even though I may not be here physically as much, the team is.

I think, for us, physical locations are nice, but you need the people, and the team we have here is the best.

The bank was founded in 1855. How long has Cape Cod 5 been on Nantucket?

About 15 years ago Bill Hourihan was instrumental in establishing our presence. You’re not going to find too many more successful examples of this organic de novo expansion. We now have about a third of the market share.

The interest rate world has changed dramatically. What are you noticing on the island in terms of types of transactions that have been impacted by the sudden surge in interest rates on the homeownership side?

We’ve seen the fastest, most significant increase in interest rates that we’ve ever seen to combat inflation, but what that does is put a lot of pressure on consumers and on businesses. Cost of credit goes up and it puts a lot of pressure on banks. Credit is expensive on the lending front, and this is particularly impactful for the markets that we’re in— jumbo mortgages and second homes. So with jumbo [loans] and in second homes, Fannie [Mae] and Freddie [Mac] were taken out of the second home business—we either need to rely on our own portfolio or find other outlets, and there really aren’t many at this point. You can’t buy a house under the conforming limit, so there really aren’t any conforming mortgages out here.

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The failure of First Republic Bank sent shock waves through many markets, not the least of which was here. And it shook people’s confidence in the banking business, particularly in the regional banks. What are your thoughts?

We live in a different world in terms of how fast our phones can move. We’ve learned more overnight; all those situations happened in an amount of hours. So, it’s all about preparing for that sort of thing. You obviously can’t plan for every scenario, but you can try to simulate some of these things.

A lot of it comes down to making sure you don’t put yourself in the position that those banks were in, which all goes back to risk management. As far as running a successful bank, it’s all about risk diversification and the concentrations that they have, asset liability management and industry risk— some of the more complex things that we deal with.

At one point, the thought was floated that if the government made every deposit insured, no matter what, you would never have a run on a bank. Is this a good idea?

We’ve seen a variation of that, and there was a lot of confusion. I think the media—and maybe everyone now—is

interested in the next bank story and doesn’t have a background in banking. SVB [Silicon Valley Bank] failed, and this was a Friday. And FDIC said the next business day, Monday, you’ll have access to all your deposits, and they continued to run it. And people were still leaving even though their deposits for 100 percent were now insured.

Did the government fail to adequately communicate their role as a backstop?

Yes, and I think there’s an implicit guarantee and I think that was the sense, right? What is a systemic risk in the industry? That would have created something more systemic. I hear some of the stories of people that didn’t even know they were banking with SVB, but their payroll company did and employees weren’t getting paid. The messaging this time around was that not one penny of taxpayer dollars was going to be used to rescue banks. So all the banks collectively pitched in for a special assessment. It worked to an extent, but some of the reasons that I don’t necessarily agree with would be that, if all deposits were insured, that it would encourage risk taking. If I’m running a bank and I take risks, my depositors are protected, but if you have your investors and your employees, a bank failure would mean everything goes to zero.

Are there other SVBs and First Republics out there that have not surfaced?

One of the things of the business model of banking is that it predicates on the fact that everyone’s not going to want their deposits back at the same time. So you take deposits in, you lend them out and then it all comes back to liquidity management. The reality of it is if you go up 500 basis points in interest rates overnight, your assets are going to be underwater. So it’s hard to generate liquidity. The Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston and the Federal Reserve are two very important [assets] for all banks to have as much availability of liquidity with that and pledging of assets. If you have something like that happen, you can generate cash, but this was not the case with SVB.

When does the other shoe drop?

We have a really high interest rate stress and then the liquidity phase, and then the next phase is the credit phase. So, a slowdown in credit, availability of credit and then, inevitably, rate increases upward. You model all this by saying we’re an asset-sensitive bank, meaning we benefit in rates up and our assets reprice up, but that assumes that the borrowers have the strength to actually pay higher service on that. Inevitably, and unfortunately, it’s going to put a lot of pressure on businesses and on banks.

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– Matt Burke
“A lot of it comes down to making sure you don’t put yourself in the position that those banks were in, which all goes back to risk management.”

This recession that has been projected is happening in slow motion. Do you think we will have one? And when do you think it’ll hit?

I’m glad I’m not an economist, because they’re always wrong. No one could have predicted anything that’s happened over the course of the past few years. So, it’s really hard. I get asked the question, what happened the last time that the economy was in the situation?

What happens when you inject $7 trillion? Now we’re dealing with the consequences of that.

Time will tell if the outcome is actually worse longterm. We have front-row seats to affordability of everything, housing, inequality and all the issues that we’re already dealing with; it’s exacerbated all of them.

If it continues to just be a slow bleed, then you don’t know what shoe is going to drop next. I don’t know how much higher interest

Is there anything that you want to share about the bank that we should know?

Ultimately, what differentiates us is we’re a mission-driven mutual bank. So we don’t have any owners; we don’t have investors ... The value of being a mutual right now is that every penny of our earnings since 1855 is in our capital today. And we invest in our customers,

rates can go before things start breaking to a larger extent than they are right now. All rates are expensive, so a further slowdown, I would assume, is inevitable.

communities, our employees and the mission, and then having people feel that this isn’t just a job. We’ve dealt with our fair share of challenges these past few years, but we are just fortunate that our bank is filled with really good people that all have shared values and dedication to the mission. Our mission is “simply enriching lives.”

We try to do that in every way we can with our customers, our community members and our employees.

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– Matt Burke
“Ultimately, what differentiates us is we ’re a mission-driven mutual bank.”
112 N MAGAZINE Sun. Sand. Sold. Compass is a licensed real estate broker and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. No statement is made as to the accuracy of any description. All measurements and square footages are approximate. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage. $4,999,000 6 BD 6F 2H BA 11,267 SF 526R MERRIMAC STREET NEWBURYPORT Ethan Goodrich goodrich@compass.com 617.398.4444 $5,995,000 5 BD 7F 2H BA 8,926 SF 250 BAXTERS NECK ROAD Joan Witter joan.witter@compass.com 508.776.1971 $8,995,000 7 BD 7F 1H BA 8,500 SF 60 LIVINGSTON ROAD Beyond Boston Properties beyondboston@compass.com 617.383.7810 $5,250,000 4 BD 5F 1H BA 6,356 SF 13 MARTIN’S COVE ROAD HINGHAM Jeff Alexander jeff.alexander@compass.com 415.595.6999 WELLESLEY MARSTONS MILLS Start your journey home today with Compass.
113 N-MAGAZINE.COM Scan the QR code to browse these homes and more on compass.com Starting at $3,529,000 New Construction Homes THE PRESERVE AT FAWN LANE compass.com $3,195,000 4 BD 5F 1H BA 5,500 SF 55 MCCALLAR LANE CONCORD The Ridick Revis Group ridickrevisgroup@compass.com 617.593.3492 • 978.807.8219 Contact Agent for Price 6 BD 7F 1H BA 10,765 SF 111 SUMMER STREET WESTWOOD The Shulkin Wilk Group shulkinwilkgroup@compass.com 617.463.9816 NANTUCKET Kevin Caulfield kc@compass.com 617.501.3685

DESIGN

ENVY

We catch up with renowned designer and Nantucket by Design keynote Ashley Hicks

INTERVIEW BY ANTONIA DEPACE PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE ESTATE OF DAVID HICKS
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When the Nantucket Historical Association announced Ashley Hicks as one of the keynote speakers for this year’s Nantucket by Design Luncheon—along with life partner Martina Mondadori of Cabana magazine—industry leaders were elated at the prospect of the renowned designer paying a visit to the island. Trained at the Architectural Association in London and son to the late David Hicks—who was infamous for a number of accolades, including decorating the first apartment in Buckingham Palace for the former Prince of Wales—Hicks is known for his eclectic, yet nuanced taste that dabbles with bold colors and patterns. “[Martina] grew up in rooms by the great Italian designer Renzo Mongiardino, whereas I grew up in David Hicks houses,” he explains. “We will talk about the home we made together in Milan and how it embraces both these very different influences and updates them for today, while reflecting her personality and needs (it’s really home to her and her children—I am a guest there).” Here, Hicks discusses favorite projects, décor tips and what’s inspiring him now. Nantucket by Design, August 2-5, Keynote Design Luncheon, August 3, nha.org; ashleyhicks.com

Tell me more about how you started to design furniture and why you dove into this sector of design?

I started designing furniture 30 years ago because I wanted to make a klismos chair inspired by ancient Greek ones and had it made by carpenters in Rajasthan, India. About 15 years ago, I started making pieces myself, and that I really love. There’s something enormously satisfying about crafting your own pieces. I lack the skills or training for fine woodwork, but I experiment with carved resin, which works for me!

What is one of your favorite design projects you’ve completed this year and why?

Two pieces I made, very different but equally fun to do. One is a washstand for a bathroom in California, which I made in resin, carved to look like rippling fur, bronzed and with gilt bronze lions’ paw feet. The other is a huge painting imitating a grisaille tapestry, which I copied from a 1796 drawing by Baron Gros of a key moment in the French Revolution, crowded with figures in excited neoclassical poses [and] Marie Antoinette with a very elaborate hairstyle behind bars. This is now hanging in the all-gray room in New York for which it was commissioned.

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What is inspiring you right now?

Historic textiles from Renaissance velvets to Indian block prints, Piranesi, Poussin, Rateau, Soane, Adam, Burges … the list is endless.

When it comes to bringing your imagination into reality, what are some of your top tips for those looking to refresh or revamp their interiors?

I like to make things myself, which does make it rather easier to bring your imagination into reality! To refresh a room, there are so many ways—you could repaint it in a zesty new color, you could hang different art on the wall, you could change the lighting—if there’s a center light and no center table for it to hang over, rip it out!

Nantucket is a very traditional New England town. What are your tips for adding a bit more personalization to interior design?

The best way to add personalization to an interior is to fill it with things you actually love and that have meaning for you, rather than generic stuff that fills the space but says nothing to or about you. If you habitually look at magazines or Instagram and are tempted to copy things you see, fight the urge! The world has enough sameness already.

You specialize in bringing historic interiors to life, all while giving them a fresh perspective. This relates directly to Nantucket as it’s a very historic island. What is your opinion on combining the old with the new when it comes to interior design, and what is the importance of keeping the history of homes in act?

I grew up surrounded by antiques, old rooms and modern décor in my father’s houses, so anything else feels very alien to me. No room should have nothing old about it! Even if it is only a traditional shape of a chair that’s been remade in new materials, there must be something old. People feel deeply uncomfortable in an all-new environment.

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Your father, David Hicks, was renowned in the field. How did you carve out your own design identity, all while honoring his successes and influences?

Haltingly at first, I would say! He died soon after I started working, which was helpful, I suppose, in that his towering presence receded a little. But I perversely made celebrating him into one of my constant goals—endless books (the latest, David Hicks in Colour, published by Cabana this year) and product collaborations keeping his style front and center, while I whittle away at my own thing, contrasted to his work in ways great or small. His oeuvre was sufficiently broad to allow any number of very different designers to find inspiration and models in it, myself included.

What’s next?

Heading to Boston to revisit that wonderful MFA [Museum of Fine Arts] with its Sargent ceilings and Ledoux boiseries. Excited!

Scan the Flowcode to learn more about Nantucket by Design.

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Luxury Requires Expertise 575 MADISON AVENUE, NY, NY 10022. 212.891.7000 © 2023 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE. ALL MATERIAL PRESENTED HEREIN IS INTENDED FOR INFORMATION PURPOSES ONLY. WHILE, THIS INFORMATION IS BELIEVED TO BE CORRECT, IT IS REPRESENTED SUBJECT TO ERRORS, OMISSIONS, CHANGES OR WITHDRAWAL WITHOUT NOTICE. ALL PROPERTY INFORMATION, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO SQUARE FOOTAGE, ROOM COUNT, NUMBER OF BEDROOMS AND THE SCHOOL DISTRICT IN PROPERTY LISTINGS SHOULD BE VERIFIED BY YOUR OWN ATTORNEY, ARCHITECT OR ZONING EXPERT. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY. Lydia Sussek Senior Global Real Estate Advisor Licensed Real Estate Salesperson O +1 212.350.2224 | M +1 917.721.7853 Lydia.Sussek@elliman.com Global real estate advisory in sales, residential property purchasing and negotiation. Available 365 days, Lydia looks forward to assisting with your every real estate need. 304 Spring Street, PH | New York City | $12,995,000 | This architectural prize-winning penthouse features 3 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, a double-height great room, 2 wood-burning replaces, a roo op with an outdoor kitchen, and iconic views. elliman.com | Web# 22507805 REBNY Deal of the Year Award Winner, 2011
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BILLIONAIRES

BEHAVING BADLY

Author William Cohan’s view on Nantucket’s uber-wealthy and beyond

William Cohan is a New York Times bestselling author whose focus has been on the world of finance and corporate America and the personalities behind it. A former Wall Street executive himself, Cohan has written such books as House of Cards: A Tale of Hubris and Wretched Excess (2009) and Money and Power: How Goldman Sachs Came to Rule the World (2011). Cohan’s most recent article for Town & Country, titled “The Battle of Nantucket,” aimed a spotlight at the behavior of a group of billionaires on the island that he suggests are changing the understated character of Nantucket.

N Magazine sat down with Cohan for a wide-ranging interview on his recent Town & Country story and thoughts on the financial world in general.

How long have you been on Nantucket and what does the island mean to you?

I grew up in Massachusetts, so I was always aware of Nantucket. We would spend our summers on the North Shore in the Gloucester area, and then occasionally, we would go sailing down here. I was out running one day, because we were renting over on Sankaty Road, and I ran by this house and there was a for sale sign. The owner had a deal, but it fell through. I made him an offer and he took it. So we’ve owned this [house] now for 14 years.

Your recent Town & Country article called “The Battle of Nantucket” has created quite a stir. What motivated you to write that piece?

Well, it wasn’t my idea to write the piece. It was Town & Country’s idea. But it was my idea to write what I wrote. I’m on the board of the Atheneum, and I’m not blind to the acute affordable housing need on the island. We had to take 10 percent of our endowment to buy a house in mid island. And we weren’t the only nonprofit around the island having to do that. So that struck me as quasi-insane. I track what happens to the real estate market and the juxtaposition of people like my friend Steve Schwarzman and others buying on the island, like John Henry. The juxtaposition of billionaires coming here, the jets and the acute need for affordable housing is stark.

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The irony about the wealth on Nantucket is that for the last century, it has always been here. In the heyday of the whaling era, there were more millionaires on Orange Street than any street on the planet. Is this just a different form of wealth or a cultural difference?

I think there were always pockets of wealth, including on Orange Street. There just seems to be a lot more of it. When you have zero interest rates for 13 years, the Federal Reserve manipulating the cost of money, and then people who are set up to take advantage of it, all of a sudden, you have all these people who make money from money. Many are on the East Coast

It used to be that a high-paid executive made tens of millions of dollars. Now, it’s hundreds of millions of dollars, and perhaps billions in the case of Elon Musk and others. With people making $50,000, $100,000 per hour, does that affect their connection to reality and therefore change their behavior? Absolutely, it affects their connection to reality. I mean, I spend my life writing about these people and I see it all the time. There’s a certain amount of hubris, although that has negative connotations. I don’t see them necessarily being bad people, but they definitely don’t think the rules apply to them. I mean, does Elon Musk think the rules apply to him? Does Donald Trump think the rules apply to him? Did Sam Bankman-Fried think that rules applied to him? No. People get this idea in their head that somehow they’re immune to the laws of gravity and the legal system.

Jack had the skill to manage everything from aircraft engines to this sophisticated financial institution. Jeff [Immelt] didn’t have those same skills. Maybe nobody had those same skills. So all I can tell you about where I come out is what Dave Calhoun, who was a former longtime GE executive and now the CEO of Boeing, said to me— and it’s a little harsh, but I happen to think he’s right. And he said it on the record, so that makes it all the more credible: Every time Jack had a big decision, he made the right one. And every time Jeff [Immelt] had a big decision, he made the wrong one.

and combine that with these incredible private jets that they can afford like it’s nothing, and then the extension of the runway, so they can land them here. The impediment of actually getting here is no longer an impediment. And it’s so damn beautiful, and probably, from their perspective, relatively affordable, right?

Yes, wealth has always been here, but I think that back when people were actually doing the whaling, that was what Nantucket was known for, and not as a finance capital.

So let’s segue to your book Power Failure about the decline of GE. Jack Welch was a longtime summer resident here, and he was viewed as a business icon. When he left the company and turned it over, things started to go south very quickly. Was that an indictment of the subsequent leadership, or did it expose weaknesses that Jack had created at GE?

That’s what people will probably be debating for a long time. My view was Jack was an absolutely unique leader who was able to manage this diverse elephant of a company. I tell the parable of the blind man and the elephant at the beginning of the book, because people really can’t tell what this thing was all about. But Jack had the ability to run it. Like, how can a bumblebee fly? This is that same question. How could GE not only exist but become preeminent and the most valuable company in the world?

Let’s talk about some of the players in the business world. Arguably, the most intriguing character is Elon Musk. Will people look back at Elon Musk as one of these historic business figures that helped change the world? Or is he something else? We should all reserve judgment on that until Walter Isaacson’s book comes out, which will be in September. So we’ll get to pull the curtain back a little bit more on what this guy is all about. Walter had incredible access. Musk is not an inventor, first of all, so I wouldn’t compare him to Edison or Westinghouse or any of our great inventors. He is smart. He’s obviously a visionary. He put his money in the right place at the right time and made big debts on things that have paid off tremendously well, but can you name anything that he actually created? He built Tesla in its current version, he drives his SpaceX in its current version, but he’s not actually an inventor.

But there’s a lot of competition coming and Tesla’s valuation is absurd, right? It just is completely unmoored to reality because he’s become like a cultlike figure. And, in short, you can’t bet against him because you’ll lose your shirt. I can’t explain it. But I mean, the fact that he’s six months into the year and he has increased his net worth $100 billion this year. It’s crazy.

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– William Cohan
“The juxtaposition of billionaires coming here, the jets and the acute need for affordable housing is stark.”

You’ve been on Wall Street yourself and have covered a wide range of players in the finance world and beyond. Who is the most admirable person living or otherwise that you have followed?

In terms of my admiration for him, I’d have to say [Hank] Paulson. He was a wonderful leader of Goldman Sachs. He took it public and has very high integrity. He was the absolute right person at the right moment to be Secretary of the Treasury during the financial crisis. I think he gave $700 million to the Nature Conservancy. … He lives modestly. He’s got incredible values. … He easily remembers friends, he helps people when he can. He’s just so admirable in so many ways. Now he’s studying about China and trying to help us with a China relationship, which he’s been doing for a long time. So he’s the whole package. And he’s totally out of central casting as a treasury secretary.

“I think there were always pockets of wealth, including on Orange Street. There just seems to be a lot more of it.”

I will say that the person who totally stumped me and turned out to be the absolute opposite of what I thought he was is Sam Bankman-Fried. I interviewed him in December 2021. I spent 90 minutes with him for a documentary film that I’ve been working on about cryptocurrency, and he was absolutely at the peak of his power and wealth and turned out to be probably a bigger fraudster than Bernie Madoff, which is hard to do and [he] may spend more years in prison than Bernie Madoff. So not at all what I thought. How do you suspect a 29-year-old of being a fraud? And the thing is he seemed completely nice and benevolent. And he was talking about giving millions away so we don’t have another pandemic, giving money to politicians, whatever it is. He showed up to my interview in the middle of December in a T-shirt and shorts, all the crazy hair, couldn’t really look me in the eye. Well, maybe he couldn’t look me in the eyes because he was such a huge fraudster.

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– William Cohan Scan here to read Cohan’s article, “The Battle for Nantucket.”
126 N MAGAZINE current vintage 4 Easy Street 508.228.5073 currentvintage com 13 CENTRE ST INKERMANNYC.COM @INKERMAN_NYC Come in for a test ride! Apparel, footwear, packs, & ebikes HEIDI WEDDENDORF 774-236-9064 • Heidiweddendorf@yahoo.com Available at Erica Wilson • Nantucket Artists Association HeidiWeddendorf.com Follow me on NaNtucket kNot earriNgs NaNtucket kNot Bracelet 62 Main St. | 508.228.0437 | @ackreds | nantucke eds.com

BLOOMING BIDS FOR FAIRWINDS

Thank you for yet another successful year in raising support for accessible mental health services to everyone in our community.

The Big Bloom Presenting Sponsors

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Collaborative Sponsors

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Blue Flag Partners

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Atlantic East Nantucket Real Estate

Ambassador Elizabeth F. Bagley

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Caroline & Douglass Ellis

Cape Cod 5 Foundation

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YOU FROM
THANK

IN THE

SHADOWS

An update on Nantucket’s housing crisis

On paper, the numbers are dismal. The median price of a home on Nantucket is around $3.36 million, according to Fisher Real Estate Nantucket. Assuming you have $720,000 for a down payment, the annual salary necessary to qualify for a mortgage at current loan rates is $630,000. The average salary of a teacher, police officer or firefighter on island: roughly anywhere from about $70,000 to a little over $100,000.

In real life, the numbers add up to something more dismal still. Middle school music teacher Nick Hayden has moved nine times in the 11 years he has been here, at one point staying in a cottage with no heat. Hayden spends $30,000 of his $70,000 salary on annual rent plus several thousand more a year on utilities, working two or three side hustles to make ends meet. And he will lose his lease in a year and a half. “I have entered a few lotteries for my own home,”

says the single father, “one for Habitat [for Humanity] and two for affordable housing through Housing Nantucket. I made it into the final drawing for two of them but didn’t get picked. Before even entering the lottery, I had to write a letter of how I would have gotten the $10,000 down payment. I was going to sell my car.”

The tales get worse. “We have heard stories in recent years of people living in a shipping container,” says Tucker Holland, Nantucket’s municipal housing director, “third

world-ish situations here on an island with a lot of abundance.” There have been people living out of their car or in a garage with nothing but a hot plate.

One family of four with a preschooler and a toddler leased a two-bedroom basement apartment because living at ground level would have cost another $1,000 to $1,500 a month. Mold grew everywhere— “fuzzy like a sweater on the slats of the bed frame,” the wife says. The tiles in the always-wet bathroom were blackened.

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er husband was offered a new job with more pay, but their rental unit was owned by his employer, and if he left his position, they would have lost the apartment, so they stayed put. “I got pretty severely anxious and depressed,” the wife says. “I didn’t take to living underground well. I felt sad for my kids, too. They couldn’t run around outside and have me see them.”

It’s not just the ones struggling to hang on who pay a price. Every economic level ends up directly

affected. According to Brian Sullivan, chair of Nantucket’s Affordable Housing Trust, 15 percent of the fire department lives off island because they can’t afford housing here. “They come over and they work a 24-hour shift,” he says. “Then they go home. If there are two emergency situations, the department can’t just call somebody into work. And we can’t call the community next door. The community next door is a boat ride away.”

Other vital services, including medical care, take a hit as well. The housing situation on island makes it “more difficult to recruit,” says Nantucket Cottage Hospital president Amy Lee. The entire state of Massachusetts is suffering a shortage of nurses and radiology and surgical technicians, she reports. But Nantucket is at a particular kind of disadvantage because of the lack of affordable housing. “That is a reality,” she comments. Some 34 positions also remain unfilled in the school department, about 20 of them teacher positions from kindergarten through high school and the rest teaching assistant and custodian vacancies, says superintendent of schools Elizabeth Hallett. Housing for teachers currently on staff sometimes comes in the form of rentals offered by those who own summer homes and are not here during the school year, she says. “We’re grateful for the 10-month housing,” Hallett remarks, but Nantucket’s teachers need “affordable housing and year-round housing. It’s really hard when you want someone to become part of the community as a teacher, and they come for 10 months but then have to leave when it’s the most beautiful time on the island and there are opportunities to get to know people in a different way.”

Beyond the school department, the town, which also employs police officers, firefighters, airport workers and people in many other municipal positions, is actively recruiting to fill 58 more vacancies. Again, the shortfall is all too easy to understand.

A recent survey filled out by more than 350 town employees indicated that as many as 1 in 2 is housing-cost burdened, with

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Nick Hayden and Daisy
We have heard stories in recent years of people living in a shipping container.
– Tucker Holland “
H

1 in 4 respondents reporting an “extreme” housing cost burden, meaning that more than 50 percent of their gross income goes to keeping a roof over their heads. A patchwork of organizations has worked to ease the crisis. For instance, Housing Nantucket has created 32 affordable year-round rental units over the last 20 years and 113 homes for ownership. And just in the last four years, the Affordable Housing Trust has facilitated the creation of 35 rental units. “We’re marching on the path toward the 490 affordable units required by the state,” Holland says. “We’re currently at 332.” This will continue to improve because from 2019 to 2022, Nantucket voters appropriated an unprecedented $67 million toward housing at Town Meeting, and this year approved a permanent annual $6.5 million allocation for housing funds. If a vote at Town

of year-round housing, both rentals and owned properties, that the island needs to house not just town employees but also shopkeepers and others who make Nantucket a sustainable community. “We’re never going to be able to get there at this pace,” he says.

Fortunately, there are solutions in the offing— although one of them is a maybe. Legislators at the State House are considering passing a law that allows a municipality to levy a transfer fee when a home sells for more than $2 million. For any amount above the first $2 million, a tax of half of 1 percent would go into a housing fund. “Had we had it in place last year,” Holland says, “we would have had another $6 million to make housing attainable for year-rounders. Over time, that could be hundreds of millions more.” Other communities have joined in the clamor for this new law. “Chatham, Brookline, Provincetown, Concord, every town on the Vineyard, they all want something similar,” Holland says. “So there’s some momentum.”

But it’s by no means a done deal. “The chances for passage are 50/50,” says Affordable Housing Trust chair Sullivan. “It has been going

Meeting next spring allows that yearly money to be bonded (that is, used to borrow larger sums), it can pave the way for a loan of as much as $100 million to create yet more units of attainable yearround housing.

Still, the recent infusion of cash is far from a magic wand. “The problem is that we have a $500 million challenge,” Holland says. It’s going to take that much to build the roughly 2,000 units

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Tucker Holland and Brian Sullivan
We’re marching on the path toward the 490 affordable units required by the state...
We’re currently at 332.
“ ”
– Tucker Holland

on for seven years. Realtor association lobbyists, a strong group, are fighting a fee because they don’t want to see a new tax related to real estate.”

Sullivan, himself a Realtor on island, says, “I can no longer profit in this real estate market without this being part of the solution.”

Others on island also want to see a transfer fee for the sale of houses over $2 million. The island’s Advisory Committee of Non-Voting Taxpayers,

made up of seasonal residents who often have significant real estate holdings, has written to the Select Board on more than one occasion to voice its support, even though the fee would be paid by them should they go to sell (unlike the 2 percent Land Bank transfer fee, which is paid by the buyer). Says the committee’s immediate past chair, Gary Beller, “Nantucket is really a magical island. But the working folks who are in the

normal day-to-day jobs of running businesses—plumbers, carpenters, store owners, restaurateurs—they need to have some subsidy from the town in order to bridge the gap between people who are able to afford housing easily and those who are not.”

Another piece of the affordable housing solution is a done deal. A new nonprofit, the Nantucket Land Trust, was founded this summer for the express purpose of creating housing

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Nantucket is really a magical island. But the working folks who are in the normal day-to-day jobs of running businesses—plumbers, carpenters, store owners, restaurateurs—they need to have some subsidy from the town in order to bridge the gap between people who are able to afford housing easily and those who are not.

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“ ”

that is attainable for middle class year-round residents. It works in a few different ways. First, if someone wants to sell their home but make it affordable for those in the year-round community, they can offer it to the trust for less than market value. Such a decision does not have to mean actually giving up any money. If a home is worth, say, $2 million,

percent of the island is in the hands of conservation organizations, and that does not include town-owned land. Less than 4 percent of the island is developable today.” Because the land doesn’t exist to build all the affordable housing necessary, turning existing housing stock into affordable real estate for year-rounders in perpetuity is a practical way to help fill in the gap.

“Thirty years ago, the proverbial fireman or teacher could come here and afford a house for a couple hundred thousand dollars on Hooper Farm Road,”

making a donation to a nonprofit, the next year-rounder will be able to move in, and Nantucket won’t keep experiencing what Holland calls “a drain of people that the island needs.”

The tax breaks alone won’t cut it; contributions directly to the trust will most definitely be needed, too. “Solving the island’s housing crisis is only going to happen with people’s largesse,” Sullivan says. “We need massive funding” to make it happen.

Holland agrees. “There’s no silver bullet,” he comments. “One single approach isn’t going to be able to do everything. But

an IRS-approved “bargain sale” to the nonprofit trust at something along the lines of $1.2 to $1.4 million might confer a tax advantage in the form of a write-off. Sellers can work through the numbers with their tax advisors to see if it would work for them. If it does, the house, now in the trust’s hands, becomes more affordable to the next buyer. For example, if the house and land together now cost $1.4 million, the trust can sell just the home to the new buyer for something along the lines of $800,000 to $900,000. Once the home passes into new hands, it remains available in perpetuity to households not earning more than 240 percent of the annual median income—$136,000 in 2023.

The creation of the new trust is a critical step, Holland says, because “we can’t entirely build our way out of the housing problem by creating new residences. Fifty-three

Holland says. “Now they’re retiring. They want to be closer to the kids and grandkids in North Carolina. When they go to sell, their $200,000 home is now worth $2 million. The new fireman and teacher coming in behind them can’t afford that.” But if the retirees sell their home to the Nantucket Land Trust and take advantage of the tax write-off for

the Nantucket Land Trust helps fill in a couple of missing pieces that we need in order to move faster to sustain a vibrant community.”

Seasonal islander/homeowner

Rick Hohlt puts sustaining the community like this: “I’m 75. I want an ambulance driver who can afford to live here so he’ll show up when I have a medical emergency.”

For more information on the newly formed Nantucket Land Trust, a 501(c)3 nonprofit, go to nantucketlandtrust.org.

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I can no longer profit in this real estate market without this being part of the solution.
– Brian Sullivan

784 Grant Requests

691

Grants Funded

92 Organizations Supported 2002 Initiation of Grant Program

$1MM Largest Grant/ The Nantucket Boys and Girls Club

Organizations receiving NCGF grants in 2022

A Safe Place

Addiction Solutions of Nantucket

Artists Association

Bulgarian Education Center

Egan Maritime Institute

Fairwinds

Friends of Nantucket Public Schools

Harvey Foundation

Health Imperatives-Nantucket

Inky Santa Toy Drive

Maria Mitchell Association

NAMI Cape Cod, Inc.

Nantucket Atheneum

Nantucket Book Foundation

Nantucket Boys & Girls Club

Nantucket Comedy Festival

Nantucket Community Music Center

Nantucket Community Sailing

Nantucket Community School

Nantucket Community Television

Nantucket Cottage Hospital

Nantucket Dreamland Foundation

Nantucket Film Foundation

Nantucket Flying Association

Nantucket Historical Association

Nantucket Ice

Nantucket Island Little League

Nantucket Lighthouse School

Nantucket New School

Nantucket Resource Partnership

Nantucket Student Lacrosse

Nantucket Student Soccer

Nantucket Swim Team Boosters (Dolphins)

New England Life Flight

Our House Nantucket

Rising Tide Preschool

Small Friends On Nantucket

Strong Wings

Sustainable Nantucket

Theatre Workshop of Nantucket

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Grant Program

Through the generous support of the members of Nantucket Golf Club, their guests and others, the Nantucket Golf Club Foundation has raised over $40 million over the last 21 years for the benefit of Nantucket youth. Thank you!

Originating in 2006, the Nantucket Scholar Program provides full four-year scholarships for two Nantucket High School seniors each year.

In 2018, the NGCF expanded its support to Nantucket students by assisting those continuing their vocational studies beyond high school.

2023 Nantucket Scholars Scholarship Programs

Ellie Kinsella

Northeastern University

Boston, MA

Wes Thornewill Boston University Boston, MA

2023 Vocational Scholarship Recipients

Jack Billings

School Attending: Wentworth Institute of Technology (MA)

Specific Field of Study: Construction Management

Edenilson Chacon

School Attending: Benjamin Franklin Cummings Institute of Tech. (MA)

Specific Field of Study: Practical Electricity

Samuel Cristler

School Attending: University of Mississippi

Specific Field of Study: Sports Administration

James Cronin

School Attending: Massachusetts College of Art

Specific Field of Study: Illustration

Stella Glowacki

School Attending: Massachusetts College of Art

Specific Field of Study: Illustration and Communication Design

Hunter Gross

School Attending: ECAM Lasalle (Lyon, France)

Specific Field of Study: Mechanical and Electrical Engineering

Maddux Hinson

School Attending: Maine College of Art

Specific Field of Study: Photography

Evan Keeler

School Attending: Johnson & Wales University (RI)

Specific Field of Study: Culinary Arts

Colin Lynch

School Attending: Wentworth Institute of Technology (MA)

Specific Field of Study: Civil Engineering

Sara Marshall

School Attending: Clemson University (SC)

Specific Field of Study: Nursing

Sean Murphy

School Attending: University of Miami (FL)

Specific Field of Study: Sports Management

Olivia Scott

School Attending: Simmons University (MA)

Specific Field of Study: Nursing-Pediatrics

Luke Stringer

School Attending: Massachusetts Maritime Academy

Specific Field of Study: Marine Transportation

Nathalia Tobar

School Attending: Cape Cod Community College (MA)

Specific Field of Study: Nursing-Infusion Therapy

Gabriel Zinser

School Attending: Belmont University (TN)

Specific Field of Study: Music Performance

36 Nantucket Scholars since 2006

42

Vocational Scholarships since 2018

52 Institutions of Higher Education Attended

2006 Initiation of Scholarship Program

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BRANCH OF

BURCH

NEELY AND CHLOE BURCH MAKE A STYLISH IMPACT ON NANTUCKET

In the hierarchy of fashion, there are names that everyone knows. Ralph Lauren, Lilly Pulitzer, Tommy Hilfiger. And then there’s Burch, as in the eponymous Tory Burch— but now there’s a new generation of the entrepreneurial family at the helm. Meet sisters Neely and Chloe Burch, the faces behind the approachable luxury accessories brand Neely & Chloe and Tory Burch’s nieces.

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The brand itself has been deemed a success since its launch in 2016 with a bevy of bestselling handbags, travel wallets, jewelry cases, vanity cases, diaper bags and more. It celebrates a pivotal seven-year anniversary this fall. And the brand’s success comes as no surprise, with a retail-forward family helping to guide them along the way. “We always say, a lot of times doctors’ kids become doctors and lawyers’ kids become lawyers, and for us it’s been entrepreneurs’ and retailers’ children become entrepreneurs and retailers,” Neely says. “It was

what we grew up talking about at the dinner table. And we were very lucky to have a lot of sounding boards as we went out into the space.”

This includes their uncle, who owned Eagle’s Eye for a number of years before it became the HaulOver Nantucket. Growing up, the sisters spent summers living in the apartment above the store. Core memories come in the form of playing on Children’s Beach and hanging out at the former Rope Walk (now Cru), as well as being allowed to walk to the nearby video rental store with their mom close behind. Today, the girls still spend time on the island, more specifically in ’Sconset, where Chloe’s in-laws own a home. “It’s just so picturesque and we can walk everywhere. We love walking to the lighthouse,” Chloe says, noting the market and Chanticleer as other favorites.

With their roots in Nantucket, it’s fitting that the sisters recently launched two Grey Lady-inspired collections. One, in collaboration with lifestyle blogger Carly Riordan, features blue and white summerready stripes printed across pillowed totes, cotton twillies, handwoven leather bags and more. “Getting to sneak up to Nantucket in

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May was so much fun for our shoot, and we got very lucky with the weather—everyone knows it can be touchy at that time of year,” Neely adds. The second collaboration with Cartolina Nantucket debuted last month and adds a playful and colorful touch to complement the Carly collection, which is on the classic side.

“What’s so nice about Nantucket is that it’s so classic; it’s the picturesque New England summer. And so you get a lot of that in the fashion world and [that’s] what we’ve tried to do with Carly’s [collection], but then it’s become

such a popular spot that you’re now getting an influx of new people coming [who are] bringing a little bit more of a trend-driven [style] to the island and I think that’s what you’re seeing a little bit with Cartolina,” Chloe explains. Both collections are available throughout the summer on the Neely & Chloe website, as well as locally in Cartolina Nantucket’s storefront.

Looking forward, Neely and Chloe plan to stay as prominent figures in the island’s evolutionary fashion scene, which prides itself on the timeless classics we so love. “It feels so synergistic with Neely & Chloe as a whole … this idea that just like Nantucket, we’re grounded in these classic concepts, these evergreen ideas that you can always go back to time and time again,” Neely concludes. “It’s the Nantucket red pants. It’s the striped shirt. … And that’s what we feel is really the core of what we do and what we build and why it’s so much fun then to throw a fun pattern on it. … And to iterate on that with a little bit of newness and freshness coming in is such a fun way, and that’s what it’s been feeling like on Nantucket lately.”

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140 N MAGAZINE the HONEYBEE collection SUSAN LISTER LOCKE Jeweler Nantucket · Palm Beach 28 Easy Street, On The Waterfront 508.228.2132 susanlisterlocke@gmail.com SUSANLISTERLOCKE.COM @susanlisterlockejeweler
141 N-MAGAZINE.COM Residential Vacation Rentals Land Commercial islandpropertiesre.com 508-228-6999 35A Old South Road, Nantucket, MA

HIM SHIRT AND PANTS: 120% LINO

SWEATSHIRT ON ARM: INKERMAN

HER DRESS: BEAU & RO

BELT: SARA CAMPBELL

NECKLACE: FEDE

HAIRBAND: VINEYARD VINES VIA MURRAY’S TOGGERY SHOP

RING (shown left): ICARUS AND CO.

RING (shown right) AND BAG: CURRENT VINTAGE

n vogue

PHOTOGRAPHER: BRIAN SAGER

WARDROBE STYLIST: LEXY KAROLYI

MAKEUP STYLIST: JURGITA BUDAITE OF ISLAND GLOW

HAIR STYLIST: KATE DIGGIN OF RJ MILLER

PRODUCTION ASSISTANT: RYLE FERGUSON

MALE MODEL: ALDEN BLEASE OF MAGGIE INC.

FEMALE MODEL: SYDNEY JENKINS OF MAGGIE INC.

HER DRESS: REMY GOLD NECKLACES AND RING

(shown left): ICARUS & CO. GOLD AND PINK RING

(shown left): SUSAN LISTER LOCKE BRACELET AND RING (shown right): THE VAULT PICNIC BASKET: CURRENT VINTAGE HIM SHIRT AND SHORTS: MURRAY’S TOGGERY SHOP

BATHING SUIT: VINEYARD VINES

JEWELRY: SEAMAN SCHEPPS

COVERUP: SARA CAMPBELL

RINGS AND BRACELET:

SUSAN LISTER LOCKE

EARRINGS: SEAMAN SCHEPPS

BAG: REMY

HAIRBAND: MURRAY’S TOGGERY SHOP

HER

SHIRT AND BATHING SUIT BOTTOMS: CURRENT VINTAGE

JEWELRY: SUSAN LISTER LOCKE

HIM

HAT: REMY SWIM TRUNKS: INKERMAN

BATHING SUIT: VINEYARD VINES

NECKLACE: SUSAN LISTER LOCKE

SWEATSHIRT: BEAU & RO

HAT AND SHORTS: DUCK HEAD

SHIRT: MURRAY’S TOGGERY SHOP

SHORTS: FREE FLY APPAREL

SHOES: INKERMAN

DRESS: REMY

BRACELETS: GRESHAM

SUNGLASSES: BEAU & RO

BLANKET (thrown over chair): MURRAY’S TOGGERY SHOP

HER HAT: REMY

NECKLACES AND EARRINGS: SEAMAN SCHEPPS

RING AND BOTTOM BRACELET: THE VAULT NECKLACE WORN AS TOP BRACELET: FEDE BATHING SUIT: MURRAY’S TOGGERY SHOP

HIM

SWIM TRUNKS AND SUNGLASSES: MURRAY’S TOGGERY SHOP

BATHING SUIT TOP AND VISOR: VINEYARD VINES VIA MURRAY’S TOGGERY SHOP SKIRT: VINEYARD VINES SWEATER (shown tied around waist): SARA CAMPBELL NECKLACES AND BRACELETS (shown left): HEIDI WEDDENDORF BRACELETS (shown right) AND RINGS: ICARUS & CO.

and frugal or lavish and elegant, the newly reimagined Whitehall is your Coastal Maine setting for modern, outside-of-the-box events. Plan your intimate wedding ceremony, reception or rehearsal dinner—or ask about booking the entire inn, and enjoy the best of Midcoast Maine all weekend long. whitehallmaine.com 207-236-3391 52 Main Street, Camden, Maine
The way Maine weddings should be. Charming
BRIDE AND GROUP PHOTOS BY LEAH FISHER PHOTOGRAPHY
155 N-MAGAZINE.COM LUXURY RESIDENCE TORI MACDOWELL TMACDOWELL@ADVISORSLIVING.COM 402.875.3192 COPLEY SQUARE | BOSTON 2,702 SQFT | 3 BED | 3 FULL BATH TRINITY PLACE 1 HUNTINGTON AVENUE RESIDENCE 603

READING RAINBOW

Hernan Diaz, Jodi Picoult, Jennifer Finney Boylan, Imani Perry, Tracy Kidder, Stacy Schiff and Luke Russert were among the featured authors during the 12th annual Nantucket Book Festival. Taking place June 15-18, this year’s fête included 22 free author presentations throughout the weekend, a Nanpuppets show, a youth poetry workshop and performances by Humans & Poetry and Nantucket’s The Shep Cats at the Chicken Box. Over the years, the festival has continued to establish itself as a major summer destination for booklovers with an impressive and eclectic lineup of award-winning authors.

156 N MAGAZINE FOGGY SHEET
1) Kaley Kokomoor 2) Danielle Trussoni 3) Luke Russert and Rob Cocuzzo 4) Tiya Miles 5) Wyn Cooper 6) Sarah Stodola and Mindy Todd
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
7) Sebastian Junger, Jodi Picoult, Luke Russert, Imani Perry 8) Samantha Hunt
157 N-MAGAZINE.COM PHOTOS COURTESY OF TIM EHRENBERG
9 10 11 13 14 15 16 12
9) Emma Straub and Tim Ehrenberg 10) James Scheurell, Jodi Picoult, Deedie Boylan, Jennifer Finney Boylan, Melissa Philbrick, Tim Van Leer, Nathaniel Philbrick, Tim Ehrenberg 11) Holly Finigan 12) Hernan Diaz 13) Tim Ehrenberg, Jodi Picoult, and Jennifer Finney Boylan 14) Mary Haft and Sally Bedell Smith 15) Dolen Perkins-Valdez 16) Mary Bergman, Jessie Greengrass, Sarah Stodola, Tiya Miles

1) Lynn Novick, Nicole Holofcener and Jenny Han during the 2023 Screenwriters Tribute

2) Libby Wadle, Ophira Eisenberg, Allison Williams, Nicole Holofcener and Michaela Watkins during Women Behind the Words

3) Sophie Skelton and Miriam Mintz during the Tony Cox Awards 4) Katy Knox and Michael Knox 5) Katy Knox and Priscilla Jiminian

6) Lola Tung during the 2023 Screenwriters

Tribute 7) Joan Baez during Joan Baez

I Am a Noise 8) Christian Blauvelt, Donick Cary, Sophie Barthes and Opus Moreschi during Morning Coffee

158 N MAGAZINE FOGGY SHEET
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

LIGHTS, CAMERA, ACTION!

Locals and visitors alike lined up to experience the best of the 28th annual Nantucket Film Festival, which took place June 21-26. After days of parties, films, keynotes and more, the festival announced the audience winners, including My Sailor, My Love, directed by Klaus Härö and written by Jimmy Karlsson and Kirsi Vikman; Morgan Neville and Jeff Malmberg’s The Saint of Second Chances; and Robert Schwartzman’s Hung

Up on a Dream. 9) Chris Matthews and Kathleen Matthews during The Politics of Food 10) Joan Baez and Maureen Orth 11) Atmosphere during the Elemental Screening 12) Ophira Eisenberg during Late Night Storytelling 13) The audience during the 2023 Screenwriters Tribute
9 10 11 12 13 14 PHOTOS COURTESY OF ANDREW H. WALKER/NANTUCKET FILM FESTIVAL/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
14) David Strathairn

A SHUCKFUL OF FUN

Hosted at Cisco Brewers on June 4, the 2023 Nantucket Oysterfest went off without a hitch thanks to the Nantucket Shellfish Association. All six local farms—Pocomo Meadow Oysters, Fifth Bend Oysters, Island Oysters, Great Harbor Oysters, Devils Creek Oysters and Grey Lady Oysters—participated in the event, which shucked an outstanding 11,000-plus oysters.

160 N MAGAZINE FOGGY SHEET
1) Ollie Kathawala, Terry Ruggiero, Campbell Herr (Grey Lady Oysters) 2) Front row: Sean Fitzgibbon (Devils Creek Oysters), Emil Bender (Pocomo Meadow Oysters), Ross Scherma; Back row: Reena Adiago, Brooks Robbie, John Balling, Ryan Murray, Mark Ranney; Trevor Cohen, Dan Lemaitre, Xander Raith, Ry Murphy
2 1 3 4 5
3) Guests lined up to get a taste of the offered oysters 4) Jim Sjolund, Matt Anderson, Simon Edwardes 5) Xander Raith, Dan Lemaitre, Brooks Robbie
161 N-MAGAZINE.COM PHOTOS COURTESY OF TUCKER FINERTY 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
6) Front: Tiffany & Dan Balling; Back: Xander Raith, Aria Dasbach, Dan Lemaitre, Trevor Cohen, John Balling, Sean Fitzgibbon 7) Carl Bois, Pete Kaizer, Bob Decosta 8) Refreshments from Cisco Brewers complemented the mollusks 9) A closer look at one of the shucked oysters 10) Naomi Silverstein 11) Mike LaMagna & Samantha Denette (Nantucket Shellfish Association Executive Director) 12) Benj Raith, Gus Day, Mac Raith (Island Oysters), Chris Raith
162 N MAGAZINE 5 South Beach St Nantucket, MA 02554 508-680-1626 www saracampbell com | @saracampbellltd Dress to impress! donehome com Films Storytelling Live Theatre Live Game Shows Stand-Up Comedy Educational Programming Live Concerts Conversations Live Broadcasts Community Events Gaming Tournaments Rental Opportunities S e e o u r f u l l s c h e d u l e a t N a n t u c k e t D r e a m l a n d . o r g o r s c a n t h e Q R C o d e a b o v e w i t h y o u r m o b i l e d e v i c e ! NANTUCKETISLANDGLOW COM LASHES SKIN CARE SUNLESS TAN HAIR REMOVAL MAKEUP TEXT +1(508) 680-4715 TO BOOK TODAY!
163 N-MAGAZINE.COM 9B Bayberry Court | PO Box 204 508-825-9993 Your gift to the Nantucket Fund will help us continue our work to support a healthy and connected community for all who call Nantucket home. To learn more & donate, visit: cfnan.org The Community Foundation for Nantucket is a trusted and unique resource for the Nantucket community. Invest in Nantucket To make a gift, visit cfnan.org, or hold your phone camera up to our flowcode:

NOW ON DISPLAY THROUGH NOVEMBER 1, 2023

Telling the story of Nantucket as a summer destination, from the opening of the first tourist hotels in the 1840s to the multi-billion-dollar real-estate, construction, and rental economy of today.

Learn more and book your visit at NHA.org

NANTUCKET WHALING MUSEUM | 13 BROAD STREET | 508-228-1894 PRESENTS ITS FEATURED EXHIBITION
@ackhistory

BACK SADDLE in the

From horse-drawn carriages to racing and leisurely strolls, Nantucket’s long been an island of equestrian connoisseurs.

165 N-MAGAZINE.COM
n ha IMAGES COURTESY OF NANTUCKET HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION’S ARCHIVES
Man and a child on a horse-drawn cart on New Street, in Siasconset, with the Union Chapel in the background. Alfred Folger made the village ice cream.
166 N MAGAZINE
A ship and two dories offshore, a crowd of people, carts and horses on shore. Revenue Cutter landing passengers and mail at Quidnet, during a freeze-up. Crowd of people watching a horse race at the Fairgrounds track.
167 N-MAGAZINE.COM
Horse-drawn taxis (c. 1900s) on Steamboat Wharf, waiting for passengers near the train station. Competition for fares from incoming visitors was fierce. Three people and a horse in front of the cottage“Camp Dewey.” Cottage, most likely 7 Elbow Lane, with people relaxing and a horse-drawn carriage outside. Labeled by photographer: A Siasconset Cottage. A group of seven people on horseback at the main entrance to the Point Breeze Hotel.
168 N MAGAZINE
Several people on the beach, with a horse pulling a fishing dory away from the shore. Another fisherman is in the background. Label: Landing fish at Quidnet. Drew Farm with a man behind a plow drawn by two white horses. Postcard of a busy day on Main Street, showing shops and cars, with a horse-drawn carriage waiting at the corner of Orange Street. An unidentified group of women and children in a horse drawn wagon beside a water pump. Hamblin Farm on Cliff Road is in the background. Captain William Baxter holding a horse hitched up to a surrey parked in front of the barn at 117 Main Street. The barn wallis decorated with nameboards and other ship carvings.
169 N-MAGAZINE.COM
View of Tuckernuck Landing, with two dories at the shore, a horse-drawn cart standing by, with more boats and lumber on the beach, as well as a shack and a group of people. Horse-drawn cart loaded with equipment passing in front of 144 Orange Street. Handwritten on photo: “Moving new engine to Wyers Valley, March 7th 1921 ” A woman on horseback beside an unidentified gambrel-roofed house. View of crowd waiting to board the Dauntless catboat, which ran from Old North Wharf to the pier east of the west jetty. Also in view are bathers, people on the beach, a horse and carriage and other dories and catboats.
170 N MAGAZINE See our full schedule at See our full schedule at See our full at N a n t u c k e t D r e a m l a n d . o r g N a n t u c k e t D r e a m l a n d . o r g N a n t u c k e t D e a l a n d . o r g or Scan the QR Code with your Mobile device! or Scan the QR Code with your Mobile device! or Scan the QR Code with your Mobile device! Tel: 508.325.6777 atlanticlandscapinginc.com Complete Landscape Design, Installation & Maintenance on Nantucket atlanticlandscaping

Introducing Nantucket’s Hottest Podcast

BOOKS, BEACH & BEYOND

#1 Bestselling Author Elin Hilderbrand and Tim Ehrenberg like you've never heard them before

Join Elin Hilderbrand, #1 New York Times bestselling author of 30 titles and the “Queen of the Beach Reads,” and Tim Ehrenberg, Nantucket’s most voracious reader and creator of the popular Tim Talks Books, as they hit the airwaves in an exclusive podcast produced by N Magazine

In what is poised to become one of the most listened to literary podcasts in the country, Books, Beach, & Beyond features special guests from bestselling and recognizable authors, to publishing industry insiders, to

local island legends who feature prominently in Hilderbrand’s prolific Nantucket stories. Discussing topics ranging from what it’s like to take a book to the screen, to the connection between a reader and a story’s characters, to the intricacies and intimate details of an author’s writing process, Hilderbrand and Ehrenberg bring books to life on the airwaves in a brand-new way!

171 N-MAGAZINE.COM BOOKS BEACH & BEYOND WITH ELIN HILDERBRAND & TIM TALKS BOOKS
THANK YOU TO OUR SEASON 1 PREMIER SPONSORS N
SCAN TO SUBSCRIBE & LISTEN
featured wedding

Bride: Kate Healey • Groom: Theo Dewez

Venue: The Wauwinet • Wedding Planner

& Designer: AJ Events • Photographer: Michael Blanchard Photographer • Lighting: Jacob Creative Co. • Caterer: The Wauwinet

Cake: The Wauwinet • Florist: Orly Khon Floral

Officiant: Christine Mockus • Invitations and Stationary: AJ Events • Escort Wall: AJ Events

Tent: Peak Event Services • Bridal Hair: Tina Sullivan, Forma the Salon • Bridal Makeup: Rita Sorrentino Makeup • Bride’s Dress: Galia Lahav Bride’s Second Dress: J. Andreatta

Groom’s Tuxedo: Ralph Lauren

Band: Hudson Horns

Look who is quoting the Current.

Nantucket Current is the fastest growing digital news source on the island, providing instant news to your phone or computer three times a week.

The Current has gained more readers in a shorter period of time than any news source on the island. The news doesn't wait to break every Thursday, so why should you? Discover why thousands of Nantucketers now view the current as their single source of news.

174 N MAGAZINE N MON • WED • FRI
SIGN UP AT WWW.NANTUCKETCURRENT.COM OR SCAN FLOWCODE TO SUBSCRIBE EVERYTHING ELSE IS OLD NEWS TM

Year Up, a leading non-profit job training program, serves young adults who are often overlooked as a source of talent but are motivated, resilient, and bring a diverse range of skills, experiences, and perspectives to the workforce. These young adults are capable and driven to succeed, but they lack access to quality job pathways and economic mobility due to systemic barriers and social and economic inequities.

For over 20 years, Year Up has provided its program participants with the opportunity to develop essential career readiness and business skills, build foundational technical capabilities, and complete an immersive, workbased experience with one of their 250+ leading employer partners like Bank of America, Vertex Pharmaceuticals, Salesforce, and JPMorgan Chase, among others. Throughout the entirety of their program, participants receive ongoing coaching and have access to a robust offering of services and support to promote their success. Year Up’s mission is to close the Opportunity Divide by ensuring that all young adults gain the skills, experiences, and support that will empower them to reach their potential through careers and higher education.

40,000+ STUDENTS SERVED

$52,000

“We could not be more supportive of the life changing work Year Up does to connect underserved young adults to career pathways. Given 23 years of leadership and proven impact, we value the ROI and potential for scale our philanthropic investment affords us, Year Up and the amazing students they serve.”

Kio Ortega was working as a dental assistant when her cousin posted on Facebook about her positive Year Up experience. As a single mother, Kio strived for more, and she saw an opportunity.

Year Up’s project management training, along with Kio’s grit and resilience and a tight-knit support network, formed the foundation of her work at one of the most prestigious universities in the world, Harvard University. Her hard work paid off. Harvard hired Kio full-time as a program assistant the day after she finished her internship. Now, four years later, Kio serves as a senior program coordinator.

Kio hopes her success at Harvard inspires her siblings to follow in her footsteps and pursue Year Up. “I didn’t have any role models growing up, and now I am one to my son,” Kio says. “My goal was that I didn’t want to be a statistic. Now, I’m not. I’m breaking generational curses of poverty, aiming to be the adult that I needed growing up, and working on being that person every day.”

80% GRADUATES EMPLOYED AND/OR ENROLLED IN POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION WITHIN 4 MONTHS OF GRADUATION

“Anne and I are hosting a Nantucket event in August for Year Up because we have enormous respect for their mission, leadership, and proven success. I have had the chance to see firsthand the talent and impact Year Up’s young adults have brought to Bank of America, making it a win-win partnership that will only continue to expand.”

INTERESTED IN LEARNING MORE ABOUT ATTENDING OUR NANTUCKET EVENT ON AUGUST 17TH OR RECEIVING INFORMATION ABOUT HOW YOU CAN SUPPORT YEAR UP?

PLEASE EMAIL MSANTOS@YEARUP.ORG

175 N-MAGAZINE.COM
JOSH & ANITA BEKENSTEIN
AVERAGE STARTING ANNUAL SALARY OF YEAR UP GRADUATES
GIFFORD KIO ORTEGA YEAR UP GRADUATE Senior Program Coordinator, Harvard University

HAMMER TIME

A QUICK CHAT WITH FINE CARPENTER AND DJ, SANDY KOHNER

What’s one lost thing from growing up on Nantucket that you’d like back?

The bowling alley.

What’s your favorite venue on island to play as a DJ and why?

The Charlie Noble, because it’s where I’ll be deejaying every third Saturday this summer.

If you could change one aspect of the Historic District Commission code to alter the appearance of island homes,what would it be?

Allowing insulated glass in the core district. It makes no sense that you can’t, so everyone uses aluminum storm windows, which are definitely not historic.

What’s a hidden gem on Nantucket that only locals know about?

Can’t tell you about that! We try to keep it a secret.

As a fine carpenter, what do you take the most pride in building and why?

Staircases. They can be the centerpiece of the house and they are always something people notice.

What could you absolutely not live without on Nantucket?

The amazing people and community.

What does a quiet day off look like for Sandy Kohner?

Relaxing coffee. A little bit of reading. Playing some music. Beach in the summer. Netflix in the winter.

What concerns you most about the future of the island?

Affordable yearround rentals.

What’s the biggest faux pas of the new Nantucket?

I feel like people need to learn to slow down in the summer and try to relax. Nobody likes the traffic, the lines or the crowded Stop & Shop, but we are all in it together—stop being in a rush.

What’s one thing that most people don’t know about you?

Growing up on Nantucket, I feel like everyone knows everything about everyone, but I’m just a nice, sensitive guy, constantly trying to be the best version of myself every day.

176 N MAGAZINE
n ot so fast
INTERVIEW BY ROBERT COCUZZO PHOTOGRAPHY BY KIT NOBLE
178 N MAGAZINE N Magazine
120% Lino 21 Broad Advisors Living Alexandra Nuttall Design Alitex Allied Marine Artists Association of Nantucket Atlantic Landscaping Audrey Sterk Interior Design Balfour Senior Living Bar Yoshi BHHS Island Properties Bierly Drake and Steele Books, Beach, & Beyond Carolyn Thayer Interiors Cheney Custom Homes Chip Webster Architecture Christian Angle Real Estate Citizens Bank CMC Construction Community Foundation for Nantucket Compass Compass - The Private Client Network Compass - Nick Gavin Properties Compass - The Nantucket Advisory Group Current Vintage Cynthia Hayes Interior Design Douglas Elliman Douglas Elliman - Lydia Sussek Eleish Van Breems Epique Pelican Bay Fairwinds Fisher Real Estate Fisher Real Estate - Brian Sullivan Forme Four Winds Painting Geronimo's Great Point Properties Gresham Gull Air Heidi Weddendorf Inkerman Island Glow Nantucket J. Pepper Frazier Co. James Robinson John's Island Real Estate Jordan Real Estate Katherine Grover Fine Jewelry Kathleen Hay Designs Lee Real Estate Maury People - Chandra Miller Maury People - Bernadette Meyer Maury People - Gary Winn Maury People - Will Maier Murray's Toggery Nantucket Cottage Hospital Nantucket Current Nantucket Golf Club Nantucket Historical Association Olson Twombly Interior Design Onne van der Wal Gallery Pella REMY RJ Miller Salon Run for Robin Russell Simpson Sam Edelman Sanford & Sanford Real Estate Sara Campbell Seaman Schepps Serenella Sotheby's - Frances Peter, Todd Peter Susan Lister Locke The Dreamland The Vault Tom Hanlon Landscaping Toscana Tradewind Undone Home VanderHorn Architects Vineyard Vines Whitehall William Raveis Nantucket Year Up 16 177 9, 155 74 3 29 57 170 15 120 120 141 23 171 26 33 7 6 32 19 163 112, 113 66, 67 25 47 126 42 31 119 12 27 127 28 87 178 106 106 22 92 49 126 126 162 20, 21, 81 42 93 51 80 5 100, 101 17 179 2 34 126 45 174 134, 135 164 30 121 8 140 178 86 80 35 75 162 4 18 13 140 162, 170 53 92 55 24 162 10, 11 180 154 14, 107 175 12 Amelia Drive • 508.228.5028 CELEBRATING
ADVERTISING DIRECTORY
Shop new summer styles now, including our limited-edition Nantucket Collection, available exclusively at our Island Boutique. vineyard vines | 2 Straight Wharf | (508) 325-9600 SUMMER REFRESH

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Articles inside

HAMMER TIME

1min
pages 176-179

Look who is quoting the Current.

2min
pages 174-175

BOOKS, BEACH & BEYOND

1min
pages 171-173

A SHUCKFUL OF FUN

1min
pages 160-164

READING RAINBOW

1min
pages 156-158

BURCH

3min
pages 136-155

SHADOWS

10min
pages 128-135

BILLIONAIRES BEHAVING BADLY

6min
pages 123-126

DESIGN ENVY

3min
pages 114-122

BANKING ON THE FUTURE

5min
pages 108-113

DIRT GOOD

2min
pages 103-107

ROBIN 5K R u n F o r

7min
pages 86-102

GOOD DOCTOR THE

4min
pages 82-85

FIGHTING AGAINST TIDE the

4min
pages 77-81

InContrast

3min
pages 69-76

Tim Ehrenberg from “Tim Talks Books” dishes on the hottest reads for summer.

3min
pages 64-65, 67-68

WORK GROUP SETTLES ON BYLAW PROPOSALS

1min
page 63

PEDICABS ARRIVE ON NANTUCKET

1min
page 63

THE SUMMER HOUSE SHUT DOWN

1min
page 62

PRIDE PAINTING IN TOM NEVERS

1min
page 62

ABODE AND BEYOND

3min
pages 60-62

to Die For Food

2min
pages 58-59

Think Big

1min
pages 57-58

HOUSE CALL

2min
page 56

AROUND

2min
pages 54-55

HOT

1min
pages 52-53

“Getting” Nantucket

2min
pages 50-52

SOLD for $38 Million Your Asset is our Priority

3min
pages 47-49

ARE WE AT A TIPPING POINT?

3min
pages 43-44

O n the Cover

1min
pages 40-42
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