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Melbourne University Law Students’ Society Proudly brought to you by:

Health & Wellbeing

MEDICAL & LEGAL BOOKS

2010

Guidebook


CONTACTS The University of Melbourne Counselling Service 8344 6927

Law School Student Centre (03) 8344 4475

Suicide Helpline (24 Hour telephone counselling) http://www.suicideline.org.au 1300 651 251

Lifeline (24 Hour telephone counselling) http://www.lifeline.org.au 131 114

CASA (Centre Against Sexual Assault) http://www.casa.org.au 96353610 or 1800 806 292

Women’s Domestic Violence Crisis Service http://www.wdvcs.org.au 93730123

Direct Line (Drugs & Alcohol Counselling) http://www.turningpoint.org.au 1800 888 236

St. Vincent’s Hospital 9288 2211

Beyond Blue http://www.beyondblue.org.au Under the ‘get help’ section there are huge range of links for a wide range of issues. 1300 22 4636

Royal Melbourne Hospital 9342 7000

Mental Health Advice Line http://www.health.vic.gov.au/mhal/ 1300 280 737


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Melbourne University Law Students’ Society presents the:

HEALTH AND WELLBEING GUIDEBOOK 2010 Editor: Mollie Tregillis Printing: On Demand Printing We would like to extend our sincere thanks to everyone who submitted to the Health and Wellbeing Guidebook this year. Without the assistance of many staff, students and others this important resource would not be possible. Please note this guidebook is simply a guide and should not in anyway be seen as a definitive source of information. Its aim is create awareness about the issues facing law students and should not be considered a replacement for professional advice and assistance. We urge you to always seek professional help for any mental and physical health issues. Please see the back page for further useful resources. The information in this guidebook has been provided by a range of professional and personal sources and should not be attributed to the Melbourne University Law Students’ Society.

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CONTENTS

Editorial

4

7

Students And Mental Health

6

8

Pip Nicholson

Ann O’Connell

Mental Health

Depression Anxiety

Mental Health In The Workplace Lasting The Distance

5

11

20

27

Student Wellbeing And Welfare Coordinator

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Physical Health

29

10 Tips For Keeping Fit During Semester

31

Dr. W.E.L Bean’s Nutritional Guide To Surviving Law School Are You Ready For The Country?

Students in Free Enterprise

34

Get Involved

42

Work Life Balance

43

46

Global Justice Studio

37

45

Friends of International Humanitarian Law

47

How To Have A Life Outside Of Law

49

Volunteering

HELP Contacts

48

Inside Back Cover

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EDITORIAL by Mollie Tregillis

It is with great excitement that I present you this guidebook. It has been a product of many months of planning and organising and it is so wonderful to finally have it in hard copy. Melbourne University Law Students’ Society feel that raising awareness about law students’ health and wellbeing is vital and increasingly must be on the agenda for all Law Schools. It seems so obvious that we must look after our health, however in this high-pressure environment it is often forgotten. I am sure we have all been guilty of not having our health high on our priority list at some point! I do hope this guidebook brings back some awareness about the issues that we all face and that you will all start putting health back up there on your ‘to do’ list. We must all rest, eat, play, breathe, laugh, and relax as well as work hard! Most of all, we must enjoy life and I hope this bright, colourful guidebook brings that message home. Having said that, I urge any of you who are really struggling with something either mental or physical to seek professional advice. There are some amazing resources out there and taking the first step to seek help is a huge step in the direction of a happier healthier life. I really hope you enjoy this new LSS initiative and here’s to all our good health!

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PIP NICHOLSON Associate Dean (JD)

I congratulate the authors on a tremendous initiative: this is a significant publication and I hope it offers much assistance to those using it. Student health and wellbeing is vitally important and I am delighted to see a publication which has this concern as its focus. I would also like to note that Melbourne Law School is acutely aware that students experience particular pressures. I take this opportunity to remind JD students that here at the Law School special consideration requests will be dealt with on an ad hoc basis. Students do not have to wait until the end of semester for special consideration decisions. More particularly, students can complete documentation for special consideration in consultation with the Student Welfare and Wellbeing Coordinator, Sarah Anthony, who will, in turn, consult with a JD course director and promptly advise students of their options. I wish you all the best with your studies and a healthy experience while you are with us.

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ANN O’CONNELL Associate Dean (LLB) It is my great pleasure to introduce the Health and Wellbeing Guidebook for 2010 being launched by the Law Students’ Society. The aim of the Guidebook is to create greater awareness in Law students of physical and mental health issues and how to deal with them. This is particularly important because of the prevalence of such issues in situations where students are managing the stress of study and trying to juggle the competing demands of study, work and life in general. As Associate Dean I am constantly being reminded of the pressures on students but also that there is help available – this Guidebook provides that information. I am also conscious that students often skip meals and generally do not look after themselves and their health can suffer – especially when assignments are due or around exams. The Guidebook has sections on anxiety and depression – how to spot symptoms and where to get help; sections on exercise and on healthy eating as well as a section called “get involved” which lists a range of extra-curricular options for students to broaden their horizons. I would also take this opportunity to remind you that the Sarah Anthony is the Student Welfare and Wellbeing Coordinator in the Student Centre (sarahga@unimelb.edu.au) and is happy to discuss any health and welfare issues on a confidential basis. I thank the LSS for preparing this Guidebook and commend it to you. Health and Wellbeing Guidebook 2010


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Mental Health

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STUDENTS AND MENTAL HEALTH Presented by the Melbourne Counselling Service. For more information go to: http://www.services.unimelb.edu.au/counsel/

Mental Health is a broad term that covers a group of conditions that can affect thinking, emotion/feelings and behaviour. About 20% of people will have a mental health condition some time in their lives (Source: National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing 1997). This is particularly relevant for our student population because early adulthood is often when mental health problems first make an appearance. Mental health conditions including anxiety, mood problems, psychosis and substance use disorders can mostly be effectively treated, although episodes can come and go.

How does mental health impact on learning? Mental health can impact on thinking, behaviour, mood, judgment and insight. This can mean problems with concentration, time management, meeting deadlines, decision making, determining and meeting priorities, multi-tasking, performance anxiety, critical thinking, participation and involvement in group activities, disclosure, and self reflection.

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Maintaining Self Care Continual attention to self care is vital to good mental and physical health. Things to consider include: 1. Sleep: do I get enough good, regular sleep? 2. Diet: is my food nutritious enough? Am I eating enough/too much? 3. Exercise: It is recommended that you undertake some sort of daily activity and at least 3 x 30 minutes periods of more intense exercise a week, vigorous enough to make you sweat and increase your heart beat 4. Relaxation: am I able to relax when I feel I deserve it, and have done enough for the day? It is essential sometimes to just ‘tune out’ by lying on a couch, listening to peaceful music, going for a slow walk, etc 5. Socialising: It’s great to go out and meet friends, eat something, have a dance, play some sport, etc, but is it going too far? If you constantly spend too much time in a crowded, demanding atmosphere, it’s going to be very hard to get a restful sleep, relax by yourself, or focus on real study priorities later on.

Getting Help Students with mental health conditions are encouraged to get professional help. Depending on the severity of the problem this may mean seeing a medical practitioner, or other mental health professional. Counselling can also be very helpful. Health and Wellbeing Guidebook 2010


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Referring People to the Counselling Service

You may think someone could benefit from counselling. They may have experienced relationship breakups, difficult family situations, loneliness or depression, the death of a friend or family member, or other situations which interfere with academic or personal achievement. Or they may just be distressed but not able to identify the cause. What should you do about people who appear troubled? • Listen, don’t rush to fix, advise or disagree • Empathise, put yourself in their shoes • Remember that as a friend or colleague your role is to provide support and to make suggestions for further support when it seems necessary. Don’t get involved beyond what seems comfortable or appropriate to you. Counselling cannot work effectively unless it is voluntary and people hold some hope that it can lead to relief. If one attends from a sense of obligation, they might not be able to talk freely. Raise the idea of seeing a counsellor without forcing the issue. While you might give the phone number or mention the name of a Counsellor you know, you should not ordinarily make the appointment on their behalf. Further information including what to expect from coming to counselling and information on specific psychological issues can be found on our website at: http://www.services.unimelb.edu.au/counsel/ Health and Wellbeing Guidebook 2010


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DEPRESSION Presented by the Melbourne Counselling Service. For more information go to: http://www.services.unimelb.edu.au/counsel/

Depression is a prolonged and persistent negative mood which can colour and interfere with many aspects of life. It is characterised by feelings of sadness, disappointment, loneliness, worthlessness, excessive guilt, self-doubt and hopelessness. Everyone experiences feelings of depression at one time or another. Feeling “down” or “sad” is a normal part of being human. These feelings commonly follow loss or disappointment and usually pass within a few hours or days. Depression that becomes intense, that lasts for extended periods of time and interferes with day to day functioning is of a more serious nature. Help, support and treatment for depression can be found by seeing a professional such as a counsellor or a doctor.

What Causes People To be Depressed? Often there are many interrelated factors associated with depression such as: • significant loss • loss of control over the environment, the belief that nothing can be done to change unfortunate events in life • life changes (childbirth, menopause, redundancy...) • disappointment • perceived failure • unrealistic expectations • negative thinking which gradually becomes self-defeating • biochemical factors (some illnesses, infections and drugs can create chemical imbalances that play a significant role in depression) Health and Wellbeing Guidebook 2010


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Signs and symptoms of Depression Physical

Emotional • • • • • •

Sadness Anxiety Guilt Anger Mood swings Lack of emotional responsiveness • Helplessness

• Chronic fatigue, lack of energy • Sleeping too much or too little • Overeating or loss of appetite • Constipation • Weight loss or gain • Loss of sexual desire • Unexplained aches and pains

Thoughts/Perceptions Behavioural • • • •

Crying spells Withdrawal from others Worrying Neglect of responsibilities • Loss of interest in personal appearance • Loss of motivation

• • • •

Frequent self-criticism Self-blame Pessimism Impaired memory and concentration • Indecisiveness and confusion • Tendency to believe others see you in a negative light • Thoughts of death and suicide

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What helps?

Identify Connections Being honest with yourself and observing changes in mood and feeling as they occur may help you to identify some of the sources of the feelings of depression.

Exercise Regularly Exercising burns up tension, helps you relax, may improve sleep patterns and leads to the release of endorphins that lift your mood.

Talk About Problems Discussing problems and feelings with those involved, or an understanding friend or a health professional (counsellor, psychologist, social worker, psychiatrist or doctor) can sometimes bring about a resolution before a critical stage of depression is reached.

Identify Times When You Feel Less Depressed Working out what it is that you do when you feel less depressed, can help you identify ways of lifting your depression.

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What helps? Try to be Aware of your Negative Thoughts and Replace Them with Positive Ones Thinking about your own unique strengths, characteristics and positive accomplishments can enhance well-being.

Seek Professional Help Treating depression is possible. Counsellors, doctors, social workers, psychiatrists and psychologists are trained to assist the individual to find ways to deal with, and overcome, depression.

Consider Anti-Depressant Medication Taking a prescribed anti-depressant medication is appropriate in some cases. It helps by lessening feelings of depression and enables you to feel more able to tackle your problems. There are different types of anti-depressants. They should be taken under medical supervision. Consult the Health Service or your doctor. Seek Professional Help When • pain and problems outweigh pleasure; • when the severity and persistence of symptoms impair day to day functioning; • when the pain seems too much and you cannot see a way out.

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Helping a Friend

Severely depressed individuals can be very withdrawn, lethargic, self-ruminating and possibly suicidal. A concerned friend can provide valuable and possibly life saving support. Talking candidly with the individual regarding your concern for his or her well-being will often help bring the problems out into the open. As you talk: • • • •

share your concern and willingness to help be supportive and patient avoid cheering up the person avoid saying “I know how you feel”

If you believe the person to be suicidal, or you hold serious concerns for his/her well-being, urge the person to seek professional help. If the individual resists, contact a counselor yourself so you can discuss how best to handle the situation.

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ANXIETY Presented by the Melbourne Counselling Service. For more information go to: http://www.services.unimelb.edu.au/counsel/

Approximately 11% of people in Australia suffer from anxiety (Reconnexion Australia).

Some people talk of anxiety as being like an invisible cage that constantly demands their attention, reduces their freedom and stops or limits what they can do in the their lives.

Feelings of anxiety can occur as a result of a stressful, worrying or frightening event or can seem “free floating” - not attached to anything in particular.

Anxiety is both a psychological and physical phenomenon. Symptoms of anxiety can range from a mild sense of general uneasiness to feeling like you are having a heart attack or are floating outside of yourself. Some anxiety develops after an experience that overwhelms your psychological capacity to cope. Whatever the history, or mystery, behind your experience of anxiety, the earlier you access help and support the better your recovery will be. Both result in an uncomfortable and preoccupying feeling that can in itself cause further worry. If the anxious feelings are an aftermath reaction to a stressful or frightening experience, it is very important to get help to deal with these feelings and thoughts.

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Some people confuse anxiety with stress. Stress reactions are normal responses to common stressors, such as being late for something important, or going out with your dream date for the first time. However, people who suffer from anxiety have excessive, irrational worries and avoidance of certain situations, which can become debilitating. For example if your anxiety prevents you attending lectures or speaking up in tutorials, that is going to greatly impact on your performance at university and your long-term quality of life. Some people talk of anxiety as being like an invisible cage that constantly demands their attention, reduces their freedom and stops or limits what they can do in the their lives.

The Counselling Service can help you to understand what is happening, help you develop ways to cope and to reduce the anxiety and eventually to get over it. With the “free floating” anxiety, there are lots of ways you can cope with this and you can manage, reduce and finally rid yourself of their hold over your life.

Make a time to speak with a counsellor at the Counselling Service for a confidential discussion of your situation.

There are lots of self help books, but nothing beats talking it over with an experienced and sympathetic counsellor. You don’t have to deal with these feelings alone.

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Assessment Anxiety Coping Strategies

When managing stress it is helpful to approach it on two fronts, first, tackling the task and, secondly, managing your emotional responses. The task we are addressing here is study, but the same model can be applied to other stressors. • Share the problem with others by having a study buddy for each of your subjects; • Organise your notes and give priority to what is essential in the course; • Work hard yet effectively in short bursts in a clearly organised way; • Seek expert help if you don’t understand the material you must learn. Speak with tutors, latter year students or lecturers. Consider paying for a tutor if a large proportion of the material is beyond your capacity; • Seek information on the time, place and format of the exams and plan how you will get there.

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Learn to Relax

Try it out right now. Lie down or sit in a comfortable chair. As you breathe in, clench your fist, making it tighter and tighter, feeling the tension in your fist. Now relax as you breathe out. Feel the looseness in your hand and notice the contrast with the tension. Repeat this with your other fist. Then go through each muscle group - shoulders, lower back, abdomen, neck, arms, legs, face, remembering to breathe out as you relax. Over time you will become accustomed to checking how tense your body is, and learning to relax the muscle group that is tight when consciously breathing out. Do this routine for at least 20 minutes every day, until you have learned to relax by merely thinking towards the muscle group and breathing out. You can also manage stress through applied relaxation training and mindfulness practice . These are a few techniques, which many people find helpful. However it is very important to find your own recipe for relaxation and stress management.

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MENTAL HEALTH IN THE WORKPLACE Presented by Blake Dawson

With evidence mounting of the comparatively high incidence of depression in the legal profession, law firms such as Blake Dawson are working hard to raise recognition of where stress stops and anxiety and depression starts. “Lawyers often tend towards perfectionism and being highly self-critical … tendencies that may indicate an increased propensity to develop depression,” says Kate Cato, director of people development at Blake Dawson. It’s easy to get a group of lawyers talking about stress, but less so about depression, she observes. Blake Dawson is using multiple approaches to tackle the issue at all levels providing mentoring for summer clerks through to partners, running mental health first aid training and appointing contact officers throughout the firm. “If someone is feeling unhappy, apart from talking to a partner or people development manager, they can see a contact officer or use the Employee Assistance Program.”

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The firm is also part of the broader initiative in which five leading firms have combined specifically to work with law students and graduates at the threshold of their careers. Revelations are also anticipated from Blake Dawson’s threeyear involvement in a research project run by the coaching department of Sydney University’s psychology school exploring self-awareness and the development of leaders’ abilities to coach and nurture others. Pro-bono work has also emerged as important for many lawyers on a quest for meaning in the workplace. “When we look at the indicators of what makes a healthy of flourishing workplace, pro bono features highly,” reports Cato. In a recent survey, about 70 percent of Blake Dawson’s lawyers said the opportunity to do pro bono work had attracted them to the firm and continued to be important to them.

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LASTING THE DISTANCE* Learn to manage stress – don’t let it take over! Almost one third of you are likely to be dissatisfied with your career to the point of contemplating a change. Lawyers are known to be at greater risk than the general population of substance abuse, anxiety disorders, divorce and stress-related illnesses such as hypertension, heart attacks and strokes. If you want to enjoy a long and successful career in law, you need to be mindful of the unique challenges to lawyers, and you need to address them from the very start.

What is so bad about stress? Everyone talks about stress and, for many, being stressed has become a badge of honour. But what is stress? When the demands of our environment tax or outweigh our perceived abilities to cope, we experience stress. Stress is therefore a negative emotional experience accompanied by biochemical, physiological, cognitive and behavioural responses directed at either altering the stressful event, or accommodating its effects. Although the stress response is vital, we are designed to respond with short, sharp busts of energy, for a “fight-or-flight” response. The body becomes rapidly aroused and motivated via the sympathetic nervous system and the endocrine system. Breathing and heart rate accelerate, and digestive processes are reduced. *The following article first appeared in the Young Lawyers’ Survival Guide (2006) and has been reproduced with the permission of the Law Institute of Victoria. For more information visit www.liv.asn.au/younglawyers

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Chronic stress is harmful. For lawyers, as for most professionals in Western countries, most stresses cannot be handled through fight or flight. Furthermore, stresses continue over extended periods of time. Prolonged and repeated stress has links to: Colds, ulcers, asthma, headaches, menstrual discomfort, herpes, skin diseases, MS, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic back pain, reproductive problems, hernias, hypertension, glaucoma, haemophilia, leukaemia, coronary heart disease, inflammatory bowel disease and cancer.

Arousal and performance Performance suffers under prolonged stress. Stress can initially be energising and improve performance, up to a certain point. After that, increases in arousal become disruptive and performance deteriorates. The optimal level of arousal depends on the task complexity: • simple task – optimal performance with high levels of arousal • medium task – optimal performance with medium levels of arousal • complex task – optimal performance with low levels of arousal Stress is cumulative. When people move from one stressful situation to the next, a relatively minor matter can push them over the edge.

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Stress Quiz How stressed are you? Are you: e Irritabl

Anxious

d re pe

about Thinking your job quitting

g linin c e d ing t work c n erie ce a Exp orman f per cal Cyni

In c re a s in g ly absent from work

Pessimistic Hav

ing

Withdrawin g from friends and colleagues

family,

diffi

cult

y co

mm

unic atin g

cy ntima ing i rienc Expe ms e probl

Drinking too much or frequently using party drugs

m te rt

Defensive

ate Unable to concentr

with d e e atisfi Diss amily lif f r you

o Sh

Feeling helpless

Depres sed

Feeling guilty

If you have ticked any of these, stress seems to have a negative impact on your life. If you have answered yes to more than seven, you urgently need to make changes and you may require professional assistance to do so. Health and Wellbeing Guidebook 2010


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Ten steps to success and happiness 1. Grow! Work towards a balanced life and avoid basing your entire self-esteem on your work.

2. Keep your body in shape through: • healthy, regular meals (yes, that means a lunch break!) • enough sleep • exercising several times a week • limiting your intake of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs. 7. Throw away your stick! Assess your accomplishments from time to time. Each time you complete a task reward yourself with a short break.

3. Make time for partners and friends, they are good for you! A happy personal environment increases professional effectiveness and vice versa. Do not get conned into neglecting your personal life – it is vital. 4. Use competitiveness as a positive force! But use it wisely, not letting it get in the way of supportive peer relationships. A supportive environment will help you effectively manage a demanding career. 5. Give yourself a chance! Start each day with a REALISTIC list of tasks. Prioritise tasks and make sure you get to enjoy a clear desk at the end of the day. Learn to say “NO”.

6. Set achievable goals! Meeting your goals will give you confidence and energy. Unrealistic goals will result in a sense of failure. Regard mistakes as an opportunity to learn and improve.

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8. Value your boundaries! Make a deal with yourself about working hours and stick to it. Leave work at the office at the end of your day. Remember, mobile phones can be switched off.

9. Take weekends and holidays off! Use weekends and holidays to regenerate energy simply by not checking phone and email messages.

10. Practise relaxation! Learn to recognise where in your body tension starts, and indulge yourself several times a day with 15 minutes of power relaxation: • Sit or recline in a comfortable position. • Close your eyes. • Become aware of your breathing. Slowly breathe in, hold your breath and slowly exhale. • Tense and relax your muscles, beginning at your feet and progressing up to your face. Keep them relaxed. • Continue for several minutes, just concentrating on your breathing. • Then slowly open your eyes and, after a while, slowly get up. ‘Lasting the Distance’ written by: Catherine Lally and Qusai Hussain M-PACT Psychology

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STUDENT WELLBEING AND WELFARE COORDINATOR Sarah Anthony

The law attracts ambitious, competitive people, who strive to achieve the highest marks on essays and exams to enable them to compete for jobs at the good firms. And law students like any other students, experience relationship breakups, difficult family situations, loneliness or depression, the death of a friend or family member, or other situations that interfere with academic or personal achievement. According to the Brain & Mind Research Institute, a University of Sydney-established centre, 41% of law students will suffer from psychological distress severe enough to justify clinical assessment at some point during their degree. This means that, at one time or another, it is likely that you will need assistance from either the Student Wellbeing and Welfare Coordinator, or another University Wellbeing Service.

The Student Wellbeing and Welfare Coordinator is a member of the Law School Student Centre whose primary goals are to deliver responsive student services within the Student Centre and to contribute to the development of student-centric services and the student experience. The Student Wellbeing and Welfare Coordinator is the primary point of contact for Special Consideration, Student Progress, Alternative Exam Arrangements, and student welfare and wellbeing activities (assesses students’ needs and identifies what services and adjustments may be appropriate.)

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If students experience an untoward (generally short-term) circumstance that has a significant impact on their studies, then you should apply for Special Consideration. If the application is approved then the student may be provided with adjustments such as a significant amount of additional time to complete an item of assessment (over 10 working days), or possibly a special exam. A Special Consideration application should usually be submitted no later than 3 days following the due date for the assessment task, and must be made online with supporting documents (HCAP or Statutory Declaration) supplied to the Student Centre.

If students experience academic disadvantage as a result of a health condition or impairment, or difficult circumstances then the Students Experiencing Academic Disadvantage (SEAD) policy may apply. This policy provides adjustments and support for students with ongoing or anticipated circumstances which impact upon their ability to demonstrate their academic potential. Examples of reasonable adjustments may include: • Alternative exam conditions such as extra time, rest breaks, alternative venue, even permission to bring in food, drink or medication. • Extra time to complete written assessment such as essays and assignments. • Priority allocation of tutes.

For more information on SEAD, any other information, or to make an appointment with the Student Wellbeing and Welfare Coordinator in the Melbourne Law School Student Centre please call 8344 4475 or email Sarah directly on: sarahga@unimelb.edu.au

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Physical Health

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10 TIPS FOR KEEPING FIT DURING SEMESTER Most people have a good understanding of the importance of physical health and fitness. Healthy people are generally happier, healthier, live longer and experience less stress than those who are unfit. Heart disease, diabetes and obesity are just a few of many complications that can result from ignoring physical fitness. However, regular exercise is often difficult during semester with busy schedules, work and assignments. Students may find it impossible to find time for a jog, let alone the recommended minimum of at least 30 minutes of exercise 5 days a week. So, how can you develop and maintain good exercise habits while at University? Here are some suggestions:

Set aside fixed times to exercise Maintaining regular times to exercise will help keep you motivated when you secretly can’t be bothered to go outside. Your biggest obstacle is falling into an “I’ll do it later” mentality. Let’s face it: you won’t. Keeping a fixed time to exercise will help you stay focused and fit.

Healthy diet Keeping a healthy diet is vital to overall physical fitness. Try not to skip breakfast in the morning, as it slows your metabolism and reduces your energy, not to mention that you’re more likely to indulge in unhealthy snacks later in the day. Aim for a balanced diet I’ll spare the preachy details. Just think lots of vegetables, fruits and fish, while cutting down on snack food. Eat a variety of food.

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Engage in lots of cardiovascular exercise Cardiovascular or aerobic exercise involves working out large muscles. It can include activities such as walking, swimming and running. Benefits include lowering blood pressure, raising metabolism and, for those looking to lose a bit of weight, burning calories. Running doesn’t do it for you? How about dance?

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Exercise with friends It can be difficult to follow an exercise program by yourself without any external motivation. Exercising with friends is fun and is more likely to keep you focused over a long period of time. Consider taking up a team sport such as soccer or netball.

Listen to music while exercising Studies have shown that listening to music while exercising significantly improve endurance and motivation while exercising. Songs with beats that match the pace of your exercise will tend to have a greater effect. When in doubt, just pick songs that make you feel motivated while exercising. Just promise you’ll go easy on the Bon Jovi.

Walk/Bike to Uni Most of us have to commute to Uni, so why not use the opportunity to get some exercise (and be green at the same time)? If you can walk from home to Uni, lucky you. Otherwise, consider riding a bike or walking from the train station. Record your progress Ultimately, the only person who can police your exercise habits is you. Recording your habits lets you know how they measure up against your goals. If you feel like you are becoming obsessed about your health and exercise habits, talk to friends or your GP. Health and Wellbeing Guidebook 2010


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Drink plenty of water A wise man once said: “Water is the essence of wetness, and wetness is the essence of beauty.” Strained relevance aside, drinking plenty of fluid is essential. It is recommended that a typical adult drink 8 glasses of water a day (your body also absorbs some liquid in food). An additional benefit of drinking water is that it is a far healthier alternative to alcohol or soft drink.

Join a gym Joining a gym is an excellent way to keep fit. Many gyms have helpful instructors and exercise classes which may be of interest to you. Just make sure that if you pay expensive membership fees, you will stay motivated to use the gym. The dropout rate for new gym members after six months is as high as 60%.

Set realistic goals Maintaining good exercise habits is far easier if you have challenging, but achievable goals to work towards. Too challenging and you’ll give up. Too easy and you’ll lose interest (not to mention achieve little). Try and set goals that are concrete and measurable: “I will try to be healthier this semester” is not only ambiguous, it will do little to motivate you.

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DR. W.E.L BEAN’S NUTRITIONAL GUIDE TO SURVIVING LAW SCHOOL* You are what you eat is an adage that is increasingly being proven correct by modern science. Another cliché likens the human body to a well-oiled machine; if properly maintained its capabilities are almost limitless but if you forget to oil it regularly it ends up a sad, twisted pile of rust. Creating a healthy balance in our lifestyles is hard enough with the normal demands and strains of life but studying law certainly ups the ante. If a uni student is a happy Suzuki Swift, Law School comes along in the form of a semi-trailer to crush the little Swift, leaving a smeared trail of despair on Royal Parade. To help turn your law school experience from one of crushing exhaustion and frantic cramming to a hopefully more productive and enjoyable term of imprisonment education we’ve asked a tame GP who specialises in Nutritional Medicine for his advice and wisdom on what it takes to live your way to success.

Vitamin D Helps your immune system plus it strengthens your bones! All it takes to top up your D levels is being in the sun for 15 minutes a day; there is no need for hours of sunbaking in the heat of the midday sun.

*This article provides recommendations and opinions and should ONLY be used as a guide; if you have any queries or health concerns please consult a medical practitioner. Do not treat any ailments/conditions or any other medical queries you may have on this advice alone.

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Fish = Brain Food The omega 3s found in fish oil are essential for a well-functioning immune system plus increase blood circulation, both of which are crucial for an alert brain. Stock up on salmon, tuna and sardines but if you want an extra boost grab some Krill Oil capsules from the pharmacy to get a potent dose. Vitamin E and B are also crucial for brain health; under stress Vitamin B levels in the body are readily exhausted and need to be constantly replenished. Folic acid is another supplement that is not in most people’s diets yet can provide major benefits. Not only does it boost the performance of Vitamin B in your body, it also improves the health of your heart and muscles. Folic acid is found in green and leafy vegetables such as spinach, broccoli, silver beet, brussel sprouts, cabbage and bok choi but is also available cheaply in tablet form from the pharmacy.

Exercise We’re told again and again to exercise. So much so that it begins to feel like another chore. BUT this one actually benefits your study. Regular exercise produces endorphins, a critical enzyme that your body produces that makes you feel happier, more alert and raring to go. It’s also amazing how an essay that had you stumped suddenly seems a lot easier once you’ve returned from a walk around the block; the energy and movement ‘clears the cobwebs’ so to speak. Exercise also helps you sleep by burning up excess energy, which brings us to my next point…

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Blueberries The antioxidants in blueberries are brilliant for your brain plus they are delicious! You can now get them fairly reasonably; either head to the markets or I just purchased 510g at Costco for $7.00. Should keep you going for a bit!

Sleep You need at least 8 hours a night. Burning the candle at both ends does not mean higher marks; if anything it means you take longer to absorb information than if you’re fully rested. No one learns or writes at their best at 2am so try to limit the all night study sessions! If you’re having trouble sleeping try taking some Magnesium; a natural muscle relaxant it not only relieves aches and pains but can remove the tension that could be preventing you from nodding off.

Vitamin A Another immune booster; need to eat plenty of red, orange and yellow coloured fruits and vegetables to stock up on this crucial goodie.

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Vitamin C Vitamin C is a crucial nutrient as it’s one of the main fuels for our immune system. As we’re coming into the nefarious Cold and Flu season it is important to start thinking of ways to fight off the debilitating sniffles. As the denizens of the Law School are already battling against the evils of circulated air and no opening windows it is crucial to boost the immune system to combat such pressures. Drinking bottled orange juice from the supermarket does not give you enough vitamin C; the minimum daily intake is 1000mg and one FRESH orange has only 50mg. The best way to ensure you are getting enough is take vitamin supplements which are readily available at pharmacies.

Ginkgo: the Law Student’s Silver Bullet? Ginkgo is clinically proven to improve memory and cognitive function as well improving one’s attention and mental clarity. Unless you’re descended from a Stegosaurus and enjoy munching upon ancient fern matter the best way to get your ginkgo levels up is through supplements purchased at a pharmacy.

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ARE YOU READY FOR THE COUNTRY? By the LSS IT Portfolio

Nothing clears your headspace quite like hitting the open road to a rocking soundtrack. But of course, hitting the road is the easy part, where to after that? The LSS IT portfolio brings you its top picks for Victorian country getaways.

Bright Distance from Melbourne: 322 kms Near: Wangaratta As you might expect from the name, Bright is a pretty delightful place to hang, beautiful and leafy with a welcoming vibe to boot. It is renown as the tree capital of Victoria but has a lot more going for it than just that - good food and wine, including one of the few rural “hatted” restaurants. If you are not after the whole fine dining thing, there are plenty of classic country pub meals to be had, a number of fine bakeries and one killer pizzeria.

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Bright is home to plenty of vintage rural architecture, Saturday markets and friendly folks. As for things to do, cycling is Bright’s forte, scenic views nearby along many pretty trails that can be cycled or walked. Glenrowan, home of Australia’s hometown hero Big Ned Kelly, is but an hour’s drive away. In Glenrowan there is much fun to be had at many decrepit Ned Kelly themed tourist attractions. I personally recommend the nostalgic Glenrowan shootout sound and light show. The technology was impressive in the 80s, needless to say it is not quite as impressive now. In terms of accommodation, I would personally recommend the Bright Oriental Hotel, well furnished and reasonably affordable. Otherwise, the YHA is by all accounts a decent place to stay. Bright also marks the beginning of the Great Alpine Road, a drive across the beginnings of the great dividing range to Bairnsdale (near Lakes Entrance). The road exposes uniquely Victorian countryside, particularly the Omeo – Bruthen stretch. With the right soundtrack, the whole experience can be positively cinematic. SHOULD I STAY OR SHOULD I GO? Bright is a jewel of a town. Recommended to anyone looking for a relaxing weekend retreat in the country. Especially in autumn. 4.5/5

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Maffra Distance from Melbourne: 227 kms Near: Sale Maffra is a lovely little dairy hub in east Gippsland. Believe it or not ½ of Australia’s total milk produce comes from the area surrounding Maffra. As such, it is very green and full of lively farmers. This makes for a great Saturday night at the local pub if you are down with flannelette and tall stories. Maffra has a variety of cafes as well as the country mainstays; excellent pub food and fish and chips shops. With the dairy heritage, you can also come across a variety of interesting cheeses. Maffra is home to the national beet museum. No joke. I have never gone myself but if beets are your thing, I suggest you check it out. The Maffra shed is a popular tourist destination, a make showroom for refurbished sports cars. It’s actually pretty cool in a quaint and understated way. Also, you can check out Australia’s first robotic dairy. It’s pretty wild, kind of like Tron for cows. A quirky new youth hostel has just opened up, and is doing pretty good business. It makes for affordable rooms and interesting international company. If you are looking for a more upmarket experience, Power’s Court might be for you.

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Maffra is a stone’s throw from Sale, Stratford (upon the mighty Avon) and even the Gippsland lakes, each of these tourist attractions in their own right and very day trip worthy. You’ll find a cinema in Sale, and one hell of an Orthodontist. SHOULD I STAY OR SHOULD I GO? Maffra is a small, but welcoming town. A slice of country nice. 4/5.

Daylesford Distance from Melbourne: 113 kms Near: Ballarat Daylesford is without a doubt the weekend escape capital of Victoria, a delightful, green town nestled in the hills between Ballarat and Castlemaine. Renown for its spas and natural springs, Daylesford has everything to appeal to spa enthusiasts. Rest assured however, there is certainly much more going for it than that. On food and wine, Daylesford wins hands down. There are many terrific places for many different types of breakfast, lunch and even dinner. There are a number of live music venues too, attracting some impressive names from the Melbourne music scene and abroad. In Daylesford you will find one of Australia’s prettiest lakes, well worth a swim, and some lovely walks.

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It is worth checking out the botanical gardens, or crashing a wedding at the picturesque Daylesford convent. Climb the old water tower too if you’re game. For train lovers, there is an old railway museum that hosts an antique market on Saturday mornings. But again, where Daylesford really succeeds is in its bars and restaurants. The vibe is relaxed, as any good country town vibe should be, and the local food and wine know how is better than you might expect from a country town. Certainly less flannelette than Maffra or Bright, but what it lacks in flannelette, it makes up for in je ne sais quoi. SHOULD I STAY OR SHOULD I GO? Straight up hunky dory. 4.5/5.

Honourable mentions: Malmsbury (check out the bakery, lovely botanical gardens, and impressive Taradale railway crossing). Cowwarr (check out the art space, come to my house). Walhalla (old ghost town in the mountains of East Gippsland, relic of the Gippsland gold rush, still 8 people left in town, limited accommodation available, lovely bushwalks, good pub food, and incredible ghost town mood). So hit the road! Leave the city behind. And don’t forget to call home to tell them you arrived safely.

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Get Involved

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WORK LIFE BALANCE Janelle Cook Lawyer, Clayton Utz

Working in a law firm presents constant challenges to maintaining a work life balance. But it is possible to achieve balance between what can be a demanding job and having a life. No matter what your work or study commitments are, it’s always important to find time to do things that you enjoy. You might wonder why there is so much attention given to work life balance and getting it right. The answer is simple - it makes you happy. It might take someone telling you that you aren’t happy to make you realise, but that’s the time you have to make a change.

For me the concept of work life balance is simple - making time for friends, family and exercise. I admit that there have been times when I haven’t achieved a balance, but I have learnt three strategies to get things right.

Firstly - prioritise. During busy times, the time you have to invest in yourself is precious. But it is important that you make the most of it. There is nothing worse than wasting a spare hour or two which you could have been using to do something you enjoy. So rather than sitting on the couch watching Biggest Loser, why not go for a run, ring your mum or bake a cake. Health and Wellbeing Guidebook 2010


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Secondly - set goals. The easy option is to do nothing. The more difficult option is to do something. An easy way to motivate yourself to keep up the things you enjoy is to set goals. For example, I love exercise - running, cycling, swimming, going to the gym - you name it, I’ll invariably be there. But, in winter especially, it’s often easier to stay in bed. To combat this, I set myself goals every now and again. Usually by entering fun runs or joining a sports team. This means I have to train or play sport regularly. There is no choice involved. With winter closing in, and the days getting shorter, I’ve decided to run a half-marathon in July. Not sure I’ll make it, but at least it will make sure that I run. And then run some more.

Finally - be flexible. There are times when you might be so busy with work or study, that you are too tired and all you want to do is go home and sleep. It’s still really important to do things you love, because otherwise you become a boring person. Remember, “all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.” So be creative in how you can fit things in - ride to uni or work, exercise at lunch time, have breakfast with friends.

Maintaining a work life balance requires effort on your part. Whilst the demands of your work or study may make it more difficult, you have to take responsibility to make sure the balance is right. Health and Wellbeing Guidebook 2010


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GLOBAL JUSTICE STUDIO

The Global Justice Studio acts as a place for conversation, exploration, activism, research and collaboration around ideas of world justice, international criminal justice, redistributive justice, and the re-visioning of the international polity. The idea is to explore different ways of seeing, thinking and speaking international law and justice through a commitment to formal experimentation (e.g. film, conversation, photography). The Global Justice Studio is, partly, administered and run by graduate students appointed as Student Associates within Melbourne Law School, with the support a number of scholars in the fields of international law, international humanitarian law, international criminal law, and legal history.

Contact Cathy Hutton at APCML c.hutton@unimelb.edu.au if you are interested in being part of the Studio.

Health and Wellbeing Guidebook 2010


STUDENTS IN FREE ENTERPRISE THE UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE

We are a non-profit student organisation developing community projects to drive social change. Our team is engaging with some of the biggest challenges facing our generation to cultivate a more optimistic vision for the future. In partnership with academic and business leaders, we have developed projects that target such issues as climate change and social inequality. OUR PROJECTS Think.Act.Green Promoting environmental awareness amongst Victorian secondary school students whilst providing them with an opportunity to develop professional skills such as financial literacy, research, analysis and evaluation.  Nexus Abroad An international development project that assists community organisations in developing countries to become financially independent. Nexus Abroad is currently engaged with Nectar Home, an orphanage in Ghana. Switched-On Enterprises Developing a more competitive business model for small enterprises in the non-profit sector, thereby enhancing their ability to provide training to disadvantaged groups. If you would like to get involved, please visit us at www.unimelbsife.org.au or contact hr@unimelbsife.org.au


Friends
of
International
Humanitarian
Law
 (FIHL)
 Helps
educate
people
about
the
‘laws
of
war’

 Even wars have laws! International humanitarian law (IHL), also known as the ‘laws of war’, is a set of international rules that aims to limit the suffering caused by war. IHL protects people who are not fighting and restricts certain types of conduct. FIHL is a volunteer network that assists the Australian Red Cross to educate the community about IHL.

Undertakes
many
activities


 • Campus events and presentations • Research, writing and publications • Organises and runs public lectures • Teaches school kids about IHL • Arranges social nights and activities

Get
involved
to
make
 a
real
difference!
 


Email:
fihlvic@gmail.com

 


Phone:
(03)
8327
7737
 
 
 www.redcross.org.au



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VOLUNTEERING Just because you are a new law student doesn’t mean that you can’t get some hands on work straight away! There are many fantastic volunteer opportunities in Melbourne, which will allow you to experience a variety of what Law has to offer. Volunteering is a great way to get involved in the community, take a break from your studies and do something meaningful for yourself and someone else. Such experience will also build your confidence and allow you to sample different areas of law before having to choose a career path. Most of all, volunteering is lots of fun, and extremely rewarding – so do it! Some great places for Law students to volunteer in Melbourne:

Asylum Seeker Resource Centre: www.asrc.org.au Consumer Action Law Centre: www.consumeraction.org.au Human Rights Law Resource Centre: www.hrlrc.org.au North Melbourne Legal Service: www.nmls.org.au Public Interest Law Clearing House: www.pilch.org.au Refugee and Immigration Legal Centre: www.rilc.org.au Women’s Legal Service Victoria: www.communitylaw.org.au/clc_women/cb_pages/about_us.php

For more volunteer opportunities available in Melbourne, see the Equality Handbook, 2010. Health and Wellbeing Guidebook 2010


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HOW TO HAVE A LIFE OUTSIDE OF LAW Proudly presented by: Allens Arthur Robinson

I started my law degree with the mentality that, the more time I spent studying, the better my grades would be. I cancelled catch-ups with friends, set my phone to silent and settled myself into the library, ready to study until I could study no more. I was going for straight high distinctions, and I wasn’t going to let a bit of socialising distract me.

This approach was productive for a while, but gradually I became less and less efficient. I would generally work for an hour or two before my mind would wander to other things (“I’d better check my email / sms / facebook updates” … “I might just get a coffee / some lunch / a snack”). Before I knew it I was regularly browsing the internet, checking my email and setting up ‘study’ camp in the uni café – thanks to the university’s new wireless system. The day would pass and although I would be spending my time at uni with my books, the overwhelming goal of ‘all work, no play’ really meant that, not only was I depriving myself of a social life, I wasn’t getting my work done either. Health and Wellbeing Guidebook 2010


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The next step in this vicious cycle was what I call, the ‘guilts’. I had become unproductive during the time I had allocated to study, and therefore any leisure time I had was haunted by the thought: ‘I should be studying’. My wellbeing had also begun to slide. Spending hours hunched over a computer was not doing my posture any good, and all the coffee and snack breaks certainly wasn’t helping my fitness. It didn’t take me long to realise that perhaps I had oversimplified the task – I needed a new approach if I was going to survive the next five years of my degree!

I decided that I needed to make time in my schedule for things that I enjoyed so that when the time came to do some work, I didn’t feel like I was depriving myself. Between work, study, fitness and socialising, this made for a very tight schedule. When I brought my concerns up with my uni friends, we discovered that we were all suffering from the same difficulties, and it all came down to the way we managed our time.

I realised that if we combined socialising with fitness we could ‘kill two birds with one stone’ and have a lot of fun as well. I started to look for ways I could spend time with my friends and get some fitness in at the same time. Rather than going to see a movie, I would suggest a walk around the park or a bike ride along the beach. On a couple of occasions a group of us went horse riding at a local trial-riding centre and when we felt really enthusiastic, we would go for a jog together. After a few months I could definitely see the improvement in my productivity at uni, and the ‘guilts’ were beginning to subside. What I was starting to embrace was a sense of balance in my lifestyle.

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But despite all of these positive actions towards a balanced lifestyle, I still felt that I was spending far too much time hunched over my textbooks, and that I needed to put more effort into my fitness. This led me to a harsh realisation: if I wanted to have an active lifestyle and a career in the law, I would have to do more than the odd walk or bike ride with my friends. The only time in my calendar that I could guarantee to be free was early mornings. My uni was advertising a group fitness class that ran three times a week from 7:00 am, so I decided to put my name down and give it a go.

Now before I go any further I will tell you, I am not a morning person by any stretch of the imagination. Had the location been a little less convenient I would never have contemplated doing the class. But as it was, it was held a five-minute drive from my house, and I was determined not to make excuses.

The first group training session was horrific. It was cold, I didn’t know anyone, and I was being forced do push-ups on the gravel, sit-ups on the wet grass and sprints up steep hills. Why had I signed up for this? But by the end of the first week, the training started to feel manageable, and I enjoyed the social aspect of training in a group along with the satisfaction of getting some exercise done by 8:00 am each morning.

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Coincidentally, while all of this was happening, I saw an improvement in my grades. I may not have achieved the holy grail of straight high distinctions, but I was definitely doing better than I had been under the ‘constant study’ approach I had employed previously.

So by compartmentalising my time, mixing social activities with fitness, and making time for a little physical exertion, I discovered how to balance my life with my law degree. As a lawyer, I now use the same approach to managing my time, but with different solutions to suit my lifestyle. Obviously the approach I took at uni will not suit everyone. But the point is, it is worthwhile to try a few new things to find a balanced lifestyle that suits you – and to avoid spending all day alone, hunched over a computer and feeling guilty about being unproductive.

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CONTACTS The University of Melbourne Counselling Service 8344 6927

Law School Student Centre (03) 8344 4475

Suicide Helpline (24 Hour telephone counselling) http://www.suicideline.org.au 1300 651 251

Lifeline (24 Hour telephone counselling) http://www.lifeline.org.au 131 114

CASA (Centre Against Sexual Assault) http://www.casa.org.au 96353610 or 1800 806 292

Women’s Domestic Violence Crisis Service http://www.wdvcs.org.au 93730123

Direct Line (Drugs & Alcohol Counselling) http://www.turningpoint.org.au 1800 888 236

St. Vincent’s Hospital 9288 2211

Beyond Blue http://www.beyondblue.org.au Under the ‘get help’ section there are huge range of links for a wide range of issues. 1300 22 4636

Royal Melbourne Hospital 9342 7000

Mental Health Advice Line http://www.health.vic.gov.au/mhal/ 1300 280 737


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