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Guyette & Deeter, Inc. North American Decoys At Auction November 20 & 21, 2020

Featuring the Jim and Pat Doherty collection


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Guyette & Deeter, Inc.

North American Decoys At Auction Friday, November 20, 2020 Auction 11:00 AM

Saturday, November 21, 2020 Auction 11:00 AM

Due to restrictions imposed by the COVID-19, we respectfully request that anyone wishing to preview items first call the office in St. Michaels for an appointment. Additionally, during the months of October and November Gary, Jon, and Zac will be traveling to several destinations around the country showing items that will be auctioned. If you would like to preview any item, simply phone the office and we will be happy to arrange a private showing in your area. Regardless of the appraised value of any specific item, we will do everything possible to accommodate your request. The auction will be streamed live, and there will be multiple active phone lines to ensure an effective bidding process. Anyone bidding through internet bidding platforms will have their online bidding fees waived. Thank you for your interest and participation.

For questions during the auction call 410-745-0485

Catalog $45. Out of Country $54 Absentee, Phone & Online Bidding accepted call 410-745-0485 for arrangements For free decoy appraisal contact: Gary Guyette | gary@guyetteanddeeter.com | 410-745-0485 Jon Deeter | jdeeter@guyetteanddeeter.com | 440-610-1768


Important Notices: ■■ GUARANTEE - We have made a concerted effort to accurately catalog and describe the property to be sold. The decoys and paintings have guaranteed condition reports. Should the need arise, the auctioneer reserves the right to make verbal corrections and provide additional information from the block at the time of the sale. Absentee bids will not be executed on items that are found to be other than described in the catalog. Since opinions can differ, particularly in the matter of condition, the auctioneer will be sole judge in the matter of refunds. If we fail to identify a flaw that has an impact on the value, you can return the decoy. ■■ DURATION OF GUARANTEE - Request for a refund for items purchased IN PERSON at the auction must be made within 3 days of the sale. If you bid absentee, by phone, or on the internet, it is your responsibility to examine the lot immediately upon receipt and notify us of any issues. The guarantee will end 5 days from the date of delivery. Therefore, all guarantees on items purchased will become null and void 10 calendar days from the date of shipment. IT IS VERY IMPORTANT TO NOTE THAT IF YOU PAY LATE, YOU WILL NOT BE ELIGIBLE FOR THE GUARANTEE. Payment must be postmarked no later than 30 days after the auction. ■■ Under no circumstances will we be responsible for damage to frames or glass, or damage caused by them. Paintings determined to be of high value or large size may be subject to special packaging at the buyers expense. Under no circumstances will we be responsible for damage to fragile decoratives. These items are marked in the catalog with an *. ■■ Stands are not included with the decoys or weathervanes unless specified in catalog. ■■ All duck calls have condition reports, but are sold “As Is”. ■■ Trade Up Program - A limited number of decoys purchased may be paid for by consigning decoys. If you would like to consign decoys to our next auction, please contact; Gary Guyette 410-745- 0485 gary@guyetteanddeeter.com or Jon Deeter 440-543-1416 jdeeter@guyetteanddeeter. com. ■■ Free appraisals are available with no obligation to consign, and all correspondences are strictly confidential. ■■ Pick up hours are 1pm – 5pm beginning November 25, or by appointment. Please call ahead so we can have your items ready. ■■ Auctioneer James D. Julia, Fairfield, Maine.

Future Auctions January 2021

Special Event | Online Only Sale at www.Decoysforsale.com

April 2021

The Westin Chicago-Lombard Lombard, Illinois

July 2021

The Sheraton Harborside Hotel Portsmouth, New Hampshire

November 2021

Talbot County Community Center Easton, Maryland

To consign, Contact:

Gary Guyette | gary@guyetteanddeeter.com | 410-745-0485 Jon Deeter | jdeeter@guyetteanddeeter.com | 440-610-1768

We are fortunate to have Robert J. Koenke on staff as our Sporting & Wildlife Art expert. Feel free to contact him for an appraisal or consignment to one of our auctions: 410-758-1644, rjkoenke@verizon.net


Guyette & Deeter, Inc.

Dale & Gary Guyette PO Box 1170 St. Michaels, MD 21663 Tel: 410-745-0485 gary@guyetteanddeeter.com

Jon & Leigh Ann Deeter 507 W. Harbor Rd St. Michaels, Md 21663 Cell: 440-610-1768 jdeeter@guyetteanddeeter.com

Zac Cote

Weekly Auction Manager Freeport, Maine Tel: 207-321-8091 zcote@guyetteanddeeter.com

Mike Stevenson

Graphic Designer & Photography St. Michaels, Maryland Tel: 410-745-0485 michael@guyetteanddeeter.com

Ed Kenney

Merchandise Manager & Shipping St. Michaels, Maryland Tel: 410-745-0485 shipping@guyetteanddeeter.com

Denise Jarrell

Bookkeeper St. Michaels, Maryland Tel: 410-745-0485 billing@guyetteanddeeter.com

Sharon Metzger

Office Assistant St. Michaels, Maryland Tel: 410-745-0485 auction@guyetteanddeeter.com

PO Box 1170 St. Michaels, MD 21663 410-745-0485 www.guyetteanddeeter.com


The Jim & Pat Doherty Collection Not long after Dad started his collection, my mother, Pat also became intrigued by the decoys. Soon they were enjoying the shows together in southern New Jersey, making new friends such as Jim and Debbie Allen, John Clayton, and Tommy Fitzpatrick among others, and buying some of the best examples of birds by H.V. Shourds and Rowley Horner - two of the premier New Jersey carvers. Mom and Dad found great joy together in learning about the history of decoys and getting to know their fellow collectors as their collection continued to grow. They began to travel down to Maryland and enjoy the wildfowl festivals every year. In the process, new friendships with Alan and Elaine Haid, Dr. Lloyd Griffith, and Don Kirson were formed.

As anyone who met him likely knows, Jim Doherty was a man of great passion in many areas of life. Perhaps one of the first passions was the art and the science of collecting. Over the years, my father’s interest in this area spanned several different genres, ranging from clocks to paperweights and many things in between. As an avid hunter and fisherman, it was only natural that he would also be drawn to decoys. On a summer day in the early 1970’s, our family was browsing a local yard sale on Long Beach Island, New Jersey when my father came across a group of three decoys. They were not very old or valuable, but my father gravitated to them. Their purchase started what would become a wonderful collection. To this day, one of those three original birds remains in our family. During the early days of collecting, Dad became interested in the contemporary carvings of Bob White. As he began studying and researching the history of decoy carving in New Jersey, his focus turned to vintage decoys of a past era when duck and bird hunting were not just sport, but necessary to provide for families. In particular, Dad especially enjoyed the history of the South Jersey and Philadelphia areas where he lived his entire life, and concentrated on the decoys and carvers in the local Delaware Valley region. Only on a rare occasion would he find a bird outside of this geographical area that he felt should be part of his early collection.

From the beginning, Dad always saw auctions as a battle and a test of wills. When the Johnny Hillman Collection came to auction in 1996, Mom and Dad were the successful bidders on the prized Shourds swimming goose. While New Jersey decoys would forever remain their first love, it was also at this time they began to expand their interest in decoys beyond the Delaware Valley region. By 1998, my parents decided to make their collection focused on selecting the very best examples in each region. That decision drove several acquisitions soon thereafter-the Adele Earnest Schoenheider goose, the pair of Elliston blue wing teal from the Dupee rig, and the Crowell ruddy widgeon and blue wing teal from the Cunningham rig.


Legend: Marks items from the Jim and Pat Doherty collection.

Marks items that are pictured in “Classic New Jersey Decoys.”

When the watershed Dr. McCleery sale held in New York City approached in 2000, Mom and Dad thought it would be a feat to come away with even a single bird. When the auction was over, they were proud owners of the Mackey Bowman curlew, the Shourds seagull, and a Verity curlew. Throughout decades of researching, studying, discussing, and handling hundreds of decoys, my mother and father had a burning desire to share their knowledge and experience with others. In collecting, Dad had the heart and mind of a teacher and enjoyed the opportunity to share in his passion with other collectors while educating new collectors on different aspects of decoys. Mom and Dad were known to open their home to many who were interested in learning. My father would discuss the finer points of form, paint, wear, and other characteristics of birds often into the late hours of the evening. Mom and Dad nurtured many and developed friendships with new collectors eager to learn such as Ed and Chris Murphy, who were frequent students at what they called “Doherty University.” Mom and Dad always enjoyed these visits, sharing information about their collection, discussing upcoming auction items and talking strategy. Over the years, new and old collectors alike would ask Dad if he would ever consider writing a book on various aspects of decoys. With help from his grandson, Ryan and many friends and collectors, Dad self-published his book Classic New Jersey Decoys in 2011. Today the book is known as a definitive work on the subject, and nearly 10 years later continues to be an important resource for collectors.

When Dad passed in August 2013, many in the decoy world expected that their collection would come to market. There were offers from several auction houses to handle such a sale. What many people did not realize was that Mom enjoyed the “ducks” as much as Dad. After my father passed, Mom started to foster my sister Barb and my own interest. Instead of being sellers, a second generation of Dohertys was now putting their own collections together. With my mother’s passing in May 2020, the time has now come to part with many of the treasures from Mom and Dad’s collection. The Doherty Decoy Collection that my father and mother lovingly built and curated will always be known as one of the best, and our family is pleased to be able to share a part of that history with the decoy community through this sale. James R. Doherty, III


The Jim & Pat Doherty Collection

Remembering Jim and Pat Doherty In the over 35 years of being involved with antique duck decoys, I have had the privilege of meeting some very interesting people. For me, Jim Doherty has, since the day I met him, ranked at the top of that list. We first crossed paths in 1987 when he purchased two Rowley Horner black ducks at a Richard Oliver sale. At the time, Jim’s only focus was on collecting the best New Jersey and Delaware River makers. In the succeeding years as our friendship grew, we held many discussions in his Cherry Hill basement office covering many topics but in particular whether he should consider expanding his collection to include makers from other regions. In the beginning, Jim was quite reluctant to move outside of his comfort zones of Jersey and the Delaware River, however, slowly, but surely, he came to the conclusion that building an eclectic collection representative of most if not all of the geographic regions, was the prudent thing to do. When that decision was finally made, Jim attacked it with a vengeance. He studied every bit of literature that he could lay his hands on and consumed that information with a voracious appetite. He sought out answers to his questions from every source available. He ultimately became THE force to be reckoned with when competing at auctions where he identified those items that in his words, “you can’t come back to”. Not only was Jim Doherty a savvy student of the trade, but as his knowledge grew and his observational skills were sharpened, he put those skills to good use and through discussions and other forms of communication he passed along his observations to not only me but to other fellow collectors as well. I recall many, sometimes heated, discussions about some of our differences in thinking, but in the end, I have to admit that I learned a great deal from Jim. He became not only an astute student but an accomplished teacher. It was only a natural next step then for him to pursue his long- time goal of writing a book on the major carvers from New Jersey. Finally, through a lot or hard work and a dogged determination

Jim Doherty with good friend, Henry Stansbury

he realized his dream and in July of 2011 his book, “Classic New Jersey Decoys” was published. His goal was to get the book written, and published, his objective was to share his observations in order to point out those subtle differences in carving and painting techniques necessary to identify the makers whose styles were so similar. His goal having been met, “Classic New Jersey Decoys” has become the definitive work for understanding the works of the top New Jersey carvers. Thinking ahead to an expanding collection, Jim and Pat decided to leave Cherry Hill and build a new home in Moorestown, New Jersey. Much of the home’s design was to provide a place for their collections of not only decoys, but tall clocks, paper weights and Pennsylvania folk art pieces. Having had the privilege of visiting this beautiful new home over the years and being able to view their fabulous collections, has been truly a delight. Having been a part of the process of building the collection was just a bonus for me. I miss those conversations, sharing our thoughts and observations and enjoying our mutual interest in collecting. One of Jim’s greatest joys was showing his collection with any who shared his common interest. Together Jim and Pat Doherty built a decoy collection that unquestionably ranks among the top in the country. They will be truly missed by all of us who had the distinct privilege of knowing them. Frank M. Schmidt


Passing the Torch My wife Chris and I became regular visitors to area antique and craft shows over 30 years ago. As our areas of collecting interests grew, we were introduced to decoys through a mutual friend who owned a local wildlife art gallery which provided an outlet for Bob White to sell his own decoys.

The publication of each new auction catalogue was met with great anticipation by all of us…and we knew that an invitation to review the upcoming sale from the Professor would be forthcoming shortly. In our case, Jim would test us by asking us to share a list of birds we liked in that auction…and how and why those birds would be meaningful additions to our collection.

As we started to first collect Bob’s decoys and then to slowly expand our decoy collection, we began to regularly attend the various decoy auctions throughout the collecting year. Although we were never formally introduced, we quickly became aware of the presence of Jim and Pat Doherty at the auctions. The Dohertys seemed to us to be well regarded, serious and very competitive decoy collectors.

At his end, the Professor would have also prepared, independently of us, his own list of birds that he thought would be good acquisitions for us in our stage of developing a collection. The comparison of both lists proved to be a very effective teaching tool…and invaluable to young collectors like us.

As the second day of the November 2006 G & S auction in Easton was concluding, Jim Doherty approached us and said : “You seem like nice folks who could use some help..may I offer you some direction?” We were really surprised… but, of course, our surprise turned to interested excitement. We immediately said yes and agreed to swap contact information when we all returned home. That initial encounter in Easton quickly mushroomed into frequent visits to Jim and Pat’s home which was, for all those who also had the privilege of visiting, a veritable museum for all serious decoy collectors. As our friendship grew, we quickly learned that Jim took a scholarly approach to his decoy collecting passion. Jim was also equally willing to share his lifetime of accumulated knowledge about decoys with us. For that reason, Jim treated each visit as an opportunity for teaching..and we started to refer to our regular visits as taking another class in decoy collecting from Professor Doherty. Make no mistake….while each visit was technically ‘social,’ they were intense. The Professor always had a lesson plan for each visit…and ran the sessions like a drill sergeant. Jim actively discouraged small talk during class….and if any of us got distracted, he would regularly complain “Are you listening to me? I invited you down here to learn, dammit!”

When representatives of the auction houses were invited to our classes, they were expected to also do their homework and be prepared to present and discuss birds coming up for their respective auction. They were also expected to listen to Jim’s frequent blistering critiques of inaccurate provenance or conditions as described in their catalogues. While the subjects of Jim’s wrath could disagree if they chose, it was a futile exercise…and they did so at great peril. During each class, and regardless of which students were present, the conversation would invariably shift to the similarities and differences of decoys from the different collecting regions….and, as we all talked about the history of decoys in that area, Jim would then direct our collective attention to the large wall in the family room where perhaps the finest birds from that area would be assembled. The privilege of seeing so many high quality birds assembled in one place was unique…and probably unlikely to be ever seen again. However, perhaps the most lasting legacy Jim provided to us were his at least daily emails exchanges with us for a period of over 7 years …and which only stopped with his untimely passing. We have kept all of them… and catalogued them into the different carvers, regions, collecting philosophies …and life lessons….they covered. We still go back and read them even now…and they remain still relevant and timeless because his advice and willingness to share his knowledge is...and remains …both unerring and a true gift. Ed and Chris Murphy


Deb and I first met Jim and Pat Doherty in 1983 at the Tuckerton Decoy show. Bob White and Tom Fitzpatrick had introduced us. After a short period of time and several visits to each other’s’ homes, Jim and Pat decided to collect old working decoys and proceeded to buy our NJ Brant collection. This launched a long-term consultative relationship between Jim and I and a deep friendship between the 4 of us that continued until the passing of first Jim and then Pat. Over the years, Jim and I spent many years strategizing over what decoys he was going to add to his collection. In preparation for every auction, we spent several hours working through every potential situation to ensure that he successfully procured those decoys he really wanted. One particularly important auction we planned for was the McCleary Auction in NY. The planning and discussions by Jim and I allowed him to successfully add the H. V. Shourds Seagull and the Bowman Curlew from Bill Mackey’s collection, along with several other important decoys to his collection. Over the years, big Jim and I taught each other so much about collecting. He was a serious collector and though there were times when we had to agree to disagree, I must say we had almost as much fun planning for the auctions as we did attending them. Because Jim so loved the history of the decoy and their original uses, he and I often discussed appropriate ways to promote decoys and their history. Education being important for promotion is something we often

Jim had passion, and I mean real PASSION about decoys. He wanted the BEST decoys the maker ever made. No damage. Best paint. Best form. And he told you that YOU should only buy the BEST, and he told you this with passion. He was disappointed when you bought a shot up decoy which I sometimes found appealing. It was really fun visiting him. He did own the Best decoys. Occasionally, you could buy one of his rejects when he found an even better example and gave up a near perfect example. My favorite Jim Doherty reject is the ‘36 Ward Canvasback in mint unused condition with the 1936 Baltimore Newspaper stuck to the bottom of the decoy that I wrote about in Kangas and Kirson’s, Bonfire of Swans book. When Jim showed it to me he accused me of reading the newspaper on the bottom which is exactly what I was doing! But usually you didn’t

discussed. Hence, Jim and Pat were often benefactors to the Easton Waterfowl festival, the Ward Museum, and were great contributors to the displays at the Tuckerton Seaport. As I am sure many of you are aware, the need to educate is one of the reasons for his book, a book that I was fortunate to assist with. Pat and Jim were always the most gracious hosts whenever our family visited their primary home or their homes at the beach. Deb and Pat and our kids (Jenny and Jimmy) would walk the beach or go shopping while big Jim and I would talk and handle decoys. Pat and Deb were the best at take-out. We always had a great meal and a great time together and were always made to feel welcome. Some of the best times we had with Jim and Pat were at the different shows in Maryland. We would hang out at our table together, hang in the rooms, feast on fried chicken from Grauls for lunch, and eat at the crab feast almost every night in the restaurant next door to the hotel. This crab feast was one of Jim’s favorite. Jim and Pat would be so happy to see that their children, Barb and Jimmy and their families are now so involved in collecting. They would also be so happy to be recognized for their contributions in decoy collecting as is evident by the quality of their collection that is being sold in this auction. Jim and Deb Allen

buy a decoy, you asked him about a decoy, and he would go into great detail about why it was the best in great entertaining detail and with passion. Then you would bring him another decoy from his beautiful display shelves and listen again to his reasoning for ownership. Jim had three Ira Hudson Black ducks with turned head in the same direction and I asked Jim if I could photograph them in a circle. He told me I was “crazy”. I got a step stool out of his kitchen and put the decoys in a circle, stood on the stool and shot down on them. He said “O.K.Henry, now I get it”! Later he called me when he decided to sell the least desirable two and keep the best (which is in this auction) and I told him he shouldn’t break them up, and I was back to being “Crazy Henry”. It was always educational and entertaining to be around Jim Doherty. Henry Stansbury


I first met Jim Doherty in January 2000 at the McCleery auction in New York City. I remember that day well, and I can’t believe that over twenty years have since passed. Jim had just purchased Lot 367, the H V Shourds gull. I waited briefly to pick the right time to approach him, introduce myself, and congratulate him on his purchase. He thanked me and realizing I was a Jersey collector, shortly after I received a call to stop by, and see his ollection. I gladly took him up on his offer, and after the visit realized it was one of the turning points that changed my collecting philosophy. It was the first of many visits over the years of our friendship. Always being gracious hosts, their home was open to both new and seasoned collectors alike. Jim liked nothing better than talking decoys, holding court, and sharing his knowledge on the subject. No better example of this trait, is exhibited in his book Classic New Jersey Decoys. They were also very willing to share the collection outside their home. During my tenure, as a member to the the board of the Ward Museum, I was charged with executing numerous decoy exhibits. He was always very willing to send the best examples, that fit the exhibit from his collection. Knowing they would be gone for many month’s he would always quip, “ am I ever going to get these decoys back?” My response was always the same. “ Maybe” and he would render a chuckle. I always made it a point to personally pick up, pack, and after the exhibit was completed, return them to their proper positioning on the shelf. Of all the decoys that went back and forth over the years, fortunately there was never an issue.

Auction time. Once the catalogs came out, always required a visit to discuss what both of us had an interest in. Most lots were never a problem due to the different size of our wallets, but on occasion they would. I know on several occasions he stepped aside, and would not bid against me. Jim and Pat normally attended the November auction in Easton, and the East Coast Decoy Collectors in April. I always looked forward to spending that time together. Due to health issues he had difficulty attending others. He knew I attended all three summer auctions, and for years I picked up and delivered his purchases. Sometime I would have them for weeks, unable to drop them off. No problem he would say come by when you can. No matter when I did arrive, the spaces were already cleared, as he knew exactly were each new one was to go. The last time I talked to Jim was several days prior to his death on August 14th 2013. We were firming up a date for me to deliver his latest auction purchases. One being a Crowell Goose that I believe to be in the upcoming auction. Unfortunately I had to deliver them to Pat when I attended his funeral several days later. I placed that Goose in the center of the table, at the luncheon were many of his decoy friends were gathered, and toasted him on his latest purchase. I am sure that a spot for that new decoy had already been chosen. Much has been written about Jim and Pat’s decoy collection and constant search for quality along with seeking out the very best examples, all true. In parting the only advise I can pass on to collectors, pick out what you like, and don’t worry as Jim has already done all the work. John Clayton


My Mentor I first met Jim Doherty( DOC) at Easton Maryland in November 2004. I had been collecting decoys for about a year and everyone in the decoy world knew about this passionate iconic collector, Jim Doherty. I introduced myself to him and told him I was a new collector suffering from serious “decoy fever.” This was the beginning of a multi-year mentoring program in which you never receive a degree, because as Doc said, “It is a continuous process that never ends.” I visited the home of Pat and Doc at least once a month for the next nine years. Both Pat and Doc were gracious hosts. I usually arrived around 10:30 A.M. and left by 3 P.M. Pat always called the morning of the visit to get my lunch order. I was told without exception: “ When you visit us, you are our guest and we provide lunch.” Some of the lessons I learned: • •

Buy the best that you can afford. “It’s all about QUALITY, not quantity. Buy only decoys that talk to you. Consider form and original paint first. Only after that consider rarity, maker, or species.

How I met Jim: I started collecting decoys in 1978. There was an ad in the local newspaper for antique clocks and decoys for sale. It was the middle of January 1982. I answered the add Jim had put in. He was more interested in showing me his clock collection of over 100 clocks and I wanted to see the decoys. He had a Dodge factory drake canvas back, two Herter decoys that were given to him. He also bought two unknown Barnegat Bay decoys. He had someone paint the Barnegat decoys with a bright paint to put in his beach house for decoration. I told Jim he shouldn’t put that kind of paint on old decoys. I said I’ll bring some old decoys over to show you. I came back that night with 18 decoys. H.V. & H.M. Shourds, Lloyd Parker, Joe King, Jesse Birdsalls & Henry Grants. Jim and his wife Pat, who had a good eye for form, were sitting on the floor trying to find the differences between the makers styles, so they

• • •

Having an outstanding collection involves both acquiring and selling decoys. One must have patience and discipline. You can only learn by handling great decoys, so attend as many shows as you can. Attend as many auctions as possible, and visit the people with great collections. Honesty and integrity

Doc was a stickler about strategy. “ Never go to an auction without a strategy.” If you go to an auction with a long listed of items, you will most likely come home with nothing. So, limit yourself to one item and one back-up. One thing I became aware of early on, don’t underestimate Pat Doherty. She knew every decoy in the collection, where it was bought and the price paid. The Doherty’s also had fabulous clock and glass collections. It was always a pleasure to spend time with them. I think about Pat and Doc frequently as I sit and look over my collection. I recall the decoys I purchased with Doc’s guidance and I will always be thankful that they came into my life. Don Kirson

could identify the maker. I left the house that night at 12:00. They were so interested in the decoys they were handling. Jim started to call and ask questions about decoys. I told him to get books on old decoys and go to shows. The first show Jim attended was Point Pleasant. The second show was the Batsto Village show. He asked me if there’s anything he should be interested in. I said there’s a Rowley Horner Black duck and a Lloyd Parker Brant for sale. He bought both decoys. The Lloyd Parker Brant he bought that day is the one pictured in his book. Those two decoys he bought in 1982 started many years of collecting. I always told Jim,” when you’re looking at a decoy don’t try to make it what it’s not.” Tom Fitzpatrick


Jim Doherty was not only a knowledgeable collector but also a fierce competitor. As we all know he wrote the statement book on New Jersey Decoys. He studied and learned about decoys from books and other collectors. As he stated, “I sought to buy the best decoys available.” He and I agreed that the best New Jersey decoys were the two working Herring Gulls by H.V. Shourds. The birds were eloquent and rare. Over time two became available. One was in the McCleery Collection and one was in the Mackey Collection. I was the under bidder to Jim for the McCleery Shourds Gull in the McCleery

One of the most poignant facts that I have learned throughout my life is that the most endearing memories, like fine wines, become richer and fuller over time. In January of 2011, my friend Jim Doherty presented me with a copy of his newly published book, Classic New Jersey Decoys, in which he penned the following dedication on the inside cover. To: Jon Deeter “I look forward to working with you and wish you great success with G&S. Hopefully you will find this book useful over the years and think of our times together when you do so.” “Enjoy!” Jim Doherty 1/10/11 I wish my friend were still around today, and if so, I would seize the opportunity to once again say Thank You, for perhaps the hundredth time. His insightful and incredible support helped me take on Frank Schmidt’s roll at the company. Upon meeting Jim for the first time, I shall never forget his iconic invitation, “hey kid, you ever

Auction. Finally the day came when I outbid, of all people, Jim’s son Jim Doherty, III to acquire the Mackey Collection H.V. Shourds Herring Gull. What I remember most about Jim and Pat were the pleasant visits to each others homes. Over lunch all four of us would choose “our 10 favorites” in each others collections. I have all that recorded in our Decoy Guest book. Marvelous memories of Jim and Pat. Alan Haid

want a 101 class on decoys then get your ass up to my place”. Needless to say, I quickly took him up on his offer, and after that initial meeting in 2009, made many trips to visit Jim and his lovely wife Pat at their home in Moorestown. Sometimes he would send me a list of decoys, usually from an upcoming Auction, and ask that I bring them during my next visit for his review. Frequently Jim, Pat, and I were joined by friends Ed and Chris Murphy, and together we would spend countless hours around a table carefully examining each piece. Generally, these enjoyable gatherings would be graciously accentuated by a delicious luncheon provided by Pat, providing the perfect finishing touch to an already wonderful afternoon. To this day, Jim’s very special book sits next to my desk. I reference it often, and each time I do, those rich and wonderful memories come gently seeping back into my mind. Thank you Jim and Pat Doherty.

Jon Deeter

Also featuring decoys from the collections of Dr. John Dinan

Duck calls from the Brian Stead collection

Robert Dunford

Harry Wilder

Lynwood Herrington

Private Midwest collection

David and Lynn Meyer


We e k ly O nline Au c t ions End ing E ve r y T hu r sd ay N ig ht

Guyette & Deeter

G u a r a nt eed co n d i t i o n re p o r t s , m ul t i p l e p hot os , q u i ck s h i p p i n g , g reat d eal s o n q ual i t y i t e m s

Online Auctions

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SOLD! $1610

SOLD! $3047

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zcote@guyetteanddeeter.com

PO Box 159, Freeport, Maine 04032 www.decoysforsale.com

Recent Sales

SOLD! $3507

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Session One Friday, November 20, 2020 11:00 am Lots 1 - 268

Session Two Saturday, November 21, 2020 11:00 am Lots 271 - 542

Virginia 1-4 Contemporary 5 - 20 23 - 28 Pacific Coast 29 - 37 Maryland 38 - 48 Illinois River 49 - 60 Miniatures 61 - 67 Ontario 68 - 77 Louisiana 78 - 91 New England 93 - 104 Mason Decoy Factory Harry V. Shourds 105 - 112 Shorebirds 113 - 126 Elmer Crowell 127 - 135a New Jersey 136 - 149 New York 150 - 155 Sporting Art 156 - 162 Ward Brothers 163 - 180 New Jersey & Delaware River 183 - 197 Contemporary 198 - 207 Louisiana 208 - 217 Midwest 218 - 221 Delbert “Cigar� Daisey 222 - 233 Miniatures 234 - 243 Etchings & Prints 244 - 257 Contemporary 258 - 260 Maryland 261 - 268

Decoratives 271 New England Shorebirds 301 Maryland 309 Virginia 325 Delaware River 333 345a Items of Interest Shorebirds 352 Elmer Crowell 358 382a Contemporary Elmer Crowell 387 New Jersey 392 Fish 401 Ward Brothers 425 Shorebirds 444 North Carolina 452 Decoratives 458 New England 474 Sinkbox Decoys 486 Shorebirds 491 Items of Interest 496 Duck Calls 514

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300 308 323 332 345 351 357 382 386 391 400 424a 443 450 257 473 484 490 495 513 542

Please read conditions of sale in the back of catalog


SESSION ONE Friday, November 20 - 11:00 am

Virginia Ira Hudson 1873 - 1949| Chincoteague, Virginia

Ira Hudson

Perhaps as a sign of the times in which Ira Hudson lived or because of the remoteness of his world, the family did not know the exact date of his birth. While it is assumed to be between 1875 and 1877, most references show it to be 1873. He apparently thought he was born in Delaware. He was actually born in Bishopville, Maryland to Ananias Hudson and Mary Elizabeth Beebe and was reportedly given the middle name of the family’s favorite minister. His family was accustomed to working with their hands and earning a living around the water. In a

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Hudson outside of his shop.

1900 census, his father was listed as a “house carpenter” and his uncle as a “lighthouse keeper.” These family occupations apparently influenced Ira’s choice of careers for he is listed as a “waterman” in 1900 and as an “oysterman” in 1910. He married Eva Bowden and the couple raised twelve children on Chincoteague.


Ira never achieved any level of great financial wealth, however, the family never seemed to be deprived of a comfortable existence. Family was very important to Ira and, even in his later years, he enjoyed getting together with them on Sundays. His success was due in part to Hudson’s willingness to do whatever was necessary to provide for their well-being. He clammed, fished, oystered, and raised his own chickens. He built boats, took on carpentry projects, and he carved decoys. It is this last endeavor that brought him some degree of fame during his life, and even higher acclaim after his death. Harvesting oysters - Chincoteague, VA

He hand chopped all his early decoys. In 1940, because the family had no electricity in their home, he acquired his first gas powered band saw. His earliest decoys were his work alone but in later years, family members, most notably two of his sons, Norman and Delbert, would assist in the finishing and painting of the birds. In Ira’s mind, he was not creating “art” but rather utilitarian objects that were needed to attract the migrating flocks of ducks and geese. He certainly possessed an artistic flair as is evidenced in some of his finest working pieces, and it is evident in his decorative flying and standing carvings.

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“Arguably the finest Hudson black ducks are a group with turned heads, exaggerated flared tails, and tight intricate feathering. When arranged correctly they appear to be swimming in a circle.” Henry Stansbury author of Ira D. Hudson and Family, Chincoteague Carvers.

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Outstanding and important hollow carved black duck, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia.  The most exaggerated of a group of three hollow carved black ducks with turned heads and tails imitating ducks swimming in a circle. Partially inlet head that is turned approximately 35 degrees with the tail and ice groove also carved at an angle. Very detailed

Provenance: Ex Art Turner collection. Exhibited at the Ward Museum October 1998 - January 1999. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

Literature: “Ira D. Hudson and Family, Chincoteague Carvers,” Henry Stansbury, p. 59, exact decoy pictured.

(40,000 - 70,000)

scratch feather paint detail. Measures 16 3/4” long.  Original paint with very fine crazing shows a few minor rubs and flakes, mostly on the underside; hairline crack in underside of tail, otherwise excellent structurally.

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“While many of Hudson’s earliest brant decoys have rather pedestrian paint patterns, by the 1930’s and throughout the remainder of his career his talent with a brush flourished. On some of his decoys an arced band of white paint defines the separation between the wings and the tail.” Henry Stansbury

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Brant, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia, circa 1930.  Two piece hollow construction with raised neck seat and tack eyes. Appealing feather paint detail on sides. Measures 15 1/4” long.  Original paint with very minor wear; excellent structurally.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. (15,000 - 25,000)

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Dave “Umbrella” Watson 1851 - 1938| Chincoteague, Virginia

Gooseville Gun Club. Hatteras, NC

Dave Watson was the son of Peter T. Watson and Susan (Handy) Watson. Peter must have been quite successful in his profession as oysterman, for at times the family employed a “domestic servant” by the name of Comfort Scarborough. David and his younger brother followed their father’s lead and also become oystermen. Dave would continue with this line of work until at least 1910, after which his listed occupation was “carpenter” or “house carpenter” until the time of his death. Various references state that prior to 1918, he supplemented his income by gunning for the market and serving as a commercial guide. He also carved decoys, both for his personal use and to sell. His decoys broke with local Chincoteague tradition by being hollow carved, requiring specific skills in selecting seasoned lumber, and great patience in shaping and finishing the heads and bodies. These pieces were generally considered too expensive for most of the locals, but found their way into rigs as far north as Hampton Bays (Long Island), New York. He is well known for a large rig he made for the Gooseville Gun Club in Hatteras, North Carolina, whose members and guests included men willing to travel substantial distances from cities such as Philadelphia, PA (Henry

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Stelwagon) and Detroit, MI (Al Lyons). Sporting author, Van Campen Heilner, was also a charter member of this club, and sporting illustrator Lynn Bogue Hunt was a frequent guest. By 1880 Watson had married his first wife, Elexine and they had two daughters, Mary and Sarah. Unfortunately, sometime prior to 1910 Elexine died, and Dave went to live with his daughter Sadie (Sarah). During this time he met and married the widow Nancy (Williams) Carpenter who brought with her two children into the marriage. As noted by authors Barry and Velma Berkey, “he was regarded generally as a quiet and reserved man, an individual who kept to himself, who hunted alone (and) who did not search for an audience of admirers”. “Some interpreted Mr. Watson’s taciturn nature to represent a sign of unfriendliness or aloofness while others viewed him as modest or shy”. “(He) was a religious man, honest, didn’t drink and liked to read”. Bill Mackey offers additional insights into his life when he states, (Watson) “- - - seems to have lead a busy but solitary life and seldom tidied up his shop. One


eyewitness during the 1920’s claims the shavings, at that time, were knee deep. The fact that Dave always wore hip boots enabled him to ignore such things”. Numerous authors have noted his somewhat unusual habit of always carrying an umbrella regardless of the weather or season. A compulsion that had led to his widely accepted nickname, “Umbrella”. He is said to have remarked: “Any fool can carry an umbrella when it was raining, but it took a smart man to carry one when the sun was shining” . There appears to be some discrepancy on the actual date of death for Dave Watson. His death certificate lists his demise as being from the “flu” on November 28, 1932 at an age of 81. All other references, however, list his death date as 1938.

Henry Stelwagon with Watson decoys, Gooseville Club

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Excellent brant, Dave ‘Umbrella’ Watson, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Hollow carved with relief carved wing tips. Branded ‘P’ and ‘WHP Jr’ in the underside. Exact decoy pictured on page 220 of “Chesapeake Bay Decoys” by Robert Richardson. Measures 18” long.  Original paint with very minor wear; a few tiny dents and an almost unnoticeable hairline crack in neck, otherwise excellent structurally.

Provenance: Ex William Purnell collection, who acquired in a trade from Bill Mackey. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. (15,000 - 30,000)

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Rare black duck, Dave ‘Umbrella’ Watson, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Hollow carved with slight relief wingtip carving and subtle paint detail. Measures 16 1/4” long.  Original paint with minor flaking and wear; tight crack in one side of breast, otherwise excellent structurally.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

(6,000 - 12,000)

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Bob White b. 1939 | Tullytown, Pennslvania

THE ORIGINAL DELAWARE RIVER HUNTER, CARVER AND DECOY HISTORIAN As a young boy growing up in the 1940’s in Trenton, New Jersey, Bob White had little idea that his near daily hunting and fishing on the Delaware River, a short walk from his boyhood home, would influence his lifetime career as a hunter, fisherman, and professional decoy carver. Bob began carving decoys as a teenager so that he and his older brother, Jim, could hunt on the Delaware. They would salvage cork insulation from discarded old refrigerators as well as wood they found in the local municipal dump. From these ‘ raw” materials, Bob and Jim both learned to fashion very crude cork stools with wooden heads to supplement their own rigs. After Bob’s marriage in 1961 to his wife Pauline, Bob and Pauline moved to the western side of the Delaware to Bristol, Pennsylvania where Bob joined Pauline’s family in their floral business.

Bob’s carving career has spanned over 60 years. During that time, Bob’s creativity has been expressed throughout different periods and is also reflected in the brands and weights which Bob used to identify his decoys. Between 1963 and 1968, Bob carved competitively and missed very few opportunities to enter his decoys in the numerous carving competitions that could be found along the eastern seaboard. The “competition birds” from that era are all highly carved and very finely painted. All of the competition birds have a “skeg” (Picture # 1) since it was essential as part of any decoy carving competition that judges could see how well the decoys could float. No other identifying brand or weight was typically used by Bob on these decoys.

A few years later, Bob and Pauline moved up the Delaware three miles to nearby Tullytown. Bob used the proceeds from the sale of Bob’s first decoy collection to purchase the home where he and Pauline still live, close by to the Delaware, with a carving workshop and a boathouse in the backyard, both of which Bob still uses on a regular basis. A chance purchase in 1959 of 27 Dawson painted John English decoys for the sum of $46.00 changed his focus and his life. Bob quickly learned that there was much more to a decoy than simply attracting ducks on the Delaware. Bob became a “picker” for all of the major collectors of the time, including Lloyd Johnson, Bill Mackey and Johnny Hillman. While doing so, he began to greatly improve his own carving skills, learning as much as he could from his mentor, John McLaughlin, who lived in nearby Bordentown on the Jersey side of the Delaware.

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Photo #1

During the 1960’s, in addition to the competition quality birds, Bob also began experimenting with other more traditional styles and began to carve his own personal hunting rig. Bob’s earliest birds from that period would typically include a circular metal weight with a near hollow center where a nail would be inserted into the decoy bottom. Frequently, one or more “R.L. White” stamps would be used next to the circular weight to confirm the identity of Bob’s birds. (Picture #2).

Photo #2


Bob also deliberately chose to distinguish and identify his very early birds used is his own personal hunting rig in a somewhat different fashion. In addition to the always present leather loop, Bob occasionally would rely on teardrop weights affixed with two screws. After his 1963 move to Tullytown, Bob included a copper strip stamped “Robert L. White, 402 Main Street, Tullytown, PA”. (Picture #3).

Photo #3

Other 1960’s era decoys included just the “R.L. White” stamp with a more traditional thin lead rectangular weight in the center affixed by multiple copper nails with the traditional leather loop. (Picture #4). By 1969, Bob had discontinued his use of “ R. L. White” stamp entirely.

Photo #4

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In the 1970’s Bob continued to experiment and expand his range by carving decoys with a more distressed, aged appearance. Bob’s decoys from that period typically included an inserted lead weight in the bottom adjacent to a hot branded oval stamp labeled “Hand Carved by Bob White, Tullytown, PA”. (Picture #5)

of the triangular weight. (Picture #7). However, more typically, that triangular weight would have an embossed profile of a bob white quail together with “ Tullytown, Pennsylvania” stamped on its side. (Picture #8). Photo #7

Photo #8

Photo #5

Other variations of weights and stamps during the 1970’s included the elimination of the circular lead weight altogether. Its replacement was either the thin rectangular or square lead weight located behind the stamp affixed to the bottom with multiple copper nails. ( Picture #6). On some of Bob’s larger birds from this era, including gulls and geese of various species, the decoy would contain 2 triangular bob white quail weights (Picture #9). For special order and presentation pieces, it would include a circular weight and a remarque. (Picture # 10).

Photo #6

After the sale of the family floral business , Bob “ turned pro’ in 1982. Since then, and continuing through his “retirement” in 2007 and beyond, Bob‘s decoys of this era represent the Delaware River style at its best, featuring crisp incised wings, fluted tails , hollow 2 piece Maine cedar bodies and the best quality oil paints. During this later period, Bob has consistently relied upon a triangular lead weight affixed to the bottom by three metal screws and the traditional leather loop to attach the anchor line. Occasionally, Bob would utilize a stamped “R. White Decoy” on the bottom

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Photo #9

Bob was the first…and perhaps the last, of the Delaware River hunters to be fortunate enough to make a full time living carving decoys. His ability to do so over such an extended period is a testament not only to his good health and longevity but, more importantly, to his innate style, consistent quality and consummate artistry in being able to transform a decoy into a work of art.


Contemporary

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Rare merganser drake with turned head and horse tail crest, Bob White, Tullytown, Pennsylvania. Carved

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Widgeon drake, Bob White, Tullytown, Pennsylvania. Carved in the Delaware River, John English style. Branded

eye. Center cut hollow. Surface and paint that is stressed

by carver on underside, brand reads “Hand carved by

for appearance of age. Signed and dated 1976 on under-

Bob White, Tullytown PA.” With pad weight Hollow carved.

side with maker’s oval brand and pad weight. 15” long.

Raised wing primaries with dropped carved tail. Signed

Small amount of paint crazing at one side of wing other-

and dated by maker 1972. 13.5” long. Excellent and origi-

wise excellent and original.

nal; surface is stressed for the appearance of age.

(800 - 1,200)

(800 - 1,200 6

A rare long billed curlew, Bob White, Tullytown, Pennsylvania. Signed by maker under tail, and dated 1998. A pitch fork was used for the bill. Carved shoulders

Pair of harlequin ducks, Bob White, Tullytown, Pennsylvania.  Both retain Bob White’s quail weight. Both

and wingtips. Measures 20” long. Excellent and original.

are signed and dated 1988. 13.5” long.  Excellent and

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(1,200 - 1,800) 7

Rigmate pair of greenwing teal, Bob White, Tullytown, Pennsylvania. Both are signed and dated

original.

(1,500 - 2,000)

1992. “R.White Decoy” is etched in bottom of weight.

Pair of wood ducks, Bob White, Tullytown, Pennsylvania.  Retains Bob White quail weights. Both

Each has a slightly turned head with raised primaries and

are signed and dated 1995. Drake is 16.25” long. In rare

dropped carved tail. Drake has fine comb painting on

swimming pose with slightly lifted and turned head. Crest

body and back. 11” long. Excellent and original.

is angled off to one side. Hen is preening with angled crest

(1,500 - 2,000)

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as well.  Excellent and original.

(1,200 - 1,500)

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Swimming wood duck drake, Cameron McIntyre, New Church, Virginia.  “CTM” carved in underside.

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Raised carved wings with extended tips and extended

and scratch painted back and sides. “CTM” is carved in

tail. Carved crest and carved eyes. Well executed paint

underside in fancy script. Made as a gunning decoy. 16”

patterns over a slight raised grain that produces an aged

long.  Stressed to some areas for the appearance of age,

affect. Hollow with a bottom board. 17.5” long.  Excellent

otherwise mint in all respects.

and original.

(1,750 - 2,250) 15

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Stylish gadwall drake, Cameron McIntyre, New Church, Virginia.  Pinch breast with fine feather detailing

Rigmate pair of hooded mergansers, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Made in the style of Ira

(1,000 - 2,000)

Rigmate pair of shovelers, Marty Hanson, Hayward, Wisconsin.  Carved splayed shoveler bills with grooved out area on back of body and side pocket carving. Back

Hudson. Both signed “McNair” on underside. Drake has a

of heads are rasped. “Prior Lake” stamp on underside of

slightly turned head. Scratch painting on body and wings.

each. 15” long.  Excellent and original.

Domed tack eyes. Wear has been added for the appearance of age. 13.5” long. Excellent and original.  (2,000 - 3,000)

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(900 - 1,200)

Rigmate pair of old squaw, Marty Hanson, Hayward, Wisconsin.  Each has maker’s Prior Lake stamp on underside. Side pocket and wing carving. Drake has inserted

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Red breasted merganser drake, Keith Mueller, Killingsworth, Connecticut.  A gunning style decoy that shows the Shang Wheeler influence. Branded Mueller in underside. Hollow with bottom board. Fine scratch painting on sides and tail. Head is alert and turned. 16” long.  A few small rubs to white area near underside, otherwise excellent.

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(700 - 1,000)

hardwood tail. Hen’s head is slightly tucked. Drake is 17” long.  Both are excellent and original.

(1,000 - 1,500)


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Canada goose, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.   Center cut hollow body with three piece head that is turned and dipping. Tack eyes.  “McNair” carved in underside. 25” long.  Strong original paint is crazed for appearance of age; body seam has separated on one side. (1,500 - 2,500)

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Canada goose, David Ward, Essex, Connecticut.  Two piece hollow body. Stamped “DBW” in underside. Snakey head with good feather paint detail. 28” long.  Very good and original. (1,000 - 1,500)

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Eider drake, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Signed. 16.5” long. Inlet head, relief wing carving, carved eyes, and open bill with mussel.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; two hairline cracks in breast.

(1,750 - 2,250)

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Alert swan, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  “McNair” carved in underside. Two piece hollow body. 33” long.  Strong original paint; has crazed and been stressed for the appearance of age.

(2,500 - 3,500)

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Pacific Coast Horace “Hi” Crandall 1892 - 1969 | Westwood, California

Crandall was born in Ashaway, Rode Island in 1892. He spent his younger days on the east coast and moved to Benecia, California in 1917 where he took a job as a ferry boat engineer. His job was carrying trains across the Sacramento River before the bridges were built. He made his first decoys while in Benecia but they were all lost in a fire. In 1931 he moved to Westwood, California on Lake Almanor where he eventually took a job with Red River Lumber Company. This is when he made the decoys collectors covet the most. “Hi” as he was known began selling decoys locally through the San Francisco sporting goods stores including, Phillips Sporting Goods. He was even asked to display his carvings at the 1939 Worlds Fair on Treasure Island in San Francisco Bay.

Horace “Hi” Crandall.

“Wildfowl Decoys of California,” Michael Miller

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Rigmate pair of mallards, Horace “Hi” Crandall, Westwood, California, circa 1930.   Collection stamp of William and Joyce Mori on underside. Carving between wings and wingtips. 16” long.  Strong original paint; small edge wear, rubs, and minor paint loss around neck seat on drake.

Provenance: “Wildfowl Decoys of California,” Michael Miller. (5,000 - 8,000)

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Rigmate pair of greenwing teal, Bill Neal, Black Point, California, 1972.   Both are branded “WN.” Made in the style of Fresh Air Dick Janson. Slight wing carving.11.5” long.  Strong original paint; structurally good.

(700 - 1,000)

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Rare speckle belly goose, Walter J. Ruppel, Portland, Oregon and Sheboygan, Wisconsin.  Has maker’s sticker on underside. Head is turned and in a feeding position. Deeply carved wingtips at back. 20” long.  Mint.

(1,500 - 2,000)

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Pintail hen from the Henry A. Spiegel rig, Stockton, California, circa 1930.  Appealing high head with slightly carved chin. Similar in style of decoys made by Fresh Air Dick Janson. Carved tail and glass eyes. 14” long.  Paint is a mix of original and gunning repaint; crack in neck; several shot scars.

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(1,200 - 1,500)


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Rigmate pair of pintails, Richard “Fresh Air Dick” Janson, Sonoma, California.  Both are branded “WJM” along with another maker’s brand. Both have four carved wingtips. 18” long.  Both have light amounts of wear; rough area at tip of tail on drake; coat of varnish appears to have been removed from both; paint is worn thin in several spots.

(3,500 - 5,500)

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Rigmate pair of widgeon, Amiel Garibaldi, San Francisco, California.   Both have slightly turned heads, raised wing primaries, and retain original Garibaldi weights. 13” long.  Light gunning wear; a few small dents; a possible very light coat of varnish.

(3,000 - 4,000)

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Maryland Holly Family Havre de Grace, Maryland Decoys have always been an important tool in hunting waterfowl on the Upper Chesapeake. The identity of the earliest carvers from the region has long since been lost to time, but early oral histories indicate that lures were made by pioneering families with names such as Morgan, Knight, Barnes, and Bishop. The Hollys and the Howletts are among the early families that have received the most research and documentation. It is stated by many that the Hollys of Havre de Grace deserve the credit as being the innovators of the Harford County style of decoy. The Holly family patriarch that was known to have carved decoys was John Holly (1818 – 1892). He is often referred to in the collecting world as “Daddy” Holly, apparently a nickname originally used by his family members. He produced decoys not only for his own use but for some of the more famous gunning scows and notable Upper Bay gunning clubs hosting hunting parties on the Susquehanna Flats. Articles published as early as 1853 reference him as one of the most respected duck hunters from Havre de Grace. He owned two large boats that may have served as accommodations for visiting hunters. These guests undoubtedly shot over decoys produced by “Daddy.” He and his wife Amanda had three sons – William, James T., and John W., Jr., and a daughter, Amanda. Census records indicate he was a “carpenter” and a “fisherman” – both occupations that would lend themselves to decoy production. While it is unclear how many decoys he produced both for himself and for others, there were, apparently, several unfilled orders upon his death. It is believed that these orders were completed by two of his sons; William and John, Jr. The extent of the carving beyond this by these two brothers is unclear and they seem to have scratched out an existence being employed primarily as painters and wall paperers. His middle son, James, however, is well known as a somewhat prolific carver of decoys of exceptional quality and finish. He was also the most financially successful of the three brothers, having several stock investments and real estate holdings. His primary occupation was that of boat building, and he and George Howlett owned the two largest, best known boat yards in Havre de Grace. James is credited with making the most seaworthy, yet trim, bushwhack boat on the Flats, and his crafts were said to be unequaled in the water. Workers in his yards constructed boats for many of the well known hunters of the time, such as members of the Barnes, Poplar, Heverin, and Heisler families. By 1901, a total of 197 boats had been produced under his supervision. In addition to

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boats, the yards also constructed a significant number of sink boxes for market hunters, guides, and clubs for use on the Flats. In fact, his obituary credits Jim as being the designer of the coffin shape for this device. James Holly catered to all the needs of the local watermen and visiting sports with not only the necessary boats and boxes, but by supplying them with the large numbers of the decoys needed to complete the rigs. Some of his orders were for decoys purchased by “The Philadelphia Ducking Club,” “The Spesutia Island Club,” the “San Domingo Club,” and for members of the “Currituck Club”(3) among others. James and his brothers undoubtedly learned how to make decoys from their father and, at some point, it is very easy to imagine some form of collaboration by various members of the family. James, however, is often the son credited with being the most accomplished carver. According to Bob Shaw, “Jim Holly refined the style set by his father, making some of the most elegantly carved and painted decoys ever to ride American waters.” James Holly’s artistic talents extended beyond the production of boats and decoys. He is known to have painted signs, and he produced one of the most famous of all paintings depicting sinkbox shooting on the Susquehanna Flats. He was also concerned with protecting this sport on his neighboring waters for, in 1884, he was listed in the court records as being a member of the Ducking Police for the Harford County side of the Flats. He, his wife, and two daughters lived on Market Street in Havre de Grace, a mere two blocks from the waterfront.


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Very rare pintail hen, James Holly, Havre de Grace, Maryland, circa 1900.  Long body with tack eyes and excellent paint detail. ‘WHP Jr’ branded in the underside. Measures 16 1/2” long.  Original paint with minor to moderate wear, mostly where line tie was wrapped around body; lightly hit by shot; very fine hairline crack in bill.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. Formerly in the William Purnell collection.

(15,000 - 25,000)

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Very rare blue wing teal, John ‘Daddy’ Holly, Havre de Grace, Maryland, last quarter 19th century.   Slightly swimming pose with scratch feather paint detail and original rigging. Original line tie and weight has been preserved just as it was found. Measures 12 1/2” long.  Original paint with minor gunning wear; chip in underside where a small nail was added to secure a separation in the wood grain; slight separation to a small knot in underside.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. (15,000 - 25,000)

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Bluebill drake, Ed Phillips, Cambridge, Maryland.  Alert head with carved and painted eyes. 12” long.  Strong original paint that has mellowed slightly after a light coat of varnish; two knots have slightly raised; small rub at tail. (2,500 - 3,500)

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Greenwing teal drake, Captain Ben Dye, Perryville, Maryland, 3rd quarter 19th century.  11.5” long.  Repainted by Charlie Joiner, Chestertown, Maryland in the 1950s. (1,750 - 2,250)

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Rare high head canvasback drake, Taylor Boyd, Perryville, Maryland, last quarter 19th century.    Original paint with moderate wear; crack partway though neck base; cracks in one side.

Literature: “Waterfowling on the Chesapeake, 1819-1936.” C. John Sullivan.

(1,750 - 2,250)

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Canvasback hen, Sam Barnes, Havre de Grace, Maryland, 1st quarter 20th century. Strong original paint; some rubs and discoloration on body; neck seam has opened slightly.

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(1,200 - 1,700)


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Very rare cork wing duck, James Holly, Havre de Grace, Maryland, last quarter 19th century.  Branded “GCC” for Gunston Cove Club. An early Potomac River club for the Washington elite. The club afforded members a wonderful view of Mt Vernon. 15.5” long.  Original paint; very slight wear; structurally very good.

(3,000 - 5,000)

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Extremely rare wooden canvasback wing duck, John Graham, Charlestown, Maryland, 3rd quarter 19th century.  13” long.  Old in use repaint; crack through neck; slight roughness to one edge; small spot of touchup on one side of head; two small holes in body for attaching it to the wooden wing of a sink box; small tail chips.

Literature: “Decoys of the Midatlantic Region,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr.

(2,500 - 3,500)

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Captain Ben Dye 1821 - 1896 | Perryville, Maryland

“Benjamin Dye’s decoys demonstrate some of the finest carvings and detail work of the early Susquehanna Flats carvers.” C. John Sullivan, author of Waterfowling on the Chesapeake, 1819-1936.

In addition to the noteworthy carvings of the Holly’s and Graham’s, Ben Dye produced some of the earliest and finest decoys from the upper Chesapeake Bay. He was born in Mercer County, New Jersey and, in 1856, married Adeline Mitchell. In 1860, the young couple relocated from New Jersey to Perry Point, and then Perryville, Maryland, opposite Havre de Grace, on the shore of the resource-rich Susquehanna Flats.

The bulk of the decoys produced by Dye are, as one would expect, canvasbacks, redheads and bluebills with fewer numbers of black ducks, all predominant species hunted out of the legendary sinkboxes. He also is known to have produced much smaller numbers of ruddy ducks and his very rare oldsquaws and teal. Oldsquaws were a species more typically hunted on the North Atlantic coast and the teal would have traditionally been the targets of early season, inshore hunters.

As noted by author Jeffery Pelayo: “Ben was a professional waterman – gunning waterfowl for the market, guiding wealthy sportsmen on sinkbox outings, fishing during the summer months and making decoys, not only for personal and family use, but also for ducking clubs and other hunting guides in the surrounding area and beyond.”

From 1872 through at least 1884, he was a member of the State’s “Ducking Police” along with other wellknown names such as H.J. Poplar, Sam Barnes and Scott Jackson. This austere group was responsible for enforcing the early gunning regulations on the “Flats” and were instrumental in being a part of the early conservation measures designed to preserve the future of all waterfowl in the Chesapeake. Again citing Mr. Pelayo, Ben Dye is credited with perfecting the Cecil County style of carving featuring a raised neck seat, and a small paddle tail protruding out from the middle of the body. His carvings typically display a delightful, distinctive, Charlestown style paint pattern in the form of “angel wings”.

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The exceptional quality of Ben Dye’s decoys unquestionably places him in the very upper echelon of carvers from the Susquehanna Flats.


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Excellent bluebill drake, Captain Ben Dye, Perryville, Maryland, 3rd quarter 19th century.  Nice form and a pleasing surface with slightly raised neck seat and detailed bill carving. Measures 11 3/4” long.  Original paint that has darkened with age; very minor gunning wear; filler has risen slightly above nail on top of head, otherwise excellent structurally.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. (10,000 - 20,000)

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Illinois River Robert Elliston 1847 - 1911| Bureau, Illinois “Robert Elliston, is certainly regarded as one of the first Illinois River commercial decoy makers and because of the quality and quantity of his output as one of the best. He traveled the Midwest until he settled in Lacon, Illinois, where he started a career of full time decoy carving while in this thirties. Later he moved to Bureau where he lived the rest of his life. Elliston’s decoys were made of the finest white pine with the bodies hollowed out of two equal pieces. The heads were well caved with a very detailed bill and had eyes set very high giving a frogeyed look. The painting was superbly done by his wife Catherine and set a high standard for other Illinois River carvers that came later. He made mallards in the greatest number, but also made pintails, teal, bluebills, redheads, canvasbacks, ringnecks, coots and Canada geese. The decoys were weighted by a lead strip on the bottom that was stamped “THE ELLISTON DECOY”. Robert was the first to make turned head sleepers. By all standards, Robert Elliston rates as a classic maker.” “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway”, Alan Haid

The Elliston family pictured in front of their home in Bureau, circa 1900.

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38

Excellent canvasback drake, Robert Elliston, Bureau, Illinois, last quarter 19th century.  Hollow carved with comb feather paint detail. Retains the original Elliston weight. Measures 16 1/4” long.  Original paint with minor gunning wear; a few shot strikes; tight crack in top

of tail, otherwise very good structurally.

Provenance: Ex Alan and Elaine Haid collection. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid.

(15,000 - 25,000)

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Walter H. Dupee (1873 – 1933)

Robert Elliston (1847 – 1915) of Bureau, Illinois crafted some of the finest decoys to emerge from the Illinois River area. His work was the inspiration for generations of carvers to follow, such as the well-known Charlie Perdew and other respected regional carvers. Hunters, too, recognized the quality of his work and the demand for his decoys only increased with time. At the turn of the century, those sportsmen that demanded and could afford the very best, purchased Bob Elliston decoys. One of the more famous (and wealthy) of these gentlemen was Walter Hamlin Dupee (1873 – 1933) of Oconomowoc, Wisconsin. Mr. Dupee was born into wealth. His father, John Dupee, was an extremely successful corn merchant and broker, and Walter initially followed in his footsteps. The family’s affluence allowed them to enjoy the services of a domestic staff of five and the family ranked high in social prominence. Walter, not yet 25, became an accomplished sailor and won many of the local

39

regattas. In 1900, his father was the Director of the Inland Yachting Association, and to encourage his son to pursue the sport, ordered two new boats to be built by the famous Amundson Boat Builders of Bear Lake. These craft were specifically designed to compete on the larger waters of Lake Winnebago rather than the more placid Lake Oconomowoc. One of the boats was a gift to Walter and the other was given to a business associate of Mr. Dupee, Mr. P.O. Armour of Chicago, the great meat packer. When the sailing season ended, the Dupee’s recreational activities shifted to the pursuit of waterfowl, particularly on the Horicon Marsh. It was here that, around 1890, Walter hunted over his rig of blue-winged teal, mallards and bluebills, all in Elliston’s early or round back style. Their comfortable finances allowed them to possess the finest of equipment and, undoubtedly, they enjoyed the best guides who would have been responsible for caring for the decoys before, during and after the hunt. No records can be found that indicate where he stayed when hunting, but we can safely assume that he enjoyed the best of accomodations while afield. In 1900, Walter married the first of his three wives (an event that made headlines in the society pages) and they would have two children. The family’s wealth continued to grow and by 1905, Walter and his family, along with his father and mother, employed a household staff of ten including, cooks, housekeepers, domestics and gardeners. The 1912 Chicago Blue Book shows

Sailboats by Amundson boat works

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Outstanding bluebill drake, Robert Elliston, Bureau, Illinois, circa 1880.  Hollow carved, round body style with comb feather paint detail by Catherine Elliston. ‘W.H.Dupee’ branded into the underside. Retains the original Elliston weight. Measures 12 1/2” long.  Original paint with minor wear; hairline crack in back; minor discoloration on one side of bill.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. (25,000 - 35,000)

Walter with his wife and children living on Lake Shore Drive in Chicago, considered the city’s “gold coast”. By 1914, his business interest had shifted and he had moved to San Diego, California where his occupation was listed as “rancher”. By this time, always an ardent sportsman, Walter had developed a love of horses and became very well known in polo circles. Eventually his interest transitioned from polo to racing. He was a steward of the Agua Caliente Jockey Club and at the time of his death, maintained a stable along “Millionaires Row” at the Tijuana racetrack. Walter H. Dupee died of a sudden heart attack in Hollywood, California, far from Oconomowoc Lake and the Horicon Marsh.

Agua Caliente Jockey Club

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40

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40

Rare green wing teal drake, Robert Elliston, Bureau, Illinois, last quarter 19th century.  Hollow carved with glass eyes. Less than six of these are known.Retains the original Elliston weight and fine paint detail by Catherine Elliston. Measures 12 1/4” long.  Original paint with minor gunning wear; small plug was added to a small knot hole behind neck seat long ago; vertical hairline crack in front and back of neck seat.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. (35,000 - 55,000)

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41

Pintail drake, Robert Elliston, Bureau, Illinois, last quarter 19th century.   17.25” long. Retains Elliston weight.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; several small dents and shot marks; professional neck crack repair; filler and touch up at opened body seam on one side.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid.

(3,000 - 5,000)

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Flat bottom style mallard drake, Charles Walker, Princeton, Illinois.  Slightly turned head. “6” painted on underside. 16.5” long.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; paint on speculums appears to be a second coat.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid.

(2,000 - 3,000)

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Pair of old squaw, Hector “Hec” Whittington, Oglesby, Illinois.  Both stamped and dated 1973. Drake has inserted hardwood tail and slightly turned head. 19” long. Hen has turned head.  Strong original paint; hen has small area of paint flaking at lower edge. (1,000 - 1,500)

43 44

Rigmate pair of pintails, Hector “Hec” Whittington, Oglesby, Illinois.  Each is stamped 1976. Slightly turned heads. Drake is 20” long.  Excellent and original. (1,000 - 1,500)

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Charles Perdew 1874 - 1963 | Henry, Illinois

44a

Pintail drake, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois, circa 1930s. 16.75” long. Good paint detail. Original paint by Edna Perdew, with minor discoloration and wear; reglued crack in neck.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid.

(10,000 - 15,000)

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44c

Important field goose from Illinois. Part of the Daniel Voorhees rig, 1st quarter 20th century. Cast iron head and wooden body. Branded “DWV” on underside. Stake hole is supported with a metal pipe. 28” long. Strong original paint with detailed feathering; areas of flaking on back and breast, some areas on the back have been darkened; wood imperfection at one side of body. (4,000 - 6,000)

44c

44d

44d

44e

Early rigmate pair of canvasbacks, Bert Graves, Peoria, Illinois, 1st quarter 20th century. Both retain

Mallard drake, Bert Grave, Peoria, Illinois, 1st quarter 20th century. Retains original Graves weight.

original Graves weights. Original paint with coat of var-

Combing on gray sides. Good feather detail on back. 17”

nish which has darkened slightly; hen has small amount

long. Old coat of varnish has darkened slightly; light wear.

of strengthening to paint at tail and spot on neck and breast; drake has paint strengthening at tail, breast, and head.

50

44e

(2,500 - 3,500)

(1,500 - 2,500)


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Pintail drake, Bert Graves, Peoria, Illinois, 1st quarter 20th century.  Retains original weight. Strong comb painting on sides. 17.5” long.  Original paint; light rub at one side of body; scratches and dents near face and top of back; varnish over white areas has darkened slightly.

(3,500 - 5,500)

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Mallard drake, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.  Slightly turned head. Hollow. Excellent original paint by Charles Perdew. Retains original Perdew weight. 15” long.  Protected by a light coat of varnish that under blacklight has partially worn away on underside.

(3,000 - 4,000)

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Charles Walker

Charles Walker was born in Princeton, Illinois and never really left the area, choosing to stay where waterfowl shooting was at its best. Walker hunted locally including at the Princeton Club, a club exclusive to Princeton area hunters.

1876 - 1954 | Princeton, Illinois

While Walker was not a full time professional carver like Robert Elliston and Charles Perdew, and he produced significantly fewer birds, he is still considered one of the best of the Illinois River region by today’s collectors.

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Mallard drake, Charles Walker, Princeton, Illinois.  16.5” long. Slightly turned head and relief wing carving.  Original paint; minor discoloration and wear; a few tiny dents. Provenance: From the Trimble rig, Princeton Fish and Game

Club. Marked “PD Trimble” on underside. Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyaway,” Alan Haid.

(8,000 - 12,000)

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48

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Important rigmate pair of greenwing teal, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois, circa 1950.  Both have turned heads with raised wings. Both have unmarked weights. Drake’s head is crested and comb painted sides. 10” long.  Strong original paint; protected by a coat of varnish.

Provenance: This exact pair of greenwing teal was made for Perdew’s close friend, Otto Meyer, as trade for Meyer buying and installing a furnace in Perdew’s home during the winter. Perdew made and traded all of the items in this photo for the furnace. (10,000 - 15,000)

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Miniatures

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Very rare pair of miniature canvasback wing ducks, Scott Jackson, Charlestown, Maryland, circa 1890.  Very rare flat bottom wing duck style miniatures from the 19th century. Excellent form with raised neck seats and long bills. Measure 4 3/4” long.  Original paint that has darkened with age; very minor separation at hen’s neck seat; very old glue at a crack in drake’s neck.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. (2,000 - 4,000)

50

Miniature pintail, Obediah Verity, Seaford, Long Island, New York, last quarter 19th century.  Relief wing carving and carved eyes. Measures 6 3/4” long.  Original paint under a coat of varnish that has darkened with age; very minor flaking; excellent structurally.

Provenance: Ex Bud Ward collection. Ex Larry Lambert collection. James and Patricia Doherty collection. Literature and Exhibit: “The Decoys of Long Island, an Exhibit at the Ward Museum,” Fleming, Haid, and Sieger, p. 36, exact carving pictured.

50

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(3,000 - 5,000)


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Miniature pintail drake, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Scratch feather paint detail on back. Double metal tail sprig. Measures 6 1/4” long.  Original paint under a coat of varnish that has darkened; small flake to filler at front of neck seat.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

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(2,000 - 3,000)

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Miniature mallard drake, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia.   Measures 5 1/4” long.  Original paint that has darkened from the original coat of varnish; very good structurally.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

(2,000 - 3,000) 52

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Miniature mallard drake, John Blair Sr., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, last quarter 19th century.   Excellent form. Measures 4 3/4” long.  Original paint that has darkened with age; reglued cracks in neck and bill; replaced tip of bill.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

54

(2,000 - 3,000)

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Miniature swimming mallard hen, John Blair Sr., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, last quarter 19th century.  In swimming pose with tack eyes. Measures 5 1/8” long.  Original paint with very minor wear; tight crack through neck and some chipping and roughness on bill tip.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

(2,000 - 3,000)

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55


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Pair of 1/4 size canvasbacks, Ed Parsons, Oxford, Maryland.  Just under 6” long.  Original paint with very slight wear and good patina; hen has a professinal neck crack repair, otherwise very good structurally. (2,000 - 3,000)

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Miniature pair of woodcock, A.J. King, North Scituate, Rhode Island.  Relief wing and dropped wing tip carving. Signed on one end of burl base. Base measures 3” across.  Taller one has had the bill reattached at the face with touch up on most of the bill.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on

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underside.

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(1,500 - 2,500)

Pair of miniature redheads, Robert McGaw, Havre de Grace, Maryland.  Mounted on original hardwood bases. Measures 5 3/4” long.  Original paint that has darkened with age; fine spots of white paint on backs; paint flake on one side of drake’s neck.

Provenance: Ex Jimmy and Debbie Allan collection. Jim and Pat Doherty

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collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

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(700 - 1,000)

Miniature quail family, A.J. King, North Scituate, Rhode Island.  Adult quail with relief carved wings and female with raised wing tips. Male’s head is turned almost 90 degrees. Together with four chicks, all mounted to a burl base. Signed on front of burl. Base measures 4 1/2” across.  Excellent and original.

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Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

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(1,500 - 2,500)


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Extremely rare pair of 1/3 size mergansers, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.  Early miniatures in Wilson’s Monhegan Island style with carved crests, inlet neck seats, and relief wing carving. Each with slightly turned and reared back heads with carved eyes. Measure 8 1/2” and 9 3/4” long.  Original paint with minor wear; chip in tail with the drake’s being darkened; much of drake’s bill is replaced.

Provenance: Hen was purchased in 1993. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. (6,000 - 9,000)

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60

Miniature standing immature robin, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.  Standing on metal legs. Relief wing carving. Measures 4” long.  Paint flaking on base, bird is excellent and original with a warm patina.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

(4,000 - 6,000)

60

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Ontario 61

Very rare harlequin drake, David Nichol, Smith Falls, Ontario.  Signed and dated 1960 on underside. 13” long.  Near mint.

(1,250 - 1,750)

61 62

Rigmate pair of goldeneye, Billy Ellis, Smith Falls, Ontario.  Both have tucked heads. 14” long.  Strong original paint with a few dents and small rubs; some discoloration to white area on hen.

(1,500 - 2,500)

62 63

Rigmate pair of widgeon, David Nichol, Smith Falls, Ontario.  Raised wingtips, carved tails. Rare species for Nichol. 14.5” long.  Strong original paint; structurally good. (2,000 - 3,000)

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Rare greenwing teal hen, Ontario, circa 1930. Fine scratch feather painting on body and head. Head is turned back to one side but slightly lifted above body. In a preening pose. Strong original paint that has worn evenly; several shot scars; exposed wood at edge of tail; feather painting has worn off of part of head. (1,250 - 1,750)

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Bluebill drake with long neck, eastern Ontario.  A little over 10” tall.  Original paint with comb detail and minor wear; structurally good. (4,000 - 6,000)

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Very rare hollow carved pintail hen, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario.  Branded “JRW Maker.” with painted “F.N” initials. 16.5” long. Thinly hollowed with .25” bottom board. Strong paint feathering on side pockets, wing, and back.  Original paint with rubs, scarpes and a few shot scars; crack in neck.

Provenance: Formerly in collection of Peter

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Brown. From the Oak Lake Gun Club in Manitoba.

(5,000 - 8,000)

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George Warin 1830 - 1905 | Toronto, Ontario

This style of Warin decoys has come to be known as the Price rig, named after the people that found them. Dr. Ralph and Patricia Price, from Port Perry, Ontario, found eight decoys at a hunt club on Lake Scugog, west of Toronto, around 1970. They are characterized by their particularly strong feather painting, feather light weight and unbranded bottom boards. Another small group of four were found in Eastern Ontario. It is believed that they came out of the Scugog Island Hunt Club prior to Dr. Price’s discovery in 1970.

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Canada goose, George Warin, Toronto, Ontario, last quarter 19th century.  Hollow carved with 1/2” bottom board. Excellent feather paint detail. Ward Foundation – Smithsonian Exhibit 1987 paper label on the underside. Exact decoy pictured on page 211 of “Decoys a North America Survey” by Gene and Linda Kangas. Measures 24” long.  Original paint with minor gunning wear; minor roughness on one edge of tail; small amount of paint shrinkage on lower breast; like most Warin geese of this style, this decoy has a bill chip repair, unlike the others, the bill chip on this goose has only .5” wedge repair to the very tip of the bill.

Provenance: Ex George Thompson collection. Purchased from Alan Haid in 1993. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

60

(25,000 - 35,000)


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Louisiana 68

Pintail drake, Mark Whipple, Raceland, Louisiana.  16.3” long.  Repair to crack in the neck; small chip missing from underside of bill; crack partway through bill; original paint with moderate wear; white area is working repaint; a few small dents.

(2,000 - 3,000)

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69

Early pair of working mallards, Mike Frady, New Orleans, Louisiana.  Drake is 16” long and has a slightly turned head. Both have carved wingtips.  Original paint; minor wear; moderate wear at tails; drake has a nail added to the neck base with a small dent and thin crack in that area.

(3,000 - 4,000)

69 70

Rigmate pair of pintails, Sidney Duplessis, Davant, Louisiana.  Both have long necks and relief wing carving. Hen is 17” long.  Original paint; good feather detail and minor wear; repair to a small chip at the top of the drake’s tail; both have small dents; small crack in hen’s neck.

Provenance: From the hunting rig of Henry Patrick Burlew, New Orleans, Louisiana.

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(2,500 - 3,500)

Early mallard hen in content pose, Reme Roussel, Raceland, Louisiana.   Relief wing carvings. Feather carving at wing tips. 14.5” long.  Original paint with minor to moderate wear; some wear to the wood at the tail.

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(2,000 - 3,000)


72

75

73

76

74

77

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Rare pintail hen, Sidney Foret, Raceland, Louisiana.  15.25” long. Relief wing carving.  Original

Cheramie.

paint; minor wear; small dent in back of head. Literature: “Louisiana Lures and Legends,” Brian Cheramie.

small chip missing from top of tail; one eye is missing; sev-

(1,750 - 2,250)

eral tiny dents. 73

Swimming mallard hen, Mitchell LaFrance, New Orleans, Louisiana.  16.75” long. Relief wing carving and very slightly turned head.  Original paint with good feather detail; small dents; numerous tiny puppy chew marks at

carving.  Original paint; minor wear; small dents; touchup

end of bill.

at neck seat.

Literature: “Louisiana Lures and Legends,” Brian (1,750 - 2,250)

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Provenance: From the hunting rig of Henry Patrick Burke,

Mallard hen, Mitchell LaFrance, New Orleans, Louisiana.  15.5” long. Relief wing carving. And good chip missing from one side of bill; several reglued cracks in neck with glue showing and small triangular piece missing from front to back on neck; several tiny dents.

minor wear; small chip with touchup on it at tip of tail; a few tiny dents.

(1,000 - 1,400)

feather paint detail.  Original paint; minor wear; small

Mallard hen, Sidney Duplesis, Davant, Louisiana.  14.75” long with relief wing carving. Good form with lifted tail and long neck.  Original paint with

(1,750 - 2,250)

Swimming mallard hen, Frank Uzee, Chalmette, Louisiana.  15.25” long. Slightly turned head. Relief wing

Cheramie. 74

(1,250 - 1,750)

Mallard hen, Mitchell LaFrance, New Orleans, Louisiana.  15.25” long.  Original paint with minor wear;

75

Literature: “Louisiana Lures and Legends,” Brian

Provenance: From the hunting rig of Henry Patrick Burke, New Orleans, Louisiana.

(1,250 - 1,750)

New Orleans, Louisiana.

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Joseph Lincoln 1859 - 1938 | Accord, Massachusetts Joe Lincoln never left the home in which he was born on Gardner St in the Accord section of Hingham, MA. As a young man, from about 1880 through 1895, he, like many others in the area, worked in a shoe factory or he worked on a piece rate basis out of a small 10’ X 12’ “tinkers shop” behind his home. After his father’s death, he lived with his mother and brother, Wilbur, who worked as a farmer and raised poultry on the family homestead. By 1910 through the early 1920’s, Joe was

a “carpenter” and was remembered by his neighbors as being extremely talented when it came to building or repairing almost anything from furniture and boats to clocks. He was a life-long, avid hunter and his home was conveniently situated directly on the shore of Accord Pond. It was here in 1904, that he became instrumental in running The North Shore Gun Club. The club used live decoys as well as numerous carved blocks. The Continued...

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Rare old squaw hen, Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts.  ‘E.L. Spear’ branded into the underside. Measures 13 3/4” long.  Original paint with minor gunning wear; lightly hit by shot including one on tip of bill causing a small chip on one side; typical drying split in underside.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

(35,000 - 55,000)

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...Continued complex consisted of a comfortable club house, an elaborate, long blind, storage sheds and live bird pens. John C Phillips in his “Shooting Stands of Eastern Massachusetts” states that “Relative to its size, I think that more fowl have been shot in this pond than any other in the State”. Joe had been making decoys for his own use

since 1885. He expanded his production to include carving birds for friends and club members, which eventually would spread his reputation far beyond Accord Pond. A 1918 article in a Boston newspaper recognized him as one of only two (commercial) decoy carvers in the State (the other being Cape Cod’s A.E. Crowell). Demand for his decoys became great enough that by the early 1920’s, he is listed in the Town Directories as “Decoy Mfg” and this would be his trade for the remainder of his working life. His business cards advertised his work locally, while contemporary articles about him in numerous periodicals spread his fame beyond the State’s borders. As late as 1933, he staged an elaborate exhibit in the annual Boston Sportsman’s Show. His work inspired a number of local carvers, such as Gordon Mann (1871 – 1958) of nearby Rockland and Charlie Thomas (1886 – 1946) of Norwell. The Lincoln influence can be clearly seen in the work of both men. Joe’s decoys are elegant in their simplicity. There were no wasted knife or brush strokes. As a minimalist, he captured the essence of the live bird as few others have on the Atlantic coast. The range of his work included solid, as well as hollow (1 known) decoys, as well as canvas over frame models, and his unique “selfbailers”. His relatively few miniature carvings are tiny

66

replicas of his working decoys. Always considered young for his age, in 1931, at 72, he married a local schoolteacher, Mary Shute, and the pair apparently enjoyed a happy marriage in the home in which Joe was born. When Joe died, he was cremated and his ashes are buried, along with Mary’s, in Accord. Joe was not all decoys and hunting. Another of his true passions was the cultivation of prize dahlias and gladiolas. He had a large garden (100’ x 100’) devoted to their production and he spent many happy hours digging and tending the plants. His efforts allowed him to introduce a number of award-winning hybrids to the horticultural world. He exhibited in local agricultural fairs and the annual, prestigious, Boston Flower Show where he competed at the professional level. He shared his love for these splendid blooms with his decoy carving neighbor, Gordon Mann, who also had a large, award winning, dahlia garden behind his home. Joe’s family knew how much he enjoyed and treasured his flowers and they were sure to note that this part of his life was mentioned first in his obituary.


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Extremely rare immature white wing scoter drake, Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts.  Most of the scoter made by Lincoln were made using canvas covered wood slat construction or his own self-bailing design. This is one of two scoter hens in Lincoln’s classic form known to exist. Exhibited at the Ward Museum October 2, 1998 - January 10, 1999. Measures 16 1/4” long.  Original paint with minor gunning wear; tight drying cracks in underside; two tiny nails added to each side of neck seat long ago.

Provenance: Ex George and Hope Wick collection. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. Exhibited Ward Museum October 1998.

Literature and Exhibit: “Massachusetts Masters, Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art,” p. 51 exact decoy. (30,000 - 40,000) Lincoln at two different periods in his life.

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80

Oversize black duck, Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts.   Branded ‘Q’ three times on the underside from the Quandy collection. Measures 18 1/2” long.  Original paint with minor to moderate flaking and wear, mostly along lower sides; dents and shot marks including a longer dent on top of tail; typical drying split in underside.

Provenance: Ex Quandy collection. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph, p. 133, exact decoy pictured. (6,000 - 9,000)

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81

Oversized canvas over wire frame merganser drake from Cape Cod, Massachusetts.  Made with Silhouette head and neck with carved wooden crest. 23 1/2” long.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear. Neck crack repair with touch up in the area.

Provenance: From the Quandy Collection, Cape Cod, MA. Branded “Q” twice in underside.

Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph, p. 75 exact decoy pictured. (5,000 - 8,000)

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82

85

83

86

84

87

82

Black duck, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts, 1st quarter 20th century. Oval brand

85

Oversize scoter from the Southern Maine coast.  16.5” long. Inlet head.  Original paint with moder-

in underside. Slightly turned head. With detailed feather

ate wear; small cracks in back; slight roughness to one

painting, especially at speculum. Rasped head and

lower side; piece of wood added to defect in underside. (650 - 950)

carved nostril. 16.5” long. Strong original paint; protected by a very light coat of varnish; two shot scars in back 86

have been darkened.

Provenance: Consignor purchased from Alan Haid.

underside. Signed by maker on underside, with notes that

(3,500 - 4,500) 83

this took 3rd place at US Nationals in 1983. Slightly turned

Hollow carved preening black duck, Willard Baldwin, Stratford, Connecticut.  Braded “WCB” also

head with feather texturing to produce a very appealing surface. 14” long.  Excellent and original.

branded “Laing” in large letters. 14.25” long.  Original paint; good detail and minor wear.

87

Provenance: Dunford collection.

wear; small dents and shot marks; thin wedge added at front of neck seat with glue visible in that area; like many

American merganser drake, Keith Mueller, Killingsworth, Connecticut.  Branded “Mueller” on

Toothacker mergansers the bill is a professional replacement.

underside. Hollow with bottom board. Head is in calling or

70

(600 - 900)

Merganser drake, Sam Toothacker, Brunswick, Maine, 1st quarter 20th century. Inlet neck seat with Measures 17 ½” long. Original paint with minor gunning

(650 - 950)

drinking position. 19” long.  Excellent and original.

(800 - 1,000)

reared back head. Carved eyes and tines of crest.

Literature: “Connecticut Decoys,” Henry Chitwood.

84

Gunning canvasback hen, Keith Mueller, Killingsworth, Connecticut.  “Mueller” is carved in

Provenance: Dr. John Dinan collection.

(1,200 - 1,800)


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Rigmate pair of old squaw from Maine circa 1900. Both with slightly turned heads and upswept paddle tails. Both branded ‘A.R. Angell’ in the underside. Measure 15” and 16” long. Dry old paint appears to be a mix of original and old in use repaint; tight crack in hen’s neck; professional tail chip repair on drake; both with tight hairline cracks in body.

88

Provenance: Dr. John Dinan collection. (2,000 - 3,000)

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Canvas over wire frame scoter, Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts.  17.5” long. Inscription on underside reads “Made for Preston Clark” with his 1920 - 1929 hunting tallies tacked to the underside.  Original paint; worn to the canvas where nails are pushing against it; head is a little loose.

90

(1,250 - 1,750)

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Pair of bluebills, Keyes Chadwick, Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts.  Both have very slightly turned heads. Drake is 13.75” long.  Original paint with minor wear; light paint shrinkage on parts of both.

(1,500 - 2,500)

90

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Hollow carved old squaw hen, David Goodspeed, Duxbury, Massachusetts, last quarter 19th century.   12” long.  Original paint; minor wear; a few tiny dents; one eye is missing.

Literature: “Decoys: A North American Survey,” Gene and Linda Kangas, p. 95. “Decoys of the Atlantic Flyway,” George Ross Starr, p. 173.

(2,000 - 3,000)

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Mason Decoy Factory 1896 - 1924 | Detroit, Michigan

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94

93

Bluewing teal drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century.  Hollow premier grade. 12” long.  Strong original

Excellent greenwing teal drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  One of the best examples we have seen. Standard grade glass eye model.

paint protected by a very thin light coat of varnish

12” long.  In near mint paint; a very, very thin line of

that is only visible under UV light; several shot scars;

neck filler was replaced around a tight seam in the

small area by one eye has a different surface but

neck.

does not appear to be restoration.

72

94

(5,000 - 7,000)

(4,000 - 6,000)


95

Stunning pintail drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century.  Hollow premier grade. 18” long.  Near mint in most respects; two tiny rubs on head; two small rubs near tail.

(6,000 - 9,000)

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96

Mallard drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Hollow premier grade. Branded “Richardson.” 18” long.  Near mint original paint; in factory filled crack in back with small amount of filler missing.

Provenance: Dunford collection. (2,000 - 3,000)

96

97

Bluebill hen and drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Early hollow premier grade model with wide spoon bills. Drake is 12.75” long and is branded “C.T. Doville.” Hen has Mackey collection stamp on underside.  Original paint with minor wear; several tiny dents and shot marks; paint and filler loss at neck base on drake; thin in factory filled crack on one side and a tiny chip repair in tip of bill on hen.

97

(2,000 - 2,500)

98

Early coot, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Challenge grade. 11.25” long. Unusual pose with slightly turned and lifted head.  Crack in head; small cracks in tail; old overpaint on much of the decoy with original showing in fairly large spots. (650 - 950)

98

99

Mallard drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Hollow premier grade. 17.75” long.  Original paint that has darkened with age; several small dents; shot marks in one lower side and underside. (800 - 1,200)

99

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100

Bluewing teal hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Hollow premier grade with early snakey head style. 12” long. Branded “J. Chas McCullough.”  Original paint with minor flaking and wear, mostly on head; very lightly hit by shot; retains original Mason Factory weight. (3,000 - 4,000)

100

101

Very rare goldeneye drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century.  Hollow premier grade. Only a few of these in original paint exist. 15” long.  Original paint; has light even wear; a crack in one side of body; a few small rubs; shot scar to one edge of bill.

(4,000 - 6,000)

101

100

101

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Mason Decoy Factory 1896 - 1924 | Detroit, Michigan

Standard size mallard shown for size, but not included in lot 101a.

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101a

Extremely rare half size mallard drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century.  Possibly unique, undersize mallard carved and painted in the Premier grade style with relief bill carving, glass eyes, and excellent paint detail. Measures 12” long.  Excellent original paint protected by the original thin coat of varnish; a few tiny flakes on one side of neck; drying crack in underside.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. (6,000 - 10,000)

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Mason Factory Shorebirds | The Display Samples 1896 - 1924 | Detroit, Michigan At the height of its existence, the Mason factory managed to capture the lion’s share of the decoy market. It did so by producing a quality product that could outcompete any and all other suppliers. It not only manufactured a wider range of species than its competitors but also offered a wider array of models that could meet the needs and wallets of both wealthy sportsmen as well as the everyday blue-collar hunter. Literally thousands of decoys flowed from the factory in Detroit. Developing a market for these birds was a noteworthy accomplishment. Ultimately, the product spoke for itself and the most effective sales tool was word of mouth but, to reach this end, the company embraced a sales strategy that relied almost exclusively on printed literature. Ads promoting their products were taken out in “The Sporting Goods Dealer”, a trade magazine for hardware stores, hunting and fishing stores, and any similar establishment that catered to duck hunters. Other advertisements were placed in sporting publications of the day, such as “Field and Stream” and “Outers”, that were designed to be seen by individual hunters throughout the country. No sales were made directly from the factory and it would have been common that any inquires made to the factory would be referred to a dealer close to the customer’s home (see fig 1). A variety of catalogs were also utilized over the years that the company was in business, and these attractive booklets proved to be remarkably effective sales tools.

Apparently, there are no indications that the company ever employed live salesmen to travel the country visiting retail outlets to entice them to carry Mason decoys. The widely held belief is that the shorebirds with the “price per dozen” written on the bottom were, indeed, sales, promotional or advertising tools, but only at the individual store level. Conceivably, once the decoys arrived at the retailer, the store owner or clerk would select the most blemish free and finely painted examples from the shipment and place these on display to attract the potential customer. To save counter or

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shelf space, the bulk of the shipment would be placed in storage. When a customer chose what he wished from what was on display, the clerk would retrieve the desired amount from some back room or other area where they were kept. Thus, the term “salesman’s sample” can be slightly misleading in the traditional sense and perhaps a better descriptor would be “store sample” or, in today’s terms, “floor model”. For obvious reasons, those shorebirds with the “price per dozen” label represent some of the best examples of the Mason product. Logically, the most attractive examples would be chosen for display and, most likely, these would never have been exposed to the harsh environment of the field. One curious feature of the Doherty examples is that the handwriting on the shorebirds is identical. The script is at the same angle on the birds, done by a right handed person, and located on the same place on the birds. One has to wonder if the Doherty examples all came from the same retailer, perhaps a very large one such as VL&A or Abercrombie and Fitch. “Snipe” decoys were advertised in the catalogs for $3.75 to $5.00 per dozen while the larger curlews were advertised for $6.00 per dozen. The prices on the Doherty examples, then, would appear to be retail prices. Of the thousands of shorebirds produced by the Mason factory, only a handful were chosen for use as “store displays”. The few that were selected open a small window into the marketing strategy employed by the factory. They must be considered exceptionally rare and they certainly play an important role in documenting the history of this remarkable firm.


104

103

102

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103

102

102

Rare display sample robin snipe, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century.  Glass eye model with iron bill. ‘Robin Snipe

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Rare display sample golden plover, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century.  Glass eye model with iron bill. ‘Golden Plover $7.00

$7.00 Dz’ written on underside. Measures 10 1/4”

Dz’ written on underside. The price per dozen likely

long.  Original paint with very minor wear; tiny flake at

went up while still being used as a sample because the

spot of filler in one side; a few shot marks, otherwise

$7.00 was changed to $7.50 at some point. Measures

excellent structurally.

10” long.  Original paint with minor wear; Very good

Provenance: Ex Mort Hanson collection. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

(10,000 - 15,000)

structurally. Provenance: Ex Mort Hanson collection. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

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(10,000 - 15,000)


“The most stately of the four models of curlews made by Mason. In original paint, decoys like this one were the finest factory shorebirds from every viewpoint. This model was used for both long-billed and Hudsonian curlews.” William J. Mackey, Jr.

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Very rare display sample curlew, Mason Provenance: Ex William J. Mackey Jr collection and so stamped. Jim and Pat Doherty collecDecoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Two piece model with iron bill and tack eyes.

tion. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

Identified and price of $12.00 a dozen on

Literature: “American Bird Decoys,” William underside. Measures 17” long.  Original paint Mackey, Jr., p. 225, exact decoy pictured. with minor gunning wear; some flaking to filler (15,000 - 30,000) at neck seam; in factory filled crack in back with minor paint flaking; drying crack in underside.

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Harry V. Shourds 1861 - 1920 | Tuckerton, New Jersey Harry V. and Agnes Shourds

Of the multitude of men who carved working decoys, a few giants stand out. Each flyway and region had its local icons but a much smaller number became recognized nationally for their outstanding craftsmanship. Crowell, Perdue, Cobb and others are recognized as producing outstanding representatives of their local style of carving. In New Jersey, Harry Vinuckson Shourds is certainly in the top two or so names that everyone clearly associates with the best of the Barnegat style. Born the son of Samuel F and Elizabeth Shourds, young Harry was one of eight children who scratched out an existence on their father’s “sailor” salary. As late as 1880, census records indicate that he was still living at home but had no listed occupation. In November of 1884, he married Mary Agnes Bartholomew (who apparently went by the name of Agnes) and, by 1900, they had had four children. Record keeping must have been very lax, for the census on that date still shows him as having no listed occupation – a very unlikely reality. Eventually he would list his occupation as “carpenter – house (1910)” or “painter – general (1920)”. Considering the huge number of decoys that he would ultimately produce, this (nor guiding) is never listed as his source of income in the federal or state record.

Family records indicate that he did guide and sold game during the appropriate season and, as many decoys as he did produce, these were seemingly carved as an adjunct to his trade as a painter. “Harry would have hunting parties to his cabin on Barrel Island in Tuckerton Bay, sometime out for a week at a time, hunting brant, ducks and geese in his sneakbox with canvas windbreaker. When he would return, he would sell the fowl by the pair and the feathers for beds and pillows, and they were also traded for other services. In the spring, he would go to his summer home in Ocean City where he worked as a painter from spring to fall, and the rest of the family would come down when school ended and left before it started back up.”

The family lived in a two story home on Water street in Tuckerton, adjacent to Tuckerton Creek, which gave Harry fairly ready access to Little Egg Harbor. When his daughter Maggie died of diphtheria, Harry and his wife raised her two children. Harry V. Shourds died from asthma and he is buried in the Greenwood Cemetery in Tuckerton. Harry’s decoy production was astounding. It is repeatedly said that he would comfortably carve a finished decoy head while getting a shave or haircut at the local barber. He is credited with carving thousands of decoys, perhaps more than any other carver in New Jersey. Following in the long standing, practical Barnegat tradition, his decoys were hollow carved with the seam made watertight with the time-honored marine use of caulking and white lead. His weights were poured lead in a recess he gouged into the bottom of each decoy, again, a time consuming but practical solution. He did not seem to keep records, yet, after packing his decoys in barrels, he would wheel them to the local railroad station where he was reported to be the largest shipper in Tuckerton. Considering his talent and the time it must have taken, he sold his finished decoys, ready to hunt over, for six dollars a dozen. Rigs of his birds have been documented as far north as Maine and as far south as Georgia. The quality of his work is beyond dispute. Bill Mackey proclaimed: “Fortunate is the collector who has an example of Shourd’s work with its original paint intact, for his painting was worthy of the excellent carving beneath.” “Shourds’s must have tried to make each one a little better than its predecessor”.

Scow Landing on Water Street in Tuckerton

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105

Bufflehead drake, Harry V Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  Hollow carved with inlet lead weight and tack eyes. Measures 12” long.  Original paint with minor gunning wear; dents in underside where it was used to hammer something; bare wood on edge of tail and underside has darkened; short hairline cracks in tip of tail.

Provenance: Ex Hillman collection, though not stamped. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

Shourds is known to focus most of his carving on (as one would suspect) producing those species most in demand locally. As noted by Joe French: “The majority of his carvings are Canada geese, brant, black ducks and bluebills but he also made fewer numbers of redheads, goldeneyes, red breasted mergansers, hooded mergansers, bufflehead and oldsquaws”. A few rarities

by his hand, such as mallards, exist and he is justly famous for his “masterpieces” - his herring gulls. He also made a wide range of carvings for the most popular species of shorebirds; curlews, knots, yellowlegs, plovers, sanderlings and a few ruddy turnstones. H.V. Shourds passed on his talents to his son Harry Mitchell Shourds who copied his father’s patterns and must have certainly worked on decoys alongside his father. The work of father and son is extremely difficult to distinguish from each other. H.M, in turn, was followed in the Shourds’ family decoy legacy by his son, H.V Shourds III.

(15,000 - 25,000)

purchased from Somers Headley in 1955 when they were referred to as “Shourdes”. This spelling persisted through the publication of Bill Mackey’s 1965 “American Bird Decoys” and into the 1970’s Bourne auction catalogs. Hal Sorenson in his 1960’s “Decoy Collectors Guide” spelled his middle name as “Van Nuckson”. Fortunately, these minor digressions have been corrected and Harry V. Shourds can now enjoy his justly famous and wellearned reputation as one of the greatest decoy carvers of all times.

As in the case of so many carvers, the early literature is rife with unintentional misspellings and mis-attributions. Joe French’s first Shourds decoy was

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106

Merganser hen, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  Hollow carved with tack eyes and four extended tines of crest. Branded ‘JF’ in the underside for the collection of Joe French. Measures 16 1/4” long.  Original paint with moderate flaking and wear; discoloration and tight cracks at nail holes; filler added with touch up at the body seem under tail.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

84

(3,000 - 8,000)


107

Rare flying brant, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey, 1st quarter 20th century.  For use as a stick up with applied canvas over wire frame wings. Tack eyes and metal rig tag with the number 85 on the underside. Measures 23 1/4” long with wingspan of 20”.  Original paint with moderate gunning wear; some flaking on back; hairline crack along back and a drying crack along head and neck.

Provenance: Ex Harry Megargee collection. Ex Russell Holst collection. Ex Murry Mitterhoff collection. Ex Joe French collection. Ex Jimmy and Debbie Allen collection. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James R. Doherty, p. 38, exact decoy pictured. (5,000 - 8,000)

85


A large, mixed rig of very fine H.V. Shourds decoys with the “F.W. Cassedy” brand has been known to the decoy collecting community for years. Research by astute and knowledgeable New Jersey collectors have traced the rig to Cape May at the very southern tip of the State but have found little else beyond that. A search of the records reveals that there was a Frank Willets Cassedy (1879 – 1956) that was born and lived his entire life in Cape May. He would have been contemporaneous with Harry V Shourds and could be a very viable candidate as the owner of the brand. He was well educated and, from at least 1910 through 1940, he was associated with the U.S. Postal Service in Cape May, beginning as a “clerk” and rising through the ranks to become “Assistant Postmaster” and eventually, in 1926, “Postmaster”.

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He and his wife, Helen, with their two children, lived on Washington St, at the tip of the Town, not far from both the ocean and the nearby salt marshes. He owned his own home which must have been quite nice, being valued in its day at a respectable $7000. Hopefully, additional research will reveal if, indeed, this gentleman was the owner of the rig that bears his name and allow researchers to discover additional facts about his life.


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Excellent bluebill drake, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey, circa 1900.  Hollow carved with inset lead weight in the underside. Branded ‘F.W. Cassedy’ in the underside. Measures 14” long.  Excellent original paint with very minor wear; filler has flaked from a spot at body seam in one side, otherwise excellent structurally.

Provenance: Rig of F.W. Cassidy. Ex Thomas and Dorothy Eshenbough collection. Ex William Butler collection. Ex Donald Kirson collection. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. William Penn Memorial Museum – 1967. Exhibited Ward Museum of Waterfowl Art - June 2008.

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James R. Doherty, p. 63, exact decoy pictured.

(12,000 - 18,000)

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109

Rare goldeneye drake, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  Hollow carved with tack eyes. One of only three known in original paint. Measures 13 1/4” long.  Original paint that has darkened with age, especially at nail holes of body seam; some cracking at nail holes in breast; very fine hairline crack in bill.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. Literature: ‘Classic New Jersey Decoys,’ James R. Doherty, p. 61, exact decoy pictured.

(3,000 - 5,000)

109

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Round bodied goldeneye hen, Harry V. Shrouds, Tuckerton, New Jersey.  13 1/2” long.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear. Filler missing from some of the nail holes joining the body halves.

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” Jim Doherty, Jr.

110

109

88

110

(4,000 - 5,000)


111

112

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Merganser drake, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey.  16” long. Very wide, round body and head style.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; slight separation at body seam; very minor roughness to crest; small dents.

Provenance: Ex Fred Ellenberg collection. Ex Jim Doherty collection.

Literature: “New Jersey Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein Jr. “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James Doherty, Jr. 112

(4,000 - 6,000)

Bluebill hen, Harry V Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  Hollow carved. Branded ‘H.W. Godfrey’ twice in underside. Retains the ‘Mackey collection’ ink stamp. Measures 14” long.  Original paint with moderate gunning wear; minor separation at body seam.

Provenance: Ex William J Mackey Jr. collection. Jim and Pat

111

Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. (2,500 - 3,500)

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Daniel Lake Leeds 1852 - 1922 | Pleasantville, New Jersey

Although a few duck decoys have been ascribed to him, Daniel Leeds concentrated his carving efforts primarily on shorebirds. James Doherty, in his “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” places him among the best of the New Jersey makers and classifies him as an important first generation carver meaning the bulk, if not all, of his carvings were created during the heyday of market gunning and well before the ultimate banning of all shorebird hunting for sport. He has been described in multiple references as a bayman and gunner but a review of the census records suggest that he may have also worked (at least occasionally) as a carpenter – a trade that would certainly give him the skills needed to sculpt his delightful shorebirds. His style of carving differed from the normal New Jersey carving tradition and would be considered rare by New Jersey standards. Robert Shaw, in his

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“Bird Decoys of North America,” notes that “all of (his shorebirds) have raised wing carvings, split tails and detailed paint patterns.” He further states that “the intricate lines that delineate his plumage are unmatched among New Jersey carvers.” Although he carved a number of different shorebird species, “his classic curlews are considered to be one of the most pleasing curlews made in South Jersey” (“Shorebirds: the Birds, the Hunters, the Decoys,” Levinson and Headley”). Examples such as the one offered today are represented in some of the best collections in the country.


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Exceptional curlew, Daniel Lake Leeds, Pleasantville, New Jersey, circa 1900.   14” long with relief wing carving and good feather paint detail.  Near mint original paint; structurally very good.

Literature: “New Jersey Decoys, Henry Fleckenstein, Jr.

(15,000 - 25,000)

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114

Exceptional robin snipe in spring plumage Daniel Lake Leeds, Pleasantville, New Jersey.  8.5” long. With relief wing carving and baleen bill.  Near mint original paint; very slight wear to end of bill.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of John Hillman, Seagirt, New Jersey. Hillman collection stamp on underside. (12,500 - 17,500)

115

Lesser yellowlegs, Daniel Lake Leeds, Pleasantville, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  Deep relief wing carving. Measures 9 1/4” long.  Original paint that has darkened with age and almost no wear; bill appears to be a replacement or was possibly reset. touch up paint around the facel, where bill and face connect and at the back of the head where it is splined through.

Provenance: Ex Jimmy and Debbie Allen collection. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

Literature: ‘Classic New Jersey Decoys’ by James R. Doherty, p. 176 and 178, exact decoy pictured. (5,000 - 10,000)

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115

114

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116

Ruddy turnstone from Cape May, New Jersey, circa 1900.  Measures 10” long.  Original paint with very minor wear; hairline crack in bill, otherwise very good structurally.

Provenance: “Shorebirds: The Birds, The Hunters, The Decoys,” John Levinson and Somers Headly, p. 86/figure 6-25, exact decoy pictured.

117 116

(1,500 - 2,500)

Yellowlegs from New Jersey, circa 1900.  Split tail carving and iron tack eyes. Measures 10 1/4” long.  Original paint with minor gunning wear; lightly hit by shot; tiny old nail added to a small chip in the back of head; tight crack in bill; some black touch up on forehead.

Provenance: Ex Hillman collection. Literature: “New Jersey Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr., color plate XIX, rigmate pictured. 118

117

(1,200 - 1,800)

Rare passenger pigeon, probably from New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  Working passenger pigeon decoys are some of the hardest decoys to find with only a handfull known to exist. Carved eyes.

Measures 13 1/2”

long.  Thin original paint with moderate wear down to bare wood; tight drying cracks in breast and top of head; small amount of old filler at base of bill.

Provenance: Ex Walter Bush collection. Purchased by Joe French through the Staten Island Museum. Ex Joe French collection. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

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Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James R. Doherty, p. 185, exact decoy pictured. 119

(1,800 - 2,500)

Plover attributed to Samuel Shute, Cape May, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.   Relief wing and wide head carving. Measures 9 1/2” long.  Original paint with moderate wear; lightly hit by shot; shot strike in top of bill.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

119

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James R. Doherty, p. 183, exact decoy pictured.

94

(1,800 - 2,500)


122 121

120

120

Feeding yellowlegs, Taylor Johnson, Point Pleasant, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.   Original paint

Yellowlegs, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey.  10.5” long.  Original paint with minor discoloration

on the white areas with minor wear; second coat on the

and wear; three shot scars in lower breast; bill is a profes-

brown areas with moderate flaking and wear; lightly hit by

sional replacement; lightly hit by shot on one side.

shot; minor loss at small knot in neck.

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Provenance: Meyer collection.

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Large curlew from Cape May, New Jersey, 1st quarter 20th century.  17” long.  Original paint with very minor

(2,500 - 3,500)

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James R. Doherty, p. 168, exact decoy pictured.

wear; some filler and touch up where bill meets face.

(1,000 - 2,000)

Provenance: Meyer collection.

(1,500 - 2,500)

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123

125

124

123

Rig of six lumberyard yellowlegs on driftwood base.  Carved eyes. Some have wingtip carving.  Original

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Red knot, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey.    Original paint with very minor wear. Lightly hit

paint with minor to moderate wear; all but one of the bills

by shot, mostly on left side; professional bill replacement

appear to be replacements; small tail chips; lightly hit by

by Russ Alan; mislabeled on bottom as being by “Henry”

shot; some restoration to backs of heads.

Shourds.

Provenance: Mackey collection. Mackey collection on underside of base.

(4,000 - 6,000)

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(3,500 - 4,500)

Black bellied plover, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey.  In fall plumage. Measures 10” long.  Original paint with minor wear; hit by shot; larger shot at stick hole in underside; tip of bill is restored by Russ Allen.

Provenance: Ex Joe French collection. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on under-

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side.

(4,000 - 6,000)


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Exceptional Hudsonian curlew, Harry V Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  Identified on underside in William Mackey’s handwriting with additional information written “Taken by sail to Locustville, Virginia by Nash Milner, famed hunter 1875-1952.”  Near mint original paint; structurally very good.

Literature: Classic New Jersey Decoys, James R. Doherty.

(12,500 - 17,500)

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Elmer Crowell 1862 - 1952 | East Harwich, Massachusetts

There is probably no one name more readily and widely recognizable in the world of decoys and decorative bird carving than A.E. Crowell. He preferred to be called simply Elmer and this gives us our first insight into this unassuming individual who was to achieve such widespread fame in his own lifetime and perhaps, even more so today. He was born in Harwich on what is referred to as the outer arm of the Cape. When he was only 14, his father, a “mariner”, purchased his son 24 art lessons from a Miss Emily King who summered in Harwichport. She noted that even at that young age, her pupil had no desire to become an artist but rather, he saw himself “first and foremost, a gunner”. His father had bought him his first shotgun, a 12 gauge in 1874 and, just one year later, Elmer purchased his first hammerless 10 gauge which allowed him still greater bags of ducks and geese. In 1876, his father purchased a large tract of land on the shore of Pleasant Lake near their home and Elmer set about to build a substantial blind there. It was here that, in addition to using his own trained live decoys, he carved his first wooden decoy and, from that point on, there was no looking back. In the late 1800’s the demand for wild game, especially ducks, geese and shorebirds was strong and handsome profits

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could be realized. The young Crowell was quick to capitalize on this market, shipping both shot and birds he had raised himself, to Boston. Although hunting seasons were much longer then than they are today, they did not last forever. In 1890, Elmer had married his first wife and he needed other means, in addition to hunting, to support himself. The soils and freshwater ponds on the Cape were well suited to the cultivation of cranberries and between the late 1800’s through at least the 1910 census, he lists his primary occupation as “farmer - cranberry” or “Cranberry grower”. In 1912 -13 he entered into a business arrangement with the Iver Johnson sporting goods store in Boston to produce 10 dozen decoys per year for them. Ultimately, he did not need to seek out customers for his carvings and word of mouth supplied all the business he could handle working out of a small barn behind his father in law’s home. From the 1920 census onward, he would list his source of income as “manufacturer - decoys” or “woodcarver - decoys”. His expertise placed him in demand both for his superior lures and for his services as “head gunner” (manager and live decoy handler) at some of the larger and best known shooting stands throughout coastal Massachusetts and Rhode Island. These operations were not only large but elaborate and expensive. Some of the stands were owned by clubs while others were privately owned by very wealthy and influential sportsmen. Men with names such as Cunningham, Phillips, Long, DuMont, Hardy and numerous others actively sought out Elmer for his services and his decoys. While working for these well-


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Early gunning style goldeneye drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  14. 9” long with oval brand. Rasping on back of head. Fluted tail. Fine feather paint detail.  Original paint with good patina and slight wear on most of the decoy; minor wear on one side; slight separation at knot in lower side.

Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph. (12,000 - 15,000)

heeled individuals, Crowell produced what are widely considered his finest works. Some of the decoys carved for these men, although intended for the marsh, lived out their lives on mantels or bookshelves as cherished mementos of pleasant days afield.

individuals or in sets of 25, to visitors to Cape Cod, schools or libraries. By the 1940’s persistent rheumatism began to take its toll and Elmer was forced to reduce, and ultimately stop, carving.

By 1918, Federal and State laws were placed on migratory game and the demand for shorebird decoys in particular began to drop off precipitously. Working duck decoys, although popular for a longer period, were ultimately destined to suffer the same fate. Crowell recognized these changes to his environment and was astute enough to adapt to them. As demand for gunning decoys was decreasing, the tourist trade on Cape Cod was increasing. His affluent hunting associates had already encouraged him to carve decorative pieces for them and now Crowell swung practically all his carving efforts in that direction. With the assistance of his son Cleon, he began to produce birds meant purely as decoratives and he excelled at it. In addition, he had already carved some miniature shorebirds as tiny copies of his working birds but he now began to produce thousands to be sold as

His unquestioned mastery of the art form has earned him the title of the “Father of American Bird Carving”. Today, his decoys very rarely float on Massachusetts waters and his jewel like minis are no longer available at a small barn in Harwich for a few dollars. Rather, Elmer’s efforts grace collections both large and famous as well as small and unpretentious. His work is proudly included in institutions such as the American Museum of Folk Art in New York, The Museum of Art in Boston, the Shelburne Museum in Vermont and a host of others. Conceivably, no other carver has had so many book, periodicals or articles written about him. His barn workshop has been preserved and will serve as a lasting monument to his life and work. Anthony Elmer Crowell’s humble carvings will continue to be the cornerstones of collections and cherished possessions for decades to come.

99


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Redhead drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts, 1st quarter 20th century.  Near perfect oval brand in underside. Shelburne Museum collection stamp on underside. This decoy exhibits Crowell’s finest characteristics, carved tail, carved and crossed wingtips, and a rasped head, which is slightly turned. 16” long.  Original paint has worn and flaked mostly on body; small area of restoration at neck filler.

Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph, p. 123, exact decoy pictured.

100

(6,500 - 9,500)


129

Early gunning bluebill drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Pre brand, circa 1910. Carved tail. Q branded on underside for Quandy collection. Painted crossed wingtips. Subtle green shading on sides of cheek patch and head. Head is slightly nestled or resting. 13.5” long.  Shallow dent at top of one side of head; otherwise very light wear. (6,500 - 9,500)

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The importance of carved primaries Perhaps no other shorebirds are as widely known and admired as Crowell’s so-called “dust jacket” examples. This name stems from groups of black bellied plovers with carved wingtips that appeared on the covers of “American Bird Decoys” and “New England Decoys”. They were the pride of the early and respected collectors Bill Mackey and Tony Waring. The incised wing tips present on these carvings represent Crowell at his zenith. It is thought by some authorities that he first experimented with this detail as early as 1895 as seen in examples of some rare, drop wing dowitchers. Because of the time required to carve these features, and the increased demands on Crowell’s time, it is widely believed that he was forced to give up this extra detail by about 1915. This wingtip treatment is very rare with only about one in 75, perhaps one in 100, having carved wings. His black bellied plovers are probably best known for this detail, but examples exist on other, rarer, shorebird species as well. We know of less than five

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Golden plovers with carved wings and only one other feeder. Subtle variations are noticed when studying Crowell’s carved wing examples. Five individually outlined feathers were somewhat the norm on the shorebirds but fine examples are known with either four or six feathers. The current auction world record for an Elmer Crowell decoy was set by our company in 2006 at $830,000. It is a feeding black bellied plover with carved wings. Between 1895 and 1915 demand for his work was still somewhat just beginning and he was carving primarily for his early patrons. Men like Hardy, Phillips, Cunningham, Long and others were the fortunate recipients of his efforts. Those collectors privileged to include an example of a “dust jacket” in their collections today are, like these early gentlemen, able to enjoy Elmer Crowell at his best


130

Very rare feeding golden plover in fall plumage, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts, circa 1905.  This is one of probably less than five carved wing golden plover by Crowell that are known. Exhibits Crowell’s desirable carved primaries, split tail, and in a unique and rare feeding position. Glass eyes. 12” long.  Excellent original paint has protected by a light coat of wax; several shot

Elmer Crowell carved wing black bellied

scars; crack in bill; crack at one eye.

(60,000 - 120,000)

plover | Sold November 2006 - $830,000

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Rare and large black bellied plover, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts, circa 1910.   A very plump bird, with Crowell’s dry brush painting. Similar on the breast to those of the famous dust jacket style. Tail is split and separated, sweeping upward and downward slightly. “PWW” is branded in underside for Parker W. Whittemore. 11.5” long.  Strong original paint with some darkening to lighter area on underside; a few very small scrapes near stick hole; light crazing on breast; very mild blunting at tip of bill. (25,000 - 35,000)

Parker William (“Buck”) Whittemore 1872 – 1959 | Boston and Gloucester, MA Along with the more familiar names such as John C Phillips, Charles Ashley Hardy, Dr John Cunningham and a small host of Boston’s prominent, socially connected gentlemen, Parker Whittemore had the means to become an early and important patron of Elmer Crowell. His father was a successful grain merchant and young Parker was to follow in his industrious footsteps, rapidly advancing in the world of business. He received his formal education at Harvard University, graduating in 1896. While attending this prestigious institution, in addition to his studies, he found time to captain the

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Parker Whittemore (R) 1925

Parker Whittemore (l) at Pinehurst N.C. c1934

school’s baseball team in his senior year. The year of his graduation, he married Grace J Sinclair in Portsmouth, New Hampshire and began his business career as a treasurer in a shoe company. By 1910, he and Grace had a daughter, Edith, and he had left the shoe company to become a “manufacturer of automobiles (see note 1)”. This must have been a successful venture, for the family was now living in affluent Newton


Highlands (a Boston suburb) with two servants and a chauffeur. He amassed enough wealth that, by the early 1920’s, he retired and he and his wife travelled extensively to Honolulu, Cuba, Jamaica, England and other ports aboard steamships the quality of the Majestic and the Araguaya. It was during this period that they returned to downtown Boston with a trendy Beacon St address and domestic staff. By 1922 he had also purchased a summer home on Cape Ann (Boston’s North Shore) in Gloucester. Here he enjoyed sailing and became the Commodore of the Eastern Point Yacht Club. His true recreational love, however, was clearly the game of golf and he apparently excelled at it. He won numerous championships throughout Massachusetts but also at distant links in New Hampshire, Wisconsin and Pinehurst, North Carolina. He played with the likes of Bobby Jones and he once beat golf pro, Walter Hagen. He was an influential member of the elitist Brookline

(Massachusetts) Country Club and was still actively playing into his 60’s, winning a number of major senior tournaments. The Brookline CC also had a trapshooting range and he is reported to have also enjoyed this sport. This activity certainly would have helped him with his wingshooting and he is said to have hunted on Cape Cod as well as at an estate he owned in Wareham (Massachusetts). Long accustomed to the finer things in life, it is no surprise that he purchased his decoys from Elmer Crowell and, undoubtedly, asked Elmer to produce some of his best carvings for him. “Buck” Whittemore’s rig can be easily identified by his conspicuous “P.W.W.” hot brand. Notes: His complete occupation in the census for that year is very difficult to read. “manufacture” is clear and “automobile” less so. Some sources have listed him as a manufacturer of “railroad cars”

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106


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Running yellowlegs, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts. Tack eyes. Good feather paint detail. Just under 12” long. Several tiny dents otherwise excellent and original.

Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph.

(15,000 - 20,000)

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133

Very rare sanderling with glass eyes, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  7.5” long.  Original paint with moderate wear; several tiny dents. (10,000 - 14,000)

134

Rare golden plover with turned head, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  9.75” long. Shoe button eyes.  Strong original dry brush painting with very minor wear; very minor wear near stick hole and on belly, approximately 2.5” round that has been professionally restored; structurally good.

Literature: “Songless Aviary,” Brian Culity. (12,500 - 17,500)

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134

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135

Mallard drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  A large full body with slightly turned head, carved crossed wingtips, and fluted tail. Rasping at back of head. Rectangular stamp three times in underside. 17” long.  Excellent original paint; very tight crack in one side of neck; very tight filled crack in one side of body; one small dent near back; a few tiny chew marks near tip of bill.

110

(8,000 - 12,000)


135a

Wood duck drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts. 2nd quarter 20th century.  Rectangular maker’s stamp on underside. Head is turned. 13.5” long.  Very small amount of restoration to a crack in the neck. (5,000 - 8,000)

111


New Jersey

136

136

Black duck, Lloyd Parker, Parkertown, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  Hollow carved with raised neck seat and carved ice groove behind neck seat. Scratch feather paint detail on body. Believed to be the only example in original paint. Measures 16 3/4” long.  Original paint with minor to moderate gunning wear; tightly reglued crack through neck, otherwise excellent structurally.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James R. Doherty, p. 125, exact decoy pictured. (5,000 - 10,000)

112


137

137

Rare mallard drake, John Dorsett, Point Pleasant, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  Hollow carved with Raised neck seat and glass bead eyes. ‘T’ stamped into the underside. Measures 18” long.  Original paint with minor gunning wear; reglued crack in neck, otherwise very good structurally.

Provenance: Ex Van Nostrand collection. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

Literature: ‘Classic New Jersey Decoys,’ James R Doherty, p. 136, exact decoy pictured. (6,000 - 9,000)

113


138

139

138

Rare juvenile old squaw hen, Mark English, Northfield, New Jersey.  Hollow carved with delicate

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head and bill carving and carved eyes. Maker’s initials

rare species by this maker. The only example known in

painted under tail. Measures 12 3/4” long.  Original paint

original paint. Measures 17” long.  Original paint with

with minor crazing and wear; filler has flaked above nail

minor flaking and wear; tight cracks in neck and tail; minor

holes in neck seat.

roughness on tip of bill.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty col-

lection sticker on underside.

p. 164, exact decoy pictured.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James R. Doherty,

114

Rare mallard, Taylor Johnson, Point Pleasant, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  Hollow carved. A

(6,000 - 10,000)

Literature: ‘Classic New Jersey Decoys,’ James R Doherty, p. 138, exact decoy pictured.

(6,000 - 10,000)


Research by Allen Linkchorst and John Clayton forms much of the basis for what is known about Henry Grant.

Henry’s father, Daniel Clarkson Grant, moved the family to the coastal community of Barnegat when Henry was quite young. His father was a gunsmith, but Henry decided to ultimately follow a different life path. Like other family members, he spent his entire life in Barnegat. As a young man of 24, his occupation was listed as “mariner”, certainly implying a deep connection to the shore. In 1875, at age 30, he married his wife, Mary, and they had four children, three sons and a daughter.

140

He spent a good deal of time as a guide for visiting sportsmen to the areas around Barnegat. In an article in an 1883 issue of Forest and Stream he is first on the list of 12 men recommended as guides from the Town of Barnegat. Grant must have been quite successful as a guide, for the January 3, 1903 issue of the New Jersey Courier reported that he and Charles Ridgeway bagged 106 assorted ducks and geese on a recent outing. Henry Grant carved both for his own use and commercially. His decoys were produced in the classic Barnegat style at a time when market gunning was an accepted practice and decoys were in demand. Jim Doherty in his “Classic New Jersey Decoys” recognizes Grant as not only an early carver but one of the best New Jersey carvers.

Red breasted merganser, Captain Henry Grant, Barnegat, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  Hollow carved with extended crest. Measures 15 3/4” long.  Original paint with very minor wear; excellent structurally.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

(8,000 - 12,000)

115


141

142

141

Excellent black duck, Captain Henry Grant, Barnegat, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  Hollow carved. Hillman collection ink stamp on the underside. Measures 16” long.  Excellent and original protected by a thin coat of varnish.

stamped. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James R. Doherty,

116

Bluebill hen, Captain Henry Grant, Barnegat, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  Hollow carved. Measures 15” long.  Excellent and original.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

Provenance: Ex John and Isabell Hillman collection and so

p. 143, exact decoy pictured.

142

(4,000 - 6,000)

(4,000 - 8,000)


143

144

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Rigmate pair of Mergansers, Lou Barkalow, Forked River, New Jersey.  Both are branded in the

144

Extremely rare Merganser Drake, Mark Kears, North Field, New Jersey.  16 1/2” Long with inset rect-

weights LEB. Both have wooden crests and are 15 3/4”

angular weight.  Original paint with minor wear; moder-

long.  Original paint with minor wear; both have small

ate wear on center of back. Small chip missing under-

amount of flaking under tail; both have a few small

side of bill. Thin crack in underside.

(3,500 - 5,500)

dents. Literature: “New Jersey Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein. (3,500 - 5,500)

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Black duck, John Dorsett, Point Pleasant, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  Hollow carved with raised ridge down the tail. Measures 16 1/2” long.  Original paint with moderate flaking and wear; drying cracks in back and breast; old filler added to plug a small hole in the underside.

145

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James R. Doherty, p. 136, exact decoy pictured. (4,000 - 6,000)

146

Bluebill drake, Lloyd Parker, Parkertown, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  Hollow carved with thin neck and typical ice groove carving. Measures 14 3/4” long.  Original paint with minor

146

wear; tight cracks in neck; small reglued chip in tip of tail; very early filler and touch up to a shallow chip in back.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

Literature: ‘Classic New Jersey Decoys,’ James R Doherty, p. 126, exact decoy pictured. (2,000 - 4,000)

147

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Very rare green wing teal hen, Henry Kilpatrick, Barnegat, New Jersey.  Hollow carved with raised neck seat and eye groove detail on head. Original paint with very minor flaking and wear; remnants of paper wrapping stuck to spots on body.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

148

(3,000 - 5,000)

Canada goose, John McAnney, New Gretna, New Jersey.  29” long.  Original paint; minor to moderate wear; minor discoloration on

148

both sides; slight separation at neck seam; small crack in one side. (2,000 - 2,500)

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149

Three-piece root head heron from New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  Removable head and bill for transport and storage. Appears to be by the same maker as the three-piece heron pictured on page 55 of ‘American Bird Decoys’ by William J. Mackey Jr. Measures 34” long.  Paint worn mostly to bare wood that has darkened with age; tight drying cracks, dents, and shot marks with some filled shot holes in body; a small nail was added to the face to hold dowelled bill from falling out.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. (6,000 - 9,000)

119


Stevens Brothers Weedsport, New York

Considered by seasoned Stevens decoy collectors to be the rarest example made by George Stevens. This vintage etching was likely the kind of graphic that was used to create this special order American Merganser hen circa 1880.

120


150

Extremely rare merganser hen, George Stevens, Weedsport, New York. Last quarter 19th century.  One of only two mergansers known and the only one retaining all its original paint. Most early mergansers and old squaws made by the major mail order makers and factories were shipped to and used in New England. This early, likely special order decoy, was found on Cape Cod like many of those made by J.N. Dodge and the Mason Decoy Factory. Measures 17 1/2” long.  Original paint with minor crazing and gunning wear; some old nails added to secure a tight crack in the underside; when the decoy was found it was missing its eyes and they were replaced by Ken Delong; a green felt was removed from the underside.

Provenance: Found in a house on Cape Cod. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

(15,000 - 25,000)

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151

Widgeon drake, George Stevens, Weedsport, New York, last quarter 19th century.  14” long. Signed “GA Stevens maker Weedsport, New York.” Good feather paint detail.  Strong original paint; protected by a coat of varnish; small areas of flaking have been darkened on back; approximately 1” around entire neck base has professional paint restoration.

Provenance: Formerly in the Joe French collection.

Literature: “Stevens Decoys,” Shane Newell. (8,000 - 12,000)

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152

Rare immature goldeneye, Stevens Brothers, Weedsport, New York, last quarter 19th century.  In emerging plumage. One of four or five known to exist. Maker’s ink stamp on underside. Measures 14 1/4” long.  Original paint with minor flaking and wear; small chip in tip of bill and underside tip of tail; hairline cracks in underside.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

(12,000 - 18,000)

123


153

154

153

Black duck, Harvey Stevens, Weedsport, New York, last quarter 19th century.  17” long.  Original paint with

154

Canada goose, Long Island, New York, unknown maker.  Square nails in neck.  With root head, tack eyes,

minor wear, mostly on the underside; short hairline crack in

and very worn paint that appears to be original; slightly

back and in underside.

raised neck seat; wood imperfection has popped from

(4,000 - 6,000)

front of face; small gouge in back; paint has worn away for an appealing look that exposed wood grain. (1,000 - 1,400)

124


155

Rare brant, Chauncey Wheeler, Alexandria Bay, New York.   Alert head pose and incised feather carving along back. Branded ‘W.F.B.’ in the underside for William Francis Beal from Long Island, who ordered the rig from Wheeler in 1919. Exhibits the torn heart pattern. Measures 18” long.  Original paint with very minor wear; chip out of underside near line tie staple; paint has flaked from cork plug in underside.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

Literature: “Chance,” Harold W. Reiser.

(12,000 - 18,000)

125


Sporting Art Oil on board of canvasbacks, Dr. Edgar Burke (1889-1950).  Signed lower left.

156

Professionally framed under glass. Image measures 15 3/4” by 11 1/2”.  Excellent and original. Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. Literature: “Duck Shooting Along the Atlantic Tidewater,” Eugene Connett, editor, p.125, exact painting pictured.

(2,000 - 3,000)

Original watercolor and gouache, Art Lamay (b.1938).  Wonderful image of five

157

Canada geese swimming together. Image size 21” x 51”. Professionally matted and framed.  Excellent and original. (1,000 - 2,000)

157

126

156


158

Oil on canvas, Jim Foote, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1980.   A scene from when Jim

158

was living in Florida. Avocets on the beach feeding with well executed reflections on the water. Signed lower right. Image measures 19” x 29”.   (2,500 - 3,500)

158a

“Low Tide at Dawn,” an oil on canvas of Canada geese, pintails, and shorebirds, Sir Peter Scott (1909-1989). Signed and dated 1980. Image size 20” x 30”. Professionally framed. Very good and original.

(2,000 - 3,000)

158a

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158b

158b

“Bull Trout,” an oil on canvas, William Geddes (1841-1884), Edinburg, United Kingdom. Geddes exhibited at the Royal Scottish Academy annual exhibition from 1865 1884. Signed lower left. Image depicting two Atlantic salmon laying on rocky beach. Back of canvas is dated February 1898. 19.50” x 36.50”. Very small thin inpainting at top where canvas meets stretcher, otherwise appears to be original and good; some crazing in lower fish’s belly area; original stretcher; canvas has not been relined.

(2,000 - 3,000)

159 159

Oil on canvas, Jim Foote, Detroit, Michigan, 2nd half 20th century.  Signed and dated lower left. Image of sneak boat approaching decoys and ducks on water. Probably a scene from southern Michigan. Two hunters in sneak boat. Image size 24” x 35”. Professionally matted and framed.   Excellent and original.

128

(2,000 - 3,000)


160 160

“In Your Face: Grizzly,” oil on canvas, John Seerey Lester (b.1946).   Of a brown bear in the snow. Signed. Image size 24” x 38”.  Several thin cracks in paint, otherwise very good and original. (3,000 - 4,000)

161

161a

161

Oil on canvas, Frank Stick (1884-1966).  A rare painting of a leaping brook trout. Frank’s

Oil on board of grouse, Harry Antis (b.1942). Signed and dated 1981.

typical thick pallet can be seen in the white

Professionally framed. Image size 24” x

areas of ruffled water. 17.5” x 11.5”.  Very small

30”. Very good and original.(1,400 - 1,800)

161a

repair to canvas approximately 1” in upper right hand side.

(1,500 - 2,500)

129


Edmund Osthaus 1858 - 1928 | Toldeo, Ohio

130


162

Large oil on canvas, Edmund Osthaus, Toledo, Ohio, 1st quarter 20th century (1858-1928).  TItled, “Rough Play.” Family of setters with four pups playing in front of mother. Grassy and treed background. Outhaus signature in the lower left. Image measures 34” x 30”.  No visible inpainting under UV light; repair at back of canvas; professional restoration to back of canvas, approximately 4”.

(30,000 - 40,000)

131


Decoratives by the Ward Brothers Crisfield, Maryland

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Steve and Lem Ward 163

One of a very few pair of decorative wood ducks, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Both made for Norris Pratt collection. Both are signed and dated on underside. Made between 1960 and 1961. Heads are turned. Both have wing separation and side pocket carving. Drake’s tail is carved. 14.5” long. Drake body is hollow, writing on underside of hen indicates it is hollow.  Both are in outstanding original paint; small areas of crazing.

(15,000 - 20,000)

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164

Rare decorative Hutchins goose, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  18.5” long. Signed “Made for Edward Fitzgerald collection Lem Ward 1967.” Detailed feather carvings and slightly turned head.  Excellent and original.

Provenance: Herrington collection.

134

(6,000 - 9,000)


165

Exceptional preening black duck with lifted wings, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated 1963. Also marked “Hollow Cedar.” 13” long. Fine feather paint detail. Carved lifted wings and fluted tail.  Excellent and original.

Provenance: Herrington collection.

(6,500 - 9,500)

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166

Hollow carved black duck with lifted wings, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated 1957. 15” long. Slightly turned head. Raised and split wingtips.  Excellent and original.

Provenance: Herrington collection. (6,500 - 9,500)

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167

Pair of decorative redheads, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Hollow carved with slightly turned heads, relief wing carving with carved tips and fluted tails. 15” long. Signed “For Mort Kramer collection Lem Ward 1966.”  Hen has several specs of off white paint on back; drake has very slight crazing at one edge of tail. (6,000 - 9,000)

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168

Large decorative canvasback hen, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  17.25” long. Relief wing carving, carved wingtips and fluted tail. Slightly turned head. Signed, “My best canvasback in 1973 Lem Ward,” with a poem written on underside.  Excellent and original. (3,500 - 4,500)

169

Large Canada goose, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  In content pose with raised carved wingtips and fluted tail. 24.5” long. Signed “Made for Leonard and Marilynn Pailisono collection. Lem Ward,” with a poem on the bottom.  Original paint with good detail; significant paint shrinkage on back and side; structurally good.

Provenance: Herrington collection.

138

(2,500 - 3,500)


170

170

Bufflehead drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated “Lem Ward 1964” on underside. Tucked head with carved side pockets and crossed wings. Hollow with bottom board. Fine feather painting on back. 10” long.  Original and good. (6,000 - 9,000)

139


171

Pair of shooting stool model lesser scaup, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Both have slightly turned heads and relief wingtip carving. Signed Phil Williamson collection, Ward brothers 1970.  Hen has a samll amount of flaking on head, otherwise very good and original. (3,000 - 4,000)

171

172

Pair of shooting stool model goldeneye, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated 1965. drake is 15.25” long. Both have slightly turned heads.  Hen has near mint original paint; drake has paint shrinkage on breast; both are structurally good. (2,500 - 3,500)

172

140


173

Pair of shooting stool mergansers, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated 1967 with the inscription “Made for our friends Pete, Jane Williams collection.” Both have slightly turned heads. Hen is 15.5” long. Both have feather paint detail.  Hen is near mint; drake has small amount of paint shrinkage on back and breast, as well as thin crack at tip of crest.

(5,000 - 8,000)

173

174

Pair of 1948 model canvasbacks, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Both have balsa bodies, inserted cedar tails, and slightly turned cedar heads. Both are signed and dated 1954.  Original paint with very slight wear; slight separation at drake’s neck seat; with a tiny chip missing from the filler in the back side; small amount of touchup in that area.

(5,000 - 8,000)

174

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175

Widgeon drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Balsa body dated 1956 on underside. Slightly turned head with upswept inserted hardwood tail. Wonderful paint blending. Made as a gunning decoy. 14.5” long.  Strong original paint; very small rough area at end of tail; a few small dents in side of body. (5,000 - 7,000)

176

Rare pintail drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Balsa. Turned and preening head. Painted eyes and inserted wood tail. Preeners are rare by the Wards. Pad weight has been removed. 15.5” long.  Original paint; a few dents; small scratches.

142

(4,000 - 6,000)


177

So called “knot head” canvasback, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.   17” long. Large ice dip behind head.  Old repaint on head, breast, and tail; paint has been restored on white and grey areas; small cracks.

(3,000 - 5,000)

178

Pinch breasted style pintail drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland, circa 1930.  Long neck with slightly turned head.  Old in use repaint; paint on head appears to be original; slight roughness to bill. (3,000 - 4,000)

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Bishops Head Gun Club In 1933 the Ward Brothers received a decoy order from The Bishop’s Head Club in Dorchester County Maryland. This was not an unusual occurrence for them, but for some reason, whether at the request of the clubs owner or perhaps creative inspiration, they decided to make several of the species in this order distinctive from others carved in the period. The pronounced apron under the tail, the notch behind the head and the squared off tale are all identifying characteristics that separate this clubs special order from other Ward decoys made in the 1920’s and 1930’s.

Dorchester County, MD

144

Early image of clubhouse and caretakers/ guides house. Sullivan, John C. 2018. “Bishops Head Fish and Gun Club”.


179

Canada goose, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Bishops Head Gun Club model with typical hump under tail. Slightly forward head pose with deep ice groove carving behind neck seat. Maryland Historical Society Exhibit, September 27, 1991 - February, 1992. Measures 26” long.  Original paint with moderate gunning wear; tight drying cracks in neck and back; appears to have early in use strengthening to paint on head, breast, and under tail.

Provenance: Ex Vance Strausburg collection. Ex David Fannon collection. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. Maryland Historical Society exhibit, September 27,1991.

(25,000 - 35,000)

145


146


180

Black duck, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Rare Bishops Head Gun Club model. Signed and dated 1932 at a later date on the underside. Measures 18” long.  Strong original paint with very minor wear; separation at neck seat and a hairline crack in underside, otherwise excellent and original condition.

Provenance: Rig of Bishop’s Head Gun Club member Colonel Albinas Phillips. Ex Gerry Horney collection. Ex Henry Fleckenstein collection. Ex Bobbie Richardson collection. Ex Larry Lambert collection. Purchased from Larry Lambert in 1995. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

(20,000 - 30,000)

147


New Jersey

183

Bluebill drake, Harry M. Shourds, Ocean City, New Jersey. 13.5” long. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; structurally very good. (1,750 - 2,250)

183

184

Black duck, Jess Birdsall, Point Pleasant, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  16.5” long.  Thick original paint with minor wear; very slight roughness to edge of tail.

Provenance: Formerly in collection of John Hillman, Seagirt, New Jersey. Hillman collection stamp on underside. (1,750 - 2,250)

184

185

Hen and drake bluebill, Ezra Henkins, Lovelandtown, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  Hollow carved with turned head and carved eyes. Drake with cocked and up looking head pose. “K” carved into the underside of each. Both also stamped “E Hankins” into the lead weights. Measure 13 1/2” and 13 3/4” long.  Both in a mix of original and old in use repaint with moderate flaking and wear and a hairline drying crack in hen’s neck; drake has a hairline drying crack in back and tail.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collec185

tion. Doherty collection sticker on underside. Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James R. Doherty, p. 135, exact decoys pic-

148

tured.

(1,500 - 2,500)


186

Black duck, Bradford Salmons, Staffordville, New Jersey, circa 1900.  Hollow carved with raise neck seat. Measures 17” long.  Original paint with moderate flaking and wear; some scattered in use repaint; cracks in one eye; crack through neck with old nails securing.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James R. Doherty, p. 152, exact decoy pictured.

(1,500 - 2,500)

186

187

Rigmate pair of bluebills, Eugene Birdsall, Lovelandtown, New Jersey, circa 1900.  Hollow carved with raised neck seats and slight paddle tails. Measure 13” long.  Original paint with minor gunning wear; white on sides and underside of drake is a very early second coat; lightly hit by shot.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

(1,000 - 1,500)

187

188

Black duck, Taylor Johnson, Point Pleasant, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  Hollow carved with raised neck seat. Measures 17” long.  Original paint with minor wear; fine hairline drying cracks in body and a few shot marks, otherwise very good structurally.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James R. Doherty, p. 138, exact decoy pictured.

(1,500 - 2,500) 188

149


John Blair, Sr. 1842 - 1928 | Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

189

Very rare blue wing teal, John Blair Sr., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, last quarter 19th century.  Blair’s classic form. Hollow carved with raised neck seat and tack eyes. This is one of the decoys obtained by Frank Lewis from Cass Baines the caretaker of the Biddle family estate. He later traded this decoy along with other Blair decoys to Somers Headley. Measures 13” long.  Original paint with minor flaking and wear; a few minor dents in back; small chip in the underside tip of bill; part of the underside was whittled down at some point, likely to remove a brand, and then painted over.

Provenance: Biddle family rig. Ex Frank Lewis collection. Ex Somers Headley collection. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. Exhibited at the Noyes Museum in Oceanville, New Jersey 1991.

Literature: “Floating Sculpture,” Harrison Huster and Doug Knight, p. 38, exact decoy pictured. “Decoy Collectors Guide, 1977,” Volume 6, p. 75, exact decoy pictured. “Decoy Magazine,” Sept/ Oct 1994 issue, p. 13, exact decoy pictured. (20,000 - 40,000)

150


Mystery surrounding the exact identification of the Blair decoys continues to this day. Blair was a popular name in the Philadelphia area in the last half of the 19th century, and whether the maker and painter of these wonderful decoys was John Blair, Sr. or not, the historical evidence we have, dating back to early interviews with Joel Barber, has credited him with their making. Said to have been made around 1860 very few of these magnificent classic style bluewing teal hens exist. The classic style is characterized by the oval shaped, two piece bodies joined by dowels, raised neck shelf, and upholstery tack eyes. John Blair, Sr.

151


190

Rigmate pair of bufflehead, John English, Florence, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  Solid body style with tack eyes. Measure 12” long.  Early in use repaint that has darkened with age; small dents and shot marks; small wooden patch in hen’s left side.

Provenance: Ex John and Isabelle Hillman collection. Ex Peter Bartlett collection. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. Literature: Exact decoys pictured on page 30 of “Decoys of the Mid-Atlantic” and page 259 of “New Jersey Decoys” by Henry A. Fleckenstien Jr. Also page 63 of “Floating Sculpture” by H. Harrison Huster & Doug Knight and page 150 of “Working Decoys of the New Jersey Coast and Delaware River Valley” by Kenneth L. Gosner. (6,000 - 9,000)

152


John English 1848 - 1915 | Bordentown, New Jersey “That John English was the most influential decoy maker on the Delaware River is without a doubt. (English) produced a body of work that, in his day, had no compare. Frugal, gifted and hardworking, John English likely considered himself little more than a man of the river. In that way, he was a Delaware River classic”. Allen Linkchorst

191

Rare redhead drake, John English, Bordentown, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  Hollow carved with incised tail feather carving and tack eyes. Measures 14” long.  Original paint that has darkened with age; minor wear; very good structurally.

Provenance: Ex collection B. Blum (First sold at Bourne Oct. 1974 lot 161). Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

(7,000 - 10,000)

153


154


192

Very rare green wing teal, John Blair, Sr. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, last quarter 19th century.   Believed to be the only green wing teal hen in original paint. Hollow carved with raised neck seat and glass eyes. Found in Bristol, Pennsylvania by Pat Sabatini. Measures 13 1/4” long.  Original paint that has darkened with age showing very minor wear; paint rubs on back and sides from when the paint was still wet and the decoy was stacked on the others being made; hairline crack in breast.

Provenance: Purchased from Pat Sabatini in 1997. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. Exhibited at the Ward Museum in Salisbury, Maryland 1995. (10,000 - 20,000)

155


193

Early round body style mallard drake, Jess Heisler, Burlington, New Jersey.  16.5” long.  Original paint with very minor discoloration and wear; very slight wear to wood on one side of tail.

Literature: “Floating Sculpture,” Harrison Huster and Doug Knight.

(1,750 - 2,250)

193

194

Impressive full size Canada goose, John McLoughlin, Bordentown, New Jersey.  Standing on carved wooden base. Individual carved wing feathers with carved crossed wingtips and tail. Head is slightly turned and in alert pose. Stands 26” tall.  Excellent and original. (1,500 - 2,500)

194

195

Pintail drake, John McCloughlin, Bordentown, New Jersey, circa 1950.   “DANE” carved in underside. Slightly turned head with excellent strong comb painting on back. Extended sprig tail. Keel has been removed. 19.5” long.  Very good and original.

(1,000 - 1,500)

195

196

Black duck, William Welker, Edgily, Pennsylvania.  16 1/4” long with glass eyes. Raised “V” wing tip carving and fluted tail.  Original paint with very minor wear; small crack through neck; very minor wear on tip of tail.

196

156

(1,250 - 1,750)


Joe was born in Fallsington, PA to J Milner and Mabel King but the family soon moved to Bristol. In 1925, he married his wife Emma and the couple set up housekeeping in Edgely. By at least 1930, he listed his occupation as “electrician” and, by 1940 he described himself as a “bill collector”. At that time he was working for the Pennsylvania Electric Co and was responsible for tracking down customers who were delinquent in paying their bills. He held that position until he retired in 1971 and left for Idaho where he continued to hunt and fish with his son, Joe Jr. Always a lover of horses, while in the west, he participated in a number of old west ‘roundups’. He is buried in the Bristol Cemetery in Bristol, PA.

197

Always an avid outdoorsman, he was a long time upland and large game hunter but did not begin waterfowling until 1939 when he designed and carved his first rig of decoys. By 1941 he had built his own boat and had teamed up with noted carver Bill Quinn. The pair would carve together and ply the waters of the Delaware until Joe left to serve in WWII. His decoys closely follow the traditional style as developed on his section of the river and are obviously influenced by the work of John English. He apparently only carved for his own use and his output was extremely limited. Author Allen Linkchorst estimates his total production at only 57 decoys, a few of which were made purely as decoratives. All of his work was of the very highest quality, and has been described as “crisp and animated” with paint that is “subtle yet exacting” Others have defined his efforts as “streamlined” yet “delicate and sculptured”. He must be considered one of the finest of the Delaware River carvers.

Desirable tucked head black duck, Joe King, Edgely, Pennsylvania, 2nd quarter 20th century. Head in a resting pose with bill touching a full crop breast. Carved in the Delaware River style with raised ‘v’ wing tips and incised wing feathers. “K” pained on under for Joe King. 15” long. Near mint original paint; structurally excellent.

(6,000 - 12,000)

157


Contemporary Carvings

198

201

199

202

200

203

198

199

Pair of blue wing teal, George Strunk, Glendora, New Jersey.  Hollow carved with slightly turned heads

201

Black bellied plover, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.   Eastern shore style. A plump bird. Signed

and raised “V” wing tip carving. Relief carved tail feath-

“McNair” on underside. Bill is spined through back of head.

ers. “GS” stamped into lead weights.  Excellent and origi-

12” long.  Numerous shot scars. Strong original paint that

nal.

has been stressed for appearance of age.

(800 - 1,200)

Excellent pair of green wing teal, George Strunk, Glendora, New Jersey.  Drake in preening pose and

202

(800 - 1,000)

Feeding black bellied plover, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Signed “McNair” on underside.

hen in sleeping pose with turned and tucked head.

Bill is splined through back of head. Carved eyes, shoul-

Raised “V” wing tips and relief tail feather carving. Signed

ders, and wingtips. Surface is stressed for the appearance

and dated 1998 and “Strunk” stamped into underside.

of age, including a few pellets. 10” long.  Mint.

Measure 9 3/4” and 10” long.  Excellent and original.

(800 - 1,000)

(800 - 1,200) 203 200

Hudsonian curlew, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Split tail with carved shoulders and carved

carved shoulders, and split tail. Carved “McNair” in

eyes. Signed “McNair” on underside head is reared back

underside. 14.5” long.  Strong original piant that has been

and slightly turned. 13” long. Bill is splined through back

stressed for the appearance of age.

of head.  Strong original paint that has been stressed for appearance of age.

158

Feeding dowitcher, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  In the style of the Phillips rig. Carved eye,

(800 - 1,000)

(800 - 1,000)


204

Pair of canvasbacks, Marty Hanson, Hayward, Wisconsin.  16” long. Both are branded “MH.” and signed “dot John Clemens 1992 Wayzata du banquiet, Marty Hanson.” Both are remarked. Relief wingtip carving.  Very good and original.

(1,500 - 2,000)

204

205

Excellent pair of plover, Marty Hanson, Hayward, Wisconsin.  Carved in the “Dust Jacket” style of Elmer Crowell like those pictured on the dust jacket of William Mackey Jr’s “American Bird Decoys”. Relief carved wings and raised wing tips. “MH” carved in the underside of tails. Measure 9 1/2” and 10” long.  Excellent and original. (1,500 - 2,500) 205

206

Pair of canvasbacks, Marty Hanson, Hayward, Wisconsin.  Thinly carved gunning style decoys with pinch breasts, slightly turned heads, and detailed bill carving. Scratch feather paint detail with excellent feather blending on hen. “MH” carved into the undersides. Both are also signed. Measure 15 1/2” long.  Excellent and original. (2,000 - 3,000) 206

207

Blue heron, Cameron McIntyre, New Church, Virginia.  Two piece construction with doweled head and neck. Carved in the Obediah Verity style. Small crest at top of head. Detailed bill carving, shoulder, and wingtips. Signed CTM on underside. 26” tall.  Excellent original surface has been stressed and rubs for the appearance of age. (1,500 - 2,500) 207

159


Louisiana

208

211

209

212

210

213

208

Pintail drake, Louisiana, 1st quarter 20th century.  Relief wing carving. Slightly turned head.  Appealing

211

Mallard hen, Mitchell LaFrance, New Orleans, Louisiana.  16” long. Relief wing carving.  Original paint

old in use paint with some original showing; hollowed out

with minor wear on most of the decoy; wear to filled area

from underside with tin plate added.

where there was a defect in the wood on underside; pro-

(1,000 - 1,400)

fessional bill repair. 209

Swimming bluewing teal hen, Ezave Ragus, Bechel, Louisiana.  12.5” long. Relief wing carving and glass

(800 - 1,200)

eyes.  Original paint; minor wear; slight roughness to tip

Mallard drake, Vic Carriere, New Orleans, Louisiana.  Deep relief wing carving with crossed wing

of tail; small area of touchup on one side of breast; shot

tips and slightly turned head. Measures 16 3/4” long.  Early

mark and dent in one side.

paint with moderate flaking and wear with some stregn-

212

(950 - 1,250)

thening to areas; second coat of grey on the underside; 210

Pintail drake, Mitchell LaFrance, New Orleans, Louisiana.  17” long.  Original paint with moderate flak-

head is a professional replacement with paint restoration on breast.

(500 - 800)

ing and wear; structurally good. Literature: “Louisiana Lures and Legends,” Brian Cheramie.

(900 - 1,200)

213

Pintail drake, Sidney Duplesis, Davant, Louisiana.  17” long. Relief wing carving. With good feather paint detail.  Original paint; minor discoloration and wear; small dents; cracks through neck; chip missing form one side of neck.

Provenance: From the hunting rig of Henry Patrick Burke,

160

New Orleans, Louisiana.

(800 - 1,200)


214

Ringbill drake, Mark Whipple, Bourg, Louisiana.  11.5” long.  Old in use repaint; structurally good.

Provenance: From the hunting rig of Warren Seevt, New Orleans, Louisiana who purchased the rig from Whipple in 1922. Decoy is marked accordingly. Formerly in collection of Charles Frank. (1,200 - 1,500)

214

215

Mallard drake, Mike Frady, New Orleans, Louisiana.  His older gunning decoys. Both have relief wing carving. 16” long.  Paint appears to be a second coat by Frady; a few small dents. (1,000 - 1,500)

215

216

Mallard drake, Sidney Duplesis, Davant, Louisiana.  15” long. Relief wing carving.  Original paint; minor wear; small chip missing from tip of tail; minor roughness to bill; two small dents in one side of head.

Provenance: From the hunting rig of Henry Patrick Burke, New Orleans, Louisiana.

(1,000 - 1,400) 216

217

Swimming mallard hen, Mike Frady, New Orleans, Louisiana.  Slightly turned head. Relief wing carving. 15.5” long.   Paint appears to be a second coat by Frady; neck seam is a little loose with filler missing; a few small dents. (1,000 - 1,500)

217

161


Midwest Nate Quillin 1839 - 1908 | Rockwood, Michigan

Fayette Brown was born in 1823 and died in 1910. He bought his share in Pte. Mouille in 1893 and paid $2,100 for it. He lived most of his early life in Cleveland until accepting a job as General Manager of the Jackson Iron Company. He was a founding member at Winous Point Shooting Club in 1856, and also enjoyed memberships at West Huron Shooting Club, Munsing Trout Club, and the Castalia Trout Club.

218

162


Quillin was Michigan’s earliest and finest commercial decoy craftsman. According to Jim Marsh, a Quillin authority, his most productive years were between 1880 and 1900. The majority of his decoys and boats were sold to members of the Pointe Mouillee Shooting Club where he worked as a guide

218

Rare pintail drake, Nate Quillin, Detroit, Michigan, last quarter 19th century.  Hollow carved with 1/4” bottom board branded ‘FB’ in the underside. Inlet neck seat and relief shoulder carving. Measures 16” long.  Original paint with moderate wear; lightly hit by shot; minor roughness and chip in on side of tail.

Provenance: Ex Alan and Elaine Haid collection. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. Literature: “Pte. Mouillee Shooting Club,” Jim and Barbara Marsh.

(15,000 - 25,000)

Nate Quillen. Credit - Pt. Mouillee Shooting Club. Jim and Barbara Marsh.

163


John Schweikart 1870 - 1954 | Strawberry Island, Michigan John Schweikart is credited with being among the earliest of carvers in the St. Clair Flats. By the 1880s, Detroit was a busy city. Throughout this era, the Schweikart family business, which included an ice company, a commercial fishing venture, and a tavern, all flourished. After a period of prosperity, Walter, Sr. began to search for a remote retreat where he and his sons could escape the city for some fine hunting and quiet. He claimed a tiny island in the Flats and named it Strawberry. Thirteen years after his father’s death in 1904, John took ownership of this hunters’ paradise for himself. As a young man, John Schweikart worked his way up in all of the family businesses. He is listed in the 1904 Detroit city directory as president of the Schweikart Boat Works. Working with his brother Carl, a master boat builder, John had learned how to work with his hands and continued the family tradition of respect for craftsmanship and pride of workmanship, a skill set he carried over to the decoys he produced. Author and collector Bernard Crandell, had this to say about his work. “Schweikart cans, with their bull-size necks and authoritative stare, have the commanding presence of a top sergeant about to dress down a platoon of rookies at boot camp. They are oversize and not only highly visible from above but, with their strong wide bodies, appear charge of their domain.”

164


219

Rigmate pair of canvasbacks, John Schweikart, Strawberry Island, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century. Hollow carved heads and bodies with applied aluminum wing tips. Swing down copper keels of Schweikart’s own design. Both have the collection stamp of Donal C. O’Brien on the underside. Measure 17” long. Original paint with minor flaking and gunning wear; lightly hit by shot; some touch up to flaking on lower part of hen’s breast, around tail, and tip of middle applied wing tip.

Provenance: Ex Michael and Julie Hall collection. Ex Donal C. O’Brien collection. Dr. John Dinan collection.

Literature: Exact pair pictured on page 109 of ‘The Bird Decoy: An American Art Form’ by Paul A. Johnsgard.

(15,000 - 25,000)

165


220

Goldeneye hen, John Schweikart, Strawberry Island, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century.  Hollow carved with thin bottom board. Believed to be one of 6 in original paint. Measures 17” long.  Original paint with minor gunning wear; a few small spots on one side of head flourece under UV light but do not appear to be touch up; a few small dents in one lower side, otherwise very good structurally.

Provenance: Ex Clune Walsh collection. Ex Ron Swanson collection. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

Literature: ‘Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway’ Alan Haid, p. 69, exact decoy pictured. (5,000 - 10,000)

166


221

Hollow carved canvasback drake, Augustus Moak, Tustin, Wisconsin.  16.75” long. Underside is beveled slightly.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; thin crack through neck with a bit of touch up.

(4,000 - 6,000)

167


Delbert “Cigar” Daisey 1928 - 2017 | Chincoteague, Virginia

222

Rare pair of ringnecks, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Both have raised wingtip carving. 11.5” long. Branded and signed, “Made in 1990 for Doily Fulcher.”  Very good and original. (3,000 - 4,000)

222

223

Rare pair of magnum pintails, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Branded and signed, “Made in 1991 for Doily Fulcher.” 20.75” long.  Excellent and original. (3,000 - 4,000)

224

Running sickle billed curlew, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.   22” long. Branded and signed “For Doily Fulcher.” Relief wing carving.  Small dent in underside of neck otherwise excellent and original.

223

224

168

(1,500 - 2,000)


Born in 1928 on Chincoteague Island, Virginia, Cigar, along with his two brothers, followed the footsteps of his father, Herbert, a decoy carver, market gunner and waterman who made a living off the land. After graduating high school in 1945, Cigar was making more money than most of the elders on the island doing what he truly loved, trapping, which included fur bearing animals and ducks. Times were different then and game laws were not as strictly enforced as they would eventually become. In truth, these were exciting times for Cigar and one could probably write an entire novel about his brushes with the game enforcement officers. Cigar eventually turned his efforts to carving and other more mainstream occupations, which included finding and selling decoys for Bill Mackey in the mid1950s. Learning that there was increasing interest for both old and contemporary decoys, Cigar was quick to capitalize on both. Over the next several decades, Cigar fine-tuned his reputation as a decoy carver, where he both judged and competed in carving competitions up and down the East Coast. One highlight was winning three first place awards, one of which was best of show, in a single World Championship contest sponsored by the Ward Foundation.

225

227

226

228

225

226

Dunlin in resting pose, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Branded. Signed under clam shell base,

227

Feeding golden plover, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Branded and signed. On origi-

“Made for Doily Fulcher.” 7.75” long with relief wing carv-

nal base, “Made for Doily Fulcher in 2003.” Slightly open

ing.  Excellent and original.

bill. 9.5” long.  Excellent and original.

(1,000 - 1,400)

Breast preening yellowlegs, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Branded and signed, “1994 for Doily Fulcher.” 8.75” long.  Excellent and original. (1,000 - 1,400)

228

(900 - 1,200)

Sleeping black bellied plover in summer plumage, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Branded and signed, “Made in 2005 for Doily Fulcher.” 7.75” long. On original base.  Very good and original.

(900 - 1,200)

169


229

Rare pair of magnum mallards, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Signed and branded. Hen is just over 18” long.  Very good and original.

(3,000 - 4,000)

229

230

232

231

233

230

Cork body brant, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  16” long with wooden bottom board and keel.

232

Wooden head and neck. Branded Cigar.  Original paint

Pair of mergansers, Pete Peterson, Cape Charles, Virginia.  Signed and dated 1999. Also branded “Pete.” Relief wingtip carving.  Very good and original.

with very minor wear, mostly on bill and under tail; small cracks in cork.

(800 - 1,200)

(500 - 800) 233

231

Pair of buffleheads, Pete Peterson, Cape Charles, Virginia.  Signed and dated 1999. Both are branded

Relief wingtip carving. Both are branded “Pete.”  Original

“Pete.” Drake has slightly turned head. Both have relief

paint with minor wear; small crack partway through hen’s

wingtip carving.  Very small paint; rub on one side of hen

heck.

otherwise very good and original.

170

Pari of Labrador ducks, Pete Peterson, Cape Charles, Virginia.  One of only two made. 14” long.

(650 - 950)

(800 - 1,200)


Miniatures

234

235

234

236

A set of miniatures in the style of H.V. Shourds, Bob Seabrook, Absecon, New Jersey. Pairs of: oldsquaw,

235

Miniature standing great grey heron, Steve Weaver, Cape Cod, Massachusetts.  7.25” tall. Slightly turned

broadbill, redhead, hooded merganser, red breasted

head. Signed “SAW” on side of base, signed and dated

merganser, bufflehead, goldeneye. Singles of: brant,

2020 on underside of base.  Excellent and original.

black duck, herring gull, mallard drake, hissing goose, and

(900 - 1,200)

swimming goose. All are hollow with Shourds style weights. Swimming goose measures 13” long. Excellent and original. (3,000 4,000)

236

Miniature preening greater yellowlegs, Steve Weaver, Cape Cod, Massachusetts.  Signed “SAW” on side, signed on underside. 4.25” tall.  Very good and original.

(900 - 1,200)

171


241 238

242 239

243 240

238

Miniature black duck, George Boyd, Seabrook, New Hampshire.  4.8” long.  Very good and original. (900 - 1,200)

239

Five miniature widgeon, Lloyd Tyler, Crisfield, Maryland.  The largest is 5.5” long.   One has a couple of small holes in underside.

240

on top of pintail’s head, otherwise excellent and original. Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. 242

(800 - 1,200)

Miniature shorebirds on driftwood base, Russ Burr, Hingham, Massachusetts.  Burr ink stamp on underside

wear, mostly on curlew’s bill; structurally good. (650 - 950) 241

the carving was varnished; very good and original.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

243

(400 - 600)

Miniature wood cock, James Ahern, Stamford, Connecticut.  Head and tail are turned to one

Miniature pintail and mallard drakes, Tom Fitzpatrick, Delanco, New Jersey.  Raised ‘V’ wing

side. ‘GBS’ in pencil on the underside. Measures 3”

tips and relief feather carving on mallard’s tail. Folky

good and original.

polka dot feather paint detail. Measure 5 1/2” and 5 3/4” long.  Very minor paint flakes and a tiny spot of touch up

172

Miniature hooded merganser, Tom Schroeder, Detroit, Michigan.  Slightly turned head and relief tail feather carving. Measures 5” long.  Bill was painted after

of base. Both are carved in the style of Burr’s working decoys. Curlew is 4.5” long.  Original paint with very slight

(400 - 600)

long.  Original paint that has darkened with age; very

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

(200 - 300)


Audubons 244 244

John James Audubon. Engraving and color by R. Havel 1834. Drawn from nature by John James Audubon. Great grey breasted rail or marsh hen. Male spring plumage, young autumnal plumage. Number 41 Plate CC111 Professionally framed with conservation glass and matting. Image size 12” x 18.75”, full print 25.25” x 38”. J Whatman 1858 watermark. Retains bold colors, a few small foxing spots in the exposed area.

245

John James Audubon.

(2,000 - 4,000)

245

Engraving by R. Havell, 1836. Image of yellow breasted rail. Male adult in spring plumage. Plate CCCXXIX, number 66. Image size 12” x19”, full plate is 21.75” x 34.5”. J Whatman 1836 watermark. Retains strong colors; a few spots of foxing. (2,000 - 4,000)

246

246

John James Audubon (1785-1851), Plate 231 - Long-Billed Curlew.   Oppenheimer Field Museum Edition Print Audubon’s Fifty Best. Double Elephant Folio Facsimile after John James Audubon’s Birds of America Limited Edition of 150, circa 1999. Professionally matted and framed. Print 111/150. Considered one of Audubon’s top 50 birds in America. Popular especially because of the view of Charleston, SC in the background. Visible watermark from Oppenheimer gallery lower right and Field museum lower left. 25.25” x 38.25”.  

Provenance: Meyer collection. Purchased directly Joel Oppenheimer gallery, Chicago, Illinois.

(1,500 - 2,500)

173


247

Etchings

Etching, Aiden Lassell Ripley.  Titled “Geese.” Signed lower right. Retains full margins. Image measures 8.75” x 12.75”.  Excellent and original.

248

(600 - 900)

Lithograph of man pulling boat through marsh with dog and gun, Frank Benson. Signed and dated 1924. Signed in pencil in margin. Professionally mat-

247

ted and framed. Image size 12” x 15.5”. Very good and original.

Provenance: Paul Tudor Jones II collection. (1,500 - 2,000)

249 249

Etching, Frank Benson.   Titled “The River.” circa 1916. Signed lower left. Image of two mallards in river. Image measures 9.75” x 7.75”.  Very good and origi-

248

nal. 250

(400 - 600)

Etching, Frank Benson.   Titled “Canada Goose,” circa 1917. Image of goose standing in water.

250

Signed lower left. Number 9 in right. 4” x 5”. Retains full margins.  Small areas of fox-

251

ing; retains good color.

Two etchings, Roland Clark.  Titled “Mallards” and

(300 - 400)

“Storm.” Storm circa 1933 signed lower right, retains full margins, image measures

251

251

7.75” x 11.25”. Mallards circa 1921, retains full margins, image measures 6.5” x 8.5”. Signed lower right.  Very good and original; slight color line perhaps from old frame or matting on mallards. (400 - 600) 252

Watercolor and gauche, Dr. Edgar Burke (1889-1950).  Four redheads flying over water. Signed and dated 1922 lower left. Done on paper laid down on heavy card stock. Image measures 6 1/4” by 8 3/8”.  Minor waving to card stock lower left, otherwise very good and original.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on back. (300 - 500)

174

252


255

252a

256

253

254

252a

257

A framed collection of Federal duck stamps. As

Jersey.  Watercolor of a Joseph Lincoln brant. Signed

well as a painting of a mallard signed “Sunderland.” 66

lower right and titled lower left. Sight size 8 1/2” by 12”.

stamps, 1934 - 2000. Stamps seem to be in very good con-

Professionally matted and framed.  Not examined out of

dition; small amount of staining to 1934, 1935, and 1936.

frame; very good and original.

(1,000 - 1,500) 253

Early oil on canvas laid on board of passenger pigeons, late 19th century.  Originally found in Maine.

lection sticker on back.

19 of the July - August, 2016 issue of “Hunting and Fishing Collectibles Magazine”.  Some craquelure in area of sky;

1/4” by 21”.  A few small spots of foxing, otherwise very

scattered inpainting, mostly on right side of image.

good and original.

256

right. Image measures 18” by 13 1/2”. Pictured on page

(500 - 800)

right. Image measures 3 1/2” by 5 1/2”.  Very minor toning, otherwise very good and original.

(300 - 500)

1991 Massachusetts duck stamp contest entry watercolor, Al Barker (b.1941), Bordentown, New

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on back.

Watercolor, Milton Weiler (1910-1974).  Small fly fishing scene inscribed “To Fred and Jerry” and signed lower

255

(200 - 300)

Porzana Maruetta – Spotted Crake, hand colored lithograph after John Gould (English 18041881).  Professionally framed and matted. Sight size 14

Professionally framed in a gilt frame. Signed illegibly lower

254

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty col-

257

(200 - 400)

“Scaling Down,” etching by Frank Benson.   Signed lower left. Numbered 101. Image size 3.75” x 3”. Retains full margins.  Paper has darkened slightly, otherwise very good and original.

(300 - 400)

175


258

Swimming wood duck, Grayson Chesser, Jenkins Bridge, Virginia.   14.25” long. Large “C” carved in underside. Signed and dated 2004. Slightly turned head and raised “V” wingtip carving.  Very good and original.

Literature: “Decoys: Sixty Living and Outstanding North American Carvers,” Loy Harrell, exact decoy pictured.

(350 - 450)

258

259

259

260

Wood duck drake, George Strunk, Glendora, New Jersey.  14” long with slight turned head, raised V wing-

Hollow carved wood duck drake, Shawn Sutton, Paulsboro, New Jersey.  Name stamped in weight. 15”

tips, and fluted tail. Signed, also stamped G.Strunk in

long with slightly turned head, raised carved crossed wing-

weight.  Very good and original.

tips and fluted tail.  Very good and original.

Literature: “Decoys: Sixty Living and Outstanding North American Carvers,” Loy Harrell, exact decoy pictured. (500 - 700)

176

260

Literature: “Decoys: Sixty Living and Outstanding North American Carvers,” Loy Harrell, exact decoy pictured. (500 - 800)


261

264

267

262

265

268

263

266

261

Bluebill drake, John “Daddy” Holly, Havre de Grace, Maryland, 3rd quarter 19th century. 12.75” long.

265

Two bluebills, Ed Parsons, Oxford, Maryland.    One has original paint with minor to moderate shrinkage and

Carrols Island Club brand on underside. Old in use repaint;

wear; the other has most of the paint missing; paint missing

filled cracks in back.

one has crack through bill; both have very small dents.

(1,500 - 2,500)

(800 - 1,200) 262

Pintail hen, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland, circa 1930s.  16.5” long.  Paint has been restored; structurally good.

266

(800 - 1,200)

Pintail drake, Charles Joiner, Chestertown, Maryland.  Date on underside of September 1969. Turned head with ice groove carving. 18” long.  Excellent and

263

Canvasback drake, John “Daddy” Holly, Havre de Grace, Maryland, 3rd quarter 19th century. 13.25” long. Branded “MVW” in underside. Old in use repaint; small dents.

original. 267

(500 - 800)

(700 - 1,000)

Pair of greenwing teal, Paul Gibson, Havre de Grace, Maryland.  13” long. Unused.  Near mint original paint.

264

Pair of canvasbacks, Robert McGaw, Havre de Grace, Maryland.  15.5” long. One retains McGaw dog

p. 57, exact decoys pictured.

bone weight.  Drake has old in use repaint on black and red areas; otherwise both have worn original paint; numerous cracks.

(800 - 1,200)

Literature: “Chesapeake Bay Decoys,” Robert Richardson,

268

(600 - 900)

Canvasback drake, Will Heverin, Charlestown, Maryland, 1st quarter 20th century. 15.25” long. Old in user repaint; crack through neck.

(400 - 600)

End of session one 177


SESSION TWO November 21, 2020 - 11:00

Decoratives

271

Swimming widgeon drake, Pat Godin, Paris, Ontario.  Signed with inscription, “Carved in Canada. Painted in Louisiana for Kurtis Fabre, May 1982.” 18” long. Carved, crossed wingtips and open bill.  Very good and original.

(2,250 - 2,750)

271

272

Hollow carved widgeon drake, Keith Mueller, Killingsworth, Connecticut.  Signed. Carved, crossed wingtips and very slightly turned head.  Several tiny dents on one shoulder, otherwise excellent and original. (1,750 - 2,250)

272

273

Pair of canvasbacks, Jim Foote, Gibraltar, Michigan.  Signed and dated 1977. Also marked “Carved for Lynwood Herrington.” Hollow carved with fine feather carving detail. Drake is 13.5” long. Both have slightly turned heads.  Hen is excellent; several small chips missing from drake’s wingtip.

Provenance: Herrington collection. (2,000 - 3,000)

273

274

Pair of redheads, Robert Kerr.  Signed and dated 1975. Marked “Carved for Lynwood Herrington.” Hollow carved with fine feather carving detail. Hen is 13.5” long.  Excellent and original.

Provenance: Herrington collection. (1,500 - 2,000)

274

178


Pat Godin Paris, Ontario

275

Exceptional pair of wood ducks, Pat Godin.  Signed and dedicated to Dr. Lynwood Herrington. Inscription on underside reads, “Wood duck hen second best marsh duck world championship wildfowl carving competition 1980. Best pair of show international wood carving Toronto 1980. drake is 3rd best marsh duck.” Drake is 13.5” long. Finely detailed feather carving with raised crossed wingtips.  Excellent and original.

Provenance: Herrington collection.

(6,000 - 9,000)

179


276

279

277

280

278

281

276

Pintail drake, Jim Foote, Gibraltar, Michigan.

Signed and dated 1975. Marked “First place Canadian

Ruddy duck drake Mike Frady, New Orleans, Louisiana.  Signed and numbered 1. Relief wing carv-

National 1975.” 19” long. Slightly turned head, carved

ing and slightly turned head. Fluted tail.  Very good and

crossed wingtips, and detailed feather carving.  Very

original.

279

(900 - 1,200)

good and original.

Provenance: Herrington collection.

277

Widgeon drake with turned head, Jett Brunet, Galliano, Louisiana.  Signed, “Originated for Kurt

(1,250 - 1,750)

280

underside. 13.75” long. Slightly turned head and carved primaries and secondaries. Fluted tail.  Several tiny dents on bill, otherwise very good and original.

Fabre, Jett 5/11/83”. 14” long.  Excellent and original. (1,250 - 1,750) 278

Sleeping widgeon drake, Mike Frady, New Orleans, Louisiana.  Signed. 11.5” long with raised carved primaries and secondaries, and fluted tail.  Very good and original.

180

(900 - 1,200)

Hooded merganser drake, Mike Frady, New Orleans, Louisiana.   Signed, and marked number 1 on

281

(900 - 1,200)

Shoveler drake, Mike Frady, New Orleans, Louisiana.  Signed. 14” long. Slightly turned head. Carved primaries and secondaries. Fluted tail.  Very good and original.

(900 - 1,200)


282

282

Wood duck drake, Bill Schultz, Milwaukee Wisconsin.  Signed and dated 1971 on underside. Turned head with carved sweeping crest. Raised and extended wingtips. Underside reads, “Merry Christmas Bill and Eva.” 14” long.   Very small dent in one side of head otherwise excellent.

283

(3,000 - 4,000)

Rigmate pair of greenwing teal, Bob Kerr, Smith Falls, Ontario.  Both are branded and signed by Kerr on underside, and dated September 1973. Both have slightly turned heads. Strong body carving. Combing on drake. Tail feathers are slightly raised and carved. 10” long.   Excellent.

(1,800 - 2,500)

283

284

Well carved gadwall drake, Roger Barton, San Francisco, California.  Signed and dated 1971 with “RWB” inscribed in weight. Well defined carved side pockets, wingtips and tail. Head is in a calling or drinking pose. 13.5” long.  Mint.

(1,500 - 2,500)

284

181


285

285

Full size peregrine falcon with greenwing teal drake, Ron Tepley.  Signed “For Dr. J.L.

286

Applied wings and feet with incised wing and tail

Herrington Jr, Ron Tepley, 1979.” 11”

carving. Measures 25” long with a 23 ½” wing span.

tall.  Thin crack in beak, otherwise

Some minor flaking where wings meet body and a

very good and original.

few hairline drying cracks in one wing, otherwise very good and original.

Provenance: Herrington collection. (1,250 - 1,750)

Provenance: Dr. John Dinan collection. (2,000 - 3,000)

286

182

Full-size flying mallard, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine, 2nd quarter 20th century.


287

Pair of decorative bluebills, Oliver Lawson, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated “For Lynnwood Herrington 1976.” Both have slightly turned heads. Relief wingtip carving and fluted tails. Hen is 14.5” long.  Excellent and original.

Provenance: Herrington collection. (2,000 - 3,000)

287

288

Pair of harlequin ducks, Harold Haertel, Dundee, Illinois.  Drake is 11.5” long. Hen has slightly turned head. Both have raised carved wingtips and fluted tails. Signed and dated 1967.  

Provenance: Formerly in collection of Doug and Ellen Miller, collection stamp on underside.

(2,000 - 3,000)

288 289

Bufflehead drake, Bill Schultz, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.  Tucked and slightly turned head. Signed by Schultz on underside. Puffed crest. Bottom board hollow. 10” long.  Near mint. (1,500 - 2,000)

289 290

Bluewing teal drake, William Schultz.   Signed with inscription, “Made for Ray Kennedy in 1971.” Slightly turned head. Relief carved wingtips. 12.75” long.  Two tiny dents in head, otherwise excellent and original. (1,250 - 1,750)

290

183


291

292

291

Bluewing teal drake, Jim Schmiedlin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.   Signed and dated September 1983. Also branded

Hooded merganser drake, Jim Schmiedlin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.  Signed and dated 1981. Jim’s

“JAS” on underside. Hollow carved with turned

finest decorative work, with detailed feather

swimming head. Raised carved wingtips 13.5”

carving, crossed raised wingtips, fanned

long.  Near mint.

delicate tail, and fanned hood or crest. 13”

(3,000 - 4,000)

292

long.  Excellent and original.

184

(3,000 - 4,000)


293

294

293

Widgeon drake, Jim Schmieldin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.  Signed

294

Greenwing teal drake, Jim Schmiedlin Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.  Signed and

and dated on underside, Feburary 1984.

dated 1985 on underside, as well as branded

Also branded “JAS.” Head is turned, wingtips

“JAS”. Head is turned slightly. 13.5” long.  Mint.

are slightly raised and crossed. Hollow. 17”

(3,000 - 4,000)

long.  Near mint in all respects. (3,000 - 4,000)

185


Chauncey Wheeler 1862 - 1937 | Alexandria Bay, New York The town of Alexandria Bay lies on the St Lawrence River (Seaway) in the heart of the Thousand Island Region of upstate New York. The area has always been a location known for its beauty and vast resources. Shortly after the Civil War, with an improved transportation system, wealthy sportsmen and gentlemen from leading U.S. cities began to purchase islands for their personal use, and the explosion in the recreational use of the area had begun. It was here, in a log cabin on one of the islands, that Chauncey Wheeler was born. His father, Peleg, moved the family to Holland St in Alexandria Bay, and Chauncey was to remain there for his entire life. He attended school but quickly entered the workforce and his employment was always aligned in one way or another with the river. By the age of 18, he was an “oarsman” as was his father. His abilities with watercraft quickly improved and from the late 1890’s through 1920 he was a “boatman”, “steamboat captain” and “river pilot”. In all of these capacities he would get to know, and befriend, many of the affluent residents of the area and, at various times, found employment working for them. Later in life, his interest apparently shifted away from the commercial waterfront and began to focus more and more on the recreational use of the river. The 1925 State Census notes his occupation as “boat builder” and in 1930 he proudly proclaims that he is a “manufacturer (of) decoys”, certainly implying that this activity was a significant contributor to his annual income. Even upon his retirement in about 1935, the river was still in his blood and he opened a small bait shop and boat livery. His pride was his sailboat, the ‘Jack Pot’, which he chartered and captained for a small fee. If customers were lacking for the boat, he would take out local children and teach them how to sail. His personal life does not read as idyllic as his professional life. He was married three times, all with very trying or negative long-term outcomes. His first wife gave him two sons who died young, Fred at age 29 and Max at 39. This wife died giving birth to their third child. With his second

186

wife, he had two daughters and this wife died from blood poisoning trying to avoid giving birth to a third child. His final marriage was a tumultuous one which resulted in three different separations, the third one being final. Due to the time he spent on the river, the two daughters from the second marriage saw relatively little of their father and they spent a great deal of time with Chauncey’s brother across the river in Gananoque, Canada. This brother too, predeceased Chance which was yet another devastating event in his life. With a history of what certainly seems to be a less than perfect domestic environment, it is no surprise that Chauncy found relief from life’s hurdles in his decoy shop. He was known to be quite gregarious and would often surround himself with a group of fellow carvers in a group that became known as “The Holland St. Whittlers”. He mentored many of these men and willingly shared his patterns, carving techniques and paint patterns with them. Familiar names that can trace their start in the decoy carving world to Chauncey’s shop include Frank Coombs, Bob Dingman, Gus Rogers and Roy Conklin. This austere assemblage saw many an evening of pipe smoke, ringing spittoons, flying wood chips and tales of dubious credibility in Chauncey’s company. Wheeler’s decoys became the standard by which the carvings of others would be judged. He incorporated a number of features into his work which would form the basis for the local school of carving. Noteworthy would be his distinctive hollow body style, deep eye groove and recessed anchor line staple. One of his personal peculiarities was the use of a reverse feather pattern which, while not ornithologically correct, gave the impression of a much softer and well-rounded bird. One of his creations that was particularly appealing and an inspiration for others, were his unique, decorative half flyers. These were made in both full and half size models and, eventually, this idea was copied and patented by Roy Conklin. The night before his death, he had his last meal of oysters and invited his usual friends to the house where they smoked and chewed while telling tall tales for the last time. Later that evening, he had a deadly premonition about a baby that his attending daughter was about to have that, regrettably, came true. Upon his passing, his last wife from the very contentious third marriage cashed in his insurance check which left the family with insufficient funds to bury their father. His daughter, Marie, had to sell what remained of his decoys, including the last rig he made, in order to pay for his services and burial in the Highland Cemetery in Alexandria Bay.


294a

294b

294a

Full size flying canvasback drake wall plaque, Chauncey Wheeler, Alexandria Bay, New York.  Half plaque made for hang-

294b

Full size flying redhead drake wall plaque, Chauncey Wheeler, Alexandria Bay, New York.  Half plaque made for hanging on the

ing on the wall with applied wing and highly

wall with applied wing and highly detailed

detailed comb feather paint detail. Measures

comb feather paint detail. Measures 21 1/4”

21 1/4” long.  Original paint that has darkened

long.  Original paint that has darkened with

with age; small chip repaired on back side of

age; tiny chip in wing tip; chip in each side of

tip of bill with touch up along the underside;

foot; very minor separation at neck seat.

professional repairs to chips in foot. Provenance: Ex Anthony Waring collection. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. (12,000 - 18,000)

(12,000 - 18,000)

187


Virginia Ira Hudson 1873 - 1949 | Chincoteague, Virginia

188


295

Standing black duck with outstretched wings, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Original paint protected by a coat of varnish; possible that a damaged area near neck seat and where wings attach to body were reset a very long time ago; varnish was not applied evenly on body so drip lines are visible at underside of body and parts of wing.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.  

(15,000 - 25,000)

189


296

Pair of 2/3 size greenwing teal, Lloyd Sterling, Crisfield, Maryland.  Drake is 8.5” long. Both have very slightly turned heads and raised carved wings made from peach basket staves.  Original piant with good detail and minor wear; protected by an old coat of varnish slight shrinkage to varnish. (2,500 - 3,500)

296

297

1/2 size flying mallard drake, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia. Applied wings and fluted tail. Scratch feather paint detail. Measures 9 ½” long with a 14” wing span. Original paint protected under a thin coat of varnish with minor flaking; tight crack in underside; head and neck were reattached with a seam visible.

Provenance: Dr. John Dinan collection. (1,500 - 2,000)

297

298

Three widgeon drakes, Lloyd Tyler, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed. The one with upright head is 13” long. All have raised carved wingtips in various poses.  Original paint with very slight wear; one has a very small chip at tip of one wing.

Provenance: One belonged to each of Tyler’s three daughters. 298

Literature: “Lloyd Tyler, Folk Artist,” Henry Stansbury, p. 46, exact

190

decoys pictured.

(2,000 - 4,000)


299

Full size yellowlegs with lifted wing, Lloyd Tyler, Crisfield, Maryland.  Mounted on wooden plaque, made to simulate shoreline. 14.5” square.  Very good and original.

Literature: “Lloyd Tyler, Folk Artist,” Henry Stansbury, p. 47, exact carving pictured.

(3,000 - 5,000)

299

300

Full size standing black duck, Lloyd Sterling, Crisfield, Maryland.  17.5” long. Raised

300

carved wingtips and slightly turned head.  Near mint original paint with good detail; three or four small tail feather tips are missing; legs have been reset and some touch up on feet.

(3,000 - 5,000)

191


New England Shorebirds The Burr Family Russ Burr with some of his miniatures

The Burr family is almost synonymous with the coastal town of Hingham, Massachusetts. Family members were among the initial residents of the town and played an important role in its history dating back to pre-Revolutionary War days. Early family members were farmers and craftsmen and these occupations and skills were passed down through the generations. Like others in the small town just south of Boston, Burr men became experts at producing small storage boxes (known as pantry boxes), firkins, canteens and other practical wooden objects. The carved wooden decoys produced by the family, likewise, served a very practical purpose, enabling the gunners to attract shorebirds, ducks and geese to within range of their guns. Long familiarity with woodworking made the production of these objects a task easily accomplished and the Burr family shorebirds, in particular, are considered among the finest carved in the Bay State. No one knows for certain when the first Burr family member fashioned their first shorebird lure. There were a number of Elisha’s and Eliza’s in pre and post-revolutionary Hingham but it is well known that Elisha (1839 – 1909), the patriarch of the branch of the family that concerns us, had practiced, and some would say perfected, the craft within his lifetime. The mid to late 1800’s saw some of the most widespread shorebird hunting in the State. The shooting remained popular through the early 1900’s but was (fortunately) largely curtailed with legislation in 1918. Limited hunting for a few species such as yellowlegs and plovers remained legal through 1928, when all shorebird shooting was finally outlawed.

Elisha Burr, then, was able to hunt these birds for his entire life and would have been very familiar with carving and using decoys to attract them. His two sons, Carl and Russ, also could have legally shot shorebirds until they were 44 and 41, respectively. Russ had no children but even Carl’s son, Alston, (6’6” and nicknamed “Shorty”) could have legally gunned for the birds until his 18th birthday. Both Carl and Russ are well documented as being active hunters and it is very likely that “Shorty” would have accompanied his father afield on more than one occasion. Both brothers undoubtedly learned to hunt from Elisha. Carl kept a hunting diary which recalls days at his camp on Cape Cod where he guided for sportsmen from Boston. Russ, too, kept a log from his earliest days afield through the 1920’s in which we find him traveling to “Third Cliff” in Scituate (near Hingham) “to shoot shorebirds”. Russ maintained a ‘shooting stand’ (camp and blind) on Trip Hammer Pond which is documented in John C Phillips 1929, “Shooting Stands of Eastern Massachusetts” and the family is known to have enjoyed hunts there (apparently accompanied by a cold keg of beer on occasion). There has been a standing debate as to which family member carved which shorebird decoy. There are brands for “E. Burr” and C. Burr”. Does the “E Burr” identify decoys carved by Elisha? Does the “C. Burr” imply that Carl carved the birds that carry that brand and alter his father’s brand from an “E” to a “C”? Russ’s diary makes it clear that he hunted shorebirds over decoys. Did he carve these decoys or use his father’s rig? One long standing theory is that all the clan members carved shorebirds using the traditional family pattern developed by Elisha. To complicate matters, there are similarities between Russ’s duck and few geese decoys that have led some to believe that Russ carved all the shorebirds and the brands are purely rig or ownership identifiers. The debate continues, but has in no way diminished the fact that the Burr family produced and hunted over shorebird decoys that must be considered Massachusetts classics. After shorebird hunting was outlawed, Russ, in particular, went on to make a reputation for himself as a carver of excellent miniatures, following in the footsteps of Lincoln and Crowell. Alston, too, followed in the family carving tradition and produced miniatures which are not as refined as those done by Russ. Please see “The Burr Family of Hingham” by Bob Mosher (May/ June 2004 Decoy Magazine) for a more complete discussion of

Main St. Hingham Center, MA.

192

the Burr family.


301

Rare willet, Elisha Burr, Hingham, Massachusetts. 14.5� long. Shoe button eyes. Relief wing carving with extended wingtips. Subtle feather paint detail. Near mint original paint; short hairline crack near one wing.

(15,000 - 20,000)

193


303

302

302

Golden plover, Elisha Burr, Hingham, Massachusetts. 10.75� long. Shoe button eyes, relief wing carving, and extended wingtips. Small amount of paint flaking on back of head otherwise very good and original.

303

(10,000 - 14,000)

Feeding black bellied plover, Elisha Burr, Hingham, Massachusetts. 11.25� long. Shoe button eyes. Relief wing carving with extended wingtips. Original piant with minor wear; structurally good.

Carl Burr (R) and Frank Studley at Trip Hammer Pond Camp

194

(10,000 - 14,000)


304

Running black bellied plover in fall plumage, Elisha Burr, Hingham, Massachusetts. A large decoy, just under 13” long. Fine feather paint detail and shoe button eyes. Relief wing carving with extended wingtips. Very good and original.

Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph. (15,000 - 20,000)

195


This exact decoy is pictured in plate 21 of American Bird Decoys, William J Mackey Jr. “A graceful Minnow in throat model that shows the artistry of this master. In New England this bird is sometimes referred to as the “Winter Yellowlegs”.

We now know that a rigmate of this decoy was painted with both sides ivory white while this is example is painted in transitional plumage on one side and one in ivory white on the other. The undiscovered maker of this rig was creating the appearance of movement for the circling birds, seeing color change as the angles changed. Under Audubon add. Possibly the inspiration for many of the minnow in throat shorebird forms.

304a

Elegant running willet with minnow in throat, Massachusetts, last quarter 19th century. One side painted in fall plumage, the other side in mid winter plumage. 13.25” long. Tack eyes and relief wing carving. Baleen bill. Original paint with minor wear; lightly hit by shot on one side; small hole in one side of baleen bill. (15,000 - 20,000)

John James Audubon interpretation of a greater yellowlegs. Possibly

196

the inspiration for many of the minnow in throat shorebird forms.


Charles Thomas - | Assanippi, Massachusetts

305

Large willet, Charles Thomas, Assinippi (Norwell), Massachusetts.  15” long with relief wing carving and slightly raised tips. Tack eyes.  Original paint; minor wear; two small cracks in lower breast.

Literature: “Decoys of the Atlantic Flyway,” George Ross Starr.

(8,000 - 10,000)

197


George Boyd 1873 - 1941 | Seabrook, New Hampshire

307

306

306

306

Outstanding plover in fall plumage, George Boyd, Seabrook, New Hamphire.  Split tail carving and

307

Plover in spring plumage, George Boyd, Seabrook, New Hampshire.  Split tail carving and

excellent paint detail. Measures 11 1/4” long.  Excellent

tack eyes. Measures 11” long.  Original paint with very

original paint with almost no wear; bill is all original but

minor wear; a few tiny paint flakes were darkened

with some touch up on front half.

where bill joins face; small chip repair in underside of

Provenance: Ex George and Hope Wick collection. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

198

307

(6,000 - 9,000)

wing tips. Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

(7,000 - 10,000)


George Boyd was a shoemaker, as were many of the residents of the Seabrook area around the turn of the century. To supplement his income, he also earned money as a market hunter. The birds that he and other area market hunters harvested were shipped via rail to markets in Boston, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, and Portland, Maine. From around 1910 through 1915, George sold yellowlegs and black-bellied plover decoys to Iver Johnson in Boston, Massachusetts. Even after the passage of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918, which protected all migratory birds, yellowlegs and plover seasons remained open for sport only up until 1928.

George Boyd, circa 1905. Credit “Finely Carved and Nicely Painted,” Jim Cullen.

308

Yellowlegs, George Boyd, Seabrook, New Hampshire.  Split tail carving and tack eyes. Measures 11” long.  Original paint with minor wear; spots of touch up on breast; neck crack repair with significant in painting on much of the neck and head.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

(1,500 - 3,000)

308

199


Maryland Lloyd Sterling 1880 - 1964 | Crisfield, Maryland

200


309

Important pintail drake, Lloyd Sterling, Crisfield, Maryland.  19.75” long with turned

McCleery, McCleery stamp on underside. Lot

head. Fine feather paint detail. Very wide body

2000 auction.

style.  Near mint original paint; short hairline crack in breast; thin crack in underside.

Provenance: Formerly in collection of Bill Purnell, Ocean City Maryland. Purnell’s stamp

204 in the Guyette & Schmidt/Sotheby’s January

Literature: “Call to the Sky,” Robert Shaw, p. 75, exact decoy pictured. “Decoys of the Midatlantic Region,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr. (25,000 - 35,000)

in underside. Formerly in collection of James

201


310

311

310

310

Rare black duck, Lloyd Sterling, Crisfield, Maryland.  17.25” long. Fine scratch feather paint detail.  Near mint original paint; never used; slight separation at neck seam.

Literature: “Southern Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein Jr.

311

(4,000 - 6,000)

Pintail drake, similar to the work of Lloyd Sterling, Crisfield, Maryland.  Slightly turned head. 17” long.  Restored paint with a Ward Brothers head; thin crack partway through neck. (2,500 - 3,500)

202


John Glenn 1876 - 1954 | Rockhall, Maryland

312

313

312

Rare widgeon drake, John Glenn, Rock Hall, Maryland.   14” long.  Original paint with very slight wear; slight roughness to end of tail.

313

Pair of pintails, John Glenn, Rock Hall, Maryland.   Drake is 17” long.  Very good and original.

(2,000 - 3,000)

Literature: “Decoys of Midatlantic Region,” Henry Fleckenstein Jr.

(2,000 - 3,000)

203


314

Wooden wing duck hen and drake, Henry Davis, Perryville, Maryland.  Hen is 15” long.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; thin crack in hen’s neck.

Provenance: Drake has the Tommy O’Connor collection stamp on underside and also branded “F” for Henry Fleckenstein collection.

204

(5,000 - 8,000)


315

Extremely rare body booting swan, Madison Mitchell, Havre de Grace, Maryland, circa 1940s.  Long cork body with inserted wooden tail and wooden head. Decoy is 35” long. Only known body booting swan made by Mitchell. Harry Jobes made copies. Blue ribbon winner Ward Museum Antique Decoy Competition 2005, Walt Oler Memorial Award first in category. Ribbon included.  Original paint; minor flaking and wear; lightly hit by shot.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Art Patterson. Exhibited at the Easton Waterfowl Festival, Ward Museum, and written up in Decoy Magazine and 2006 Wildfowl Art Magazine. (6,000 - 8,000)

205


John Graham 1822 - 1912 | Charlestown, Maryland

Carpenter, master carpenter, cabinetmaker

This photograph is reproduced with the permission of Gerard Wittstadt and the original can be found in his publication, “Maryland’s Charles Town, 1742 and Beyond, a Pictural Tour of its History,” currently found at www.cecilcountydecoys.com. Mr Wittstadt’s book will be available in print form by Christmas 2020.

– these were John Graham’s occupations as he listed them on the federal census records for the dates 1850 through at least 1880. These vocations would have certainly given him the skills, tools and access to materials that he would need to produce some of the finest decoys to emerge from the Susquehanna Flats. His obituary goes on to credit him with being a boatbuilder, undertaker and farmer who, was “- - - also engaged in fishing, ducking, etc” . An article in “The Canvasback” echoes

the feelings of most seasoned collectors when it states that he “is widely considered to be the grandfather of the Cecil County school of decoy carving” and that his work “inspired the next generation of Charlestown’s makers”.

206

Christmas 1908


316

Very rare blue wing teal, John Graham, Charlestown, Maryland, 3rd quarter 19th century.  Very rare species with raised neck seat, tack eyes, and detailed bill carving. Originally found in the attic of a home in Port Deposit, Maryland. Measures 10 1/2” long.  Original paint with minor gunning wear; some flaking on one side; small dents; remnants of white paint or glue on the underside that was partially removed; filler above two small nail holes in neck seat was restored.

Provenance: Ex Pat Vincenti collection. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

(15,000 - 25,000)

207


317

Swan, Madison Mitchell, Havre de Grace, Maryland, circa late 1960s.  31.5” long. Decoy was supposed to have been bought from Mitchell in the late 1960’s by a fishing captain from the the Outer Banks.   (2,000 - 3,000)

317

Swan carved in the style of Madison Mitchell, Jim Pierce, Havre de Grace, Maryland.  Signed and dated

318

1981. Made form a cedar pole from Aberdeen Proving Grounds.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; a few very small dents; slight separation at back of neck seat. (1,000 - 1,500)

318

319

Hollow carved swan in the style of Madison Mitchell, Wildfowler Decoy Factory, Point Pleasant, New Jersey.  32” long.  Original paint that has been aged; structurally good.

319

208

(600 - 900)


320

320

Canvasback drake, Leonard Pryor, Elkton, Maryland.  15” long.  Strong original paint that has mellowed for an appealing surface; a small amount of wear is visible, mostly on 320

white areas of back; wood filler has popped to expose nail head near base of neck; a strong example of Pryor’s early work. 321

(4,000 - 6,000)

Pair of pintails, Oliver Lawson, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed. Drake is 18.5” long. Both have slightly turned heads.  Very good and original.

(1,200 - 1,500)

321

209


Charles Nelson Barnhard 1876 - 1958 | Havre de Grace, Maryland This quote by C. John Sullivan in the Spring 2001 issue of the Canvasback, says it best. . . . “Decoys from the Upper Chesapeake Bay have been described over the years in many terms: graceful, sleek sturdy, practical, and even stately. Some collectors and enthusiasts from other regions of the country become confused when studying Upper Chesapeake Bay decoys. A few have gone so far as to say that they all look pretty much the same. They frequently ask how you can tell one carver from another. There is always one exception to this, and that is Charles Nelson Barnard”. Barnard’s work is highly sought after by

322

Exceptional high head canvasback hen, Charles Nelson Barnard, Havre de Grace, Maryland, last quarter 19th century.  Just under 10” tall. Branded “J. Pusey” for Joel Pusey of Swan Creek, MD. Known to of had a rig of 500 Susquehanna Flats decoys, which included several high neck Barnard canvasbacks. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; some feather paint detail; thin crack in neck, lightly hit by shot; tight crack partway through bill.

Literature: “Waterfowling on the Chesapeake 1819-1936”, C. John Sullivan. (15,000 - 20,000)

210


collectors. His decoys have been displayed at the Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art, the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum, and The Havre de Grace Decoy Museum. Examples of his work have now been sold by all of the decoy auction houses as well as Sotheby’s in New York City. If Upper Bay decoys are stately, Barnard’s birds are dignified. If the Susquehanna Flats produced decoys that are sturdy, Barnard produced work that was forthright. If one studies closely the very few photos that exist of Charles Nelson Barnard, the same dignity and pride show in the man that appear in his carvings.”

323

High neck canvasback drake, Charles Nelson Barnard, Havre de Grace, Maryland, circa 1900. 10” tall. Appealing old in use repaint; paint on head appears to be original; working repair to approximately 40% of bill; lightly hit by shot.

ProvenanceL From the J. Pusey rig, and so branded. (4,000 - 6,000)

211


Ira Hudson 1873 - 1949 | Chincoteague, Virginia

325

Excellent merganser hen, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia, 1st quarter 20th century.   Believed to be the finest Ira Hudson merganser to have ever been offered at auction. Carved crest, fluted tail, and partially inlet neck seat. Scratch feather paint detail and tack eyes. Measures 15 1/2” long.  Strong original paint with minor gunning wear; small chip on edge of tail; minor were on edge of crest and one side of bill.

Provenance: One of a rig of decoys purchased from Ira Hudson by Ed Tom Baker of Gargatha, Virginia for use on Gargatha Creek. This decoy was given as a gift in 1920 by Mr. Baker where it sat on a mantel until Guyette & Schmidt sold it in July of 2007. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. (60,000 - 90,000)

212


213


326

Early three piece hollow carved brant, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia.   17” long. Bold feather paint.  Original paint with very minor wear; several small dents at tail; slight separation at body seams under the tail.

Provenance: From the Kruger rig, makred with a circled “K” Literature: “Southern Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein Jr.

214

(6,000 - 9,000)


327

328

327

329

Rare pair of buffleheads, Charles Birch, Willis Wharf, Virginia.  Painted by Ira Hudson. Hen is 10” long.  Numerous small cracks and dents.

(2,500 - 3,500)

329

Blackduck, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia.  16” long with ice dip behind neck and fluted tail.  Paint was restored by the Ward Brothers; lightly hit by shot; roughness to end of tail.

328

(650 - 950)

Rare pintail hen, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Fluted, banjo style tail and tack eyes.  Worn original paint; several cracks.

Literature: “Southern Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr. (800 - 1,200)

215


329a

329a

Canvasback drake, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia. 17.5” long.

Restored paint in the style of Ira Hudson, probably by Mark McNair.

Literature: “Southern Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein Jr.

216

Scratch feather paint detail. 17.25” long.

chup to much of the black areas; tail through neck.

329b

Black duck, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia. Cedar body

Original piant with minor wear; touhas been slightly blunted; thin crack

329b

(2,500 - 3,500)

(1,000 - 1,500)


330

Solid body brant, Nathan Cobb Jr., Cobb Island, Virginia, last quarter 19th century.  20” long. With inlet head, carved eyes, and raised V wingtip carving. A backward “N” is carved in the underside.  old in use repaint; numerous cracks; bill appears to be an old replacement.

Literature: “Southern Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein Jr.

(8,000 - 12,000)

217


According to carver and decoy historian Grayson Chesser, many of the narrow body brant with serifed E initials or the E.B. Cobb brand have beautiful holly limb heads, and are undoubtedly made by Nathan Jr. This hollow, flat bottom, redhead decoy appears to be similar in quality to those brant as well as some of the best quality duck decoys with the serifed N.

218


331

Redhead drake, Nathan Cobb Jr, Cobb Island, Virginia, last quarter 19th century.  Hollow carved with inlet head and relief carved wing tips. ‘E.B. COBB’ branded into the underside. Also branded ‘P’ and ‘WHP Jr’ for the collection of William Purnell. Exact decoy pictured on page 218 of “Chesapeake Bay Decoys” third edition by Robert Richardson. Also page 53 of “The Bird Decoy an American Art Form” by Paul A. Johnsgard. Measures 14” long.  Original paint with minor to moderate gunning wear; a few small nails added long ago to secure some hairline drying cracks near tail; minor flaking to filler at neck seat.

Provenance: Cobb family rig. Ex Grayson Chesser collection. Ex William Purnell collection. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. (40,000 - 60,000)

219


220


The Cobb Island Hotel in 1885. Seated is Nathan Cobb, Jr. and his wife Sally Cobb. Standing is Nathan and Sally’s son Elkanah and Annie Wyatt, who was a housekeeper for the Cobbs.

332

Excellent black duck, Nathan Cobb Jr, Cobb Island, Virginia, last quarter 19th century.  Hollow carved with raised wing tips and inlet head. ‘N’ carved into the underside. Measures 15 1/2” long.  Original paint with minor to moderate flaking and wear; some flaking to original filler at neck seat; some dark filler was added at body seam in breast.

Provenance: Ex collection William Purnell. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

(35,000 - 55,000)

221


Delaware River John Blair, Sr. 1842 - 1928 | Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

222


333

Black duck, John Blair Sr., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, last quarter 19th century.  Blair’s classic form. Hollow carved with tack eyes. ‘C. Spreckler’ branded into the underside. This is one of the decoys obtained by Frank Lewis from Cass Baines the caretaker of the Biddle family estate. He later traded this decoy along with other Blair decoys to Somers Headley.

Measures 16

Provenance: Biddle family rig. Ex Frank Lewis collection. Ex Somers Headley collection. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. Exhibited at the Noyes Museum in Oceanville, New Jersey. 1991. Exhibited at the Ward Museum September 1995. Literature: “Decoys a North American Survey,” Gene and Linda Kangas, p. 55,

1/2” long.  Original paint with minor wear;

exact decoy pictured. “Floating Sculpture,”

area at body seem under tail with small whit-

Harrison Huster and Doug Knight, p. 29,

tle marks; four shot strikes where filled and

exact decoy pictured. “Decoy Collectors

touched up long ago.

Guide, 1977,” Volume 6, p. 78, exact decoy pictured.

(25,000 - 35,000)

223


Born into a family of early American settlers, John Dawson was one of four sons belonging to Thomas and Julie Dawson. The family’s residence was in the 600 block of Centre Street in Trenton, New Jersey. Dawson worked primarily as a kiln operator at the Scammel Pottery Company for most of his life. Like many that grew up along the Delaware River, John enjoyed the outdoors – duck hunting included. Around 1900 when he was in his twenties, his uncle gave him a rig of decoys that needed “sprucing up.” These decoys are now known as the English/Dawson decoys. Carved and originally painted by John English, John Dawson “tuned them up” for another round of hunting. Some of the decoys were stripped and painted some were just painted over the old surface. Dawson eventually progressed to making his own decoys to supplement his income, many of which were sold through hardware stores in Trenton for $2.00 each. These are known as Dawson/Dawson decoys.

334

Rare English/ Dawson pintail hen, last quarter 19th century.  Hollow carved with raised ‘V’ wing tips, tack eyes, and relief tail feather carving. Carved by John English of Florence, New Jersey and painted by John Dawson of Trenton, New Jersey. Believed to be one of two English pintail hens in John Dawson paint and the only one whose form matches those of the drakes. This hen and two English/Dawson drakes were originally found in a sporting goods store in Trenton, New Jersey. Measures 14 1/2” long.  In use repaint by Dawson with very minor wear; very minor roughness on tip of tail, otherwise excellent structurally.

Provenance: Ex William J. Mackey Jr. collection. Ex Bob White collection. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

224

(15,000 - 25,000)


225


335

336

335

Black duck, Dan English, Florence, New Jersey.  15.5” long. Good raised V wing carving

Greening teal drake, Reg Marter, Burlington, New Jersey.  11.8” long with raised V wingtip carving and

detail.  Original paint with very minor wear and a few small

fluted tail.  Original paint with good feather paint detail;

dents; slight paint shrinkage on one side of head.

shallow chip missing from top of tail with old repaint.

Provenance: From the H. Cheeseman rig, branded “HC” in weight and in underside.

226

336

(3,000 - 4,000)

Provenance: From Marter’s hunting rig, his brass tag is on the underside.

(1,500 - 2,500)


339

Bluebill hen, John McLoughlin. Bordentown, New Jersey. 13.5” long. Carved extended wingtips, slightly turned head with long neck. Very good and original.

Provenance: Miller collection. (650 - 950)

339

340

Rigmate pair of pintails, John Mcloughlin, Bordentown, New Jersey. Both signed by McLoughlin on underside and stamped Miller collection. Both are hollow and have raised tail with slightly turned heads. Drake measures 20” long. Excellent and original.

(2,000 - 3,000)

340

341

Bluebill drake, John McLoughlin, Bordentown, New Jersey. Signed by McLoughlin on underside. Carved wingtips and primaries. 13” long. Excellent and original.

(700 - 1,000)

341

342

High head mallard drake, John Mcloughlin, Bordentown, New Jersey.   Head is slightly turned. Wingtips are raised, split, and crossed. Signed on underside. 17” long.  Unused.

(700 - 900)

342

227


William Quinn 1915 - 1969 | Yardley, Pennsyvania

William Quinn was not born into a sporting family, so early on he relied on his friends to teach him the ways of the outdoors. Living in Tullytown, Pennsylvania, he soon met and befriended decoy carver Joe King who taught him to make decoys. Quinn’s early decoys are marked “Tullytown” on the undersides. It was not long before Quinn developed a reputation as a talented duck hunter and competitive shooter. Much of Quinn’s hunting was done on Money Island, near Florence, where he belonged to the Penn Warner Gunning & Fishing Club. This is where

228

he introduced the club members to his style of duck hunting, called “sculling.” It was so effective that the members asked him to resign, they did not like the impact the sculling had on their shore blind shooting. The decoys made in this period and used at this club are marked “W. Quinn, Yardley, PA”.


343

Important rigmate pair of pintails, William Quinn, Yardley, Pennsylvania. Drake is 17.75” long. Both are in content pose with subtle feather paint detail. Raised V wingtip carving and fluted tails. Both have “W. Quinn Yardley, PA.” painted on the underside. Very good and original. (15,000 - 25,000)

229


John Blair, Jr. 1881 - 1953 | Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Plate 50, “Wildfowl Decoys,” Joel Barber. Architectural drawing by Joel Barber states, “Old Pintail Drake, hollow, New Jersey Shore, maker unknown, Courtesy of John Blair, Jr.”

230


344

Rare hollowed carved pintail drake, John Blair, Jr., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1st quarter 20th century.  17 1/4” Long. Tack eyes. Weight is attached with small square nails. Loop feather paint on back.  Original paint with minor discolor-

ation and wear; small chip missing from tip of tail.

Literature: “Floating Sculpture,” Harrison Huster and Doug Knight. (17,500 - 22,500)

231


The population of the Wood Duck was in serious decline in the late 19th century as a result of severe habitat loss and market hunting both for meat and the millinery trade. By the beginning of the 20th century Wood Ducks had virtually disappeared from much of their former range. In response to the Federal Migratory Bird Act of 1918, wood duck populations began to slowly recover. By ending unregulated hunting and taking measures to protect remaining habitat, wood duck populations began to rebound in the 1920s. The development of the artificial nesting box in the 1930s gave an additional boost to Wood Duck production. For this reason, wood duck decoys from the turn of the 20th century are incredibly rare.

345

Rare working wood duck hen, Blair school, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, last quarter 19th century.  Three piece hollow carved body with inlet neck seat and extended crest. Head is two piece vertical laminate with a dowel attaching the pieces just below where eyes would be. Scratch feather paint detail on back and sides. Measures 13 1/4” long.  Original paint with minor flaking and wear; hairline cracks in neck base; professional repair to 2/3 of the bill.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

232

(8,000 - 12,000)


Items of Interest

345a

345b

345a

345c

345d

A pair of 19th century cast iron lawn or garden ornaments, in the form of a recumbent whippet dog, late 19th century, possibly J.W. Fiske Foundry of New York. 38” long, 18” high. Multiple coats of old black paint with semi flat shine.

345c

232/450. Wolf howling and another wolf looking straight on. 19” tall. Excellent and original.

(1,200 - 1,700)

(3,000 - 5,000)

Bronze, David Turner. Of Labrador head, mounted

Bronze sculpture, Mark Hopkins, Loveland, Colorado. Signed on back. Copyright 1992. Number

on base. D.H. Turner 2018 10/90” is inscribed on back of

409/450. Cougar head and paw. Fine detail and nice

bronze. Detailed Labrador head with collar and name

patina. 13” tall.

345d 345b

Bronze sculpture of wolves, Mark Hopkins, Loveland, Colorado. Copyright 1997. Signed on back, number

plate. 17.5” tall. Excellent and original.

(1,200 - 1,700)

(1,500 - 2,500)

233


345e

345e

Brass and copper dive helmet with face. Appears to have good age. Materials are brass copper and glass. 15� tall. (1,000 - 2,000)

345f

Large and unique flint lock wall gun. Brass barrel, side lock, and trigger guard. Measures 47�. Three different markings on barrel. Stock has some early patch work repairs; wood is worn and has a nice old patina; mounted on contemporary base.

345g

(2,500 - 3,500)

Replica punt gun. Stressed paint and rusted metal parts, all for the appearance of age. A single hammer percussion gun. Measures 110� long. A great wall decoration. Stock is painted brown.

345g

234

(1,500 - 2,500)

345f


345h

345h

Wall shelf by Frank Finney, Cape Charles, Virginia. Vintage board and shelf constructed of hard oak, covered by varnish. An oil painting on board, signed Finney, depicting pintails flying in to marsh at sunset is flanked by two carved and painted pintail half bodies. 18” x 36”. Very good and original.

345i

(3,000 - 4,000)

Rare Campbell soup curved porcelain advertising sign, circa 1920. Measures 22.5” Retains excellent color with mounting bracket on back; a few small rubs where paint is missing.

(2,000 - 3,000)

345i

235


345k

Wonderful sculpture of a green frog perched on base, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois, 1956. Presented to Otto Meyer. Measures 7.5” long x 4.5” wide. Pictured on the cover of the April 2009 Guyette & Schmidt auction catalog. Excellent and original.

Provenance: This exact frog was made for Perdew’s close friend, Otto Meyer, as trade for Meyer buying and installing a furnace in Perdew’s home during the winter. Perdew made and traded all of the items in this photo for the furnace. Ex Gallaher collection. Ex Otto Meyer collection.

(4,000 - 6,000)

345k

345L

345L

19th century sneak boat model. Intricate construction, copper nails, and brass screws. Rudder and tiller intact. Measures 41” long x 8.5” wide. Separate cover piece is intact Protective coat of varnish has crazed; to create a very appealing surface; small amount of damage to one side of top; fading from sun exposure. (2,500 - 4,500)

345k

236


346

349

347

350

348

351

346

Large swing handle basket, probably Shaker.  Orig-

349

inal green paint. 14” wide.  Very good and original. (400 - 600)

Folk art carving of a bull, 1st quarter 20th century.  18” x 10” tall.  Original surface has crazed heavily; eyes sit forward on the face; small areas of damage; applied rope tail.

347

(300 - 500)

Two early swing handle baskets.  10.5” and 15” wide. Woven split birch.  Smaller appears to have worn or removed paint; larger has natural surface.

350

(400 - 600)

Large bark carrying basket with two handles, possibly Anishinquabeg or Chippewa/Ogibway.  Made from elm bark. Measures 18” long x 11” tall.  Structurally

348

Vintage whirligig with early mechanical goose, 1st quarter 20th century.  Goose head and tail move

good; some damage to wrapping at top where wire has been used as a replacement.

(400 - 600)

when blade spins.  Blade and goose are original to piece, stand is a more contemporary replacement. (200 - 400)

351

Adirondack vintage camp hat or gun rack.  Appears to be 1st quarter 20th century.   Varnish surface has crazed; structurally good.

(400 - 600)

237


John Walter Brady 1868 - 1959 | Oyster, Virginia that “- - - the only Walter Brady they knew never made any decoys”, yet an “old timer” in Oyster “had purchased goose decoys from Brady shortly before his (Brady’s) death - - “. Another resident could point to

one of the homes where Walter lived. So where does this leave us in the endless debate over the Walter Brady mystery? One very plausible explanation lies in the Federal census records. Indeed, there was a John Walter Brady who seemed to go by both “Walter” and “John Walter” (for simplicity we will refer to him as “Walter”). “Walter”

J. Walter and Mary Brady

Some of the very finest decoys said to originate on Hog Island, Virginia are assigned to the hand of Walter Brady. Early decoy authority, Bill Mackey, wrote in “American Bird Decoys” that Walter “was a market hunter, who died at an advanced age in the 1940’s” . Sadly, no Walter Brady can be found in the Federal or State census records that fits this description. It has also been claimed by Henry Fleckenstein and others, that Brady was a Cobb Island guide but, again, no factual information to collaborate that claim can be located. Decoy authority, Cameron McIntyre, who has long studied decoys from the region, asserts that decoys said to be by Brady are very likely, the early work of Eli Doughty. The fact that a Walter Brady from Oyster did actually exist is verified by a number of statements written in “Decoys of Virginia and the Carolinas”. In that text, we find that residents of Oyster recalled

In somewhat remote Capeville and the villages of Oyster and Eastville, records were poorly kept and facts must be extrapolated from a number of sources. What emerges is that Walter was born in Oyster, the son of William H. and Emily Susan Brady(see note 1). The young Walter probably by-passed school and quickly entered the workforce because, for his entire life, he could neither read nor write and, when necessary, signed documents with his “mark” which

Salisbury (MD) Times, Dec. 10 1959

238

Travis Atlantic Cottage, Oyster, VA. Reported one-time residence of Walter Brady


352

Rare curlew, Walter Brady, Oyster, Virginia, last quarter 19th century.  Large body with typical ridge down back. Slightly turned head and split tail carving. Measures 16” long.  Original paint with minor to moderate discoloration and wear; hit by shot; chip in base of neck and near stick hole; 1/2 the bill is professional bill replacement by Cameron McIntyre.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

(40,000 - 60,000)

would then be authenticated by someone else. On December 10th, 1890, he married Mary Elizabeth (Lizzie”) Moore and they would quickly have five sons and three daughters. Walter was obviously hard working and he vacillated between being an “oysterman” or “waterman” (1900. 1910, 1940 and death certificate) and working as a “laborer” on a local farm (1920, 1930). His obituary refers to him as “Captain” so he must have spent a good deal of time on or around the waters of Capeville and its offshore islands (Hog, Cobb, etc.). He apparently never achieved any substantial wealth for he never owned his own home and his residences were always “rented”. Despite his local reputation as

being a “cantankerous and hardbitten old fellow”, he must have been a good family man for, in 1940, he took in one of his granddaughters to live with him and his wife, (presumably after some mishap with one of his daughters?). Mr. Brady is buried in the Eastville Baptist Church Cemetery in Eastville, Virginia. We cannot be certain if this was the Walter Brady of decoy fame. The pieces somewhat fit the legend yet, until concrete evidence emerges, the intriguing mystery will remain. Notes:1. On Walter’s death certificate, his father is listed as John Walter Brady Sr.

239


353

353

Large curlew, Arthur Cobb, Cobb Island, Virginia, last half 19th century.  Carved eyes with splined bill through back of head. “A” is carved between tail and stick hole on underside. 15” long.  Paint has worn away to show a raised wood grain; several shot scars; tight cracks in head; small pieces missing on bill and where bill attaches to face.

240

(8,000 - 12,000)


354

Yellowlegs, Charles Clark, Chincoteague, Virginia. Earnest ink stamp on the underside. Measures 11” long.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; some flaking to original filler at a defect in wood on one side; long knot fell out from one side of tail when the bird was being made; original bill is loose; tight crack in top of head.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

Literature: “Folk Art in America,” Adele Earnest, p.142, exact decoy pictured.

(8,000 - 12,000)

241


Nathan Cobb, Jr. 1825 - 1905 | Cobb Island, Virginia

355

Rare black bellied plover, Nathan Cobb Jr., Cobb Island, Virginia, last quarter 19th century.  Relief wing and split tail carving. Measures 9 1/2” long.  Original paint with minor to moderate gunning wear, mostly on the raised edge of the wings; heavily hit by shot; very small amount of filler added on one side where the original bill meets the face.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. (35,000 - 45,000)

242


Shorebird hunting on Cobb Island

243


356

Rare curlew, Luther Lee Nottingham, Cheriton, Virginia, last quarter 19th century.   13.5” long. Tack eyes, relief wing carving, and “V” carved wingtips. “LLN” is carved under the tail.  Appealing old repaint by Nottingham; minor wear; bill is an old replacement.

Provenance: Ex Mort Hanson, Sr. collection.

Literature: “Southern Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr.

244

(15,000 - 25,000)


357

357

Very rare black bellied plover, Dave “Umbrella” Watson, Chincoteague, Virginia.  7.5” long. Raised “V” wingtip carving and tack eyes.  Original paint with minor wear; moderate wear on lower breast and bill; several tiny dents.

Provenance: Ex William Mackey, Jr. collection, and so stamped.

Literature: “Southern Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr.

(12,500 - 17,500)

245


Elmer Crowell 1862 - 1952 | East Harwich, Massachusetts

246


358

Superb preening yellowlegs, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Signed and dated “A.E. Crowell maker, Cape Cod 1940” with maker’s stamp in underside. Multi colored wood base is scalloped to create texturing, often refered to as his “carved bark base”. Yellowlegs has one wing lifted and head preening underneath, with feather at tip of bill. Paint execution on underside of wing is impressive. Slightly dropped wingtip with carved tail.  Strong original paint that shows nice age; approximately .25” round restoration to jesso at top of thigh and approximately .15” has been darkened at very tip of lifted wing.

(22,500 - 27,500)

247


359

Full size walking yellowlegs, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts, 2nd quarter 20th century.   Glass eyes and dropped split tail. On carved wooden base, often referred to as “chip carved base”. Measures 12” tall.  Small amount of restoration to jesso at top of thigh otherwise excellent and original. (8,000 - 12,000)

248


359a

359A Full size tern, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts,

circa 1930.   Marked “Wilson Tern” on underside of base and “J. Ashley Dempsey”. Tern is mounted on carved wooden oyster shell. Has raised split wingtips and relief carved wings. 11” long.  Strong original paint with a very small amount of restoration near one eye.

360

(6,000 - 9,000)

Miniature tern on base with ash tray, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Heron is 6.5” long. On doube carved rock base.  Very good and original.

(1,750 - 2,250)

360

249


361

Rare full size semi palmated plover, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Excellent paint detail. Maker’s rectangle stamp on the underside of base. Measures 5 1/4” long and stands 5 1/4” tall.  A few minor paint flakes from metal legs, otherwise excellent and original.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. (12,000 - 18,000)

250


362

Full size least peep, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Maker’s rectangle stamp on the underside. Measures 5” long and stands 5” tall.  Original paint with a warm patina; back of one jesso toe and a tiny flake near one wing patch with touch up, otherwise excellent and original.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. (6,000 - 9,000)

251


Miniatures by Elmer Crowell

363

365

367

364

366

368

363

Miniature wood duck, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Pre stamp with extended

366

crest. Measures 4” long.  Excellent and original. Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. 364

collection sticker on underside. 367

Miniature old squaw, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Maker’s rectangle stamp on underside. Numbered ‘22’ in pencil. Measures 4 1/8” long.  Excellent and original.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty

(2,000 - 2,500)

Miniature flicker, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Maker’s rectangle stamp on the

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

368

(1,800 - 2,200)

Miniature hooded merganser, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Maker’s rectangle stamp on underside. Numbered ‘19’ in pencil. Measures 3 1/8” long.  Very minor crazing on breast, otherwise

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

excellent and original.

(2,000 - 3,000)

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

252

(1,800 - 2,200)

original.

underside. Measures 3 1/4” long.  Excellent and original.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty

on underside. Measures 5 1/2” long.  Excellent and

collection sticker on underside. 365

long.  Excellent and original.

(2,000 - 3,000)

Miniature pintail drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Maker’s rectangle stamp

Miniature goldeneye hen, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Unstamped. Measures 3”

(1,800 - 2,200)


369

Early pair of miniature bluebills, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Pre-stamp examples circa 1910. Identified by Crowell in pencil on the underside. Measure 3 1/4” long.  Excellent and original.

Provenance: From the Talbot collection. Sold Northeast Auction 2007. Literature: ‘Birds in Wood and Paint’, Joseph Ellis, page 38 for more information on miniatures from the Talbot collection.

369

(3,000 - 5,000)

Very rare miniature grouse, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s circular

370

ink stamp is on the underside of the base. Unusual larger than typical size, 4.5” long. Tail is fanned out almost 1.25” wide.  Near mint original paint; structurally good; very tiny touch up to paint flake at tip of bill and tail.

(3,000 - 4,000)

370

372

371

371

Miniature redhead, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Maker’s rectangle

372

Miniature redhead hen, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Maker’s rectangle

stamp on underside. Numbered ‘5’ in pencil.

stamp on underside. Numbered ‘6’ in pencil.

Measures 4 1/4” long.  Excellent and original.

Measures 4” long.  Excellent and original.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. (1,800 - 2,200)

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. (1,800 - 2,200)

253


373

375

377

374

376

378

373

Miniature goldeneye, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.   Maker’s rectangle stamp on under-

detail. Measuring 4 1/8” long and standing 4 1/4”

long.  Excellent and original.

tall.  Professional neck crack repair with touch up down onto breast, otherwise excellent and original.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty (1,800 - 2,200)

Miniature bufflehead, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Maker’s rectangle stamp on under-

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. 377

side. Measures 2 5/8” long.  Excellent and original. Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. 375

Miniature yellowlegs, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  A large size with excellent paint

side. Numbered ‘21’ in pencil. Measures 4 1/4”

collection sticker on underside. 374

376

stamp is in the underside. 5” long.  Very good and original.

Miniature reaching greenwing teal drake on carved rock base, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Retains Crowell’s rectangular “Makers” stamp on underside.  Excellent original paint

(1,800 - 2,200)

Miniature feeding canvasback, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s rectangular

(2,000 - 3,000)

with one very small area of touch up on right rear of cheek; excellent physical condition. 378

(1,250 - 1,750)

(1,400 - 1,800)

Miniature flicker, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Maker’s rectangle stamp on underside. Numbered ‘18’ in pencil. Measures 3 1/4” long.  Professional repair to a chip in bill tip, otherwise excellent and original.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

254

(2,000 - 3,000)


379

381

381b

380

381a

382

379

Miniature bufflehead drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts. 2.4” tall. Oval paper

381a

Abercrombie and Fitch label on underside, there are

Crowell on the underside.  Small repair to the very tip of

probably less than 100 that were sold here. Very good

tail, overwise very good and original.

and original.

(1,250 - 1,750) 381b

380

Miniature bluewing teal drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.   Crowell’s rectangular

(1,200 - 1,500)

Miniature wood duck, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Rare tucked head pose. Maker’s rectangle stamp on underside. Numbered ‘23’

stamp is in the underside. 4.25” long.  Several tiny paint

in pencil. Measures 3 3/4” long.  Tiny paint flake in tip

flakes missing at wingtips, otherwise very good and origi-

of bill, otherwise excellent and original.

nal. 381

Miniature pintail drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  5.5” long. Signed by

(1,250 - 1,750)

Miniature mallard drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  5” long.  Several tiny paint flakes missing from base otherwise very good and original.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

382

(1,200 - 1,500)

(1,800 - 2,200)

Miniature Canada goose, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Maker’s rectangle stamp on underside. Identified on the underside. Measures 5 3/4” long.  Tiny spot of touch up on one side of bill, otherwise excellent and original.

Provenance: Ex Fred Noyes collection. Ex Gary Giberson collection. James and Patricia Doherty collection.

(1,800 - 2,200)

255


Contemporary carvings 382a

Excellent pair of wood duck, Bob White, Tullytown, Pennsylvania. Both signed and dated 1987 with Bob’s quail weight. Turned heads. Raised wing primaries and carved tails. 15” long. Excellent and original. (2,000 - 2,500)

382a

382b

382d

382c

382e

382b

Herring gull, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia. Signed “McNair” on side of keel. Center cut hollow

Rare eider drake, Roger Barton, San Francisco, California. Hollow body with turned head. Glass eyes.

carved with split tail and carved eye. 18” long. Strong

Branded “RB” on underside. 16” long. Paint has been

original paint that has been darkened and stressed for the

stressed for appearance of age.

appearance of age.

382d

382e 382c

Rare and early hooded merganser drake, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia. Signed on underside “M. McNair.” Head is reaching over back. Wingtips are raised. Carved in the Delaware River tradition. 11” long. Strong original paint with stress aging to surface. (2,000 - 3,000)

256

(1,000 - 1,500)

(1,800 - 2,200)

Pair of mallards, Bob White, Tullytown, Pennsylvania. Bob White weight on undersides. Both are signed and dated 2001. Hen is 16.25” long. Very good and original. (950 - 1,250)


Jim Schmiedlin 1945 - 2015 | Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania 383

Bluewing teal drake, Jim Schmiedlin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.  Jim’s Reward for Return label on underside, dated 12/2000. Also branded “JAS.” Head is reared back and turned. Detailed carving at wingtips and tail. 13” long.  Excellent and original.

(4,000 - 5,000)

383 384

Ringneck drake, Jim Schmieldin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.  “Reward for Return” on underside. Dated 8/05 and branded “JAS”. Head is turned and slightly reared back. Subtle tail carving. 13.5” long.  Near mint.

(3,000 - 4,000)

384 385

Old squaw drake, Jim Schmiedlin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.  Signed and branded JAS. Slightly turned head and relief wing carving. 16” long  Hairline crack partway through neck, otherwise good and original.

(4,000 - 6,000)

385 386

Gunning pair of surf scoters, Jim Schmieldin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.  Both signed and dated, with Jim’s hunting notes stating used at Kelley Island, Ohio and Erie, Pennsylvania. Jim dated them 9/2000. Comments on underside from Jim say lower body reseal and paint maintenance in 2011. Fine feather carving and tail outlines on both.  Original Schmieldin paint; heads are turned. (5,000 - 8,000)

386

257


Elmer Crowell 1862 - 1952 | East Harwich, Massachusetts

258


387

Exceptional Canada goose, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Feather rasping on head and breast. Maker’s oval brand in underside. Measures 22 1/2” long.  Original paint with very minor wear; some flaking to filler at neck seat; drying split in the underside.

Provenance: From a home in Little Compton, Rhode Island and acquired directly from Crowell. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. (20,000 - 30,000)

259


389

389

388

260


388

Rare canvasback drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts. circa 1930.  Maker’s stamp twice in underside. Carved fluted tail. Rasped head that is slightly turned. Rasping on the breast. Fine feather paint detail. Shading to red areas of head. 15” long.   Excellent and original. (10,000 - 15,000)

389

Widgeon drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts, circa 1930.  Branded “WW” and “ELW” on underside. Bears Crowell’s rectangular stamp. Head is slightly turned. Back of head and breast are rasped. 16” long.  Strong original paint has mellowed nicely; tight crack in neck; very small amount of restoration to rough area at tip of tail.

(12,000 - 18,000)

261


390

Pair of bluewing teal, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s rectangular stamp is in the underside of each. Both have slightly turned heads. Hen is 11.5” long. Both have detailed feather paint.  Each has small amount of touchup at the neck seam, hairline crack with touch up on one side of hen’s neck seat; otherwise excellent and original.

390

262

(14,000 - 18,000)


391

391

Pair of goldeneye, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Both have Crowell’s rectangular stamp in the underside. Slightly turned heads. Drake is 14” long.  Near mint original paint; structurally excellent. (6,500 - 9,500)

263


Harry M. Shourds 1890 - 1943 | Ocean City, New Jersey The old adage “the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree” would certainly seem to apply to Harry Mitchell Shourds. His famous (in decoy circles) father, Harry Vinucksen Shourds was a house painter by trade and his son was to learn from and follow his father in that occupation. Likewise, Harry M learned how to carve decoys from his father and was to go on to produce some of the finest decoys to emerge from the Garden State. Noted authority, Jim Doherty, recognized father and son as two of New Jersey’s four best carvers along with Rowley Horner and Lloyd Parker. Harry M produced decoys that are extremely difficult to differentiate from Harry V’s work, which is understandable when one realizes that he was using the family patterns and , being a painter, was imminently capable of mimicing his father’s colors and feather patterns. Unfortunately for the collector, despite the exceptional quality of his decoys, Harry M produced only a fraction of the carvings that his father did. H.M Shourds was born in Tuckerton, New Jersey, but the exact dates of his birth and death are subject to some debate. Authors Doherty, Gosner and Fleckenstein cite his dates as 1890 – 1943. The 1890 birth appears on his WWI and WWII draft registrations but census records claim his entrance into the world anywhere from 1890 to 1892. His actual death, based on two of his published obituaries was June, 1944.

As a young man, he attended school but quickly entered the work force. By age 19, he was listed as single, employed as a house painter and living in Tuckerton with, and presumably working for, his father. At some point between 1910 and 1915, he married his first wife Luetta (Lenetta) Lode. This marriage lasted through at least 1920 when the couple and her mother were living on Asbury Ave in Ocean City. For some reason, this arrangement ended and, in 1923, Harry M married Martha Clemson and the pair moved to the opposite end of Asbury Ave. The family would grow to include a daughter and three sons. The youngest son was named after his grandfather and he, too, was destined to extend the family fame as a carver of fine decoys in his own right. Although he did duck hunt, Harry M also enjoyed upland hunting accompanied by his setters and beagles. His children fondly remember the happy times they spent afield with their father. His youngest son reminisced that “his father probably spent more quality time with his children than any man could today”. Ironically, Harry M acquired the nickname “Nuck” or Nucky”, something that one would normally associate with his father Harry Vinucksen Shourds. A life long painter and decoy carver, Harry Mitchell’s life was cut short by a stroke and he is buried in the Seaside Cemetery in Ocean City, New Jersey. Jim Doherty spent years scouring private collections and the decoy marketplace in order to obtain the best available examples of Harry Mitchell Shourds’ work for inclusion in his book. His efforts were successful as evidenced by the exceptional quality of H.M’s decoys being offered in this sale.

Courier Post, Camden (NJ). Fri. June 16, 1944

264


392

Very rare rigmate pair of redheads, Harry M. Shourds, Ocean City, New Jersey.  Hollow carved with inlet lead weights. Hen is the only one known by either H.V. or H.M. Shourds. Measure 14” long.  Original paint with moderate flaking and

base; some touch up to black on top of drake’s tail and to a small bill chip repair in one side of drake’s bill. Provenance: Ex collection of John Delph. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

wear; small dents and shot marks; drake has drying Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James R. Doherty, p. 82, exact decoys pictured. (15,000 - 25,000) cracks in back, tail, breast, and on one side of neck

265


393

393

Fine black duck, Harry M. Shourds, Ocean City, New Jersey, 1st quarter 20th century.  Hollow carved with tack eyes and scratch feather paint detail. Given to Harry V Shourds III when his fathers decoys were divided among his brothers and sisters. Very hard to find Shourds decoys in this condition. Measures 16 1/4” long.  A few very minor paint rubs and small dents, otherwise excellent and original.

Provenance: Shourds family rig. Ex Harry V Shourds III collection. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. Exhibited at the Ward Museum September 1995.

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys, James R. Doherty, p. 79, exact decoy pictured. (8,000 - 12,000)

266


394

394

Extremely rare brant, Harry M Shourds, Ocean City, New Jersey, 1st quarter 20th century.  Believed to be the only H.M. Shourds brant in original paint ever offered at auction. Hollow carved with carved eyes. Given to Harry V Shourds III when his fathers decoys were divided among his brothers and sisters. Measures 16 3/4” long.  Original paint with minor flaking and wear; some white paint along one side appears to have rubbed off another decoy it was placed next to when paint was still wet, some of the white paint has been cleaned off.

Provenance: Shourds family rig. Ex Harry V Shourds III collection. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. Exhibited Ward Museum of Waterfowl Art - June 2008

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys, James R. Doherty, p. 77, exact decoy pictured. “New Jersey Decoys,” Henry A. Fleckenstein, Jr., p. 100, exact decoy pictured.

(15,000 - 25,000)

267


395

Rare merganser drake, Bill Brown, Barnegat, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  15.5” long. Detailed bill carving and wooden crest.  Original paint; almost no wear; crack through neck.

Literature: “New Jersey Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr. (3,000 - 4,000)

395

396

Black duck, John Dorsett, Point Pleasant, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  Hollow carved. Measures 17” long.  Original paint with very minor wear; hairline cracks in breast and neck; small amount of filler added to one side of neck seat and tight crack in front of neck.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James R. Doherty, p. 136, exact decoys pictured.

396

(2,000 - 3,000)

397

Bluebill drake, Joe Tom Cramer, Manahawkin, New Jersey, circa 1900.  Hollow carved. Measures 15” long.  Original paint on back and bill; black and white areas are an early second coat with minor flaking and wear, mostly on breast; tight crack in one eye; reset crack in one side of neck and head.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty col-

397

268

lection sticker on underside. (1,000 - 1,500)


398

398

Outstanding classic model bluebill, Nathan Rowley Horner, West Creek, New Jersey, 2nd quarter 20th century.  Hollow carved with painted eyes and nice bill carving. Measures 14” long.  Small spot of touch up to a flake on back and one on side, otherwise outstanding original condition.

Provenance: Ex Bill and Elizabeth Cross collection. Ex Jimmy and Debbie Allen collection. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James R. Doherty, p. 104, exact decoys pictured.

(10,000 - 18,000)

269


399

Fine black duck, Nathan Rowley Horner, West Creek, New Jersey, 2nd quarter 20th century.  Hollow carved with ice groove and painted brass tack eyes. ‘Sander’ painted on the lead weight for the rig of Robert Sander who purchased them directly from Horner in 1936. Measures 16 1/4” long.  Original paint with very minor wear; a few small spots of flaking above nail holes; one small filled defect in wood on underside and two on one lower side.

Provenance: Ex Robert Sander rig. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James R. Doherty, p. 107, exact decoys pictured. (10,000 - 15,000)

270


400

High head model bluebill drake, Nathan Rowley Horner, West Creek, New Jersey.  Hollow carved with painted eyes. Measures 13 3/4” long.  Original paint with minor wear; one eye was moved when the decoy was made; strip of touch up along body seam on each side.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James R. Doherty, p. 106, exact decoys pictured.

(6,000 - 10,000)

271


Fish “In the folk art tradition, effigies depicting humans often function as memorials. In this sense, fish models, plaques and rendering qualify as folk art effigies on two levels. First, they exist as visual remembrances of a particular fish that was caught. Secondly, they also commemorate a specific act of catching - an act that becomes (through the effigy) a memorialized event. In Swanson’s account, the fish effigy is more than a simple likeness. Filtering his narrative through the skein of longing that comprise the modern idea of folk art, he presents fish effigies as talismanic relics produced for, and consumed by, generations of anglers”

By Michael Hall, Hamtramck, Michigan, October 2008. According to Ron Swanson’s book, “Fly-fishing as a sport or a peaceful pastime had been practiced by a small number of individual since the fifteenth century, but it was not until the reign of George IV of England (1820 -

1830) that it started to become fashionable. During King George’s short reign, angling became a court amusement attracting the interest of the upper classes and some writers who passed on the delights of the latest sporting activity. As fishing for sport gathered momentum, the idea of preserving specimens of particularly large or important fish also became popular. The science of taxidermy that had been around for centuries, was undoubtedly the first method used to preserve trophies, but until recently this ancient technique was not a very permanent way to preserve a fish. In fact, for nearly two hundred years the finest British taxidermists enclosed their stuffed or ‘put up’ fish in airtight glass cases so they would be preserved a little longer.” The emergence of carved and painted trophy fish can be directly related to the problems associated with taxidermy detailed above.

401

401

Large and important Atlantic salmon trophy fish plaque, P.D. Malloch Company of Perth.  Writing on backboard “River Bjora 27th of July 1935. 42 lbs. JAC.” 40 lb. fish are rare to find and this is an exceptional example. Malloch fish are carved with 3/4 of body showing, with painted and framed wooden plaque. Carved eye, gills, and superb original paint. Board measures 20” x 54”.   A very small amount of restoration between the eye and mouth; knot in the body has pushed slightly; mild crazing to painting below midline on body.

401

(16,000 - 20,000)


402

402

Large and important striped bass, Phillippe Sirois, Arrowsic, Maine, 2nd quarter 20th century.  The largest known

402

fish model by Sirois with carved incising on gills and fins. Carved from a bass that Sirois caught in the Sasona River. Scale stamping on most of the body and gills. Fish measures 38” long and the plaque measures 44”.  Original varnish has darkened with age; anal fin was professionally reset at the body at some point, otherwise excellent and original. Provenance: A private Florida collection. Literature: North American Decoys Magazine, Fall 1979, p. 18-19, exact carving pictured. Decoy Magazine, May/June 2000 issue, exact carving pictured. (6,000 - 9,000)

403

403

Large brook trout, Lawrence Irvine, Winthrop, Maine.  Mounted on desirable painted backboard. Fish measures 19” long.  Pectoral fin has been broken and reattached.

(1,000 - 1,500)

273


274


Spear Fishing Made for the purpose of being suspended below the surface of winters ice. Fish decoys are attached by a line, which when carefully manipulated swims the wooden fish up and down in a circular motion, imitating swimming or wounded fish. Once the decoy has attracted the interest of a large predator fish, preferably a musky or pike, the fisherman thrusts an iron spear into the water, harpooning the prey. The art of spear fishing was invented by the Native Americans and has been around for a few hundred years. The popularity of spear fishing grew from the late 1800¹s into the 1960 and in some states is legal today.

Oscar Peterson

405

One of the longest pike fish decoy we have seen, Oscar Peterson, Cadillac, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century.  Rare glass eye model. Measures 15” long x 1” wide x 2” tall. Excellent bear paw pattern on both sides. With carved detailing on underside of gills.  Excellent original paint protected by a light coat of varnish; paint has crazed tightly in some areas to show good age; small flaking around one eye; a few small nicks or dents with paint loss. (10,000 - 15,000)

275


406

An early and excellent perch fish decoy, Oscar Peterson, Cadillac, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century.   A thick body that measures 1.25” wide x 1.6” tall x 9.25” long.  Excellent original paint protected by a coat of varnish; minimal paint loss at fins; one small mark in body.

407

(6,000 - 10,000)

Fish decoy, Hans Janner, Mount Clemens, Michigan.  Small mouth bass. Natural side body with painted head and belly. Glass eyes. 11.5” long.  Nice worn patina; multiple layers of paint on underbelly by Janner; small repair to lower portion of tail fin; dorsal fin is original, other metal fins are a professional replacement.

276

(3,000 - 6,000)


408

Fish decoy, Oscar Peterson, Cadillac, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century.  Carved eye model. 7” long x .75” wide x 1” tall.  Original paint protected by a coat of varnish; some paint loss at metal fins; one small rub.

409

(1,500 - 2,500)

408

Fish decoy, Oscar Peterson, Cadillac, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century.  Brown trout. 9” long x 1” wide x 1.5” tall.  Original paint protected by a coat of varnish; rough area at front of face has been darkened slightly; paint loss at underside of fin.

410

(800 - 1,200)

409

Fish decoy, Oscar Peterson, Cadillac, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century.  A small sucker, 4.75” long x .6” wide x 1” tall. Tack eyes.  Strong original paint protected by a coat of varnish; light wear; some paint loss at fins; professional restoration to small area at rear fin.

410

(500 - 700)

411

Fish decoy, Leroy Howell, Hinkley, Minnesota.  Flower fish in an unusual color. Dark orange with three painted fins of orange and brown. 5” long.  Original and good.(1,000 - 1,500) 411

412

Large fish decoy, Leroy Howell, Hinkley, Minnesota, 1st half 20th century.  11” long. Double bat wings. Wood imperfection has been reglued. $1.75 price written on underside.  Original paint; staining and discoloration; a hole through one metal fin.

413

(500 - 1,000)

412

Fish decoy, Leroy Howell, Hinkley, Minnesota.  Flower fish with green body, red a white dots. 6.5” long.  Very slight tarnish to bat wing, side fins, otherwise excellent and original.

(1,000 - 1,500) 413

277


414

Fish decoy, John Tax, Osakis, Minnesota.  Blue gill. With yellow and green body. Scalloped dorsal fin and carved eye. 5” long.  Repair to lower third of tail; paint is heavily worn; appears to be original.

(600 - 800)

414

415

Fish decoy, Ryden, Minnesota.  Tack eyes with strong original green and orange paint. 5.5” long. Carved gill and mouth.  Protected by a coat of varnish, which was only partially applied to the tail.

415

416

(600 - 800)

Fish decoy, Fred Lexow, Minnesota.  A rare small size with glass eyes. 5” long.  Original paint has worn evenly; bare wood exposed at some spots.

(600 - 800)

416

417

Fish decoy, William Faue.  Highly decorated paint pattern with painted eyes, mouth, and gills. 5.5” long.  Light wear.

(700 - 1,000)

417 418

Early fish decoy, Frank Mizera, Ely, Minnesota.  Black with orange and yellow decoration. Light wear. 7.75” long.  Original and good. (800 - 1,200)

418

419

Fish decoy, Leroy Howell, Hinkley, Minnesota.  Rare yellow color with red eye. 8” long.  Slightly tarnished fins otherwise excellent and original. (800 - 1,200)

419

278


420

Fish decoy, Frank Mizera, Ely, Minnesota.  Unusual small size, blue with black and white dots. 5.75” long.  Light wear; original and good. (800 - 1,200) 420

421

Rare color fish decoy, Earnie Newman, Minnesota.  Two shades of green on body with glass eyes. Red, white, and yellow dots. 7.25” long.  Some flaking to fins. (800 - 1,200)

421 422

Fish decoy, William Faue, Minnesota.  A large fish with painted fins. 10.5” long.  Original paint has crazed evenly to create an appealing surface; some paint loss on fins. (1,000 - 1,500) 422

423

Fish decoy, Leroy Howell, Hinkley, Minnesota.  A fat fish with carved gills. Natural sides with white painted underside. Measures 7.5”.  Fins have tarnished slightly; otherwise very good and original.

(1,000 - 1,500) 423

424

Fish decoy, Chet Sawyer, Minnesota, 1st half 20th century.  Silver fish with red accents and pearl eyes. 5” long. Carved gill and mouth.  Original paint with several rubs; rough area at front of face; paint loss on fins.

424a

(400 - 600)

424

Early fish decoy, Pearl Bethel, Park Rapids, Minnesota.  Trout with yellow and pink body color. Coat of varnish has mellowed and darkened the paint surface. 6.5” long.  Light wear. (300 - 600) 424a

279


Ward Brothers Crisfield, Maryland

425

426

425

280

Pair of bluebills, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Each signed and dated 1967. For the

426

Redhead drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  1932 model. From the Deale Island

Waterfield collection. Highly detailed paint stippling

Club.  Original paint; minor wear; very lightly hit by

on back of each. Fancy feather painting between

shot; small crack in underside; at one time the head

wings. Each has a turned head. 14” long.  Very good

was repainted as a bluebill it has since been cleaned

and original.

and had redhead paint restored.

(4,000 - 6,000)

(4,000 - 6,000)


427

Pair of bluebills, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated 1972 with poem on undersides. Shooting stool models. Both have slightly turned heads.  Very good and original.

(2,500 - 3,500)

427

428

Canada goose, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland, circa 1930.   23.5” long. Slightly turned head.  Old in use repaint; traces of original showing on back; chip and crack repairs with touch up on neck. (2,500 - 3,000)

428 429

Canada goose, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland, early 1930s.   23” long. Slightly turned head.  Paint was restored a number of years ago; crack in neck; several filled cracks in body.

(2,000 - 3,000)

429 430

Early Canada goose, Lloyd Tyler, Crisfield, Maryland, circa late 1920s.    Old in use repaint; professional bill chip repair; small cracks; gouge missing from one side; small hole drilled in back; age split in underside.

(1,750 - 2,250)

430

281


431

Exceedingly rare and important swimming brant, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland, circa 1928.  Believed to be the only cedar brant made by the Ward Brothers. With painted embellishment on the underside identifying it as being from the Prescott collection. Appears to have been rigged but never used with the rigging removed at some point. Measures 23” long.  Excellent original paint; hairline crack in one side of neck, otherwise excellent and original.

Provenance: Ex Prescott collection. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. Exhibited at the Ward Brothers Decoy Exhibit and exhibition book, “Timeless Treasures, Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art, Salisbury University, August December 2007.

282

(35,000 - 55,000)


283


432

432

Classic 1936 model pintail drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Slightly turned

433

Stylish canvasback drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  1936 model with desirable

head. Good feather paint detail on back.  Original

Ward stamp underneath tail. Head is turned. 16”

paint that has darkened with age; crack through

long.  Dry original paint; with rubs to bare wood at

neck base.

edges of tail and bill and a few small spots on body.

(7,000 - 10,000)

(7,000 - 10,000)

433

284


434

Mallard hen, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  1936 style with slightly turned head and excellent paint detail. Signed and dated 1940 on the underside. Measures 17 1/4” long.  A few minor flakes to filler at neck seat, otherwise excellent unused condition with a warm patina.

Provenance: Ex Tom Hinman collection. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

(15,000 - 25,000)

285


435

Rigmate pair of bluebills, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  1932 models, but marked 1938. Drake has turned head. Both have ice dips behind the neck. Hen is 15.5” long.  Original paint; moderate wear; short crack on front side of drake’s neck; both have filler missing from nail in top of head; small chip missing from one end of hen’s tail; slight roughness to edge of bill.

(5,000 - 8,000)

435

436

Rare merganser drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Shooting stool model. 16” long with turned head and wooden crest. Signed and dated 1966 with a poem on the underside.  Very good and original.

436

286

(4,000 - 6,000)


437

1936 model mallard drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  “VL&A” stamp under the tail. Slightly turned head.  Near mint original paint; structurally excellent, never used. (10,000 - 14,000)

287


438

Bluebill hen, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Fat jaw style. Underside reads, “Lemuel T Ward made in his old barbershop in 1918, repainted 1970” and signed. Head is turned. Slightly carved tail. 12” long.  Restored paint.

438

439

Redhead drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland, circa 1918.  Fat jaw style. Relief carved wings and shoulders. Head is turned and slightly looking up. Signed by Lem and Steve Ward on underside.  Paint has been restored probably by the Ward Brothers. (4,000 - 6,000)

439

288

(3,000 - 5,000)


440

Large Canada goose, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland, circa 1930.  Head turned strongly to the left. Deep ice grove behind head with nicely overhanging tail and finely detailed bill carving. Signed by Lem Ward on the bottom along with the notation “1930 – made for the Deal Island Club”.  Tight cracks in neck and back; right eye replaced; restored working repaint with rubs to wood and some shot marks.

Provenance: Ex Ellery Clark collection and so noted on the bottom.

440

(1,500 - 2,000) 441

Black duck, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.   1936 model with slightly turned head. 16.5” long.  Paint has been restored; a few small dents. (1,500 - 2,000)

441

442

Canvasback drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland, circa late 1920s.  15” long. Slightly turned head.  Old in use repaint; age split in one side.

(1,500 - 2,000)

442

443

Black duck, Bob McGaw, Havre de Grace, Maryland, 1st quarter 20th century.  Strong scratch painting covering head and body. McGraw’s classic weight on underside.  Strong original paint; rub at chine line on one side of body; dowel has slightly exposed at top of head; a few small shot marks; professional repair to approximately 1/2” of front of bill.

(500 - 1,000) 443

289


William Bowman 1824 - 1906 | Lawrence, Long Island, New York

444

Very rare willet, William Bowman, Lawrence, Long Island, last quarter 19th century.  Plump shorebird with relief wing carving, and raised wing tips. Measures 12” long.  Original paint with minor gunning wear; chipping at each wing tip; small amount of filler and touch up on back of head; 75% of the bill is a professional replacement.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

Literature: “The Decoys of Long Island, an exhibit at the Ward Museum,” Fleming, Haid and Sieger, p. 39 and 68, exact decoy pictured.

290

(30,000 - 50,000)


291


445

445

Running black bellied plover, Wendell Squire, Hampton Bays, New York, mid 19th century.  A large decoy, approximately 12.25” long. Shoe button eyes and relief wing carving.  Worn original paint; small dents and shot marks; bill appears to be a professional replacement. (8,000 - 12,000)

445a

Yellowlegs by a member of the Verity family, Seaford, Long Island, last quarter 19th century. Relief wing carving and carved eyes. Measures 10 3/4” long. Original paint with moderate discoloration and wear; hit by shot; chipping on one edge of tail; chip in underside of bill; top of head was cracked off and reset; long chip in underside of bill.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

445a

292

(2,000 - 3,000)


446

Excellent black bellied plover, Daniel Demott, East Rockaway, New York, last quarter 19th century.  Measures 10 1/2” long.  Original paint with a warm patina and almost no wear; a few small shot marks.

Provenance: Rig of the maker and passed down in the family. Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

Literature: “The Decoys of Long Island, an Exhibit at the Ward Museum,” Fleming, Haid, and Sieger, p. 50 and 65, exact decoy pictured.

Daniel DeMott was the fourth of seven children born to Michael DeMott and his wife, Emaline Johnson. The family was living in the Rockville Centre section of Hempstead, and Michael’s occupation was listed as “farmer.” The rural nature of his father’s profession and his proximity to Jamaica Bay and the beaches and marshes of the Atlantic Ocean probably instilled a love of nature in the young Daniel. The area around his early home was once one of the largest oyster producing regions in the world and supported an active community of baymen and, ultimately, tourists, and year-round homes. At the age of 21 he married Anna Augusta, and the couple had three children; Alma, Robert, and Perry. His entire life was spent in Hempstead, which is comprised of a number of separate villages and hamlets, all with their own unique names. By 1870, his occupation was listed as “miller,” a profession he

(10,000 - 14,000)

would rely on for about the next 40 years. During this period, his millwork included both “feed” as well as “wood.” As late as 1905, he was listed as living in the East Rockaway section of the town, employed as a “miller.” By 1910, however, while still living in Hempstead, he listed his occupation as “house carpenter” and would list “carpenter” as his primary field of work for approximately the next 20 years. It is believed that he carved his first decoys as early as 1865 to be used as necessary tools in his market hunting ventures which, presumably, were a supplement to his other sources of income. His carpentry experience certainly would have given him the materials, tools, and skills needed to produce some of the finest decoys carved on Long Island. His wife died in 1926, and he retired shortly after that date and took up residence in the home of his brotherin-law in Oceanside, one of the many Hempstead villages. He is buried in Lynbrook Village, Hempstead, NY.

293


The Rogers Rig Decoys Jamaica Bay, Long Island, New York As was noted in his numerous obituaries, published as far away as Boston, MA, and Demoines, Iowa, he was extremely fond of hunting. He became president of the Jamaica Rod and Rifle Club where he is remembered as “ - - - one of the best shots of the organization. He was a good live bird shot and was never happier than when on a gunning

Pen and Ink sketch of Theodore Rogers

Bank of the Metropolis, NY, NY

Like so many genuinely great decoys, the identity of the maker(s) remains a mystery to this day. Some of the finest decoys to emerge from Long Island, unfortunately, fall into this category. Perhaps the most well-known of these are the shorebird decoys collectively referred to as the “Rogers Rig”. As one would suspect, most of the birds in this rig carry the hot brand of “T. Rogers”. This identifier was eventually traced to a Theodore Rogers (1831 – 1903) of Jamaica, Long Island. Mr. Rogers had a sad beginning to his life when his parents, Alexander and Elizabeth, both died when he was not yet seven years old. It is not clear who immediately raised the young Theodore and his brother and four sisters but, by the time he was 17, he was listed as a boarder in the family of Ruben and Marie Rogers. He was educated at the Union Hall Academy and upon completion of his education entered into the mercantile business under the supervision of ex-senator Monroe Henderson in Manhattan. The young man must have enjoyed the challenging environment of the business world and he soon became a teller in the American Exchange Bank in the City. This was the beginning of what was to become a highly successful career in banking. From his initial position, he moved to the National Shoe and Leather Bank and, at the incorporation of The Bank of the Metropolis, he was hired as “head teller”. He steadily advanced and eventually rose to the position of president of that bank – a position he held for twenty years. Ill health and bouts of paralysis finally forced his retirement, at which point, the bank appointed him to the newly formed position of President of the Board of Directors, a title he held until the time of his death. Mr. Rogers never married and, was a life-long resident of Jamaica, Long Island. There he boarded on the large farm of Mr. and Mrs. William Williamson and he maintained a cottage at Three Mile Mill on the shore of Jamaica Bay where he spent his summers and entertained a variety of guests.

294

expedition”. His financial success allowed him to purchase 3000 acres of waterfront and dunes in North Carolina which, although he did not live to see its completion, was to become the famous Pilentary Hunting Club in Carteret County. From July 1, 1854 through May 29, 1863, Theodore kept a hunting journal that might reveal details of his hunts and its contents may be discussed in the forthcoming book on Long Island Decoys by Mr. Ron McGrath Although a quiet and discreet man, he was heavily involved in a variety of local organizations. He was a member of the New York State Association for the Protection of Fish and Game; the Aldine Club of New York City; The Jamaica Club of Jamaica, Long Island; the Wyandanch Club of Smithtown, Long Island; The Bellport Gun Club of Great South Bay; and the Carman’s River Fishing Club of Brookhaven, Long Island. He enjoyed the arts and was a patron of the Jamaica Chorale Society and a member of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. He was well liked in the community and, when discussing his improving health in a 1902 issue of the (Brooklyn) Times Union newspaper, the reporter wrote: “This information is received with unspeakable pleasure, as there is no one in Jamaica who enjoys the esteem of the community in greater measure than Mr. Rogers”.

His success in business allowed him to amass a very sizable estate reported to be as high as three million dollars at the time of his death – a huge sum of money in its day. He left no immediate family and the monies were distributed among his nephews and nieces with sums going to a few close associates and the Williamsons with whom he resided for much of his life. Theodore Rogers is buried in the Prospect Cemetery in his chosen home of Jamaica, NY. His hunting rig consisted of shorebirds carved by more than one (unknown) maker. The decoys that have received the most acclaim are the uniquely designed plovers and dowitchers that have a plump, tucked head appearance which would certainly have given the illusion of a wellfed, content, flock in a safe, bountiful area. Some of his decoys bear the brand/overbrand of J. S. Fosdick for Jay Sheldon Fosdick. Mr. Fosdick had, like Mr. Rogers, a home/ cottage on Three Mile Mill and he would have been 22 when Theodore Rogers died. He apparently acquired all or a portion of the shorebird rig from the Rogers’ estate. Some of the yellowlegs decoys that bear only the Fosdick brand are seemingly patterned after the yellowlegs in the Rogers rig that were carved by, presumably, a different hand than the plovers and dowitchers.


449

448

450

447 447 - 450 447

Rare curlew from the Roger’s Rig, Jamaica Bay, New York, last quarter 19th century.  Carved eyes and ‘T Rogers’ branded on the underside. Measures

Dowitcher in fall plumage from the Rogers rig, Jamaica Bay, New York, last quarter 19th century.  Painted eyes. Branded ‘T. Rogers’ in the under-

12 1/4” long.  Original paint with very minor wear;

side. Measures 11”. Original paint with minor flaking

lightly hit by shot; stick hole position was changed and

and wear; dents in underside.

filled in the making and the filler has risen slightly.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. (8,000 - 12,000)

448

449

Rare ruddy turnstone from the Rogers rig, Jamaica Bay, New York, last quarter 19th century.  Plump shorebird with carved eyes. Measures

collection sticker on underside. Literature: “The Decoys of Long Island, an Exhibit at the Ward Museum,” Fleming, Haid, and Sieger. (5,000 - 8,000) 450

10 1/4” long.  Original paint with very minor wear; tiny chip at stick hole and a fine hairline crack in the

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

Literature: “The Decoys of Long Island, an Exhibit at the Ward Museum,” Fleming, Haid, and Sieger, p. 58 and 64, exact decoy pictured.

(6,000 - 9,000)

Dowitcher in spring plumage from the Rogers rig, Jamaica Bay, New York, last quarter 19th century.  Carved eyes. Measures 10 1/2” long.  Original paint with minor wear; hairline crack in one side of bill.

underside, otherwise excellent structurally.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

Literature: “The Decoys of Long Island, an Exhibit at the Ward Museum,” Fleming, Haid, and Sieger. (5,000 - 8,000)

295


Robert Morse 1881 - 1971 | Churches Island, North Carolina

False Cape Gunning Club Bob Morse and Hattie

Bob Morse was born in Duck on the Currituck Banks and, with the exception of a period around 1920, he spent his whole life in the area of Poplar Branch and Churches Island. His father was a fisherman and Bob, with only a fourth grade education, earned all or a portion of his income as a fisherman throughout his life. For most years recorded in the census, he listed his primary occupation as “carpenter”, either in a shipyard or as a contractor. His death certificate records him as a “boat builder” and, during his life, he was highly sought after by many who admired his craftsmanship. While it was legal, he hunted for the market. To be successful as a hunter, one needed decoys and Bob began to make his own starting in about 1900 and continued to do so for more than sixty years. These were carved in the traditional regional style and were so successful that he was soon taking orders for rigs from area guides, gun clubs and individual sportsmen. He is remembered as making a particularly distinctive rig for the False Cape Gunning Club. Many well-known individuals made decoys on Church’s Island and when orders began to become backlogged, Bob would hire

a neighbor, Joe Hayman, to help him in his shop. His production was centered around those species which would be the targets of the local gunners and large quantities were needed for the sinkbox rigs. His ruddy ducks are scarce and, as noted in “Gunnin’ Birds”: “Bob Morse ruddy ducks - - - have exceptional form. They have an alert high head position and they show up well on the water. These decoys are significant and rare.”

Robert Morse never acquired great wealth. He always lived in a rented home and lived a modest life. He married his wife, Hattie, in 1903 and they raised a large family on Bob’s efforts. In his obituary, he is listed as a widower with 22 grandchildren and 40 great grandchildren.

452

Excellent ruddy duck, Robert Morse, Churches Island, North Carolina.  Classic form with ‘V’ shaped underside. Measures 11 1/4” long.  Thin original paint with minor gunning wear; drying crack in one lower side with an old chip out of the underside; tight crack through neck.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

Literature: “Gunnin’ Birds,” Kroghie Andresen. (20,000 - 30,000)

296


297


453

Redhead drake, Lee Dudley, Knotts Island, North Carolina.  Branded “LD” in underside. With carved tail. Slight ice groove or shoulder carving in back. Head sits back slightly on body. With well distinguished chine line. Retains the same club style carving as his ruddy ducks with the cut tail and “LD” brand.  Old paint that is a mix of original and early strengthening; vertical crack at back of head; shot scars in head and body; crack at base of neck and at narrow portion of neck where a hunter restrengthened it with added nails; head is original; white paint has worn off to expose bare wood; retains original Dudley weight.

298

(15,000 - 20,000)


The brand “LD” in the underside of this redhead helps date it to Lee Dudley’s earliest period of decoys. This rig was made for Dudley’s personal use, eventually being sold to a Knotts Island Gun Club in 1913, according to what he told Joel Barber in an interview in the 1930s.

299


Alvirah Wright 1869 - 1951 | Duck, North Carolina

Born in Camden, North Carolina in 1869, Alvirah Wright worked as a logger harvesting the juniper and cypress that grew around Camden. He was also recognized as a highly skilled boat builder. Wright made mostly canvasbacks and ruddy ducks. All of his decoys have high graceful heads, large bodies and delicately carved bills. The bodies of his decoys were wide across the stern, much like a boat, with hand chopped tails. Decoys by Alvirah Wright remain among the most highly prized of the North Carolina makers.

300


454

Ruddy duck, Alvirah Wright, Duck, North Carolina, 1st quarter 20th century.  Measures 10 1/2’” long. Part of a rig of 12 that were all repainted as coots around 75 years ago.  Original paint with moderate flaking and wear; drying cracks in breast and body with two nails added in one side to secure a larger crack; tight drying cracks in head and neck.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. (15,000 - 20,000)

301


455

456

455

Pair of cast iron ruddy duck wing ducks, last quarter 19th century.  From a foundry. Just under 9” long.  Rusted with some pitting.

302

(1,500 - 2,500)

456

Very rare cast iron Canada goose sink box decoy.  21.5” long.  Original and good. (2,500 - 3,500)


457

Rare Canada goose, James Best, Kittyhawk, North Carolina.  23.75” long. Exceptionally fine form.  Repainted a long time ago for use as a swan; much of the paint has flaked off showing the original goose paint; two cracks through neck; thin cracks in lower side and underside.

Literature: “Gunnin birds,” Kroghie Andresen. “North American decoys,” Oct-Dec 1964 issue. (15,000 - 20,000)

303


Decoratives

458

459

461

462 460 458

Pair of 2/3 size pintails, Lloyd Tyler, Crisfield, Maryland.  Drake is just under 12” long. Both have slight-

and detailed feather carving. Signed and dated 1977

ly turned heads and feather paint detail.  Original paint

15”.  Excellent and original.

with minor wear; crack partway through drake’s neck; two cracks in underside of drake. 459

(2,000 - 3,000)

Pair of 1/3 size toucans on wooden bases, Frank Finney, Cape Charles, Virginia.   Taller is just under 9”.

on the underside. Measures 15” long with a wing span of

collection sticker on underside. 461

coloration and paint mellowing to white wooden areas;

(1,000 - 1,400)

ing mallards with applied wings and detailed feather painting. Drake’s with open bills. Signed and dated 1975 and 1978. Wing spans from 13 1/2” to 14 3/4”. Decorative flying 3/4 size pintail with outstretched wings

304

Swan, George Crosson, Back Bay, Virginia.  Canvas head position. 30” long.  Strong original paint; little dis-

carving and carved eyes.  Paint has been aged.

Five miniatures, R.J. Platt.  Two pairs of 1/2 size fly-

(500 - 900)

over wire frame and wood body. Reared and dipping

Both have serifed “F” carving in underside . Relief wing

460

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty

structurally excellent. 462

(700 - 900)

Pair of flat bottom style pintails, George Strunk, Glendora, New Jersey.  Signed and dated 2006. Drake is 21” long. Both have carved crossed wingtips and fluted tails.  Very good and original.

(800 - 1,200)


463 463

463

463

Three piece wall display of nine yellowlegs mounted on driftwood, Reggie Birch, Germany and Chincoteague, Virginia.  Birds are in various positions, each exhibits carved shoulders and wings with slightly dropped wingtips. Each piece measures approximately 30” long.  Very good and original.

464

(1,500 - 2,000)

Early decorative passenger pigeon on sassafras branch, 1st quarter 20th century.  Relief wing carving and incised tail feathers. Passenger pigeons fed on sassafras berries in fall and the maker used a piece of sassafras as a perch. Surface has darkened with age, excellent and original.

Provenance: From the estate of a Connecticut resident whose relative had worked at the Cincinnati Zoo, once home to Martha, the last living passenger pigeon.

(1,000 - 1,500)

464

305


465

Downey woodpecker, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.  Raised wing tip and incised feather carving. A rare species for the maker. Measures 8 3/4” long.  Original paint with moderate flaking; chip in underside of bill; chips in tail with one being reglued.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

(1,200 - 1,800)

465

466

Black duck head, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Feather rasping on back of head and detailed bill carving. Base was made by David B. Ward, Essex, Connecticut and stamped ‘DBW’ in the underside. Dowelled head is removable from wooden base. Head measures 6 1/4” long.  Some very minor paint rubs, oth-

466

erwise excellent and original. (500 - 800)

467

Cardinal, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.  Dropped wing and incised tail feather carving. Measures 9 1/4” long.  Small chips in tail, on top of crest, and to the very tip of bill, otherwise excellent and original.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

(2,000 - 3,000)

467

468

Three 1/2 size song birds, Frank Finney, Cape Charles, Virginia.  Signed. Also serifed “F” carved under the base. Prairie warbler, goldfinch, and Canada warbler. Prairie warbler, the largest, is 5.25” long. Good carving detail.  Very good and original.

468

306

(1,500 - 2,000)


469

470

471

469

472

Four 1/2 size flying ducks, Roy Conklin, Alexandria Bay, New York.  Stamped RAC and Roy Conklin Jr

473

471

Pintail drake, Bob Kerr, Smith Falls, Ontario.  Just under 18” long. Carved crossed wingtips. Branded and

Alexandria Bay New York.” Widgeon is 8” long. Both have

signed, “Made for Raymond Kennedy 1974.”  Excellent

carved feet and extended wings. Made to hang on the

and original.

(800 - 1,200)

wall.  Bluewing teal drake has broken and reglued foot, reglued, widgeon drake has break in wing that has been

1/4 size jack Russel terrier on wooden base, Frank Finney, Cape Charles, Virginia.  Dog is 6” long.  Very

reglued, otherwise original and good.

good and original.

greenwing teal drake has break in wing that has been

470

472

(1,500 - 2,500)

Quail family on tree fungus base, 1st quarter 20th century.  16” wide. Feather carving at wings, glass eyes.  Original paint with minor wear; structurally good. (1,500 - 2,000)

473

(500 - 700)

3/4 size decorative standing goose, Tad Beach, Eastville, Virginia.  Standing on one leg with slightly turned head and raised wing tips. Highly detailed feather carving. Signed on the underside of base and dated 1987. Measures 16” long and stands 17” tall with base.  Excellent and original.

(600 - 900)

307


George Boyd 1873 - 1941 | Seabrook, New Hampshire George H. Boyd was born in November 1873 in Seabrook, New Hampshire where he spent his entire life until his death in 1941 at age 67, less than a mile from the house in which he was born. Until Jim Cullen wrote his book, “Finely Carved & Nicely Painted,”little was known of George Boyd other than the fact that he made beautiful duck and goose decoys, shorebirds, and miniatures. Dan Graf, well known collector of George Boyd’s work, noted in his forward of Jim Cullen’s book that “Mr. Boyd not only carved shorebirds and waterfowl, but also provided sneak floats, sculling oars, clam shucking knives, and most any other tool needed to harvest products of the marsh and tidal flats along our shoreline.”

474

Rare swimming Canada goose, George Boyd, Seabrook, New Hampshire.  Canvas over wood slat construction with tack eyes. One of a few known in original paint. Measures 30 1/4” long.  Original paint with minor gunning wear; lightly hit by shot; 1” tear in canvas behind neck seat; hairline crack in bottom board; the original head was reset at some point with small amount of glue visible at neck seat.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside. (30,000 - 50,000)

308


309


475

Early redhead hen, Keyes Chadwick, Oaks Bluff, Massachusetts, 1st quarter 20th century. Tucked and reared back head with long body style. Donal C. O’Brien collection ink stamp on the underside. Measures 15 ¼” long. Original paint with minor wear and scattered touch ups to areas of flaking; very good structurally.

Provenance: Ex Donal C. O’Brien collection. Dr. John Dinan collection.

475

(3,000 - 4,000) 476

Eider drake, Thomas Alexander, Harpswell, Maine, circa 1900. Raised neck seat and relief bill carving. ‘TA’ carved into the underside at a later date. Measures 18” long. Original paint with minor to moderate gunning wear; tight crack through neck where an old nail was added; minor roughness on edge of tail; small chip in the underside of bill was smoothed out.

476

Dr. John Dinan collection. (3,000 - 5,000)

477

Canada goose, George Boyd, Seabrook, New Hampshire.  Canvas over wooden frame body with carved breast and neck.  Old in use repaint; minor damage to tail; several tears in the canvas; several small chips and cracks behind neck; small hole in lower breast.

Literature: “Finely Carved and Nicely Painted,” Jim Cullen.

(1,200 - 1,500)

477

478

Oversize canvas over wooden frame scoter, Captain Clarence Bailey, Kingston Massachusetts.  27.5” long.  Appealing old in use repaint; several small holes in canvas. (1,200 - 1,500)

478

310


Lou Rathmell 1898 - 1974 | Stratford, Connecticut

479

480

479

Hollow carved canvasback, Lou Rathmell, Stratford, Connecticut.  15.5” long. Ice dip behind

480

neck. Very slight wingtip carving.  Original paint with very minor discoloration and wear; structurally good.

Cork body black duck, Lou Rathmell, Stratford, Connecticut.  Slightly turned cedar head. Inserted cedar tail. 19” long.  Excellent and original.

Provenance: Dunford collection.

(4,000 - 6,000)

Provenance: Dunford collection. Literature: “Connecticut Decoys,” Henry Chitwood. (8,000 - 12,000)

311


Albert Laing 1811 - 1886 | Stratford, Connecticut

Albert Laing’s impact on decoy history is immense and almost unmeasurable. It is best described in the words of those that have written the most about him. “No single individual ever exerted a more direct or lasting

“Laing was an innovator, and he was the first, if not the

influence on the design and making of decoys. Albert Laing

first ever, to make hollow floating decoys – a model that

must be ranked as one of our greatest decoy makers.” When

became the norm in many parts of North America in the

discussing a particular sleeping black duck: “The black duck

second half of the nineteenth century.” – Robert Shaw

by him in plate 46 is to a decoy collection what a Rembrandt is to an art museum.” – William J. Mackey, Jr. “Among collectors today, no name is held in higher esteem than Albert Laing. He is acclaimed as the father of the Stratford School and recognized as one of the greatest decoy carvers who ever lived.” – Henry C. Chitwood

312


Fun Fact: Sometime in the late 1970’s collector and author Ron Swanson decided he was going to focus on pursuing rare decoys by Albert Laing. One of the first items on his acquisition list was a rare resting goldeneye drake owned by Donel O’Brien. Swanson needed the decoy for his collection. O’Brien fielded Swanson’s offer letters but O’Brien was not interested in cash. He wanted a good Midwestern or Canadian decoy. After numerous corresponding letters filled with detailed legalese, the trade items had been established. Swanson traded evenly a Tom Chambers wood duck drake for this exact Laing resting goldeneye.

481

Important hollow carved goldeneye drake, Albert Laing, Stratford, Connecticut and New York, New York, 3rd quarter 19th century.  Rare tucked head style. Branded “Laing” on

used to secure the two body halves have deterio-

in top of head has slightly raised.  A dry second

24, exact decoy.

rated leaving stains that bleed through the white paint.

Provenance: Formerly in the collections of Ron underside with second “Laing” brand over top. Ice Swanson, Donel O’Brien, and Tom Marshall. groove carved in back and unique bill indentation Literature: “American Decoys,” Quintina Colio, p. carved where lower side of bill meets face. Dowel (27,500 - 32,500)

coat of paint possibly by Shang Wheeler; nails

313


Shang Wheeler 1872 - 1949 | Stratford, Connecticut

Wheeler’s decoy production was limited and was never a commercial venture. He carved for his own pleasure and refused to sell his birds, giving most away to friends as gifts. His early birds were strictly for gunning the marshes at the mouth of the Housatonic River but his abundant artistic flair and talent finally led him to competition carving. In 1923, he entered the first Bellport, New York Decoy Show where he won first place in the amateur category. For twelve consecutive years he won first prize in the amateur category of the International Decoy Makers contest held annually at the Sportsman’s Show in New York City. He finally withdrew from competition feeling that “it was time to give somebody else a chance.”

314

He is renowned today as a member of Connecticut’s leading decoy triumvirate consisting of Albert Laing, Ben Holmes, and himself. His carvings certainly represent the Stratford School of carving at its pinnacle of perfection. His keen eye observed all the nuances of each species’s anatomy and feathering and are faithful reproductions of nature and accomplished works of art. Although he carved a wide variety of species for competition, he seems to have lavished most of his love on the black duck. It is said that “imitation is the greatest form of flattery” and Wheeler’s efforts were the inspiration for a host of Connecticut carvers to follow. Men such as Rathmell, Welles, Disbrow, Merwin, Bliss, and Breit, to name a few, followed closely in his footsteps and clearly reflect his influence in their work.


482

Exceptional hollow carved gunning black duck, Shang Wheeler, Stratford, Connecticut.  19” long. Fine feather paint detail. Slightly turned head with ice groove behind it.  Very small dent in underside of bill tack, otherwise excellent and original.

Provenance: Made by Wheeler and given to William B. Smith, a Stratford sportsman, hunting companion, and friend of his. Literature: “Shang,” Dixon Merkt. “Connecticut decoys,” Henry Chitwood.

(25,000 - 35,000)

315


483

483

Sleeping black duck, Albert Laing, Stratford, Connecticut, 3rd quarter 19th century.  Hollow carved with tear drop weight. 14.5” long.  Old in use repaint appears to be done by Shang Wheeler, eye position was changed slightly at this time; a few tiny dents.

Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph.

316

(8,000 - 12,000)


484

Hollow carved surf scoter, Albert Laing, Stratford, Connecticut, 3rd quarter 19th century.  14.5” long. Laing brand in the underside.  Paint is an old restoration; bill has been professionally restored; lightly hit by shot.

Provenance: Dunford collection. Formerly in collection of George Thompson. “GWT goose” stamp in underside.

(6,500 - 9,500)

317


Sink box decoys

486

486

487

Cast iron sinkbox decoy, canvasback drake.   Hole in tail; multiple coats of old paint.

487

(300 - 500)

Sink box decoy, probably a diver from New York, last quarter 19th century.  Nice aged surface. 13” long.  Remnants of old paint showing white speculum. (400 - 600)

488

488

489

490

Cast iron sinkbox decoy.  In the shape of a puddle duck. 16” long.  Very old green paint.

(400 - 600)

490

Cast iron sinkbox decoy. Bluebill drake probably Long Island, New York.  14”  Very old paint has worn slightly. (400 - 600)

489

Redhead drake cast iron sink box decoy.   14” long.  old paint.

318

(400 - 600)


491

492

494

493

495

491

Group of 10 golden plover silhouettes from Nantucket, Massachusetts. Includes 6 sticks. Bills,

493

Robin snipe in spring plumage from New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  8” long.  Original paint with

heads, and bodies all cut from a single piece of wood

minor wear; lightly hit by shot; bill is an appealing profes-

making a weak spot at the wood grain in bills. Measures

sional replacement.

(800 - 1,200)

10” long. All in excellent original paint; chips to all the 494

bills.

Provenance: Dr. John Dinan collection. Found on

11.75” long. Hollowed out from the underside. Marked

Nantucket Island where Dr. Dinan had a vacation home.

Johnson col.” Also marked picture see Mackey’s book

(1,500 - 2,500) 492

Black bellied plover, Rhodes Truex, Absecon, New Jersey.  Glass bead eyes. Measures 9 1/4”

Wind bird from Nantucket, Massachusetts, last quarter 19th century.  A yellowlegs with tack eyes.

p. 42.  Original paint with minor flaking and wear; very lightly hit by shot.

Provenance: Meyer collection.

495

Robin snipe from New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  7” long.  Original paint with minor wear; sev-

(1,200 - 1,500)

long.  Excellent and original with a warm patina. (800 - 1,200)

eral tiny dents and shot marks bill is an appealing professional replacement.

(800 - 1,200)

319


Items of Interest

496

497

496

Carved wooden fishing creel, Emile Robichaud, Medway, Maine.  Wood lathe construction with leather fish hinges and leather buckle. Carved brook trout, downward leaping. Pine drawings on top of creel with two flys and pine cones. Signed on underside by maker. 7.5” tall.  Protected by a coat of varnish that has mellowed slightly. (800 - 1,200)

497

Carved wooden fishing creel, Emile Robichaud, Medway, Maine.  Wood lathe construction with leather fish hinges and leather buckle. Carved brook trout, upward leaping. Pine drawings on top of creel with two flys and pine

499

cones. signed on underside by maker.

498

7.5” tall.  Protected by a coat of varnish that has mellowed slightly. 498

(800 - 1,200)

Vintage boat motor, Johnson Seahorse.  With company logo on gas tank. Purchased from B.J., Michigan boat motor dealer. A perfect decorative item. 34” long.  Has been cleaned free of any grease or oil.(500 - 800)

499

Vintage boat motor, Evinrude Ranger.  Purchased from B.J., the Michigan boat motor dealer. Has Evinrude sticker at top of housing. A very clean decorative item. 30” long.  Has been polished and cleaned with no traces of oil or grease.(500 - 800)

320


503

500

504

501

502

500

501

505

Pack basket.  Made of woven splint wood against wooden frame. 23” tall.  Painted surface is partially

Carved wooden whale, Gus Mirando, New York, New York.  Branded “Mirando.” 17.25” long.  Original

worn.

and good.

503

(500 - 800)

Early swing handle basket from Nantucket.  Woven with carved wooden handle, attached

504

(750 - 1,000)

Well made diorama of workshop with man carving and woman painting.  Titles “Charles and

with brass piece inserted into weaving. Remnants of

Edna.” Several cats are visible along with workshop

sticker on underside that reads “Lightship, Nantucket

tools, wood shavings, wood stove, and paint brushes.

Mass.” Possibly by Mitchell Ray. 10” wide.  Nice mel-

9.5” x 14.5”.  Excellent and original.

(800 - 1,000)

low patina protected by a coat of varnish. (1,000 - 2,000) 502

Bronze duck head paperweight after Joel Barber, 2nd quarter 20th century.  Measures 5 3/4”

505

Swordfish bill souvenir sword, probably New England, 1st quarter 20th century.  Measures 34”. Inlayed decorative scabbard with fine patina.  Structurally good.

(600 - 800)

long.  Very good condition.

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection. Doherty collection sticker on underside.

(500 - 800)

321


511

508a 506 509

512

513

507

508

506

510

Early green painted plant stand with four shelves.  Well built. 33” tall x 39” wide.  Original paint.

510

(400 - 600)

Wooden shaker gathering basket in original gray paint.  25” x 11.5” x 15”.  Paint has crazed and worn to bare wood in some areas, mostly on edges; otherwise Very good

507

Pennsylvania bird carving, last half 19th century.  Possibly a parrot. Carved to hang inside of a carved wooden hoop. Bird measures 10” Hoop is 9.5”.  Surface is excellent crazed and very old and original.

and original. 511

(300 - 500)

(300 - 500)

Early painted bowl.  Red with make due repair to crack. Measures 19” diameter.  Original paint; worn at base; small white

508

Vintage bear trap, Onida Community, number 5.  Approximately 36”.   (250 - 450)

508a

Wooden parchiese board.  Mulit colored. Framed

diameter.  Original paint; a few cracks; worn

behind glass. Appears to be circa 1900. Board measures

area at base; paint loss at rim; several rubs.

splatter on one side. 512

17.5” x 17.5”.  A few scratches to frame. 509

Extra large painted bowl.  Gray. 22” in

(500 - 700)

Carved and painted Canadian checker board.  Red

(400 - 600)

(400 - 600) 513

Vintage large barber pole.  One piece

and green squares. Red squares have additional carv-

with carved ball at top. Red, white, bule,

ing. Circa 1900. Board measures 27” x 19”.   Red paint has

and gold. 62” tall x 9” wide.  Red and white

mostly worn out of gallery area.

are mostly original with minor touchup to

(400 - 600)

small areas; gold appears to be a few coats

322

but probably in the making.

(400 - 600)


Calls

514

516

518

515

517

519

514

Duck call, unknown maker.  Realfoot style insert. long. Wedge block is a possible replacement.

7/8” Excellent condition and longest call measures.

Duck call, John “Sandy” Morrow, Flint Michigan.  Square stopper with rifle style insert. Call

Provenance: Stead collection. 518

Provenance: Stead collection.

(800 - 1,200)

Provenance: Stead collection.

519

Duck Call, A.M. Bowles, Little Rock, AR.  Early call of barrel. 6.25”. Very light wear.

barrel. 7”. Light wear with a white mold in wood grain.

Provenance: Stead collection.

(800 - 1,200)

with four raised and checkered pannels. Brass ring at end

Duck Call, John Jolly, Memphis Tennessee.  Smooth

Reed may be replaced.

Duck Call, A.M. Bowles, Little Rock, AR.  Four 6.25”.  Near mint.

mouth piece. 5.5” long. Varnish wear at mouth piece and end of stopper, otherwise original and good.

(400 - 800)

checkered pannels with makers stamp in top of barrel.

will not come apart but rifle style insert is viewable from

516

Two Duck Calls, Tom Turpin, TN  Both smooth burl with no stamping. Shorter call has burrell stopper. 6

(800 - 1,000) 515

517

Highly decorated carving, shows good age. 5.75”

Provenance: Stead collection.

(2,000 - 3,000)

(800 - 1,200)

323


520

Duck Call, A.M. Bowles, Little Rock, AR.  Early call with four raised and checkered pannels. Brass ring at end of barrel. Makers stamp at end of barrel. Brass has tarnished; light wear and some chew marks on barrel.

Provenance: Stead collection. (2,000 - 3,000)

520

523

522

521

521

Five Duck Calls by E. Stoffer  Call with dark stopper

522

Three Duck Calls E. Stofer, all marked K.C.MO.  Two

is marked Lone Jack, Longest and two shorter calls are

checkered and one with three rings. Longest is 5.5 inch-

marked K.C.MO. Middle call is marked just Stofer. Longest

es. Light wear to varnish on light wood checkered call.

is 6.75”. One call from KC has chew marks, long call has

All parts appear to be original.

(800 - 1,200)

missing wedge block, call with painted stopper might have replaced wedge block.

(500 - 800)

523

Duck Call, similar to Claude Stone, MO.  Four raised checkered pannels. 6”. White mold in the checkering, that seems to be removable.

324

Provenance: Stead collection.

(1,000 - 1,500)


524

526

528

524

529

527

525

Duck call, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.  Carved

527

Duck and goose call set, Johnny Marsh.  Marked

with three ducks on barrel. Rare green mouth piece.

Johnny Marsh with Larry Hickerson’s trademark. Longest

6”.  Appears to be original.

measures 6.5”. Three checkered panels on each.   Both

(3,000 - 5,000)

are excellent. 525

from goose duck, elk, and turkey. 19 calls in total. Inside

526

(400 - 600)

Rare salesman sample PS Olt Calls.  Varieties range 528

Two duck calls, Heidelbauer, South Dakota.  Smaller

of PS Olt and company manufacturing salesman sample

call is labeled “mallard toller, 13/35” and dated 1996.

box.  Excellent.

Longest measures 5.5”.  Excellent.

(800 - 1,200)

Duck and goose call set, Howard Harlan, Memphis, Tennessee.  Both with checkered barrels. Duck call is marked “The heavy duty H.L.H.” 5”.  Excellent.

(400 - 600)

529

(400 - 600)

Duck call, Sam Cox, Gaffney, South Carolina.  Marked Cox call on side, copyright 198  . Inlay with pintail head in stopper. Two checkered panels. 6.25”. Marked   9 on both stopper and wedge block.  Excellent. (400 - 600)

325


530

532

534

531

533

535

530

Duck and goose call set, Mike Pahl, Pickerington, Ohio.  Both signed and dated 1998, Mike Pahl.” Longest measures 5.5”.  Both are excellent.

533

Chicago. One is aluminum.  

Fancy highly carved duck call, Jack Wilson, Flint, Michigan.  Four raised and checkered panels. Top of

Two snipe whistles, R. Woodman Manufactured, Boston, Massachusetts.  Marked “R Woodman” and “Eureka.” 2.9”.  Small dents; one is tarnished to a side.

barrel is marked JW 1997. 6.5” long.  Excellent. (400 - 600) 532

Group of six duck calls and two crow calls.  Crow

535

Five snipe whistles.  Two are marked Ekdal call. One is marked WB Wintress. One is marked R. Woodman

stamped on it. Ditto duck call, Oscar Quam duck call

Manufacturing Boston Mass.  

realfoot style stopper, Fred Allen duck call, truetone red label missing wedge block, and crow call in container by Ranger.  

326

(500 - 700)

call by Charles Perdew has “CHAS.H.Perdew Henry Illinois” with water label, bluebill call, call marked P.H. 1939” with

(1,000 - 1,500)

(400 - 600) 534

531

Five barrel whistles.  One is marked Ludwig & Ludwig,

Provenance: Jim and Pat Doherty collection.

(300 - 400)

(400 - 600)


536

Early turkey call, wing bone yelper style.  Wing bone has been inserted into piece of bamboo. Brass ring over a second larger piece of bamboo. Measures 7”.  Shows good age.

537

(1,000 - 2,000)

Wing bone turkey call yelper.  Carved decorated wooden flute with decorative brass cap. 8.5”.  Appears to have some age.

536

538

537

(1,000 - 2,000)

538

Turkey box call, Neil Cost, Greenwood, South Carolina.  Made of red cedar. Finished in January 1972. Details and Cost’s store address written on underside. 9.5” long. 

539

Turkey box call, Neil Cost, Greenwood, South Carolina.  Signed and dated 1969. 9.5” long. 

540

(800 - 1,200) 539

(800 - 1,200)

Turkey box call, Neil Cost, Greenwood, South Carolina.  Signed and dated 1974. Additional knob at top of panel. Measures 10”. 

541

(800 - 1,200)

540

Turkey box call, Neil Cost, Greenwood, South Carolina.  Signed and dated “Greenville 1974 .” Measures 9” long.  

542

(800 - 1,200)

Turkey box call, Neil Cost, Greenwood, South Carolina.  Signed and dated 2000. Gobbler Shop stamp on underside. 8” long.  

541

(800 - 1,200)

End of session two

542

327


Index of Carvers Ahern, James.. ................................................................ 243 Alexander, Thomas.. ....................................................... 476 Antis, Harry....................................................................161A Audubon, John James............................................ 244-246 Bailey, Clarence............................................................. 478 Baldwin, Wilbur................................................................. 83 Barkelow, Lou................................................................. 143 Barker, Al......................................................................... 255 Barnard, Charles Nelson.. ........................................ 322,323 Barnes, Sam...................................................................... 34 Barton, Roger.. ....................................................... 284,382D Beach, Tad.. .................................................................... 473 Benson, Frank.. .................................................. 248-250,257 Best, James..................................................................... 457 Bethel, Pearl.. ................................................................424A Birch, Charles.................................................................. 327 Birch, Reggie.. ................................................................. 463 Birdsall, Jess.. ................................................................... 184 Birdsall, Eugene.............................................................. 187 Blair, Jr., John.. ................................................................ 344 Blair, Sr., John.. ......................................... 53,54,189,192,333 Bowles, A.M... ........................................................... 518-520 Bowman, William............................................................ 444 Boyd, George...................................... 238,306-308,474,477 Boyd, Taylor...................................................................... 33 Brady, Walter.................................................................. 352 Brown, Bill........................................................................ 395 Brunet, Jett.. .................................................................... 277 Burke, Dr. Edgar....................................................... 156,252 Burr, Russ......................................................................... 240 Burr, Elisha................................................................ 301-304 Carriere, Vic.. .................................................................. 212 Chadwick, Keyes....................................................... 90,475 Chesser, Grayson.. .......................................................... 258 Clark, Roland.................................................................. 251 Clark, Charles................................................................. 354 Cobb, Arthur................................................................... 353 Cobb, Jr., Nathan.. ........................................... 330-332,355 Conklin, Roy.................................................................... 469 Cost, Neil.. ................................................................ 538-542 Cox, Sam.. ....................................................................... 529 Crandall, Horace Hi.......................................................... 23 Cranmer, Joe Tom.. ........................................................ 397 Crosson, George............................................................ 461 Crowell, Elmer................. 82,127-135A,358-382,387-391,466 Daisey, Cigar........................................................... 222-230 Davis, Henry.................................................................... 314 Demott, Daniel............................................................... 446 Dorsett, John.. ....................................................137,145,396 Dudley, Lee.. ................................................................... 453 Duplessis, Sidney.............................................70,74,213,216 Dye, Captain Ben........................................................ 32,37 Ellis, Billy............................................................................. 62 Elliston, Robert............................................................. 38-41

English, Dan.................................................................... 335 English, John............................................................ 190,191 English, Mark................................................................... 138 English/Dawson ............................................................ 334 Evinrude ......................................................................... 499 Faue, William........................................................... 417,422 Finney, Frank.............................................345H,459,468,472 Fitzpatrick, Tom............................................................... 241 Foote, Jim................................................... 158,159,273,276 Foret, Sidney..................................................................... 72 Frady, Mike............................................ 69,215,217,278-281 Garibaldi, Amiel................................................................ 28 Geddes, William........................................................... 158B Gibson, Paul.................................................................... 267 Glenn, John............................................................. 312,313 Godin, Pat................................................................ 271,275 Goodspeed, David.......................................................... 91 Gould, John.................................................................... 256 Graham, John............................................................ 36,316 Grant, Henry............................................................ 140-142 Graves, Bert........................................................ 44D,44E,45 Haertel, Harold............................................................... 288 Hanson, Marty.................................................15,16,204-206 Harlan, Howard............................................................... 526 Heidelbauer, ................................................................. 528 Heisler, Jess..................................................................... 193 Henkins, Ezra................................................................... 185 Heverin, Will.................................................................... 268 Holly, John “Daddy”............................................30,261,263 Holly, James................................................................. 29,35 Hopkins, Mark..................................................... 345C,345D Horner, Nathan Rowley........................................... 398-400 Howell, Leroy..............................................411-413,419,423 Hudson, Ira................... 1,2,51,52,295,297,325,326,328-329B Irvine, Lawrence............................................................. 403 J.W. Fiske Foundry .......................................................345A Jackson, Scott.................................................................. 49 Janner, Hans................................................................... 407 Janson, Richard................................................................ 27 Johnson, Taylor..................................................120,139,188 Johnson ......................................................................... 498 Joiner, Charles................................................................ 266 Jolly, John....................................................................... 516 Kears, Mark..................................................................... 144 Kerr, Robert........................................................274,283,471 Kilpatrick, Henry.............................................................. 147 King, A.J....................................................................... 56,58 King, Joe......................................................................... 197 LaFrance, Mitchell..................................... 73,75,77,210,211 Laing, Albert......................................................481,483,484 Lamay, Art...................................................................... 157 Lawson, Oliver......................................................... 287,321 Leeds, Daniel Lake.................................................. 113-115 Lester, John Seerey........................................................ 160


Lexow, Fred.. ................................................................... 416 Lincoln, Joseph....................................................... 78-80,89 Malloch, P.D... ................................................................. 401 Marsh, Johnny.. ............................................................... 527 Marter, Reg..................................................................... 336 Mason Decoy Factory . . ............................................ 93-104 McAnney, John.............................................................. 148 McCloughlin, John.................................................. 194,195 McGaw, Robert...................................................57,264,443 McIntyre, Cameron.............................................. 11,14,207 McLoughlin, John.................................................... 339-342 McNair, Mark...................... 12,17,19,20,200-203,382B,382C Mitchell, Madison.................................................... 315,317 Mizera, Frank.. ....................................................418,418,420 Moak, Augustus.............................................................. 221 Morrow, John.................................................................. 515 Morse, Robert................................................................. 452 Mueller, Keith....................................................13,84,86,272 Neil, Bill.............................................................................. 24 Newman, Earnie............................................................. 421 Nichol, David............................................................... 61,63 Nottingham, Luther Lee................................................. 356 Osthaus, Edmund........................................................... 162 Pahl, Mike.. ...................................................................... 530 Parker, Lloyd............................................................ 136,146 Parsons, Ed................................................................. 55,265 Perdew, Charles................................... 44A,46,48,345K,524 Peterson, Pete......................................................... 231-233 Peterson, Oscar..........................................405,406,408-410 Phillips, Ed.. ........................................................................ 31 Pierce, Jim...................................................................... 318 Platt, R.J.......................................................................... 460 Pryor, Leonard................................................................ 320 PS Olt, ............................................................................ 525 Quillin, Nate.................................................................... 218 Quinn, William................................................................. 343 Ragus, Ezave .. ................................................................. 209 Rathmell, Lou........................................................... 479,480 Ripley, Aiden Lassel........................................................ 247 Robichaud, Emile.................................................... 496,497 Rogers Rig .............................................................. 447-450 Roussel, Reme.. ................................................................. 71 Ruppel, Walter J............................................................... 25 Ryden ............................................................................ 415 Salmons, Bradford.......................................................... 186 Sawyer, Chet.................................................................. 424 Schmiedlin, Jim...........................................291-294,383-386 School, Blair.................................................................... 345 Schroeder, Tom.............................................................. 242 Schultz, William..................................................282,289,290 Schweikart, John..................................................... 219,220 Scott, Sir Peter.. .............................................................158A Seabrook, Bob................................................................ 234 Shourds, Harry M............................................... 183,392-394

Shourds, Harry V................................... 105-112,121,124-126 Shute, Samuel................................................................. 119 Sirois, Phillippe................................................................. 402 Squire, Wendell............................................................... 445 Sterling, Lloyd....................................... 296,300,309-311,458 Stevens, George...................................................... 150,151 Stevens, Harvey.............................................................. 153 Stevens Brothers ............................................................ 152 Stick, Frank...................................................................... 161 Stoffer, E................................................................... 521,522 Stone, Claude................................................................. 523 Strunk, George............................................ 198,199,259,462 Sutton, Shawn................................................................. 260 Tax, John......................................................................... 414 Tepley, Ron..................................................................... 285 Thomas, Charles............................................................. 305 Toothacker, Sam............................................................... 87 Truex, Rhodes.................................................................. 492 Turner, David................................................................. 345B Turpin, Tom...................................................................... 517 Tyler, Lloyd.........................................................239,298,299 Uzee, Frank....................................................................... 76 Verity, Obediah................................................................ 50 Verity Family ................................................................445A Walker, Charles............................................................ 42,47 Ward, David...................................................................... 18 Ward Brothers .................................... 163-180,262,425-442 Warin, George.................................................................. 67 Watson, Dave “Umbrella”........................................ 3,4,357 Weaver, Steve......................................................... 235,236 Weiler, Milton.................................................................. 254 Welker, William................................................................ 196 Wells, John R..................................................................... 66 Wheeler, Chauncey..................................... 155,294A,294B Wheeler, Shang.............................................................. 482 Whipple, Mark............................................................ 68,214 White, Bob................................................... 5-10,382A,382E Whittington, Hector..................................................... 43,44 Wildfowler Decoy Factory ............................................ 319 Wilson, Gus............................................... 59,60,286,465,467 Wilson, Jack.................................................................... 531 Woodman, R................................................................... 534 Wright, Alvirah................................................................ 454


Wings of Wonder -- A superb new book by Sporting Classics Senior Editor Dr. Lloyd Newberry For four decades, Dr. Newberry has been writing hunting and fishing stories chronicling his many adventures in 67 countries and provinces. Three of his prior books include Pages of Time: Memoirs of a Southern

Sportsman, The Big Five of Africa and European Hunter: Hunting 33 Countries in the Old World.

For more than a half-century, Dr. Newberry has been interested in old hand-carved duck, goose and shorebird decoys. This passion has resulted in countless hours and trips in pursuit of these treasured old birds and the history that each represents. His favorite decoys and geographic area for collecting has for many years been the Eastern Shore of Virginia. From his home on the coast of Georgia, he began making trips to Virginia in 1971 for waterfowl hunting and decoy collecting. His favorite decoys were those made by the iconic Nathan Cobb family who emigrated to the Eastern Shore in 1837 and homesteaded on little more than an island sandbar. Dr. Newberry’s book narrates the thrilling adventures of three Cobb family generations on their island paradise of fishing and waterfowl hunting. The lifelike decoys they produced are some of the most highly sought-after by collectors and historians today. The number of their birds in the top 100 sales is second only to Elmer Crowell, and none of the Cobb decoys were decoratives. But equally interesting are the many adventures that this family experienced for a century before a major hurricane put an end to it all. Some five years in the making, Wings of Wonder features more than 400 beautiful full-color photographs of rare duck, goose and shorebird decoys in addition to many rare historical photographs of the early carvers.

Wings of Wonder: The Remarkable Story of the Cobb Family and the Priceless Decoys They Created on Their Island Paradise will be available in late November of this year. Pre-Order online at www.SportingClassicsStore.com or Call (800) 849-1004 for more information.


Order Now!

by James R. Doherty • Featuring New Jersey’s finest coastal decoys in original paint • 216 pages with 426 color photographs • Accurate decoy maker identification • 1000 numbered First Edition copies

To Order: Send a check payable to Jim Doherty in the amount of $66.00 for each book ordered. Mail to: Weber Display & Packaging Attn: Jim Doherty 3500 Richmond Street Philadelphia PA 19134


NORTH AMERICAN

ASSO NORTH AMERICAN AS S OCIATION

WE’VE CHANGED OUR NAME TO REFLECT WHO WE REALLY ARE

Introducing the North American Decoy Collectors Association “Midwest” becomes “North American.” What started out 55 years ago as a small gathering of early decoy enthusiasts, the Midwest Decoy Collectors Association has grown into the largest and most geographically diverse decoy collecting group anywhere. With nearly 800 members hailing from 45 states, the District of Columbia, and five Canadian provinces, we are, in fact, a “North American” group. Clearly, we’ve changed. And now, so has our name. Our members collect decoys and other sporting collectibles from all over the continent. Our roster includes historians,

authors, restorers, dealers, magazine publishers and contemporary folk artists. As sponsor of the premier North American Vintage Decoy & Sporting Collectibles Show, our new name truly reflects who we are today. Come Join Us: If you are not already a member, we invite you to join us now. Not only will you receive information rich club newsletters, a full member directory, free admission to the annual show, and access to trading in our “members only” Facebook group, all through 2021, you’ll be able to connect with hundreds of other collectors who share similar interests. You

can join online at nadecoycollectors.org, or complete the membership application below and mail it along with a check made out to “NADCA” for $25. We hope to see you in Chicago. Our 55th annual show will take place at the Westin Lombard hotel, April 20-24, 2021. As the premier event of its kind, it is the “must attend” show for anyone who collects decoys and sporting collectibles. Check out our website at nadecoycollectors.org for more information. We look forward to having you join our passionate group of collectors.

NADCA Membership Application Name

Spouse

Address

Phone Email Collecting Interest

Mail to: Matt Bryant, 17114 Erskine Street, Omaha, NE 68116


CONDITIONS OF SALE ‑- PLEASE READ 1.

GUARANTEE ‑ We have made a concerted effort to accurately catalog and describe the property to be sold. The decoys and paintings have guaranteed condition reports. Should the need arise, the auctioneer reserves the right to make verbal corrections and provide additional information from the block at the time of the sale. Absentee bids will not be executed on items that are found to be other than described in the catalog. Since opinions can differ, particularly in the matter of condition, the auctioneer will be sole judge in the matter of refunds. If we fail to identify a flaw that has an impact on the value, you can return the decoy. 2. DURATION OF GUARANTEE ‑ Request for a refund for items purchased IN PERSON at the auction must be made within 3 days of the sale. If you bid absentee, by phone, or on the internet, it is your responsibility to examine the lot immediately upon receipt and notify us of any issues. The guarantee will end 5 days from the date of delivery. Therefore, all guarantees on items purchased will become null and void 10 calendar days from the date of shipment. IT IS VERY IMPORTANT TO NOTE THAT IF YOU PAY LATE, YOU WILL NOT BE ELIGIBLE FOR THE GUARANTEE. Payment must be postmarked no later than 30 days after the auction. 3. PROTESTED BIDS ‑ In the case of a disputed bid, the auctioneer is the sole determinant as to who the successful bidder is, and at his discretion, may reoffer and resell the article in dispute. If a dispute arises after the sale, the auctioneer’s sales records shall be conclusive as to who the purchaser was, and the purchase price. 4. BIDDING - Bidding usually starts below the low estimate and advances in increments of approximately 10% of the open‑ ing bid subject to the auctioneer’s discretion. The auctioneer reserves the right, at his sole discretion, to refuse any bids that he deems unreasonable. The minimum bid increment guideline is as follows: $500 to $1000 - $25 $10,000 to $20,000 - $500 $100,000 and above - $2,000 $1000 to $10,000 - $100 $20,000 to $100,000 - $1,000 5. ABSENTEE BIDS ‑ Phone or mail bids, at the discretion of the Auctioneer, will be accepted with a 20% deposit. In such case, the bookkeeper will execute such bids competitively. Absentee bids are executed by the bookkeeper on behalf of the bidder in accordance with the bid increment policy shown above. Please review the rules governing both absentee and phone bids in the back of the catalog. 6. TERMS ‑ All items are to be paid for in U.S. funds on the day of the auction. No items will be released until they are paid for. Those who have not established an account with us and wish to pay by check, must do so prior to the beginning of the auction, by presenting a current letter of reference from their bank, or by providing references, that are suitable to the Auctioneer. The Auctioneer reserves the right to hold merchandise purchased by personal check, until the check has cleared the bank. Phone and absentee bidders ‑ You will be notified one week after the auction of your bids/results. PAYMENT IS DUE UPON RECEIPT. A late charge will be accessed on all balances not paid, at the rate of 12% A.P.R. commencing 30 days after the auction. If any accounts become more than 60 days overdue, the consignor will be given the name of the buyer who is responsible for holding up their funds. Guyette & Deeter will not carry insurance on items that are not paid for within 35 days of the auction. Also, the auctioneer may retain and/or recover the deposit specified as liquidated damages. In addition, the property can be resold at public or private sale without further notice. Any defi‑ ciency resulting from such resale shall be paid to the auctioneer by the defaulting buyer, together with all charges, fees, and expenses incurred by such resale, or the enforcement of the obligation hereunder. Buyer agrees to pay all charges and expenses incurred by reason of any breach of the Terms and Conditions of Sale, including without limitation, reasonable attorney fees. 7. PAYMENT FOR PURCHASES CAN BE MADE WITH CREDIT CARD (VISA, MasterCard, American Express, or Discover), CASH, CHECK, OR WIRE TRANSFER. 8. BUYERS PREMIUM- The buyer’s premium, assessed on each selling lot, is 20% of the hammer price up to and includ‑ ing $1,000,000, plus 10% on any amount in excess of $1,000,000. For payments made using a credit card, the buyer’s premium is 23% up to and including $1,000,000, plus 13% on any amount in excess of $1,000,000. 9. TAX ‑ THERE IS AN 6% SALES TAX IN MARYLAND. Tax is waived if buyer presents a valid resale certificate from any state or has purchases shipped outSIDE of MARYLAND. 10. ACCEPTANCE OF CONDITIONS ‑ Bidding on any articles in this catalog indicates your acceptance of all the above items. 11. BIDDING AGENT RESPONSIBILITY ‑ If you are registering for someone or if you execute a bid for someone else under your number, you are responsible for the settlement of that account. You are also responsible for examining the decoy(s) for your client regarding the guarantee. 12. WITHDRAWAL ‑ We reserve the right to withdraw any property before the sale and shall have no liability whatsoever for such withdrawal. 13. TITLE ‑ Title passes upon the fall of the auctioneer’s hammer. It will then be the responsibility of the buyer to make full payment prior to removing the goods from the premises. Removal is at both the buyer’s risk and expense, and must be made at the conclusion of the sale, unless other arrangements are made with the Guyette & Deeter staff. Any lots we might make arrangements for moving or storing are solely at the risk of the owner, and any damage or loss occurring after the fall of the hammer becomes that of the buyer. 14. LEGAL DISPUTE ‑ Any legal disputes arising from this auction shall be settled in the court system of the State of Maine. UNIFORM COMMERCIAL CODE - The Maine Uniform Commercial Code, Title II, Section 2328 applies to this auction. 15. Cases are not included with shotgun shell boxes. All dimensions are approximate and are not guaranteed. All calls are sold “As Is”. THE OFFICE WILL NOT BE OPEN UNTIL WEDNESDAY AFTER THE AUCTION.


ABSENTEE, PHONE, AND ONLINE BIDS 1. Absentee bids are a service provided to our customers free of charge. Every effort is made to execute all absentee bids, however, in the event of an error or omission, or failure to properly execute absentee bids, the Auctioneer shall not be held liable. 2. All absentee bids must be accompanied by a 20% deposit, which will be refunded immediately after the auction if your bid is unsuccessful. If your bid is successful, the deposit will be applied to the purchase price and the balance due upon presentation of your bill. All absentee bidders are notified by mail, whether successful or unsuccessful. 3. Visa and Mastercard numbers can be given in place of a check deposit, if your bid is submitted by phone. Your card number will not be used to make payments for purchases, it is only used as collateral. Your card number will only be used to make payment for purchases if you default on payment. 4. To execute an absentee bid, fill out the enclosed form listing catalog number, description, and your top bid price (not including the 20% buyer’s premium). Send this together with your deposit as soon as possible. If your bids are sent seven days or less prior to the auction, you should call our office three days prior to the auction, to confirm that we have received your bids. If they have not been received at that point in time, we will take your bid over the phone. We cannot guarantee that bids received after the auction has started will be executed. 5. If two or more bids are received on the same item from different people, the bidding will open at the next logical raise above the second highest bid. If two absentee bids are received with the exact same amount, the first one received will take precedence. 6. All bids must be in even dollar amounts. Bids in fractions of dollars will be considered the next lower even dollar amount. 7. Bid increments: The bid increment policy, which also applies to both absentee and phone bidders, is listed under “CONDITIONS OF SALE” (item #4), in the front of the catalog. 8. Open bids, bids with no set top amount, or orders to just simply buy the lot, cannot be accepted. You must have a definite top limit before we can execute your bid. Alternatives to this are as follows: a. To bid over the telephone. This can be done by simply sending a 20% deposit for what you wish to bid on the object. This will bind whatever bid amount you wish to bid over the telephone. (NOTE: There are only 8 phone lines into the auction room and phone bids will be handled on a first come, first serve basis.) b. Some bidders concerned that a lot might just go for one bid above their top limit, leave a top bid plus one bid. This works as follows: the top bid submitted might be $1,000, but not wishing to lose the lot for simply $25 more, the party might bid $1,000 + 1 bid if they definitely don’t want to go over a certain price, they would indicate $1,000 +1 ($1,025) (NOTE: One possible problem that occasionally arises with absentee bids is when someone in the audience bids exactly the amount, which you specify is your limit. In such a case, we would not go one extra bid unless your bid sheet indicates “plus one” bid.). 9. If you are a successful bidder, a bill will be sent a few days after the auction. Purchasers should indicate their desired method of shipment, if such is necessary. There is a charge for shipping, labor, materials, and insurance. Please provide notice in writing if items are covered under your own insurance policy. Shipping is done on a first come, first serve basis, and can take up to 4 weeks. Please note that a certified check, Visa, Mastercard, or any other form of guaranteed funds will expedite shipping. 10. For expensive oil paintings and delicate carvings, we need a written statement from the purchaser, assuming the responsibility of pursuing any claims, in the event of damage incurred during shipping. Valuable lots need to be sent 2 day air UPS due to values. Under no circumstances will we be liable for damage to glass or frames, or fragile decoratives, regardless of cause. 11. TERMS — Phone and absentee bidders — You will be notified one week after the auction of your results. Payment is due upon receipt. Interest will be charged on all balances not paid within 30 days after the bill is sent at the rate of 12% APR. If any accounts become more than 60 days overdue, the consignor will be given the name of the buyer who is responsible for holding up their funds. If an account is 75 days overdue, the items may be returned to the consignor and overdue buyer will pay the buyers premium and commission from the sale, if they wish to participate in future Guyette and Deeter auctions. 12. Bidding on any article(s) indicates your acceptance of these terms above. 13. If you would like any additional information on any of the lots, please contact: Gary Guyette at (410) 745-0485 or Jon Deeter at (440) 610-1768. nd

If you have any questions concerning absentee bids, please call us.


OFFICE: OFFICE:

PO Box Box 1170 1170 PO St. Michaels, MD 21663 St. Michaels, MD 21663 410-745-0485 410-745-0485 Fax 410-745-0487 410-745-0487 Fax decoys@guyetteanddeeter.com michael@guyetteanddeeter.com

I desire to bid on the following items in the sale. The bids are to be executed by Guyette & Deeter, up to but not exceeding the amount(s) specified on the below bids. All bids will be executed and accepted subject to the Terms of Sale and Absentee Bids Procedure outlined in the catalog. (Please be sure that you understand our procedures before using this Absentee and Phone Bid Form.) Office will not be open until Wednesday after the auction.

A PREMIUM OF 20% WILL BE APPLIED TO ALL ITEMS SOLD, TO BE PAID BY THE BUYER


Page 2

NAME OFFICE USE

PHONE IN CATALOG # ORDER

AUCTION DATE DESCRIPTION

BID AMOUNT


402

405

332

331


Guyette & Deeter, Inc. PO Box 1170, St. Michaels, MD 21663 www.guyetteanddeeter.com 410-745-0485

Profile for Guyette & Deeter

North American Decoys at Auction | November 20 & 21, 2020  

Guyette & Deeter's annual fall decoy and sporting art auction held on November 20 & 21. The sale will be held remotely from the St. Michaels...

North American Decoys at Auction | November 20 & 21, 2020  

Guyette & Deeter's annual fall decoy and sporting art auction held on November 20 & 21. The sale will be held remotely from the St. Michaels...