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Ashley’s Bend Ashley's Bend is very easy to tie and untie once you have the knack. Even so it is a very secure bend and can put up with a good deal of strain and movement. It can also be used to tie a bend with thin line.

How to tie Ashley’s Bend (A) Take the end of one rope and make a crossing turn by taking the working end (the bit you are

A

moving) around behind the standing part (the long end of the rope you are not using).

(B) Take a second rope and make the crossing turn in the same way by first putting the working end through the first turn. Then lay the second rope over the first turn and take it under itself. Make sure the end of the second turn is lays on top of the standing part of the first turn.

B (C) Now hold the two crossing turns together and take both of the working ends in your other hand.

C (D) - (F) Put both working ends through both turns from front to back.

E

D

F

G (G) Tighten the knot a little by pulling on the two working ends and the two standing parts. You will have to tighten the knot fully by pulling on the two standing parts (in opposite directions). (H)

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H


Buntline Hitch

A

The Buntline Hitch is very useful as it simply will not come undone even when the rope moves about a great deal. It was used on square-sailed ships to secure a line to the Bunt (which is the middle part of a sail).

How to tie a Buntline Hitch (A) - (B) Take the end (working end) of the rope

B

and pass it up through the ring from back to front.

Take the end of the rope behind the long standing part (this forms a half hitch) (C). Then bring it across the front of the half-hitch.

(D) D

C

E

(E) Now double back on yourself and take the working end of the rope behind the half-hitch.

F (F) Bring the end of the rope around to the front of the knot and pass it through the half-hitch

G (G) Pass it all the way through and then pull on the standing part to secure the knot.

H (H) To tighten the knot pull on the long standing part (the bit we didn't use) and the working end (the short bit that did all the running about).

Scouting Resources http://www.scoutingresources.org.uk/ Š Darren Dowling – webmaster@scoutingresources.org.uk


Buntline Hitch

A

The Buntline Hitch is very useful as it simply will not come undone even when the rope moves about a great deal. It was used on square-sailed ships to secure a line to the Bunt (which is the middle part of a sail).

How to tie a Buntline Hitch (A) - (B) Take the end (working end) of the rope

B

and pass it up through the ring from back to front.

Take the end of the rope behind the long standing part (this forms a half hitch) (C). Then bring it across the front of the half-hitch.

(D) D

C

E

(E) Now double back on yourself and take the working end of the rope behind the half-hitch.

F (F) Bring the end of the rope around to the front of the knot and pass it through the half-hitch

G (G) Pass it all the way through and then pull on the standing part to secure the knot.

H (H) To tighten the knot pull on the long standing part (the bit we didn't use) and the working end (the short bit that did all the running about).

Scouting Resources http://www.scoutingresources.org.uk/ Š Darren Dowling – webmaster@scoutingresources.org.uk


Carrick Bend A Carrick bend is probably the nearest you will get to a perfect bend. It is symmetrical, easy to tie and very strong. It will not slip or jam and so is very easy to untie as well. It is the ideal knot to use when joining heavy cable. You can let the knot tighten and collapse on itself when the strain is taken on the ends.

How to tie a Carrick Bend (A) Take the end of a length of rope and cross it over itself to make a crossing turn.

(B) Take the end (working end) of a second B piece of rope (green) so that it lies across the

A

crossing turn.

C (C) Now take the second end (green) and take it under the standing end of the first rope and then over and across the working end of the first rope.

(D) D (E) Take the second end (green) under the crossing turn and then across the top of itself (F) . Then tuck it underneath the crossing turn of the first rope. (G)

G

E

F

(H) Pull on all four ends to tighten the knot. (I) I

H

(J) Ensure the knot is tight although the Carrick Bend does a good job by itself if you simply put strain on the ends of the rope. It collapses in on itself and becomes secure. Scouting Resources http://www.scoutingresources.org.uk/ Š Darren Dowling – webmaster@scoutingresources.org.uk

J


Constrictor Hitch The Constrictor Hitch is formed from a Clove Hitch although it will bind much tighter than a Clove Hitch. The last tuck of the hitch holds the rope in place as the ends are pulled. The only trouble is that it binds so tightly that it is very hard to undo and you may have to cut the rope.

How to tie a Constrictor Hitch

(A) Repeat the first few steps of a Clove Hitch as normal.

A

(B) Do not pull the knot tight yet. Pass the working end (green end) over the top of the first turn.

B (C) Now pass the working end under the first turn as shown. Pull the end through.

C D

(D) Pull on the working end (green end) and the standing part (long end of the rope) to tighten the knot. (E)

E

Scouting Resources http://www.scoutingresources.org.uk/ Š Darren Dowling – webmaster@scoutingresources.org.uk


Cow Hitch or Lark’s Head The Cow Hitch is also known as the Lark's Head. It is just two half-hitches tied in opposite directions. It is perhaps the least secure of any hitch as you need to apply equal strain to both ends to make sure that the knot is secure. However an extra tuck can change this insecure knot into a very secure one, the Pedigree Cow.

How to tie a Cow Hitch A

(A) - (B)

B

Double a length of rope to form a bight. Pass this bight up through the ring or around the pole (from back to front). Make sure the bight is nice and wide and sits either side of the long ends that you are not using (standing parts)

C) - (D) Pull the standing parts up through the bight.

C

D

E

(E) Pull tight.

How to tie a Pedigree Cow Hitch If only one end of the rope is going to take some strain you can use a Pedigree Cow Hitch. Repeat as above. Now take the end of the rope and pass it between the bight and the ring

F

G

(F) - (H) . H

J I

(I) - (J) Pass it all the way through and then pull on the standing part to secure the knot.

Scouting Resources http://www.scoutingresources.org.uk/ © Darren Dowling – webmaster@scoutingresources.org.uk


Figure-of-Eight Hitch This hitch can be tied very quickly and is easy to untie. However it is not very secure.

How to tie a Figure-of-Eight Hitch A (A) Take the working end (black end) around the ring and lay it across the long standing part. (B)

B

C (C)

Now change direction and take the working end back under the standing part.

D (D)

Pass the working end up over the hitch and through the top of the knot as shown.

Scouting Resources http://www.scoutingresources.org.uk/ Š Darren Dowling – webmaster@scoutingresources.org.uk


Figure of Eight This is essentially formed when you do an extra turn to an Overhand Knot. It is a more solid knot than the Overhand Knot and is easy to untie. It is very useful if you want to prevent a rope from slipping through a hole.

A

How to tie a Figure of Eight (A) Take one end of a rope and make a crossing turn (lay the end of a rope over itself). Make sure you take the working end of the rope over the standing part (the longer part that you are not using...the other end of the rope).

B (B) Now take the working end behind the standing part.

(C) Now bring the working end C

across the front of the knot and pass it through the crossing turn ('loop' at the top of the rope) (D)

D (E) Pull the two ends tight to finish the knot.

E

Scouting Resources http://www.scoutingresources.org.uk/ Š Darren Dowling – webmaster@scoutingresources.org.uk


Fisherman’s Bend This is also known as the Anchor Bend. It is often used for securing a rope to an anchor. You can see that it is very similar to the Round Turn and Two Half-Hitches. The first half-hitch is locked into place by the round turn itself.

How to tie a Fisherman’s Bend

B

A

(A) - (B) Take the working end (black end) of the rope through the ring twice to form a round turn.

(C) Take the working end behind the long standing part. Now tuck it through the round turn. C D Pull the end through. (D)

E

- (E)

F

(F) Now make another half-hitch by taking the end behind the long standing part and then up over the top tucking it inside itself.

G (G)

Tighten the knot by pulling on the standing part and on the working end.

Scouting Resources http://www.scoutingresources.org.uk/ © Darren Dowling – webmaster@scoutingresources.org.uk


Fisherman’s Knot The Fisherman's Knot is simply made up of two overhand knots. It is a very simple knot but quite effective nonetheless. Is is most used with two lines of roughly equal thickness and can be difficult to tie with thick ropes. The Fisherman's Knot is used quite often by anglers and climbers. Note: The Fisherman's Knot is a bend (used to tie two ropes together). However the Fisherman's Bend is actually a hitch (used to tie a rope to or around an object).

How to tie a Fisherman’s Knot (A) Take the end of each rope and place them parallel to each other. (B)

A

B

Take the end of one rope and place it over and around the second length.

(C) - (E) As you come around place the end underneath itself, forming a overhand knot around the second length of rope.

C

E

D

(F) Tighten the overhand knot.

F

(G) - (I) Repeat the procedure at the other end using the second length of rope. G

H

(J) Now the second length of rope has formed an overhand knot around the first length. Pull gently to tighten slightly.

I

J (K) - (L) Now pull on each rope so that the two overhand knots slide along the rope until they lie against each other. If you want the final knot to be fully secure then tape the working ends of the rope down.

L K Scouting Resources http://www.scoutingresources.org.uk/ © Darren Dowling – webmaster@scoutingresources.org.uk


Hunters Bend The Hunter's Bend is a useful substitute for the Sheet Bend. It can be used even with 'slippery' synthetic rope. History: The Hunter's Bend used to be known as the Rigger's Knot. When it appeared on the front page of the London Times in 1978 it was credited to Dr Edward Hunter. This led to much publicity for a knot and also to the foundation of the International Guild of Knot Tyers.

How to tie a Hunters Bend

A

(A) Take the ends of two ropes and lay them side by side (overlapping) as shown. B (B) This is the important step. Form a crossing turn with both ropes (imagine them as a doubled rope) as shown. Make sure that the strands on the right side are twisted behind the strands on the left side.

(C) Take the working end (short end) on the left side (white rope) behind and then through the crossing turn (from back to front). (D)

D

C

E (E) Take the working end of right side (red rope) through the crossing turn from front to back. (F) F

(G) Now pull slowly on the standing parts (long ends not being used) to tighten the knot. You must make sure that the working ends stay tucked in through the crossing turn as you do this.

G

Scouting Resources http://www.scoutingresources.org.uk/ Š Darren Dowling – webmaster@scoutingresources.org.uk


Overhand Knot Also known as the Thumb Knot this is the simplest of all knots. It forms the basis of many other knots and can be useful in its own right. It is difficult to untie if it is put under a lot of strain though.

How to tie an Overhand Knot (A) Make a crossing turn by taking the working end (the short end in the picture that does all the work) behind the standing part (the long part of the rope). (B) Then bring the working end to the top of the knot.

C A

B

(C) Pass it through the crossing turn and pull on both ends (D) to tighten the knot.

D

A

How to tie a Double Overhand Knot B You can make a Double Overhand Knot by adding an extra turn. This will form a bigger knot. You can repeat this to make the knot as large as you want. Knots with many turns are called Blood Knots.

(A) . Then tuck the working (B) . Pull tight on both ends to tighten.

Form the beginnings of an Overhand Knot as shown end through the turn again

How to tie a Slipped Overhand Knot A B

A Slipper Overhand Knot is a useful stopper knot that can be untied very quickly.

(A) Form a crossing turn as before. (B) Form a bight with the working end (double it up and pinch it together to almost form a 'loop').

C

D

(C) Take the bight into the crossing turn. (E) Pull on the bight and the standing end to tighten the knot. You can untie the knot by pulling on the short working end.

E Scouting Resources http://www.scoutingresources.org.uk/ Š Darren Dowling – webmaster@scoutingresources.org.uk


Pile Hitch This is a very simple but useful hitch for tying around a post. It is ideal for mooring.

How to tie a Pile Hitch

(A) Make a bight in the rope. Make a turn around the post (winding the standing part upwards). (B) B A

C (C) Now take the loop up and over the post with the other hand. (D)

D

(E) Pull on the standing parts to tighten Very quick to tie which means it is ideal for quickly mooring a boat or similar.

E

Scouting Resources http://www.scoutingresources.org.uk/ Š Darren Dowling – webmaster@scoutingresources.org.uk


Rolling Hitch This is a useful knot for tying a rope to a pole. It can also be used to put a thin line around a much thicker piece of rope. This can be useful as it can allow several people to haul on the thin rope to free the thick rope that may be jammed in a winch or such like.

How to tie a Rolling Hitch A (A) Make a turn around a pole and bring the end up on the right side of the long standing part.

C

(B) - (C) Now take the end across the standing part and make another turn around the pole.

B

D

E (D) - (E) Make the third turn beside the second and across the first.

F

(F) Tuck the working end under the third turn.

(G) - (H) Pull on the working end and the standing part to tighten the knot. Take the standing part over the first and second turns before applying strain to the rope. Note that it will only take strain in this direction.

G

H

Scouting Resources http://www.scoutingresources.org.uk/ Š Darren Dowling – webmaster@scoutingresources.org.uk


Round Turn and Two Half-Hitches This knot can be used to secure a rope in a variety of situations. It can be placed under a lot of strain and is easy to untie.

How to tie a Round Turn and Two Half-Hitches B

A

(A) - (B) Take the end of a rope up around the pole from back to front

D

C

(C) - (D) Then take it around the pole again to form a round turn.

E

(E)

Now take the working end across the standing part (the long 'unused' part)

F

G (F) - (G) Then take the rope behind the standing part and tuck it behind itself to form a half hitch

(H) - (J) Repeat to make a second half hitch. Pull on the ends to tighten the knot. H

Scouting Resources http://www.scoutingresources.org.uk/ Š Darren Dowling – webmaster@scoutingresources.org.uk

I

J


Sheepshank The Sheepshank is designed to shorten a rope (without cutting it!). It can also be used to take up the slack in a rope. Another very useful purpose it serves (that people often overlook) is its ability to protect a weak or damaged section of the knot. Simply ensure that the damaged section forms the middle line of the Sheepshank. The strain will be taken at either end and very little (or no) strain will be placed on the weakened part.

How to tie a Sheepshank – Method 1

(A) Make 3 turns that cross over themselves, all of them in the same direction A

(B) - (D) Put your hand through the back of the right hand turn and pull the centre turn through the right hand turn.

B

C

D

(E) - (G) Put your hand through the left hand turn and pull the middle turn through the front of the left hand turn.

G E

F

(H) The rope that you pulled through either end now forms two loops. Pull these loops gently.

To tighten the knot and make sure it holds pull on the two 'standing parts'. That is pull on the two ends of the rope. Ensure that the knot is tight before use else it will slip.

Scouting Resources http://www.scoutingresources.org.uk/ © Darren Dowling – webmaster@scoutingresources.org.uk

H


Sheepshank The Sheepshank is designed to shorten a rope (without cutting it!). It can also be used to take up the slack in a rope. Another very useful purpose it serves (that people often overlook) is its ability to protect a weak or damaged section of the knot. Simply ensure that the damaged section forms the middle line of the Sheepshank. The strain will be taken at either end and very little (or no) strain will be placed on the weakened part.

How to tie a Sheepshank – Method 2 (I) Arrange the rope into 3 equal 'lengths'. Often the two ends will be unavailable (e.g. they be secured at the ends to a tree) so you will have to loop the rope as shown. If you are using a Sheepshank to relieve strain on a damaged portion of the rope make sure that the damaged portion is the middle piece of rope.

I

(J) Take one end of the rope and form a crossing turn.

J

K (K) There is now a loop and a crossing turn at this end. Take the loop and push it through the crossing turn.

(L) Pull the end of the rope ensuring that the knot is secure and tight. Note that there is no 'tying' a knot at the end.

L

(M) Repeat for the other end of the knot. Make sure that the knot is tight before use else it will slip.

M

Scouting Resources http://www.scoutingresources.org.uk/ © Darren Dowling – webmaster@scoutingresources.org.uk


Sheet Bend A Sheet Bend is perhaps one of the most useful and practical knots you can use for bending two ropes together. It is very quick and quite easy to tie. Note that if the ropes are of quite different diameters (e.g. a very large and a small rope together) then you will be better off tying a Double Sheet Bend. Also note that if you have done the knot correctly the two ends should be on the same side of the knot.

How to tie a Sheet Bend A

(A) Form a loop with one end of a length of rope. B

(B) Take the end of the second length of rope underneath and then up through the loop. C

(C) Pass the end of the rope that you are working with (the working end) around the back of the loop. Take care that you go around the short end of the loop first and then behind the loop. (D)

D

(E) Now take the working end F

G

over the front of the loop (over the long end of the loop) and tuck it inside itself. (F)

(G) Now hold the loop (green) and pull the standing end of the second length (red. Recall that standing end is the long end that you are not moving around, the bit that goes off to the tree or whatever). This should lock the knot in place. If you really want the bend to be secure then seize the two ends together.

E

How to tie a Double Sheet Bend

(G) Proceed as above but do not tighten the knot at the end. E

E (H)

Now pass the working end (red rope) around the loop.

E (I) Once you have gone around the loop again then tuck it underneath itself. Pull the knot tight to secure it.

Scouting Resources http://www.scoutingresources.org.uk/ Š Darren Dowling – webmaster@scoutingresources.org.uk


Sink Stopper Knot This is a useful knot to use to stop a thin rope from slipping out of a large hole.

How to tie a Sink Stopper Knot

(A) Make a crossing turn. Now make a bight and pass it through the crossing turn (Just like for a Slipped Overhand Knot). (B)

A

B

(C) Tighten the crossing turn by pulling on the bight and the working end.

C D

(D) Now bring the (short end) working end across the knot so it lies parallel with the previous turn.

E

(E) Then take the working end and pass it through the bight.

F

(F) Hold the know with one hand and pull on the standing end with the other. You may have to work the knot into shape a little.

Scouting Resources http://www.scoutingresources.org.uk/ Š Darren Dowling – webmaster@scoutingresources.org.uk


Stevedore Knot A Stevedore was a dock worker. They used this knot as a stopper knot.

How to tie a Stevedore Knot (A) Give yourself plenty of rope for a long working end. Take it over the

A

standing part (this forms a crossing turn).

(B) Now pass the working end behind the standing part.

(C) Now bring it back in front again. B

C (D) Now take it behind the standing part one more time.

D (E) Now you can bring the working end up to the front of the knot.

E F

(F) Put the working end of the knot through the crossing turn. (G) G

H (H) Pull tight by pulling on the standing part and the working end. You can tighten the knot even more by pulling the two turns.

Scouting Resources http://www.scoutingresources.org.uk/ Š Darren Dowling – webmaster@scoutingresources.org.uk


Stopper Knot This is a decorative version of the Double Overhand Knot. It can also be used to weight the end of a rope when throwing.

How to tie a Stopper Knot (A) Give yourself plenty of rope at the working end.

A B

(B) Take the working end around two fingers and then over itself (to make a round turn).

(C) Carry on making a series of at least five turns around your fingers and over the standing part.

C D (D) Now turn your hand over and tuck the working end inside the turns and pull it all the way through. (E)

E

F (F) Pull the knot tight. You may have to work it into shape and make sure the turns lie neatly side by side.

Scouting Resources http://www.scoutingresources.org.uk/ Š Darren Dowling – webmaster@scoutingresources.org.uk


Timber Hitch This is a very simple hitch to tie yet it is easy to untie. It will grip harder and harder as you apply more strain. It is useful for tying a rope around a pole or a bundle of logs.

A

How to tie a Timber Hitch (A) Pass the end (green end) of the rope around a pole

B

(make sure you leave a long working end - give yourself plenty of rope to play with). Cross the end over itself. (B)

C (C) Now tuck the end under itself working back around the pole. Keep doing this until you have run out of rope and have formed a series of tucks around the pole. (D)

D (E) Pull hard on the long standing part to tighten it.

E

How to tie a Killick Hitch If you want to drag a log or trunk it will help immensely if you use a Killick Hitch. If you just use a Timber Hitch the log will try to swing round to bring the hitch to your end.

(F) Tie a Timber Hitch and take the rope down along the log. (G) Take it around the log and then tuck it under itself.

F

G

(H) This forms a half-hitch. Now you can pull on the long standing end without the log swinging about.

H Scouting Resources http://www.scoutingresources.org.uk/ Š Darren Dowling – webmaster@scoutingresources.org.uk


G

Water Knot The Water Knot is also known as the Tape Knot (or even the Double Overhand Bend which gives you an indication of how to tie it). It is recommended for joining flat tape. To make sure the knot is secure keep the second tape/rope one the same side of the first tape/rope as the knot is doubled.

How to tie a Water Knot A (A) Take the end of one rope and form an Overhand Knot (take the working end over the standing part as shown).

B

(B) Take the end of a second rope (green) and, starting from the end of the first rope (red), follow the first rope into the Overhand Knot. We are about to 'double' the knot.

C

D (C) - (D) Continue to follow the path of the original end with the second working end. You must make sure that the second rope does knot cross over the first.

E It should now look like this

(E)

F (F) To tighten the knot pull on the ropes at either end. Make sure the knot is worked into shape and that one rope does not slip over the other.

Scouting Resources http://www.scoutingresources.org.uk/ Š Darren Dowling – webmaster@scoutingresources.org.uk

Scout Knots  

Tutorial to help learn essential knots for scouting

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