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October 2013 • Volume 17, Issue 7

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Ranchers, Sportsmen Work on Depredation Legislation

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IFBF Sponsors Energy Tour

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Idaho Farm Bureau

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Post Fire Management Strategies


Here’s to a Happy, Plentiful Harvest By Bob Stallman AFBF President

Autumn is upon us once again. This is my favorite time of year, when the air turns crisp and the hills are in full color. It’s a time to take the grandkids to the pumpkin patch and sip hot cider on a chilly evening. Most importantly, it’s harvest time.

Website puts everything GMO-related on the table By Frank Priestley President Idaho Farm Bureau Federation

What’s for dinner? For many people around the world, they want to know far more than just what’s on their plates. They want to know how it got there and who and what was

Farm Bureau Opposes EPA Efforts to Regulate Idaho’s Waters By Rick Keller CEO Idaho Farm Bureau Federation

The Idaho Farm Bureau is opposed to the latest efforts by the Obama administration to wrest control over states’ water authority. The Environmental Protection Agency 2

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / OCTOBER 2013

The Ag Agenda Harvest captures what I, and probably most farmers, feel this time of year: a sigh of relief; a twinge of excitement; a feeling of blessedness when a good crop is brought in. Hayrides & Apple Bobbing Harvest time is steeped in a tradition that has encompassed farm families and rural communities across the world for generations. In fact, until the 16th century, the involved. And that “what” often means whether genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are on the menu. To help consumers answer these questions, the agricultural biotechnology companies that develop GM seeds recently launched the GMO Answers website. Through a public Q&A section and other resources, the easy-to-access public website provides information on GMOs, their background, use in agriculture, and research and data.

(EPA) has been granted authority for implementing the Clean Water Act (CWA) on navigable waters of the United States but the agency is now seeking to extend their authority to all waters. Previously exempt from their jurisdiction has been non-navigable waters. Currently, non-navigable waters are regulated by the states. We are witnessing an all-out multifaceted effort by this administration to gain control of all Idaho’s water. Recent examples are the U.S.

term “harvest” was used to refer to the season we now know as autumn. Today, most folks outside of agriculture simply think of it as a very special, nostalgic time of year, celebrated with corn mazes, hayrides and apple bobbing. For farmers, harvest secures our reward for an entire year’s worth of hard work, commitment and patience. It represents an end-goal See STALLMAN, page 8 “From the basics of what GMOs are and how they are used to peer-reviewed scientific studies and data, GMO Answers is a one-stop shop,” said Andrew Walmsley, American Farm Bureau Federation biotechnology specialist. The public Q&A section is a unique feature of the site, and one that the companies involved are excited for consumers to use. “GMOs are a growing topic of discussion today, with a wide range See PRIESTLEY, page 8 Forest Service and BLM failure to renew grazing and land use permits unless the permit holders sign over water rights to the government for the permit, and the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) ruling that Idaho’s irrigation water on crops like potatoes, onions, and fruit trees must meet swimming pool quality standards. EPA’s newest proposed ruling is an additional extension of more and more government authority into the livelihoods of Idaho’s See KELLER, page 4


Volume 17, Issue 7

IFBF OFFICERS President ................................... Frank Priestley, Franklin Vice President ..................................Mark Trupp, Driggs Executive Vice President .............................. Rick Keller BOARD OF DIRECTORS Bryan Searle ............................................................Shelley Scott Bird .......................................................... Pocatello Chris Dalley ....................................................... Blackfoot Dean Schwendiman ........................................... Newdale Danny Ferguson ........................................................Rigby Scott Steele ..................................................... Idaho Falls Gerald Marchant .................................................. Oakley Rick Pearson ................................................... Hagerman Mike Garner.............................................................. Declo Curt Krantz ............................................................ Parma Mike McEvoy..................................................... Middleton Tracy Walton ....................................................... Emmett Marjorie French .............................................. Princeton Bob Callihan . ...................................................... Potlatch Tom Daniel ............................................... Bonners Ferry Carol Guthrie ......................................................... Inkom Cody Chandler ..................................................... Weiser STAFF Dir. of Admin. Services ....................... Nancy Shiozawa Dir. of Organization............................... Dennis Brower Commodities & Marketing Assistant ........... Peg Pratt Member Services Assistant . ................... Peggy Moore Publice Relations Assistant ..................... Dixie Ashton Dist. I Regional Manager .......................... Justin Patten Dist. II Regional Manager ....................... Kendall Keller Dist. III Regional Manager .................. Charles Garner Dist. IV Regional Manager ..........................Brody Miller Dist. V Regional Manager ...................... Bob Smathers Dir. of Governmental Affairs ...............Russ Hendricks Asst. Dir. of Governmental Affairs ... Dennis Tanikuni Energy/Natural Resources . ..................... Bob Geddes Director of Public Relations ............. John Thompson Video Services Manager ............................ Steve Ritter Broadcast Services Manager .................... Jake Putnam Office Manager, Boise ................... Julie Christoffersen Member Services Manager ........................ Joel Benson Printed by: Owyhee Publishing, Homedale, ID

A sedated wolf is examined and collared by Idaho Fish and Game biologists. Ranchers and sportsmen’s groups are cooperating to write legislation to provide funding for wolf depredation and control. Photo Courtesy of Idaho Fish and Game

Sportsmen, Ranchers Cooperate on Wolf Depredation Funding Plan

By John Thompson At the behest of Idaho Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter, sportsmen and ranchers are working together on legislation to fund wolf management. The legislation includes funding from Idaho’s general fund and is expected to be controversial during the 2014 legislative session. Although the legislation has not yet been written, it’s expected to contain $110,000 put up by the livestock industry, a $110,000 match from the Idaho Fish and Game budget, and $400,000 from the state’s general fund. The money would then be doled out to the Animal Damage Control Board to be used by Wildlife Services, a division of USDA, for control and prevention of wolf damage.

GEM STATE PRODUCER USPS #015-024, is published monthly except February, May, August and November by the IDAHO FARM BUREAU FEDERATION, 275 Tierra Vista Drive, Pocatello, ID 83201.

According to Fish and Game officials, nobody who sat on the Governor’s task force that was assigned to find a solution, was keen on taking over funding wolf management. Several ranchers have voiced concerns about not wanting wolves in the first place and now facing the burden of funding wolf management.

POSTMASTER send changes of address to: GEM STATE PRODUCER P.O. Box 4848, Pocatello, ID 83205-4848. Periodicals postage paid at Pocatello, Idaho, and additional mailing offices.

While the livestock industry is planning to raise its share of the funds from an increase in brand registration fees, Fish and Game is hoping for approval of a license fee increase, which makes sportsmen unhappy.

Subscription rate: $6.00 per year included in Farm Bureau dues.

But in spite of the nearly unanimous dissension, doing nothing isn’t much of an option either. Todd Grimm, State Director of USDA’s Wildlife Services said a wolf was shot south of Interstate 84 this year and wolves were trapped and relocated as far south as Morgan, Utah. Wolves can easily cross the Wyoming border into southeast Idaho. And collared wolves have been documented traveling from Yellowstone Park as far west as the Pine / Featherville area in Camas County. “Just because they (ranchers) aren’t having problems now doesn’t mean they won’t,” Grimm said.

MAGAZINE CONTACTS: Idaho Farm Bureau Federation EDITOR (208) 239-4292 • ADS (208) 239-4279 E-MAIL: dashton@idahofb.org www.idahofb.org

Cover: Idaho Farm Bureau’s Governmental Affairs Team sponsored an energy tour for Legislators in early September. The group toured a wind farm in Power County, hosted by landowner Lamar Isaak. Photo by Steve Ritter

See WOLF DEPREDATION page 4 Idaho Farm Bureau producer / OCTOBER 2013

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WOLF DEPREDATION

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Grimm said budget cuts to his agency amount to $742,000 over the last three years. The cuts resulted in staff reduction from 29 to 19 full-time employees. His agency’s presence in Idaho has dropped to one supervisor, one secretary, one pilot and 16 trappers scattered around the state. Brad Compton, assistant chief, Bureau of Wildlife, Idaho Fish and Game, said the task force was assembled in result of legislation proposed last winter by State Rep. Judy Boyle, R- Midvale. The bill passed both houses of the Idaho Legislature and would have redirected funds collected by Fish and Game through sale of hunting and fishing licenses to wolf management. Gov. Otter vetoed the bill because it didn’t include collaboration from Fish and Game or sportsman’s groups. After snuffing the legislation, Gov. Otter acknowledged the problem and directed Fish and Game to come up with a recommendation of how to

solve it. A task force made up of livestock industry representatives and sportsmen’s groups met twice and came up with the recommendation detailed above. The Idaho Fish and Game Commission signed off on the proposal in August and directed staff to work with the Governor’s office to write the legislation, Compton said.

tions drop off drastically but pick up again in the early spring when cattle herds begin calving. Last year federal pilots flew 1,600 hours at a rate of about $175 per hour. They shot 2,038 coyotes and 15 wolves. Budget cuts have limited wolf tagging activities, which has made it more difficult to locate packs, he said.

According to USDA records for fiscal 2012, wolves killed 50 calves, nine cows, 319 sheep and two dogs. Wolves injured 21 calves, two cows, 49 sheep and two dogs. Listed under “probable” kills were nine calves four cows, 31 sheep and one dog. Grimm said wolf activity ticks up from mid-July until the end of August. In August, Wildlife Services killed 41 wolves by either trapping or aerial gunning – the most wolves the agency has ever taken in a single month. He said when hunting season starts in early September, wolf depreda-

Over the past two years, counties with the most livestock losses to wolves have been Lemhi, Valley and Custer followed by Blaine, Adams, Camas, Elmore and Idaho. Wildlife Services currently has trappers in the following locations: Sandpoint, Riggins, Midvale, Boise, Glenns Ferry, Twin Falls, Paris, Bancroft, Rexburg Dubois, Challis and Jerome. They have an open position in Emmett and have pilots flying out of Gooding and Caldwell.

In the Rapanos case, the Supreme Court clarified that the term “waters of the United States” includes only those relatively permanent, standing or continuously flowing bodies of water . . . . [like] streams, oceans, rivers [and] lakes.” The Court also ruled that all waters with a “significant nexus” to “navigable waters” are covered under the CWA, but the term “significant nexus” is open to judicial interpretation and considerable controversy. It is this controversy the EPA is banking on to gain more authority.

way of life. Allowing the federal government to claim jurisdiction over state waters would have a devastating impact on rural communities throughout our state and the food supply throughout our nation.”

KELLER

Continued from page 2 citizens and its sovereignty over water. This effort isn’t new with the EPA. The U.S. Supreme Court slapped the grabbing hands of the Agency when it tried earlier to regulate every ditch, swell, and pothole that could possibly hold water in the Rapanos v. United States. The High Court ruled that the CWA does not allow federal jurisdiction over non-navigable waters and yet the EPA is seeking to do so by rule. The basis for federal jurisdiction over navigable waters lies in the U.S. Constitution. Since the early nineteenth century, the U.S. Supreme Court has held that the Commerce Clause gives the federal government extensive authority to regulate interstate commerce and broad federal power over navigable waters. Because of this broad authority and the vast body of federal regulation concerning these waters, there is frequent litigation as to whether particular bodies of water are navigable. 4 #

Idaho’s 2nd Congressional District Representative Mike Simpson said it well: “Like many people who have watched this issue carefully, I’m very concerned about this proposed rule. Most farmers and ranchers I talk to are scared to death about the possibility that the EPA would be able to regulate their irrigation ditches, drainage ponds, and even groundwater, and I understand why. In the West, water is critical to our

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / OCTOBER 2013

One of many concerns that Farm Bureau has with this proposed rule is that once EPA jurisdiction has been determined and broadened, it establishes grounds for litigation by third parties, not simply assertions of jurisdiction by EPA. Farm Bureau will continue its efforts to oppose this devastating proposed expansion of EPA’s authority. We applaud Congressman Simpson and others including language in the FY14 House Interior Appropriations bill that will prevent any attempt by the EPA to claim additional jurisdiction over state waters and increase its already excessive authority over Western farmers, families, and businesses.


Farmers and ranchers who supply Whole Foods Markets are considering a new policy the company is pursuing that would require labeling of all products that come from livestock that were fed genetically modified crops. Farm Bureau file photo

Whole Foods – They Don’t Get It News Analysis By John Thompson Agriculture biotechnology reduced chemical applications on crops by 379 million pounds between 1996 and 2009. To most people, that’s a significant advancement. The companies that developed the genetically modified crops prevalent today did it mostly to make farms more efficient and in turn, profitable. Reducing the need for chemicals on crops is a big benefit to the environment and has also made farm work safer. However, some consumers and at least one major food retailer would like to turn back the clock and the advancement of agricultural technology, without a clear understanding of what it means to the people who produce our food. Is the customer always right? Last spring Whole Foods Markets (WFM) announced a new policy requiring labeling of all products that contain genetically

modified crops by 2018. A WFM spokesman says the policy arose from consumer pressure and the company respects their customers’ right to know what’s in the food they buy. Eating food is one of the most intimate acts we humans engage in and we certainly don’t dissuade anyone’s right to know exactly what they eat. However, does this policy accomplish that goal, and at what cost? WFM teamed up with a non-profit organization based in Washington called the NonGMO Project. Its eight-person staff claims it will work with farmers and ranchers from across the U.S. and Canada to inspect farm practices and verify food products supplied to WFM if the producer so chooses to seek the Non-GMO label. Otherwise, products will be labeled as containing GMO ingredients. On its website, WFM acknowledges that genetically modified commodities are pervasive. For instance, 88 percent of the U.S. corn crop comes from genetically modified seed. Other crops deemed

“major-risk” for GMO include alfalfa, soy, sugarbeets, cotton papaya, canola zucchini and yellow summer squash. For a livestock producer who wants to meet the Non-GMO standard the obvious choice is to buy certified organic feed. Three major components of most livestock feed rations are corn, soy and alfalfa. The cost of organic alfalfa is about $25 more per ton. USDA spot market prices show organic corn and soy fetch about twice as much as conventional corn and soy. WFM spokesperson Libba Letton said her company is working with producers to help source organic feed. However, when asked if there would be a premium paid to producers who achieve the Non-GMO standard, she did not respond. In addition, it’s important to note, especially to WFM shoppers, that the WFM policy does not explicitly preclude livestock producers from using conventionally See WHOLE FOODS page 6

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WHOLE FOODS

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produced feeds and still attaining the NonGMO label, as long as the feedstuffs did not come from GMO crops. In other words, the company seems to be supportive, or at least not opposed to a return to production of feed crops utilizing multiple applications of different kinds of pesticides used to kill broadleaf weeds and grasses – rather than biotech crops that utilize one chemical, glyphosate, to control all weeds and grasses. The verification process, by which food products will attain the Non-GMO label, is another component that WFM customers should be aware of. The biggest problem with it is there is no way to test meat or dairy products to see if they contain traces of GMO crops. Joe Dickson, WFM global quality standards coordinator, described it as a “processed-based standard, rather than a finished product test.” “They are looking at the production process and sourcing process to assess the way that you exclude certain products,” he said. “You can’t test finished products for traces of GMO’s.” The U.S. government doesn’t require GMO labeling for the same reason – there’s no way to tell the difference between a steak or a piece of cheese that comes from a cow that either ate or didn’t eat GMO feed. This important point begs the question; what good is a process-based standard if there is no way to tell the difference in the end products? Nonetheless, WFM is pushing the federal government to establish a broad GMO labeling requirement for all food. The company was supportive of a voter initiative effort that failed in California last year, and is also supporting I-522, a mandatory GMO labeling initiative that voters will decide on in Washington this November. The WFM website includes the following explanation: “Whole Foods Market has long believed that consumers have a right to know how their food was produced. We strongly support mandatory labeling 6

of GMO-derived food. We believe that government-mandated labeling of GMO ingredients would enable shoppers, retailers and manufacturers to make purchasing decisions that reflect their beliefs.” The WFM stance on labeling seems both noble and political. But it’s got a few obvious holes in it. First, is WFM willing to back up their policy with cash to help pay for the government bureaucracy that would surely need to be created to enforce acrossthe-board GMO labeling? Would this result in an additional tax on food, or would the cost be passed along to producers? If there is no scientific test that can tell the difference between animal products that came from animals that ate GMO feed and those that didn’t, what good is a label? Dickson further explained that WFM is focused on transparency in the labeling of products so that customers have as much knowledge about the supply chain as possible. “Our feeling is if we as a natural or organic industry don’t draw a line in the sand, the prevalence of GMO crops will go even higher and we will no longer have a chance,” he said. “It’s certainly more difficult and more expensive to provide, but we are working with suppliers and have found lots of sources who have access and want to make the switch to non-GMO. We are working to connect people in our supply chain to minimize some of that impact.” When pressed about unsubstantiated yet prevalent claims about GMO foods causing cancer, diabetes, obesity etc., Dickson said WFM customers are label readers who hold a wide range of opinions. “The important thing to remember is that we are a grocery store and we sell products to consumers,” he said. There is a wide range of opinion in our customer base and lots of reasons why people might want to avoid GMO’s. Our focus is letting customers make decisions that reflect their own beliefs.” In email correspondence with Courtney Pineau, assistant director of the Non-GMO Project, she stated the following: “We require that every single batch of major risk

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / OCTOBER 2013

ingredient used in a verified product (e.g. those derived from corn, soy, etc.) is tested before use, and is below our action threshold of 0.9%.” Unfortunately, Idaho Farm Bureau was unable to follow-up with Pineau before press time for this magazine. With regard to the previous statement it would be relevant to know what constitutes a “batch.” The statement seems to indicate that the Non-GMO Project has an incomplete understanding of livestock feed consumption. Further, Pineau stated that testing has to be done on an ongoing basis, and is confirmed through annual audits and onsite inspections. They also have an internal surveillance testing program to confirm the results. GMO crops make up a significant percentage of the feed that contributes to the U.S. food supply and have since the early 1990’s. Although the primary reason for development of these crops was to increase efficiency at the farm level, they have also reduced the amount of herbicide applied to crops in the U.S. by 379 million pounds. They are not perfect and there is confirmed science showing that resistance to glyphosate herbicide is increasing. What that shows is that Mother Nature is and always will be one step ahead of our best science. We can’t change that. The underlying suggestion that a return to conventional herbicide use would be better is just flat wrong. In fact, it’s a step backwards. What’s most troubling is that after 20 years in production and consumption of these crops and the animals they feed, at least one influential retailer is bowing to unsubstantiated hysteria. We don’t fault WFM for attempting to give its customers what they say they want. But we have to question the validity of a “process-based” verification system that is incapable of living up to its claims.


The State of Idaho and Bureau of Land Management are at odds over sage grouse protection measures and the placement of a large power transmission project. Photo by Jim Parker

Idaho Appeals Gateway West Proposed Route By John Thompson Idaho Governor C.L. “Butch” Otter and the Bureau of Land Management are at odds over a plan to manage sage grouse that could alter the path of a large power transmission project. BLM accepted and acknowledged Wyoming’s plan outlining critical habitat for sage grouse and incorporated that state’s

advice into planning the path of the Gateway West Transmission Project. However, Idaho’s plan was not taken into consideration and BLM’s Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for the transmission project relies heavily on private land, crossing mainly southern Idaho farms, rather than federally managed land. BLM Project Manager Walt George says the federal agency can’t dictate where the

transmission corridor will be established, only where it enters and exits federal land. However, Gov. Otter and a coalition of private landowners contend the agency’s stance is disingenuous. “Simply claiming that BLM lacks siting authority over nonfederal lands essentially ignores the fact that when BLM grants a right-of-way, its decisions dictate the location of the rightSee GATEWAY WEST page 11

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STALLMAN

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of growing food that nourishes our families, neighbors and communities across the globe. While there are exceptions, many areas of our nation were blessed this year with a record crop. The Agriculture Department is projecting record corn yields in 11 states, from Michigan to Georgia. A Cornucopia of Blessings While many farmers will bring in a good crop this harvest, there are others who didn’t have such a bountiful year because of drought and other weather conditions.

For example, spring rains in Iowa prevented farmers from planting until later in the season. The state’s corn crop is now only projected to reach 162 bushels per acre, whereas it should be at least 180 bushels per acre. Unfortunately, that’s the business of farming. Some years you’re up, and others you’re down. It’s my hope that those farmers suffering this year will be back in the saddle come next harvest. Someone once said that farmers deserve our deep respect—for the land and its har-

vest are the legacy of generations of farmers who put food on our tables, preserve our landscape and inspire us with a powerful work ethic. My wish for all farmers this year is a plentiful harvest, after which you can sit back and take pleasure in the toils of your labor with family and friends. Enjoy an outing with the kids to the pumpkin patch or corn maze, and then partake in that muchdeserved hot cider. It has been a blessed year.

Priestley

Continued from page 2

of questions and emotions,” said Cathleen Enright, Ph.D., spokesperson for GMO Answers. “Food is personal, so we want to open the door for personal discussions. We recognize we haven’t done the best job communicating about GMOs-what they are, how they are developed, food safety information-the science, data and processes. We want people to join us and ask their tough questions. Be skeptical. Evaluate the information and decide for yourself. We look forward to an open conversation.”

offered to address questions submitted to GMO Answers openly, based on my personal insights, experience and research,” said Martina Newell-McGloughlin, director of the International Biotechnology Program at University of California-Davis. “I know that many of my colleagues have committed to do the same because we feel consumers have every right to ask questions about how their food is grown, and they deserve an open and honest response so that they can make informed decisions.”

Among those ready to answer any and all GMO-related questions are farmers, scientists, academics, and food safety and health experts. The questions currently trending on the site are related to labeling of GMO products, the research behind the safety of GMOs and what would happen if GMO crops mixed with non-GMO varieties.

With a commitment to openness and access to information, GMO Answers is based on five core principles:

As the public discussion on GMOs continues, the scientists who develop biotech seeds, along with farmers who grow them, want to make information about GMOs easier to find and understand. “Having grown up on a small farm and spent much of my life in academia I can relate to the issues on several levels. I’ve 8

Respecting people around the world and their right to choose healthy food products that are best for themselves and their families. Welcoming and answering questions on all GMO topics. Making GMO information, research and data easy to access and evaluate and supporting safety testing of GM products, including allowing independent safety testing of our products by validated sciencebased methods.

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Supporting farmers as they work to grow crops using precious resources more efficiently, with less impact on the environment and producing safe, nutritious food and feed products. Respecting farmers’ rights to choose the seeds that are best for their farms, businesses and communities and providing seed choices that include non-GM seeds based on market demands. “As GMOs are tools that help farmers produce more food using less water and fewer pesticides, this website is a tool for parents who want to know more about what they’re feeding their families, or young adults who want to learn about all the options biotechnology provides them as they’re making their abundant food choices,” Walmsley said. GMO Answers is produced by the members of The Council for Biotechnology Information, which includes BASF, Bayer CropScience, Dow AgroSciences LLC, DuPont, Monsanto Company and Syngenta. AFBF is a supporting partner of GMO Answers.


The lifeblood of America . They’re the humble heroes who rise before dawn and battle the elements. They put clothes on our backs and food on our tables. Their genuine values and tireless work ethic are an inspiration to us all. We appreciate all that America’s farmers do and invite you to join us in saying thanks at www.fbfs.com/SayThanksToAFarmer.

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Photo by Jim Parker

Focus on Agriculture

In Agriculture, Uncertainty is Certain By Glen Cope Any farmer will tell you that with agriculture things don’t always go as planned. In fact, farmers often refer to farming as a gamble. We never know from the beginning of each growing season if our efforts will pay off in the end. 10

A farm, like any business, is subject to many different variables that can each be vital factors in achieving a profit. One variable that sets agriculture apart is Mother Nature. The weather, when cooperative, can be a farmer’s best friend in terms of raising successful crops and providing ample forage for livestock.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / OCTOBER 2013

However, many times it has proven to be one of agriculture’s biggest adversaries. Both the widespread drought of 2012 and the more regional droughts during the previous year are prime examples of what a lack of moisture can do to food See FOCUS ON AG, page 14


GATEWAY WEST Continued from page 7

of-way on private property,” states a letter from Gov. Otter appealing the FEIS sent to Neil Kronze, Principal Deputy Director of the BLM on August 23. The Gateway West Transmission Project proposes to cross 990 miles of southern Wyoming and southern Idaho. It originates in Glenrock, Wyoming and connects with the Boardman to Hemmingway Transmission line near Melba. George told the Idaho Farm Bureau in June that a significant majority of the project (over 70 percent) was slated to cross private land. After that information was published in this magazine, the utility companies backing the project, Rocky Mountain Power and Idaho Power disagreed with George’s assessment. They say their preferred route in Idaho crosses 444 miles of federal land, 58 miles of state land and 401 miles of private land. Regardless of which path is ultimately established, sage grouse habitat plays a major role in the decision making. Last year, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service determined that sage grouse deserved to be listed under the protections of the Endangered Species Act. However, USFWS held off on the listing, releasing the following statement: “After a thorough analysis of the best available scientific information, the Fish and Wildlife Service has concluded that the greater sage-grouse warrants protection under the Endangered Species Act. However, the Service has determined that proposing the species for protection is precluded by the need to take action on other species facing more immediate and severe extinction threats.” With regard to siting construction projects, BLM is required to follow sage grouse interim guidelines, which do not allow large infrastructure in sage grouse habitat areas. But here’s the rub, Gov. Otter established a collaborative task force in 2011 at the behest of then Secretary of Interior Ken Salazar in an attempt to preclude the ESA listing of sage grouse. In September 2012,

Gov. Otter submitted a sage grouse management plan to BLM. The report was then clarified and refined and in April of this year the USFWS concurred with a majority of Idaho’s sage grouse management plan. In the letter to Deputy Director Kornze, referenced above, Gov. Otter stated that BLM’s response to Idaho’s effort to comply and establish a sage grouse management plan was “disappointing.” The BLM’s response states that Idaho’s plan is not “sufficiently final to be considered in the environmental analysis associated with the proposed Gateway West transmission line. According to Gov. Otter, “This summary dismissal is so vague that I am left to question BLM’s commitment to the collaborative Gateway process, and more importantly, my sage grouse plan.” The letter continues stating that Idaho’s plan is sufficiently final and is largely unchanged since September 5, 2012. Where the Idaho plan and BLM differ is largely in designation of critical habitat areas for sage grouse. The state’s plan would allow much more access for the transmission project on federal land, whereas BLM wants to push the project onto private land in favor of protecting habitat for sage grouse. In closing, Gov. Otter asks that BLM reconsider its routes and place as much of the Gateway project on federally managed lands as possible. In addition to concerns about protecting sage grouse habitat, the Governor’s letter references the Federal Land Policy Management Act of 1976 which requires BLM to “assure that consideration is given to those state, local and tribal plans that are germane in the development of land use plans for public lands; assist in resolving, to the extent practical, inconsistencies between Federal and non-Federal Government plans and shall provide for meaningful public involvement of State and local government officials. . . “ Several counties in the proposed path of

Gateway West have voiced similar concerns. Counties have jurisdiction over siting infrastructure projects granted through the Idaho Land Use Planning Act. Several counties have previously designated corridors for transmission projects. A coalition of landowners and county commissioners represented by attorney Doug Balfour of Pocatello, are also working to reduce the impact of Gateway West on private landowners. Their correspondence and public comments submitted to BLM raise several other important questions including that the need for the Gateway project has been questioned. They claim that the proponents (Idaho Power and Rocky Mountain Power) have admitted that they do not see a need for extra transmission capacity in the near future. A recent editorial by Idaho Farm Bureau President Frank Priestley questioned whether landowners would be treated fairly by the utility companies in the negotiations over acquiring rights-of-way. The utilities provided the following response: “The Companies seek to acquire rightsof-way for transmission lines through mutual agreements and agree that landowners should be compensated fairly. Each parcel is individually assessed a fair market value by a certified appraiser. Once the location of the transmission line has been determined and the required permits have been obtained, the Companies will begin coordinating with property owners to acquire easements. The Companies negotiate easements with landowners separately, primarily because each property is unique and the individual landowner knows the most regarding the characteristics of their land and operations.” In addition, the Companies added that they take pride in the fact that they have a high success rate in reaching mutual agreements when acquiring rights-of-way and that they would only use eminent domain as a last resort.

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21+ Category

Photo Contest 2013

Grand Prize - Jenna Harrison, Grace, ID - 13 yrs old

21+ - Casey Balterton - Soda Springs, ID 12

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / OCTOBER 2013


Photo Contest 2013 “Seasons of Agriculture in Idaho” photo contest is a project of the IFBF Women’s Leadership Committee.  Completing another year, winning photos will be used in the 2014 Calendar published by the com-

mittee.   Requirements for the contest are full frame photos with lots of creativity.  It is limited to amateur Idaho resident photographers only.  Entry deadline for the 2014 contest is September 1st, 2014.

6-12 Year-old Category 13-20 Year-old Category

6-12 yr old Division - Tate Priestley, Franklin, ID 13-20 year old Division - Kara Harrison, Grace, ID

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FOCUS ON AGRICULTURE

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The flip side of that extreme is too much moisture. What farmer in the Midwest could forget the Mississippi River flood of 1993, which completely covered entire fields with water, drowning 20 million acres across nine states. Other examples of the tough hand Mother Nature can deal are frost, wind and hail damage to crops and infrastructure, which can also be common occurrences on the farm. Another uncertainty that many farmers find equally as frustrating as the weather is market fluctuations for the crops they grow. Aside from normal supply and demand pressures on the market, other influences include the state of both the global and U.S. economies, growing conditions in competing countries and even hedge fund managers, who may

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find agriculture commodities attractive investments one day and completely pull money from them the next. Farmers always try to plan for a small profit after crops and livestock are sold. However, one can imagine the disappointment when something completely out of a farmer’s control causes the market to plunge. This uncertainty can make financial planning difficult for the best of farmers. This is why the phrase “farmers are price takers not price makers” is often heard amongst the people who make their living off the land.  With all the unknowns related to farming, it is extremely important that some of the risk be reduced. It is high time that our policymakers give farmers some assurance that if another bad weather year occurs, they won’t be financially ruined

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / OCTOBER 2013

because of the high cost to put out a crop. If it were not for crop insurance, it would have been nearly impossible for even a debt-free family farm to survive a year like 2012.  Crop insurance allows farmers to farm for another year. If another 1993 or 2012 occurs, many farmers will be forced to sell out because they have so much invested in the crop before it is even harvested. In light of all the uncertainty of farming, farmers need Congress to pass the farm bill and save the farm when disaster strikes again. Glen Cope is a fourth-generation cattle rancher from Missouri. In 2012, he served as chairman of the American Farm Bureau Federation’s Young Farmers & Ranchers Committee.


WIND FARM TOUR

Photos by Steve Ritter

Idaho Farm Bureau’s Government Affairs staff hosted an energy tour in early September in Power County. Legislators from eastern Idaho attended including Julie VanOrden, Douglas Hancey and Paul Romrell.

Stephen Slack is the operations manager for First Wind, a wind power company operating in Power County. The popularity of wind-generated power is increasing all around the world. Turbines that generate 2 megawatts of power cost about $2 million each and generate enough power to run 500 average American households each year. By the end of 2010 there were over 197,000 megawatts of wind power operating in the world. That number has increased by three times since 2005. Idaho Farm Bureau producer / OCTOBER 2013

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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / OCTOBER 2013

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AFTER THE BURN Article and photos by Yvonne Barkley It was another summer when the sky turned black. The National Interagency Fire Center reports that to date, 2013 saw 1,318 wildfires scorch 728,986 acres of Idaho’s forests and rangelands. Whether in the direct path of flames or weeks spent under smoky skies, thousands of people were affected by another summer of fire. Idaho’s forest and rangeland ecosystems are extremely resilient and supremely adapted to disturbance by fire. By living in firebased ecosystems, we become part of those ecosystems and influence the landscape by our activities. As owners and managers, the time after a burn can provide opportunities to achieve specific objectives for the lands we steward. Damages vs. benefits From a post-fire management perspective, damages are defined as the unfavorable effects of fire-caused changes that make management objectives difficult to achieve or unobtainable. Benefits are the favorable effects of fire-caused changes and are factors that contribute to the realization of management objectives. All effects must be looked at with reference to the overall short- and long-term management objectives of any particular piece of land. The effects of fire in an ecosystem that is being managed for wilderness objectives may be viewed differently from those being man18

Damage assessment should be done as soon as possible after a wildfire.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / OCTOBER 2013


should be updated any time a change has occurred on the landscape. Establishing set photo points throughout your land will help you compare conditions and changes over time.

Deciduous trees and woody shrubs can start sprouting soon after the first post-fire rain.

aged for timber production. Emergency Rehabilitation Treatments The fire-based ecosystems of Idaho have a long history of fire and our native species have one or more mechanisms for surviving fire and/or reproducing after a burn. Because of these adaptations, emergency rehabilitation will not be necessary for many burned areas; most of this land will recover without intervention. The USDA Forest Service uses the Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) system for assessing and treating large areas of burned land and has collected a vast amount of information about post-fire rehabilitation treatments useful to family forest owners and managers. One of the most important things BAER teams have found is that, though well intended, many rehabilitation efforts actually interfere with natural recovery responses. Assessment After a burn, satellite images are commonly used by BAER teams to identify treatment areas and those identified as needing immediate, on-the-ground assessment are visited by teams which usually include soil scientists, hydrologists, and others with a range of knowledge and experience. Burns

less than 300 acres are rarely considered for treatment unless threats to life, property and/or water quality are identified. Other reasons for emergency rehabilitation treatments are to repair facilities for safety reasons, stabilize biotic communities, and prevent the degradation of critical, known cultural sites and natural resources. As a family forest owner or manager who has smaller acreages, the best way for gathering the necessary post-fire information will be by walking your property. Be very careful when first entering burnt areas. Trees with partially burnt trunks and root systems, called hazard trees, are common and can fall without warning. Assessment and treatment may be more accurate and effective if adjacent properties are included. Damage assessment should be done as soon after the burn as possible to allow time for any necessary post-fire treatments. For example, emergency erosion treatments need to be in place before the first rain of the fall for best effects. Before beginning your assessment review your management objectives. An inventory of damages will be easier if you already have records of the pre-burn characteristics of your land. Photographs are a valuable part of management plans and

The information you gather will be more manageable if you assess your land by unit. Units are areas similar in landform and vegetative communities. A map of all effected units will be needed. Photocopy topographic maps or aerial photographs and enlarge the unit area, or sketch a map of the unit. Color-coding your information can make interpreting maps easier. For example, you could use green for areas that experienced no to light damage, yellow for moderate damage, and red for severe damage. Make several copies of unit maps, as you will have different types of information to collect. When you are through, photocopy all but your base map onto clear acetate. You can then overlay maps and identify areas of greatest concern, look for patterns, and compare characteristics and differences. Idaho’s forests and rangelands are resilient and begin healing before the major fires of the year are even controlled. Many will view the time after a burn as they would the end of a good book, with the story told and the ending known. But others will see this time after the burn as the beginning of a new chapter, in the book that is about life lived in the fire-based ecosystems of the West. For more information on this topic see the University of Idaho Extension publication After the Burn: Assessing and Managing Your Forestland after a Wildfire; available online at www.uidaho.edu/extension/ forestry/content/fire/ecology or by requesting a copy by email from yvonnec@ uidaho.edu. Forest landowners are encouraged to check with local land management agencies for information, expert visits, and cost-share programs. Yvonne Barkley is an associate extension forester for the University of Idaho. She can be reached at yvonnec@uidaho.edu

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / OCTOBER 2013

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Top Farm Bureau Agents

Rookie of the Month:

Bea Guzman      Palmer Agency

Agent of the Month:

Doug Johnson       Schmitt Agency

Agency of the Month:

Schmitt Agency

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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / OCTOBER 2013


Idaho Farm Bureau producer / OCTOBER 2013

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Grant Steed plants Roundup Ready Alfalfa in a field near Malta.

Idaho Farmers Planting Roundup Ready Alfalfa Article and photo by Jake Putnam In a dusty field near Malta, Idaho farmer Grant Steed planted Roundup Ready Alfalfa for the first time this fall.  “Yea, we’re really excited,” Steed said. “We have neighbors that planted last year and had a good crop. They’ve seen tremendous yields and a big difference in quality there.” Steed has lofty goals for his hay. He wants a dairy grade crop his first cutting next spring. Fellow farmers report that it takes a year or two to get up to premium grade with regular seed because of weeds.  “Not with round up,” said Steed, “you don’t have that problem. It’s just straight hay and you’re able to get good profits out of it because there’s no competition with weeds and just excellent yields. We’ll also get two to three more years of growth instead of the standard alfalfa varieties.” According to the USDA, Roundup Ready varieties comprise 20 to 25 percent of all alfalfa planted in the U.S. in 2013 and that number is expected to double next year. 22

Steed works the family farm with a few hundred acres of his own land. He’s not worried about the negative press swirling around Round-up Ready crops. Two incidents the past six months have environmental groups fired up. The first came last spring when GMO wheat was found growing in a non-GMO field in Oregon and then in September when a small amount of GMO hay was detected in a non-GMO Washington field. A Washington State farmer filed a complaint with state agriculture officials that his hay crop was rejected for export sale because of the trace GMO content. The report triggered complaints from antiGMO groups that have fought the government for a decade to keep biotech alfalfa from contaminating organic hay supplies. Organic crop groups have warned that these two reports have threatened U.S. exports of hay to Asian nations that reject GMOs. They’re encouraging farmers to test every bag of seed they buy before planting. The wheat embargo was lifted this summer

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / OCTOBER 2013

and the Oregon GMO incident was labeled ‘suspicious’ by investigators. Just a week ago the United States Department of Agriculture concluded that the detection of Round-up in the Washington farmers’s non-GMO hay was under 2-percent and “well within the ranges acceptable too much of the marketplace.”  Farmers plant more than 20 million acres of alfalfa each year and its nation’s 4th largest crop in number of acres planted each year. Steed says he’s not concerned about GMO’s he’s willing to pay more for seed just to get better yields and premium market prices. “You know for us it’s not about price, but there will just be more income from it down the road. That’s what we are looking at. We haven’t used a lot of chemicals on our alfalfa fields or herbicides in the past. We just let the hay do its thing. But in the future knowing that we’ll have hay with no weeds whatsoever that’s money in our pockets and we’ll get more when we sell See GMO ALFALFA page 29


Idaho Farm Bureau producer / OCTOBER 2013

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Grain Marketing with Clark Johnston

Corn Forecast Unchanged: Keep an Eye on RSI to Find Support By Clark Johnston The corn production estimates haven’t changed much since last month. We are still seeing projections in the area of 13.8 billion bushels, give or take a few million. With the current production numbers and the estimated demand we could see a carryout for the 2013/14 crop year close to 2 billion bushels. The crop matured quickly the last couple of weeks in September which pressured the market along with a reduced threat of early frost. The transition from old crop corn and new hasn’t been all that smooth as supplies in some areas ran short leaving elevators with a decision of just how to entice producers to bring their corn to market a little early. The answer was to adjust the costs of drying the corn down from higher moisture levels. In southeast Idaho there was one feeder that increased their basis to as high as 150 over the December futures for delivery by the 15th of October. With the spread between the posted bids and the 150 over, even after paying the additional freight producers from as far away as the western part of the state could contract corn for better than the local bids. We are also seeing producers looking at next year and considering the possibility of a water shortage and would they be better off planting alternative crops rather than taking the chance on enough water to finish their corn. So far there doesn’t seem to be a clear choice as wheat prices for next year aren’t high enough to be equal to corn. Chicago wheat futures are showing a carry of 14 cents from December 13 and September 14. This isn’t much of a carry, thus not giving producers an incentive to 24

contract wheat for next year at this time. The Stocks to Use Ratio for the 2013/14 marketing year is projected to be in the area of 20 percent. This would be the lowest level in quite a few years. Looking at the ending stocks and the effect it has had on the carry charge in the market we will need to watch the futures market very closely as we move through the winter months and into spring. This is definitely shaping up to be a year where you will need to trade the futures and basis separately. The basis for next year will remain weak especially if the futures rally. As some of you experienced this year, by locking the price of your wheat early you also locked in a cheap basis. The market for this upcoming year will give you an opportunity to be profitable but you may need to market your wheat differently than you have in the past. First of all you should watch the spreads in the futures from the front month to the deferred contracts. At this time it doesn’t look as though we will see the carry charge widen out but, it is always a good practice to watch and monitor the spreads. Then find a technical indicator that doesn’t necessarily show you ways to be a day trader but, one that will give you a few opportunities throughout the year to market your grain. A good indicator to become familiar with is the Relative Strength Index or RSI for short. In a nutshell this Index will give you a good idea as to just when the market is going to find support or experience some resistance in the market. Let’s use this as an indicator as just when to sell your futures and then wait for the basis to strengthen later in the year. Pro-

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / OCTOBER 2013

Clark Johnston

ducers that used this strategy to merchandise their wheat this past year realized up to as much as 80 cents per bushel better prices than if they would have just priced their wheat on the day they sold the futures. Basis has some definite seasonal trends and it will be in your best interest to follow these trends in an effort to be a better merchandiser. Local grain elevators, flour mills and export companies all trade basis. If you learn futures and basis and use these tools in your operation you in turn will be on the same page as the companies you are selling to. By the way, you won’t believe just how good it will feel to make your decisions based on your knowledge of the market and less and less on guessing and emotion. When I say guessing I am referring to trying to guess the top. For information on how we at the Idaho Farm Bureau Federation can assist you in your efforts simply call Peg Pratt at the federation office in Pocatello. 208-2327915 or 208-239-4228. Clark Johnston is a grain marketing specialist who is on contract with the Idaho Farm Bureau. He is the owner of JC Management Company in Northern Utah. He can be reached at clark@jcmanagement. net


Students from Timberline High School recently recognized the importance of irrigation water in Idaho’s economy.

Boise Students Observe Blue Thursday in honor of Farmers Article and photo by Jake Putnam

the season without irrigation water.

acres are impacted downstream.”

About 40 high school students gathered on the banks of the Riddenbaugh Canal in support of farmers recently.

Timberline teacher Dick Jordan summed it saying water is not only important to farmers but every man, woman and child in the Gem State. He told students assembled that agriculture impacts the Idaho economy and the lack of irrigation water is troublesome.

Students, farmers and water experts stood on the banks of the Riddenbaugh canal, a block east of the high school on September 6th. On that day as the canal slowed to a trickle, Norm Semanko of the Idaho Water Users Association stressed the importance of water storage during drought years.

On September 5th water managers shut down the landmark canal that winds through Boise because of lack of water. In a show of support, Timberline High School students dubbed the event Blue Thursday to bring awareness to downstream farmers who will farm the rest of

“Water is so super precious and we really need to think about it,” Jordan, told students. “I wanted you guys to think about the impact of this canal being turned off. This drought is an act of nature. 69,000

“We need more water saved up for years like this and we are looking at expanding See BLUE THURSDAY, page 26

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / OCTOBER 2013

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BLUE THURSDAY

Continued from page 25

one of our upstream dams. We don’t want to build a new dam, but expanding existing dams like Arrowrock will help us in years like this,” said Semanko. Third generation farmer Sid Freeman of Middleton spoke to the students and got them thinking about the impact of water and agriculture on the economy.    “A strong and viable agriculture industry is the most important cornerstone in a country’s national security,” Freeman said. “From irrigated land downstream we send seeds grown here, from this water to every continent on earth. The economic value of the Idaho seed industry can only be mea-

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sured by the value outside our borders, were talking billions. It can also be measured in a two year period when the seed hits the ground and becomes food that feeds billions of hungry people around the world. This water becomes a worldwide humanitarian issue. It impacts millions and it’s priceless.” Farmer Drew Eggers of west Ada County also spoke to the students. Eggers farms more than 1,000 acres. “I get water directly downstream from the Riddenbaugh,” he said. “If we didn’t have the canal system and this excellent reservoir system to hold back the water for when we need it, this land would be sagebrush

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / OCTOBER 2013

and none of you’d live here. My main crop is peppermint it’s used in flavoring and toothpaste. It takes about four acre feet to raise a mint crop. So if you imagine four feet of water per acre from the ground up and spread the water over my land its four feet deep. That’s a lot of water. Water is very important to mine and other crops in the Treasure Valley.” Liz Paul of Idaho Rivers United agrees with the Water Users Association that more water storage is needed in the future to ensure Boise River flows, but also to meet the growing needs of agriculture. “The Boise River is in our life from the moment we wake up

till we go to bed each night and it works all through the night for us. What we see this year is an opportunity for all of us to work together to get more investment dollars into the irrigation infrastructure because it’s an incredible investment and we need to bring it into the 21st century especially in drought years. We need to get better use out of every gallon of water,” said Paul. The noon hour rally was a rare show of support for farmers. Students learned from farmers and water experts. Professionals attending the event were impressed with Blue Thursday. “It’s sure a positive sign, in dry, uncertain times,” said Freeman.


2014 Idaho FFA Foundation Tractor Raffle Win this Classic

1951 Allis Chalmers WD Tractor and support Idaho FFA members with your

$10 raffle ticket donation 2nd Prize—Traeger Grill 3rd Prize—$250 Carhartt Gift Card Proceeds benefit Idaho FFA Members through post-secondary education scholarships and support of Idaho FFA programs statewide through the Idaho FFA Foundation. (36) $1,000 scholarships have been awarded to date and another $22,000 in scholarships will be awarded in April 2014. In addition, the local FFA chapters designated on the winning tickets will receive a portion of the total ticket proceeds. Tickets may be purchased from your local FFA chapter or the Idaho FFA Foundation. The drawing will be on April 11, 2014 at the Idaho State FFA Leadership Conference in Twin Falls. Need not be present to win. This restored classic tractor includes a sprayer tank and new tires.

Idaho FFA Alumni

Tractor donated by Tim Riggins of Caldwell Contact your local Idaho FFA Chapter for Tractor Raffle tickets, or call Idaho FFA Foundation Tractor Raffle Chairman Sid Freeman at 208-941-3584. For more information about the Tractor Raffle, visit: www.idffafoundation.org 2013 Idaho FFA Foundation Tractor Raffle Scholarship Winners

THANK YOU! Idaho Farm Bureau for your support of Idaho FFA and the Tractor Raffle! For a full list of Tractor Raffle sponsors and more information about the Tractor Raffle program, please visit: www.idffafoundation.org

FFA—Premier Leadership, Personal Growth and Career Success through Agricultural Education Idaho Farm Bureau producer / OCTOBER 2013

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Treasure Valley Agriculture Tour

Several state legislators attended the annual Treasure Valley Agriculture Tour this year in early September. The tour group made stops at Sun Ridge Dairy near Nampa, Amalgamated Sugar, the Langley Power Plant in Payette County, Sawtooth Winery, Fort Boise Produce and several others. They competed in tractor driving and siphon tube setting competitions at the University of Idaho Parma Research Center. Photos by Steve Ritter

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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / OCTOBER 2013

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GMO ALFALFA

Continued from page 22 it,” said Steed.

With a flurry of Federal District Court lawsuits in play, Steed says he’s followed the fight for GMO alfalfa closely and says the arguments are emotional and people should research the issue closely. “We know the seeds have been tested, they’ve done experiments with them, they’re safe to use,” he said. “If people have questions - get educated, make sure that research is based on sound science. Talk to people involved in agriculture and see the difference they’ve made. When we can use fewer chemicals and save money. It’s a good thing. They’ve helped a lot crops throughout the world and will make a big difference for us in the future.” U.S. Ag Secretary Tom Vilsack says the USDA is continuing their research on GMO seeds. “Not only are we going to do additional science and research to figure out if there

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are ways we can prevent pollination from occurring,” said Vilsack. “We’re going to make sure that we improve our research in terms of protection of transgenes in alfalfa seeds but we’re also taking a look at the modeling that would determine if the extent of pollination is accurate.”  Washington State agriculture officials notified the USDA that they confirmed low-level of GMO substance in non GMO hay the first week of September. The Ag inspectors did not identify the level of contamination, but in a letter to APHIS said it was “within ranges acceptable to the marketplace.” The USDA first approved Roundup Ready alfalfa in 2005. But environmental groups and seed companies sued the USDA in 2006 successfully forcing the agency to hold up approval after a federal court found USDA had not conducted a thorough environmental review. After the 2010 review the government at

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / OCTOBER 2013

first considered approving GMO alfalfa with restrictions, but then approved unrestricted planting after extensive research in January 2011. Steed says with his first application of Roundup he’s confident he won’t have to apply anything else, saving time and making that first crop profitable.  “There’ll be less chemicals,” he said. “We’ll put on Roundup to help with the weeds but it will be good and I think with higher quality alfalfa. In the long run it’ll help with greater milk production and savings that’ll carry on to the consumer.” Alfalfa is the fourth largest U.S. field crop behind corn, wheat and soybeans and is used to feed dairy cattle and other livestock according to the USDA. The crop is worth $8 billion per year and is grown on 17 million acres across the U.S.


County Happenings At the Gooding-Lincoln County Farm Bureau Annual Picnic, September 7, 2013, in Shoshone, Idaho, County President, Steve Ballard makes the presentation of the 2013 Idaho Farm Bureau and Gooding-Lincoln County Scholarship Awards to recipient Jonathan Wisniewski.

American farm bureau federation news

AFBF Advocates for Port Expansion Projects SEATTLE, Wash., Sept. 24, 2013 -- Expanded capacity and access to markets on the West Coast is critical for U.S. agricultural products, which is why the American Farm Bureau Federation joined with the Alliance for Northwest Jobs & Exports this week to show support for three proposed multi-commodity export terminal projects in the Pacific Northwest. Located in Cherry Point and Longview, Wash., and Boardman, Ore., the three proposed port expansion projects under consideration in the Pacific Northwest are expected to bring thousands of jobs while strengthening the region’s trade infrastructure, benefitting coal, agriculture and other producers. “Agriculture is very trade dependent. Last year alone, more than $141 billion worth of U.S. agriculture products were exported around the globe,” said Steve Baccus, president of Kansas Farm Bureau and chair of the American Farm Bureau Federation Trade Advisory Committee. “The Pacific Northwest is a crucial gateway for agri-

cultural exports, and these export facilities will help our members meet the increased demand for their goods in burgeoning Asian markets.” Trade is responsible for 40 percent of all jobs in Washington which is the most tradedependent state in the United States.  Agriculture products are Washington’s thirdlargest export.  In Oregon, one in five jobs is dependent on international trade with agricultural products and services accounting for 10 percent of Oregon’s gross domestic product.   “We are glad to have the American Farm Bureau Federation as an important voice of support for these projects,” said, Lauri Hennessey, Spokeswoman for the Alliance for Northwest Jobs & Exports.  “The American Farm Bureau Federation joins many of our local and state-wide Farm Bureaus in supporting these projects which will lead to the expansion of trade for all kinds of exports including wheat, grain, soybeans and corn.”

 Exports from these projects will travel by freight trains, the most fuel efficient means of ground transportation. In Washington alone, there are more than 3,200 miles of track that move goods to, through and from the state, including coal, timber, agriculture products and consumer goods. The increased investment associated with coal and agricultural exports will keep the trade doors open for decades to come by strengthening the rail presence in U.S. port cities, according to the Washington Research Council. AFBF’s Trade Advisory Committee is currently touring the Pacific Northwest looking at ports and waterways infrastructure. Members visited the Port of Vancouver earlier this week, and after Seattle are headed to Portland and Oakland. The group of farm leaders is urging Congress to pass the Waterways Resources Reform and Development Act to bring U.S. ports up to par with that of the Port of Vancouver and other international ports.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / OCTOBER 2013

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American farm bureau federation news

Congress Must Finish a Farm Bill This Year

KANSAS CITY, MO., September 19, 2013 – The farm bill is an economic stimulus bill that creates jobs and helps small businesses and rural communities every year, according to American Farm Bureau Federation President Bob Stallman. Congress can – and must – finish a farm bill this year, Stallman said in remarks presented to the Agricultural Business Council of Kansas City. “It’s obvious that we will not have a new farm bill in place by the time the current one expires, about two weeks from now,” Stallman said. “The only extension Farm Bureau sup-

ports is a five-year extension that looks a lot like the new farm bill that is working its way through Congress,” he added.

Although many political pundits in Washington and around the countryside are skeptical about the odds for passage of a farm bill in 2013, Stallman is optimistic. “I am confident that Congress can pass a five-year farm bill this year,” he said. Touching on another issue important to Farm Bureau, Stallman said the U.S. will lose billions of dollars in agricultural production to other countries

if problems with the current immigration system are not solved.

tures are aging, failing or just plain outdated and obsolete,” he concluded.

“We need to make it easier for farmers and ranchers to hire the foreign workers they need,” he said. “We need Congress to pass immigration reform now.”

AFBF is conducting an organizational campaign during September called, “The Heat is On,” designed to communicate with members of Congress the importance of the farm bill, immigration reform and waterway and port infrastructure improvements.

Authorization and funding of lock and dam projects is another critical issue on Farm Bureau’s agenda. “More than $20 billion worth of farm exports travel on our inland waterways,” Stallman said. “More and more of those waterways transportation struc-

The ABC of Kansas City is an alliance of individuals, businesses and organizations that advocate growth and awareness of the food, fiber, agriscience and related industries in the Kansas City region

More Corn, Smaller Soybean Stocks Predicted WASHINGTON, D.C., September 12, 2013 – The September World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates report released by the Agriculture Department forecasts a binbusting corn crop coupled with significantly smaller projected ending-stocks for soybeans. September’s WASDE report projected the 2013 corn crop at 13.84 billion bushels, which would be a record crop, if realized, and more than a 3 billion bushel increase compared to 2012. The report estimates the 2013 corn yield at 155.3 bushels per acre, up slightly from the prior month’s forecast. “This is a later maturing crop than 2012 so the yield projections become more accurate as the crop becomes ready for harvest,” explained Todd Davis, American Farm Bureau 32

Federation economist. The USDA report predicts 2013-14 corn ending stocks to drastically increase to 1,855 million bushels, from 661 million bushels for 2012-13. “The U.S. corn market will shift from a 21-day end-of-year supply to a 53-day end-of-year supply. This increase in stocks will cause prices to decline from a marketing-average price of $6.90 per bushel for 2012-13 to a projected $4.80 per bushel in 2013-14,” said Davis. The 2013 U.S. soybean crop is projected at 41.2 bushels per acre. This is down from the August estimate and reduces the projected soybean crop by 36 million bushels from the previous estimate to a 3.15 billion bushel crop for 2013-14. The 2013-14 soybean ending

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / OCTOBER 2013

stocks are expected to sharply decrease from the August estimate, to 150 million bushels. If realized, soybean stocks are projected to increase by only 25 million bushels over the 201213 marketing year. Looked at another way, 150 million bushels in stocks equates to about 17 days of soybeans in the grain bins on Sept. 1, 2014. Even so, the projected marketing-year average price for soybeans is expected to decline from $14.40 per bushel for 2012-13 to $12.50 per bushel for 2013-14, although this estimate is up slightly from the prior month. Soybean prices will be less connected to corn, in the coming year, according to Davis. “Market dynamics are changing compared to what farmers

have seen over the last three years or so,” Davis said. “Soybean prices have been following the corn market the last three years but are now poised to separate from corn,” said Davis. “As corn stocks are projected to increase, the corn price will have limited upside potential as the market has to clear. Soybeans are projected to continue to have tight stocks, which will keep prices high enough to ration use throughout another marketing-year.” The report from USDA incorporates farm production information in the supply and demand estimates but does not adjust acreage estimates. USDA will publish a revision to its acreage estimates in October adding another bit of uncertainty to the market.


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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / OCTOBER 2013

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New $1,000 Truck Incentive

Effective immediately and continuing through April 1, Chevrolet and GMC are offering exclusively to Farm Bureau members in participating states an additional $1,000 incentive on the acquisition of any new 2013 or 2014 regular cab, heavy duty (2500/3500 series) truck.  This is in addition to the standard

Idaho Red Meat Production Up

Commercial red meat production at Idaho packing plants for July 2013 totaled 3.8 million pounds, up 7 percent from July of last year, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service. Accumulated red meat production for the January-July 2013 period totaled 26.2 million pounds, up 6 percent from the comparable period a year earlier. Commercial red meat production for the United States totaled 4.16 billion pounds in July, up 5 percent from the 3.95 billion pounds produced in July 2012. Beef production, at 2.29 billion pounds, was 4 percent above the previous year. Cattle slaughter totaled 2.89 million head, up 4 percent from July 2012. The average live weight was up 7 pounds from the previous year, at 1,302 pounds. Veal production totaled 9.6 million pounds, 1 percent above July a year ago. Calf slaughter totaled 70,000 34

$500 Farm Bureau incentive, which brings the total Farm Bureau incentive on Chevy Silverado and GMC Sierra HD models to $1,500. To take advantage of the applicable Farm Bureau discount on these or any other new Chevrolet (except Volt), Buick or GMC vehicles, members log onto fbverify.com/gm.

head, up 4 percent from July 2012. The average live weight was down 7 pounds from last year, at 234 pounds. Pork production totaled 1.84 billion pounds, up 7 percent from the previous year. Hog slaughter totaled 9.08 million head, up 6 percent from July 2012. The average live weight was up 2 pounds from the previous year, at 271 pounds. Lamb and mutton production, at 14.1 million pounds, was up 13 percent from July 2012. Sheep slaughter totaled 211,600 head, 19 percent above last year. The average live weight was 133 pounds, down 7 pounds from July a year ago. January to July 2013 commercial red meat production was 28.3 billion pounds, up slightly from 2012. Accumulated beef production was up slightly from last year, veal was down 6 percent, pork was up slightly from last year, and lamb and mutton production was up 2 percent.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / OCTOBER 2013

The RFS Can Be Flexible

The Environmental Protection Agency recently proclaimed that the nation’s Renewable Fuels Standard has some wiggle room. RFS is the law that requires transportation fuel sold in the U.S. to contain a certain amount of renewable fuels, such as ethanol or biodiesel, to reduce our reliance on oil. Oil companies claim the law will cause “economic harm,” but EPA decided the mandated volumes for 2013 just need to be tweaked. “EPA does have the flexibility to adapt within a changing environment,” said Matt Erickson, American Farm Bureau Federation economist. “The world is changing quite frankly. We had the recession. We have CAFE standards, which are higher fuel efficiencies within our transportation system.”

Computer Use on Farms Continues to Rise

The Agriculture Department’s National Agricultural Statistics Service released the latest Farm Computer Usage and Ownership Report, which determined an increase in usage and ownership of computers on U.S. farms with a higher level of high speed internet access versus dialup. Sixty-seven percent of U.S. farms have internet access, up from 62 percent in 2011, and 70 percent have computer access, up from 65 percent two years ago. The

report also said 40 percent of farms use computers for the farm business, up 3 percent from 2011.

Aging Farmers Are Staying on the Farm

According to the Agriculture Census, 25 percent of farm operators are more than 65 years old. Farming has traditionally encompassed more timeconsuming physical labor, but with modern technologies that make farming easier on the body, farmers are able to farm longer, surpassing retirement age. Farmers are also delaying retirement as they experience larger profits due to higher yields and elevated grain prices that make it harder to hand over the keys to the tractor.

USDA Develops New Feed Tracking Software

A new system developed by agricultural engineers at the Agriculture Department’s Agricultural Research Service is providing capabilities to track the feeding habits of animals, making it easier to know when they may be sick. The system was originally developed for feedlot cattle and is now being converted for use with growfinish swine. Ear tags, monitoring antennas and data recording software are used to track the everyday movements and habits of animals; information that can be used in many ways for future studies.


Farm Size, Questions on ‘Big Ag’ Focus of Next Food Dialogues

The U.S. Farmers & Ranchers Alliance will address the differences and similarities between large and small farms at its next Food Dialogues event, which will be held in Boston on Oct. 24. The event will stream live online at www.fooddialogues.com. Timed to Food Day, the Food Dialogues: Boston event, “Does Farm Size Really Matter? From environmental stewardship to animal care, are small and big farms that different?” will feature a panel of farmers, ranchers and food pundits. The panel will explore farm size and ownership and will address recent attacks on industrial agriculture and food production. For more information on this event, including how to regis-

ter, visit www.fooddialogues. com. You can also follow USFRA on Twitter (@USFRA using #FoodD) and check out the Facebook page, www.facebook.com/usfarmersandranchers.

New Carbon Testing Methods Evaluate Conservation Efforts

The Agriculture Department’s Natural Resources Conservation Service has created the world’s largest soil carbon dataset, an approach to assist farmers in estimating how conservation practices affect carbon soil levels. Researchers examined 148,000 soil samples for carbon content. “By understanding our soils’ current carbon content, we can target the ones with the greatest potential to store additional carbon. Planners can use models (where accuracy is enhanced

by RaCA data) to better predict the impact a conservation practice might have on enhancing the soil’s carbon content,” according to Christopher Smith, an NRCS soil scientist.

Lower Ethanol Production in Forecast

The Energy Information Administration recently released the September issue of its short-term energy outlook. EIA forecasts that the U.S. ethanol industry will produce an average of 890,000 barrels per day in 2014, down slightly from the prior month’s forecast. The current EIA estimate assumes the 2014 renewable fuel standard volumes will be identical to those recently finalized by the Environmental Protection Agency for 2013, which equates to 16.55 billion ethanol-equivalent gallons of renewable fuels. 

Illegal Immigration May be Rising

After leveling off in recent years, illegal immigration may be on the rise again, giving ammunition to House Republicans who want to secure the border with Mexico before considering a broader overhaul of the nation’s immigration laws. A report released by the nonpartisan Pew Research Center recently found there were 11.7 million undocumented immigrants in the U.S. in 2012, approaching the nation’s all-time high of 12.2 million in 2007. Jeffrey Passel, senior demographer at Pew’s Hispanic Trends Project, said rises and falls in illegal immigration have traditionally mirrored the state of the U.S. economy. “Historically, the patterns seem to be strongly related to employment opportunities,” Passel said.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / OCTOBER 2013

35


Farm Bureau Members Pay Less For Choice Hotels!

FARM BUREAU COMMODITY REPORT GRAIN PRICES

Portland:

White Wheat 11% Winter 14% Spring Corn

Ogden:

White Wheat 11% Winter 14% Spring Barley

Pocatello:

White Wheat 11% Winter 14% Spring Barley

A $40 room will be closer to

$32

Burley:

White Wheat 11% Winter 14% Spring Barley

Nampa:

A $60 room will be closer to

White Wheat (cwt) (Bushel)

Lewiston:

$48 A $90 room will be closer to

White Wheat Barley

1.800.258.2847

Farm Bureau Discount Code

New 2012 Code - 00209550 advanced reservations required

9/26/2013

7.34 8.05-8.11 8.36 265-267.25

7.13 No bid 8.24 No Bid

- .21 N/A - .12 N/A

6.32 6.87 7.58 8.30

6.53 7.17 7.98 7.95

+ .21 + .30 + .40 - .35

5.90 6.44 6.89 No Bid

6.30 7.42 7.32 No Bid

+ .40 + .98 + .43 N/A

6.16 6.51 7.00 8.75

6.30 6.77 7.00 8.00

+ .14 + .26 Steady - .75

10.58 6.35

10.33 6.20

- .25 - .15

7.12 181.50

6.84 144.50

- .28 - 37.00

8/20/2013

9/25/2013

Trend

Feeder Steers

Feeder Heifers Under 500 lbs 500-700 lbs 700-900 lbs Over 900 lbs

Holstein Steers Under 700 lbs Over 700 lbs

Cows

Utility/Commercial Canner & Cutter

Stock Cows Bulls

Slaughter

BEAN PRICES: Pinto Pink Small Red

140-195 129-190 120-149 97-138

148-198 130-174 119-157 105-138

+ 8 to + 3 + 1 to - 16 - 1 to + 8 + 8 to steady

125-179 123-158 115-140 83-135

142-186 121-160 102-144 90-133

+ 17 to + 7 - 2 to + 2 - 13 to + 4 + 7 to - 2

67-115 81-105

71-113 75-102

+ 4 to - 2 - 6 to - 3

62-84 60-82

58-86 50-73

- 4 to + 2 - 10 to - 9

No Bid

No Bid

N/A

70-109

69-95

- 1 to - 14

40.00-42.00 39.00-40.00 40.00

40.00-42.00 No Bid No Bid

Steady N/A N/A

Compiled by the Idaho Farm Bureau Commodity Division 36

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / OCTOBER 2013

Trend

LIVESTOCK PRICES Under 500 lbs 500-700 lbs 700-900 lbs Over 900 lbs

$72

8/21/2013


IDaho Hay Report

Alfalfa Large Square Good

September 20, 2013 Tons: 5017 Last Week: 3300 Last Year: 6655 Compared to last week, Premium and Supreme Alfalfa not tested this week. Fair and Good Alfalfa steady in a light test as producers resist lower prices. Trade slow with light to moderate demand. High testing Alfalfa is in short supply with abundant supplies of low testing rained on hay. Rain showers dominated the trade area this week and most interests are busy with silage corn harvest. Retail/feed store/horse not tested this week. Buyer demand good with light to moderate supplies. All prices are dollars per ton and FOB unless otherwise stated.

Fair Timothy Grass Large Square Premium Good

Alfalfa hay test guidelines, (for domestic livestock use and not more than 10% grass), used with visual appearance and intent of sale Quantitative factors are approximate and many factors can affect feeding value.

POTATOES September 24, 2013 IDAHO---Open-market trading by processors with growers was slow. Openmarket prices paid to growers for Russet Ranger potatoes, field-run, bulk, per cwt, less dirt, rot and green tare, F.O.B. unless otherwise stated: French-Fry quality overages 4.00 base price. Harvest still continues throughout the State. Dehydration

5 Year Grain Comparison

Grain Prices................09/22/2009...................09/21/2010...................09/21/2011.................. 09/24/2012...................9/26/2013 Portland: White Wheat..................... 4.40 ..............................6.51 ..............................6.58 ............................8.77...............................7.13 11% Winter...................4.78-5.04 .....................No Bid.........................7.66-7.86.......................9.43-9.48........................No Bid 14% Spring........................ 6.31 ............................No Bid.............................9.46 ........................No Bid............................ 8.24 Corn...............................155.50-157.................... 209-209.75...........................N/A......................... 311-312.50.......................No Bid Ogden: White Wheat..................... 4.40 ..............................6.05 ..............................6.55.............................. 7.95............................ 6.53 11% Winter....................... 3.97 .............................. 6.14 .............................6.65 ........................... 8.29............................. 7.17 14 % Spring.......................5.18 .............................. 7.21 .............................8.30 ........................... 8.91............................. 7.98 Barley................................. 4.99 .............................6.70 .............................12.10.............................12.20............................. 7.95 Pocatello: White Wheat..................... 4.10 ..............................5.85 ..............................6.45...............................8.00............................ 6.30 11% Winter....................... 3.56 .............................5.97 ..............................6.40 ............................8.36............................. 7.42 14% Spring.........................5.13 .............................. 7.14 .............................7.95 ............................8.68............................. 7.32 Barley................................. 4.48 ............................6.46 ..........................11.67.............................12.92......................... No Bid

Wheat Straw Large Square Good

Tons

Price

Wtd Avg

150 1000 1167 400

190.00-190.00 260.00-260.00 165.00-180.00 175.00-175.00

190.00 260.00 173.57 175.00

400 285.00-285.00 285.00 1000 200.00-200.00 200.00

900

Comments

Organic Export

Export

45.00-50.00 47.22

plants are using Russet Norkotahs and French-Fry plants are using Russet Rangers. POTATOES UPPER VALLEY, TWIN FALLS-BURLEY DISTRICT, IDAHO---Shipments 402-706-630 (includes export of 2-3-3) ---Movement expected to remain about the same as growers continue to put potatoes into storage. Trading moderate. Prices baled slightly higher, cartons slightly lower. Norkotah Russet U.S. One baled 5 10-pound film bags non size A mostly 4.50-5.00, 50-pound cartons 40-80s 10.0011.00, 90-100s 8.00-9.00. Burley: White Wheat..................... 3.99 ..............................5.80 ..............................6.55...............................7.82.............................. 6.30 11% Winter....................... 3.78 ..............................6.05 ..............................6.43 ............................8.00.............................. 6.77 14% Spring........................ 5.00 ............................. 7.17 .............................8.03 ............................8.43.............................. 7.00 Barley................................. 4.50 .............................6.75 ..........................11.50.............................13.00............................. 8.00 Nampa: White Wheat (cwt).......... 5.68 ............................. 9.42 ............................10.42.............................13.08............................ 10.33 (bushel)............3.41 ..............................5.65 ..............................6.25...............................7.85.............................. 6.20 Lewiston: White Wheat......................4.13 ..............................6.40 ..............................6.30...............................8.55.............................. 6.84 Barley................................ 91.50 .........................146.50............................211.50...........................236.50.......................... 144.50 Bean Prices: Pintos................................32.00............................No Bid......................42.00-45.00.................38.00-40.00.................40.00-42.00 Pinks............................32.00-34.00.......................No Bid......................44.00-45.00.................40.00-42.00........................N/A Small Reds...................32.00-35.00.......................No Bid......................42.00-45.00.................40.00-42.00 ***

IDAHO Milk production September 19, 2013

August Milk Production up 2.7 Percent

Milk production in the 23 major States during August totaled 15.7 billion pounds, up 2.7 percent from August 2012. July revised production, at 15.7 billion pounds, was up 1.3 percent from July 2012. The July revision represented an increase of 29 million pounds or 0.2 percent from last month’s preliminary production estimate.

Special Note: Due to sequestration, administrative data will be used for all releases of this report through the end of the fiscal year on September 30, 2013. Releases will contain milk production data only. No information on the number of cows or milk per cow will be released. Please check the NASS website at www.nass. usda.gov for any future updates on NASS programs.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / OCTOBER 2013

37


5 Year livestock comparison .....................................09/22/2009...................09/21/2010...................09/21/2011.................. 09/24/2012................... 9/25/2013 Under 500 lbs.................90-134 ........................115-145 .....................128-181 ....................126-187........................148-198 500-700 lbs..................... 85-114 ........................101-137..........................116-160.........................116-170........................ 130-174 700-900 lbs......................80-96 ........................95-112 ......................101-133.........................115-151.........................119-157 Over 900 lbs....................78-87 .........................80-102..........................101-118.........................110-129........................ 105-138 Feeder Heifers Under 500 lbs................. 83-112..........................105-141 ......................119-170.........................117-174........................ 142-186 500-700 lbs......................79-97 ........................96-121 .......................114-144.........................116-155........................ 121-160 700-900 lbs......................68-89 .........................90-108..........................103-125.........................110-133........................ 102-144 Over 900 lbs....................73-78 ........................84-100...........................90-114.......................... 98-120..........................90-133 Holstein Steers Under 700 lbs..................45-69 ...........................65-91 ...........................78-92 ..........................75-118...........................71-113 Over 700 lbs....................50-66 ..........................65-82 ...........................74-92 ..........................63-103..........................75-102 Cows Utility/Commercial...........33-54.............................47-67.............................51-71............................ 54-78............................58-86 Canner & Cutter..............20-48.............................40-55.............................42-67.............................55-72............................50-73 Stock Cows......................650-850 .....................800-1000............................N/A ..................... N/A .....................N/A

United States Cattle on Feed Down 7 Percent September 20, 2013 Cattle and calves on feed for slaughter market in the United States for feedlots with capacity of 1,000 or more head totaled 9.9 million head on September 1, 2013. The inventory was 7 percent below September 1, 2012. Placements in feedlots during August totaled 1.79 million, 11 percent below 2012. Net placements were 1.73 million head. During August, placements of cattle and calves weighing less than 600 pounds were 405,000, 600-699 pounds were 338,000, 700-799 pounds were 430,000, and 800 pounds and greater were 615,000. Placements for the month of August are the lowest since the series began in 1996. Marketings of fed cattle during August totaled 1.88 million, 4 percent below 2012. Monthly marketings for August are the second lowest since the series began in 1996. Other disappearance totaled 55,000 during August, 10 percent below 2012.

Bulls – Slaughter............45-64.............................47-77.............................61-89 .......................... 70-90............................69-95

Cattle Outlook Sept. 20, 2013 Retail beef prices set new record highs in August for the second consecutive month. The average price of choice beef in grocery stores during August was $5.394 per pound. That was up 44.9 cents from August 2012 and up 3.7 cents from the record set the month before. The average price for all fresh beef was $4.968 per pound. That was up 26.8 cents from August 2012 and up 2.5 cents from the record set the month before. The crop condition report for September 15 said 53% of corn acres were in good or excellent condition. That was down 1 percentage point from the month before, but up 29 points from a year ago. The pasture condition report rated 37% of U.S. pasture acres as poor or very poor. That was 1 percentage point more than the week before, but 19 points less than a year ago. Fed cattle prices were a bit lower this week with very light sales volume. Through Thursday, the 5-area average price for slaughter steers sold on a live weight basis was $122.70/cwt, down 30 cents from last week and down $2.59 from the same week last year. There were not enough steers sold on a dressed basis for a price quote. This morning, the boxed beef cutout value for choice carcasses was $192.45/cwt, down 61 cents from the previous Friday and down $1.43 from a year ago. The select carcass cutout is at $176.11/cwt, down 21 cents for the week and down $8.08 from the same day last year. The choice-select spread, $16.34 today, is up for the eighth consecutive Friday.

38

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / OCTOBER 2013

This week’s cattle slaughter totaled 633,000 head, up 3.6% from last week and up 1.1% from a year ago. The average steer dressed weight for the week ending on September 7 was 872 pounds, up 5 pounds from the week before and up 2 pounds from a year ago. Oklahoma City feeder cattle auction prices this week were $3 to $5 higher for steers and steady to $1 higher for heifers with prices for medium and large frame #1 steers: 400-450# $191-$203, 450-500# $188.50-$192.50, 500-550# $163.50$176.50, 550-600# $165-$168.75, 600-650# $150-$169, 650-700# $150-$171.25, 700-750# $156-$168, 750-800# $152-$160.50, 800-900# $140-$159, and 9001000# $138-$145.50/cwt. The October live cattle futures contract closed at $125.95/cwt today, up 70 cents from last week’s close. December fed cattle settled at $129.75, up 60 cents for the week. February closed at at $131.52/cwt. The September feeder cattle futures contract ended the week at $157.10/cwt, down 20 cents from the previous Friday. October feeders settled at $160.22, up 95 cents for the week. The November feeder cattle contract ended the week at $160.75/cwt. Provided by: University of Missouri


DEADLINE DATES: ADS MUST BE RECEIVED BY

Classifieds

NOVEMBER 20 FOR NEXT ISSUE.

Animals

Miscellaneous

Wanted

Trailer

Free - 3 Sicilian Jenny Donkeys. Likes children, was raised in petting zoo. Pocatello, Id. Email sheensmail2@yahoo.com or call 208-221-2155

Certified Organic Hardneck Garlic. Romanian Red & Georgian Crystal. Hardy premium planting stock or use for eating and long storage. 16.00/lb. twells@silvetstar.com 208-313-7157

Wanted to Buy: Tractor, 175- 200 horsepower. In like new condition with low hours. Prefer John Deere, but will consider others. Twin Falls, Id. Please call-208-733-3634

Fully enclosed, white, 1978 Circle J two horse, straight load, dual axel trailer. Bought new/one owner. Repainted/refinished. Four new tires/brakes/lights redone in 2010. Easily removable center panel. $2,000.00/ Reasonable offer. Twin Falls, ID call 208420-7069

ASCA registered Australian Shepherd pups. Working line since 1968. Full satisfaction guaranteed. All four colors available. Boise, Id 208-484-9802

Farm Equipment Incredibly old tractor for sale. 1937 AD_RC, wide front, rebuilt motor, hard crank. Don’t miss this old timer! Dubois, ID 208-7094114 Full size sheep camp. Completely refinished with full bed, original cabinets, stove, dishes, lambhook, paint branding numbers and more. Metal running gear with rubber tires, tarp top cover made by Blackfoot canvas. American Falls, Id 208-226-5034, 317-9025 Oliver One Row Potato Digger field ready. Two, 2500 bu. Grain bins in good condition. New Albers self-locking stations, 350 holes. New Cornell chopper pump 4” discharge with 3 hp. 3 phase motor. All at Best offer. Wendell, Id. 208-536-6448 Challenger MT 755, 2209 hrs, annual service by Western States, 1000 hrs on 25” tracks, Trimble A/S and sprayer control, $162,000.00 Two 500hp US Motors, 480 volt, 3 phase, Inverter duty, hollowshaft irrigation motors, $25,000 each. Call 208-220-5588 or email deegt@aol.com Balewagons: New Holland self-propelled or pull-type models. Also interested in buying balewagons. Will consider any model. Call Jim Wilhite at 208-880-2889 anytime

Real Estate/Acreage 10 wooded acres with pond. 3 bdrm, 3 bath home built in 2004 with many extras. Landscaped with sprinkler system and paved drive. Abundant wildlife and serenity. Located 20 miles northeast of Idaho Falls near Snake River. $510,000. 208-520-8787

Billiard Table. 3/4 inch slate. Balls, Rack, Sticks, etc. $1,000. Meridian, ID 208-6293999 MK10” tile saw, with diamond blade, pump, stand. Used only 3 or 4 times. $300 firm. Lincoln 220V wire welder SP-130T with large argon gas tank, rolling stand, cover, nice condition. $600 Contact me at crinidaho@ hotmail.com Coeur d’Alene Idaho. 208-6606709 Selling refinished antique furniture; also will buy old antique furniture that needs refinished, any condition. Call for more info. H 208-226-5034, Cell 317-9025

Recreational Equipment 37’ Fleetwood 1994 RV, Southwind special edition, with 57,128 miles. Sleeps 6, seats 10. 8 outside storage compartments. Ford 460 fule injected gas motor, hydraulic jacks, air conditioning. Asking price is $12,000. Pocatello, Id 251-3435 or 251-4411

Wanted: Air Stream Trailer. Please call 208536-6448 Paying cash for German & Japanese war relics/souvenirs! Pistols, rifles, swords, daggers, flags, scopes, optical equipment, uniforms, helmets, machine guns (ATF rules apply) medals, flags, etc. 549-3841 (evenings) or 208-405-9338. Old License Plates Wanted: Also key chain license plates, old signs, light fixtures. Will pay cash. Please email, call or write. Gary Peterson, 130 E Pecan, Genesee, Id 83832. gearlep@gmail.com. 208-285-1258 Help Wanted

Earn $75,000/yr Part Time in the livestock or equipment appraisal business. Agricultural background required. Classroom or home study courses available. 800-488-7570.

Three Horse Slant Load Trailer: Brand is C&B, Year is 2001. Trailer has not been used for last 3 years excellent shape. Has a back tack room plus a extended tack room in the front could be used for sleeping and made into a camper has large window. Trailer has escape door and drop down windows. Priced at $6,000.00. Will send photos on request. anita.clark44@gmail.com Phone: 208-788-4280

FREE CLASSIFIED ADS

FOR IDAHO FARM BUREAU MEMBERS send to: dashton@idahofb.org

1972 14 ft. Fiberglass Boat & Trailer with a 55 Horsepower Evinrude Outboard Motor and trolling motor. New Gas Can & New Battery. Priced to sell at: $750.00 Photos on request. for photo’s e-mail anita.clark44@gmail.com or phone: 208-788-4280.

Vehicles 1984 GMC Jimi 6.2 diesel H.D. $4,000 into Rear end and front. No Rust. Solid. $1,200 OBO. Hayden, Id. 208-772-4700 leave message. 1979 Chev Van. 3/4 ton. Runs good. Good tires, Q bed carpet, 350 engine, 350 tranny. Good heart. Some rust. $500 OB. Hayden, Id Leave message 208-772-4700 Idaho Farm Bureau producer / OCTOBER 2013

39



October 2013, Volume 17, Issue 7