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Your Source for Best Business Practices From the Trenches

SEPTEMBER 2012

REVIEW

Whole Foods’ John Mackey Secrets of Success

Grow Your Business Ten Ideas to Use Today

Become a Champion

Creating Unstoppable Momentum


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Review Preview Your Source for Best Business Practices From the Trenches

In this month’s Review, we’re featuring two business leaders we’re really excited about. First up is John Mackey. John began as an owner of a small natural foods store in Austin, Texas, in 1980. And he really wasn’t given much of a chance. Today, the company he co-founded, Whole Foods Market, employs more than 67,000 team members at more than 300 stores. We’re also featuring another maverick who helped change the way we perceive business today. Jenn Lim has been a consultant at Zappos for nine years. In 2005, she created the company’s first Culture Book and has produced them ever since. She’s also CEO and Chief Happiness Officer of Delivering Happiness, a company she and Tony Hsieh, CEO of Zappos.com, co-founded to inspire happiness in work, community and everyday life. D e spite d i f fe re nt b ack g rou nd s , a n a ge gap a nd compa ny headquarters more than 1,500 miles apart, these two have a lot in common. Like Dave, both are huge proponents of company culture. They believe creating a great one is truly the secret to success. And so do we. Besides these great articles, we also included a number of other stories designed to help you keep your momentum going, even when times are at their toughest. So sit back, read and enjoy. And until the next issue, keep up all of that great work. As small business owners, you are truly the backbone of our economy. We can’t do it without you!

Daniel Tardy, Vice President, EntreLeadership

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Table of Contents 4

Top of the Food Chain Whole Foods’ John Mackey’s Secrets to Success

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Bulletproof Your Business Four Financial Mistakes Businesses Make and How to Avoid Them

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The Secret to Happiness Zappos Culture Book Creator Tells You How to Be Content

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10 Business Ideas Quick Tips to Improve Your Company and Team

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Fighting the Slowdown How to Keep Your Momentum Going

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Meet Alana Ward Making the Tough Calls

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Fight the Fear of Failure Don’t Allow a Spirit of Fear to Drive You

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Surviving the Storm The Best Medicine for Disaster Is Helping Others

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Lessons From George Becoming a Great Servant Leader

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Playing Well With Others Understanding Your Team’s Personality Styles

Join Dave in Orlando for EntreLeadership Master Series on October 14–20. Learn more

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Top of the Food Chain Whole Foods’ John Mackey’s Secrets to Success

He was told his idea was dumb. No one but a few hippies would ever buy from his store. Others said he would never be able to compete with the giant grocery store chains like Kroger and Safeway. But luckily for millions of his customers, John Mackey didn’t listen. And today, the coproprietor of a small natural foods store that opened in Austin, Texas, in 1980 employs 67,000-plus team members at more than 300 stores in North America and the United Kingdom. So what ’s the secret of John’s success? On a recent broadcast, Dave spoke with the cofounder and CEO of Whole Foods Markets about his road to making his company one where team members love to work and consumers adore shopping even more. Here are a few takeaways from his amazing story.

1. Empower the People Dave believes in team empowerment so much, it is one of the main principles taught at EntreLeadership Master Series.

And like Dave, John is a huge fan. He says that when you treat your people well, celebrate wins, and see failures as a way to grow, success will follow. Each person who works for Whole Foods is on a team, and each team meets regularly to discuss issues, solve problems, and recognize each other’s contributions. Efforts are appreciated and results rewarded.

Through the years, there have been plenty of other tough times, including an antitrust case when the company announced it was buying its largest competitor, followed by an investigation by the SEC. Despite being the worst time of his life, John says, he kept moving forward. Eventually, the sale went through, and John was cleared of any misconduct.

“The retail market is kind of easy to understand,” John says. “You have to create value for your customers, or you are going to fail in the marketplace . .. Your team members are the ones who create that value. They have to be welltrained and enjoy their work.”

“ Sure, you are going to get knocked back, but you have to be resilient,” John says. “You have to pick yourself up, learn from your mistakes, and do better next time.”

2. Never Give Up Creating the Whole Foods chain has been no day at the organic farm. Less than a year after opening, the worst flood in 70 years hit Austin. The flagship store’s inventory was wiped out, and most of the equipment was damaged. To make matters worse, John and his business partners had no flood insurance. Their losses totaled more than $400,000. Despite the catastrophe, no one considered quitting. Plans to reopen started immediately, even though the founders had no idea if they would even be able to pay their team members. Cleanup began just as quickly.

3. Leaders Are Readers A lack of a college degree didn’t stop Mackey from pursuing his dream. The University of Texas dropout worked as a waiter, dishwasher and manager of a natural food store before starting Whole Foods. He learned every step of the way through those experiences. John is also an avid reader and credits books by free-market proponents like economist Milton Friedman for his political views and much of his company’s success. What company will be the next big hit? By simply refusing to quit when the going gets tough, always being willing to learn, and recognizing that your team members are the key to your growth, it could be yours. Just ask John.

By day three, the original investors agreed to reinvest. By day 28— with the help of the community and their loyal team members— the store reopened.

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Bulletproof Your Business Four Financial Mistakes Businesses Make and How to Avoid Them 1. Do the Accounting At heart, we’re all brave warriors who work long hours, fight the competition, and make any sacrifice to succeed. That is . .. until it comes to accounting. Then, most of us would rather have a tooth drilled without Novocain. Unfortunately, it ’s about the biggest business mistake you can make. As the Bible says, “Be diligent to know the state of your flocks and attend to your herds.” (Proverbs 27:23 NKJV) Ask any business owner, and they’ll tell you. One of the best ways to gain knowledge and skills is by making big, fat, whopping mistakes. Lessons learned are what make us stronger, smarter and resilient. However, there are some goofups that do more than teach a lesson. They can kill a business. Luckily, every one of them can be avoided. As Dave teaches in EntreLeadership Master Series, there are several ways to bulletproof your business and find financial peace at the same time. Here are a few of the preventative measures every business owner needs to take.

Debt magnifies your mistakes, kills your cash, and puts your business’ very survival at risk.

Dave, too, dislikes accounting. But he loves the control and awareness it gives him. “I don’t care how much you hate diving into the numbers, business owners who don’t stay on top of their accounting fail and close up shop.”

2. Pay Your Taxes If there is anyone, and we mean anyone, you do not want to mess with, it’s the tax man. He will always get paid, even when you don’t. You should have a monthly tax-savings account, where you can set aside 25% of your profits to pay your quarterly IRS estimates. Treat the money in that account as untouchable. The same holds true for payroll/sales taxes. Don’t borrow from them to operate, because you’ll never catch up. Add severe penalties and interest, and you can count yourself gone.

3. Avoid the Toys

latest gadget or electronic gizmo— all in the name of increased productivity, profit or client approval. The most successful businesses don’t buy nicer things and toys without surplus funds. They never go into debt for them. “No deal was ever made or lost based on the couch in the reception area,” Dave says. “That is ego.”

The most successful businesses don’t buy nicer things and toys without surplus funds. 4. Make Cash King Anyone who has listened to Dave for more than two seconds on the radio knows he is the number-one enemy of debt. But that’s just for home, right? Actually, no. Dave believes that businesses can operate successfully without borrowing as well. His company, plus many others both big and small, runs every day without borrowing. Debt magnifies your mistakes, kills your cash, and puts your business’ very survival at risk. It should be avoided at all costs. These steps are just a few of the many principles needed to successfully run a business. Make time to keep your financial house in order, and you will always reap the rewards.

O nce you r compa ny b eg i n s making a decent profit, it’s easy to fall into the trap of needing the

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The Secret to Happiness Zappos Culture Book Creator Tells You How to Be Content of the general mantra for Zappos, which evolved into Tony’s first book—Delivering Happiness (Tony Hseih is Zappos’ CEO). Basically, publishers became interested in the story, and it seemed like a natural title to describe the journey of what it took to grow. Tony went from starting Zappos to now Delivering Happiness (a company to help people, organizations and businesses apply the different frameworks of happiness to their lives). Is it possible to sustain long-term happiness at work and at home? According to Jenn Lim, creator of the first Zappos Culture Book and CEO and Chief Happiness Officer of Delivering Happiness, it’s not only possible, it’s the only way to prosper. She spoke to EntreLeadership Podcast host Chris LoCurto about delivering happiness and the effects it has on each person and the world. Here’s an excerpt from their conversation.

Chris:

How did you come around to this concept of delivering happiness?

Jenn:

It evolved as Zappos matured over the years. As a startup, we wanted to be the biggest online retailer in the world. As Zappos grew up, we next wanted to be the best in customer service. Then, we grew up again and wanted to focus on employee happiness and company culture. A couple years after that stage, we came to the realization that essentially what Zappos was doing was delivering happiness to employees, customers, partners and vendors.

Chris: How does all of this happiness translate into revenue or the bottom line? Jenn:

Research shows that if you treat your employees right, they’ll treat each other and customers right, which increases productivity and engagement and leads to profits. It’s also about the message you are sending to your customers. Naturally, if you have a customerservice rep who is happy on the end of the line, their customer will be more inclined to stay on the phone with them and buy a little more. Or if you have a lot of competitors doing what you are doing, your customers will come back to you because they feel like you are being authentic and in the end, happy.

Chris: How would you advise a small-business owner to build happiness on their team?

Jenn: One way to create happiness for yourself or for your employees is a sense of perceived progress. For example, one of the pretty important positions at Zappos is being a buyer. Going from an assistant buyer to buyer is usually an 18-month process.

Because of the sense of perceived progress, we chopped the training time into six-month chunks. After the first six months, there is almost a celebration. We tell them, “This is great, this is where you are, and you are this much closer to being a buyer.” It happens again in another six months. It still takes 18 months to train, and there is no additional cost by splitting it into six-month increments. The employee is much more engaged, optimistic and productive because he or she feels like they are progressing in becoming that buyer.

“Employees who feel like they have a choice over decisions and the freedom to make them are happier.” A sense of control is another big part of happiness. Employees who feel like they have a choice over decisions and the freedom to make them are happier. A great example is Zappos’ customer loyalty team. No one has a script. They are allowed to talk as long as they want. Actually, the record customer-service call was 8.5 hours with a single customer. I have no idea what they were talking about—maybe chatting about life. They have the ability to make choices and are empowered to do it their own way. Want to hear the rest of Jenn Lim’s conversation with host Chris LoCurto on delivering happiness? Download this episode of the EntreLeadership podcast. We guarantee it will make you happy!

Delivering happiness became sort

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10 Business Ideas Quick Tips to Improve Your Company and Team difference in how their companies grow and their teams prosper. And you can, too, by following these quick-to -implement tips from Dave’s EntreLeadership Master Series.

1. Set goals

For D av id C h r i s t i a n s on , a n i nst r uct iona l de si g ner/cou rse developer for Abilene Christian University in Texas, it’s as simple as a high-five at a moment of success as a quick, free acknowledgment of excellence. For Zef Banda, president and CEO of Banda Group International in Chandler, Arizona, it ’s always remembering that his actions and words are powerful, and the people he is leading pay attention to everything he does and says.

Taking a break from work helps avoid burn-out, sparks creativity, and rekindles passion for the job. Both of these small gestures may seem simple, but sometimes the little things mean a lot, especially when it comes to business and leadership. By taking a few moments each day, these two EntreLeaders are making a

Figure out what you want to accomplish for the second half of this year, get it down on paper, and watch the magic begin. “When you lay out exactly what you want to do in detail, you immediately start feeling the room move and the earth shake,” Dave says.

2.Cast your vision Once your goals are set, let your staff know about them early and often. Casting your vision will inspire and fire up your team.

3. Pray about the big decisions Always remember that you may own the company, but someone else is always in charge. And He is your go-to when it’s time to make the tough calls.

4. Show them the money Want to make a team member beyond-motivated and ready to tackle any project? How about a $50 handshake for a job well done? It works every time.

5. Get braggadocious Everyone, and we mean everyone, from the CEO of a Fortune 500 company to your mailroom clerk, longs for recognition. Let them know that they matter and are doing a great job. It refreshes their souls.

6. Set a date Besides being good for you healthwise, taking a break from work helps avoid burn-out, sparks creativity, and rekindles passion for the job. Pick up your calendar and schedule some days off right now.

7. Recognize their birthdays No one is ever too old or superior to be wished happy birthday.

8. Change it up No matter the importance of the subject, meetings can quickly turn dull and uninspiring. For a burst of creativity, how about a change of venue? At Dave’s company, leaders sometimes meet with their team in the company’s coffee shop, outside or off-site to pump up the inspiration.

9. Pick up a book Carve some time out of your day to read a chapter or two of a book that will help you grow personally or professionally. Start with our fave—EntreLeadership!

10. Confront the issues Don’t postpone dealing with a team member with character or behavioral issues. Take care of the problem or let them go. Businessman and Wall Street maverick Peter Cohen once said, “There is no giant step that does it. It’s a lot of little steps.” And we agree. Although the 10 tips above won’t make or break any business, they are an excellent start on your journey to success.

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Fight the Slowdown How to Keep Your Momentum Going The Solution: Each morning, make a prioritized list of tasks for the day and stick to it. If there’s a fire to put out, throw some water on it. But then get back to the chores at hand quickly. You will either tell your day what to do, or you will wonder where it went.

To avoid distractions, try: • Scheduling email viewing times • Setting time limits on meetings

Every EntreLeader has it. That fire in their belly to succeed, a passion for their company. But despite all that love, it’s easy to fall into the trap of losing that spark. So how do you keep that momentum going in order for your business to continue moving forward? As Dave teaches in EntreLeadership Master Series, there are a number of ways to stay productive during the dog days of summer. Use these tips to get back on track.

1. Step Away From the Remote Have you ever been at home with a long list of errands when you hear the siren song of your TV? Your remote is calling, and before you know it, you’re sucked in. You have to see that last episode of Pawn Stars. The same holds true at work. You walk through the door and are faced with hundreds of distractions. Soon, the day is gone, and you feel like you’ve accomplished nothing.

If you feel tempted to look at your email at non-scheduled hours, hand your assistant your phone or turn off your internet connection. Avoid distractions by putting away your electronic devices, hanging a do-not-disturb sign, or going off-site. Do whatever it takes to keep on track.

You will either tell your day what to do, or you will wonder where it went.

2. Get Fired Up Starting a company, creating a new product, or signing that contract with your dream client is unbelievably exciting. It’s what makes business a lot of fun. But along with those incredible moments comes a lot of everyday hard work and worry that can cause you to lose your passion.

revitalizes your brain, allowing creativity and passion to flow. Here’s even a better reason: Taking time off can save your life. Research shows that men who miss annual breaks are 32% more likely to die of heart attacks, while women who take a vacation less than once every six years are eight times more likely to develop coronary heart disease.

3. Learn Something New According to a study by researchers at Harvard and MIT, learning something new and having success fires up the pleasure section of your brain, leading you to even more education and prosperity. The Solution: Dave is a huge proponent of reading nonfiction leadership/business books as a way to grow his business. He’s not alone. The average millionaire reads a book a month. Leaders are readers. But that’s just one way to gain more knowledge. Find a mentor, network with fellow business leaders, or attend seminars or other business events. Take advantage of your downtime to refocus, recharge and learn. It’s an awesome way to keep the momentum flowing and get your team fired up.

The Solution: The best way to get re-energized is actually to use no energy at all. Taking a vacation

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Meet Alana Ward Making the Tough Calls naïve when I made the decision to do so. The business was by no means financially stable when I assumed it, and it continues to be a struggle today. However, I have gained invaluable experience, and I have had success with the company. I also know I can win with this business, and the tools I learned at EntreLeadership are helping me do it.

Taking the Easy Way Alana Ward is president of Baggett Heating & Cooling in Clarksville, Tennessee. At just 29, she took over the family business from her father. We talked to her about making the tough calls at her company.

My Inspiration My husband and daughter are the constant push behind everything I do. When things get tough and I even think about letting up or quitting, I look at them and remember why I go to work every day. My husband is an eternal optimist and is always there to support and build me up. Many times, the faith he has in me gets me to the next step, when faith in myself has failed. My daughter is the reason I want to succeed. I want to be the kind of mother she respects and hopefully aspires to be like one day. Whether her choice in a career is our family business or something else, I hope to teach her the steps to success.

The Toughest Call I assumed ownership of the business from my father after working in it for six years. In retrospect, I realize I was very immature and

I hope this doesn’t sound condescending, but I pride myself in not taking the easy way. It always causes more problems in the end. But that’s not always been the case. In the past, I have taken the easy way out when it came to recruiting and hiring. It was because of ignorance. I thought I had few options. Being in the HVAC business really didn’t demand a thorough, professional hiring process. I would just take someone because the need to fill a position was looming over me. I know it caused way more trouble than it ever eliminated. I’m still not good at hiring, but acknowledgment is the first step, right? It’s something our company is dedicated to improving.

Soliciting Advice By talking through tough decisions with others, you gain their perspectives and usually some keys to solving the problem or making the decision. I don’t become a talking head in these situations. I pool their thoughts with my own to come to a decision that I am comfortable with.

“I find when I’m nervous, I’m usually doing something I shouldn’t.” My Gut Feelings I believe that my “gut” never gets involved when things are going smoothly. I just ride through with no “gut” interruption. When I veer from that path, though, my “gut” starts talking. I find when I’m nervous, I’m usually doing something I shouldn’t. I remember a time when I knew I needed to terminate an employee. I came up with every excuse under the sun as to why I shouldn’t do it. When I finally listened to my gut and terminated him, life was so much easier. I had been held hostage by him and didn’t even realize it.

“By talking through tough decisions with others, you gain their perspectives and usually some keys to solving the problem or making the decision.”

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Fight the Fear of Failure Don’t Allow a Spirit of Fear to Drive You When trying to decide on a new project or option for your company, think worst case. If everything falls apart, will you be able to survive?

Running a business can be scary. You put your heart and soul into your company and can’t imagine doing anything else. And then you realize that no matter how successful it is, you might be just a few bad decisions away from losing your dream, disappointing your team, and boarding that bus to Loserville. It doesn’t have to be this way. As Dave teaches in EntreLeadership Master Series, being scared paralyzed his decision-making ability until he came up with a system to fight it. In fact, one of the core values of Dave’s team today is that decisions are never made based on fear. So how can you conquer your fear of failing? Here are a few tips that can help you overcome those nightmarish feelings.

1. Face Your Fear What’s the easiest way to get over your fear of failure? Own up to it. Realize that along with great success come many stumbles. You are going to mess up at some point, and that’s okay. Henry Ford, Bill Gates and even Thomas Edison

all screwed up numerous times before they hit it big. It’s the best way to learn. As Eleanor Roosevelt said, “You gain strength, courage and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face.”

2. Consider the Awful Truth When trying to decide on a new project or option for your company, think worst case. If everything falls apart, will you be able to survive? When the answer is yes, the decision is no longer so frightening. You know that even if you bomb spectacularly, you’ll still be around. ”Once I know I’m not going to die from making this call— even if I’m wrong—it releases me to make the call,” Dave says.

3. Talk It Up Remember when you were a kid and facing something scary? It was always better to have a friend by your side to talk about it. Well, the same holds true for adults. You don’t have to go it alone. Find a business mentor who’s been through tough times and discuss your biggest business fears with

them. Once those concerns are out in the open, you’ll find them much more manageable.

4. Make a Contingency Plan One of the easiest ways to get rid of fear is to have lots of options. If something goes wrong, you already have a back-up plan in place. Use a number of vendors, for example, so you are not relying on one. Don’t put all of your eggs in one basket. As Dave says, options give you power, therefore removing fear. Fear will always play a part in ow nin g your ow n business, whether it’s being scared of losing customers or revenue, or even being sued. And they’re all legitimate concerns. But it’s how you handle them that makes the difference between success and failure. “It is wise to recognize that those fears may be well-founded, and we should not ignore the potential consequences of our decisions,” Dave says. “But we will not allow the spirit of fear to drive us.”

Join Dave in Orlando for EntreLeadership Master Series on October 14–20. Learn more

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Surviving the Storm The Best Medicine for Disaster Is Helping Others job. The city was going to be destroyed. She just had a ‘feeling.’” The couple drove to Baton Rouge to their daughter’s small college apartment. Mitch thought they would have a great time and be home the follow in g day. Unfortunately, Sandy’s “feeling” was correct. Hurricane Katrina was one of the most powerful storms ever to hit the Gulf Coast. More than 80% of New Orleans was under water and more than 1,700 people were killed. When life hands you lemons, you’re supposed to make lemonade. But what if it gives you a whole orcha rd? I f you’re EntreLeader Mitch Landry, you not only make the best out of the bad situation, you change the lives of others too. We re ce nt ly me t M itc h at EntreLeadership Master Series in Tucson, Arizona. Mitch, a title attorney, lives in Lafayette, Louisiana. His story touched us so much, we knew we had to share it. You see, Mitch hasn’t always lived in Lafayette. He and his wife, Sandy, were longtime residents of New Orleans. That was until August 2005, when Katrina came blowing into town. Normally, Mitch and Sandy, a fifth-generation New Orleanian, rode out the storms. But this time, Sandy insisted they leave. “She told me that we needed to get out of there,” Mitch says. “And then she added that I needed to bring some suits with me because I would be looking for another

The Landrys soon learned their home was substantially damaged and Mitch’s office destroyed. Six adults, a 2-year old, a dog and three cats would be staying in that tiny apartment for quite a while. But instead of feeling sorry for themselves, they decided to help.

“I watched those kids doing whatever was necessary, and it gave me the strength to do the same.” The family hit the streets and volunteered wherever needed. They spent a lot of time helping residents of nursing homes who were being transported from New Orleans through Baton Rouge to destinations unknown at the time. Many were scared, had no idea whether their families had survived or even if they were going to live through the terrifying situation themselves. The Landrys gave comfort, spent

time talking and reading to the seniors, cleaned beds, changed diapers, whatever was needed—all without complaint. Mitch says it was a heart-breaking, life-changing experience, especially when he saw young college students— many LSU star athletes—lending a hand without hesitation. “We felt so helpless, we had to do something,” Mitch says. “I watched those kids doing whatever was necessary, and it gave me the strength to do the same. The entire experience showed me how precious life is and that it can be gone in a second.” Mitch and his family eventually moved back home. But Mitch’s business, which focused on real estate, never quite recovered. The family realized they couldn’t stay in their beloved city. Today, Mitch is a partner in a thriving law firm—Andrus, Boudreaux, Landry & Cousaan in Lafayette. He adores his new home and his job. “I really love what I do,” he says. “People in real estate transactions are happy. The seller has sold their house, the buyer’s dream is about to come true, and the real estate agent is finally getting a paycheck. Litigators can’t ever say that. I have the best of all worlds.” When life hands you lemons and you’re Mitch Landry, you make more than lemonade. You stop focusing on your own problems, step out of your comfort zone, and lend a helping hand. It’s a lesson that we can all take to heart and use as an example of EntreLeadership at its finest.

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Lessons From George Become a Great Servant Leader Today, more than 230 years later, his actions are still applicable. In fact, servant leadership is how Dave has built his company and is one of the guiding principles he teaches in EntreLeadership Master Series. So we thought we would honor our first president by sharing some of his values that you can put in place in your own business.

On a cold, dark winter morning, a soldier rode out of his encampment and noticed a group of his comrades desperately trying to put a log on the top of a wall they were building. Each time they attempted it, the beam fell. The men were exhausted and ready to give up. The only thing stopping them from throwing in the towel was a corporal who was barking orders. The soldier asked the noncommissioned officer why he didn’t lend a hand. “Don’t you see, I’m a corporal? ” he answered, not realizing who he was talking to. Without saying a word, the soldier dismounted and helped the infantrymen put the timber in place. He then told the men that if they needed any assistance again, just send for him—their commander and chief. Why would George Washington take time to help build a wall? Because the man who would become the father of our country knew that the war could not be won without the loyalty of his troops. Our country’s success depended on their success. And the way he accomplished this task was through servant leadership.

1. Have Fanatical Integrity Through his words and deeds, Washington proved over and over again that he would do the right thing and could be absolutely trusted. How to Do It: By doing your best each day, always telling the truth, and simply behaving as a stand-up person, you will build loyalty within your team. As Dave says, “Loyalty is born and a quality culture occurs when the EntreLeader follows through in a predictable, positive and proactive manner on every issue and opportunity.”

2. Be a Good Listener Part of being a servant leader is listening to those around you. Washington surrounded himself with people who were willing to tell him the truth instead of advisors who simply said what he wanted to hear. He was with his men whenever possible too, even staying with them during the miserable winter of 1777 at Valley Forge under very un-officer-like conditions.

office. Get to know them and their families, and ask their opinions to get the real answers. Find some mentors who can help lead you in the best direction.

Through his words and deeds, he proved over and over again that he would do the right thing and could be absolutely trusted. 3. Do Unto Others Washington spent as much time trying to feed, arm and clothe his soldiers as he did actually leading the troops into battle. He always put others first—including enemy prisoners whom he housed and fed. As a servant leader, he followed the Golden Rule. “Do to others as you would have them do to you.” How to Do It: Love your team well. When you would expect to be praised, praise. When you would expect a raise, give one. If you need some grace, give it. When you expect a reprimand, do it promptly and privately, because that is what you would want. By following Washington’s simple principles, you can inspire the same loyalty within your team, who will soon stand by your side and help you become more successful than you ever dreamed possible.

How to Do It: Spend time with the troops in the trenches instead of locking yourself away in your

Join Dave in Orlando for EntreLeadership Master Series on October 14–20. Learn more

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Playing Well With Others Understanding Your Team’s Personality Styles Decisiveness D’s Style: For these steamrollers, getting the job done is the most important thing. Never mind minor details or possible hurt feelings. As long as the end goal is achieved, they’re good. Why We Like Them: They’re our problem solvers and will keep the company moving along.

Interactive

In a perfect world, all of your team members instantly know the best way to work and communicate with each other. Everyone simply gets along. In the real workplace, though, not so much. Fortunately, you can build a winning team who like, respect and communicate with each other and their leaders by learning the four distinct behavioral styles used in the DISC personality assessment test. Dave covers the DISC test extensively at EntreLeadership Master Series and believes it is so important that everyone who goes through the interview process for his company is required to take the test. It gives insight into how people make decisions and what their tendencies are. As a tool, it helps Dave’s leaders understand if a candidate’s style fits with the job and the team they’ll join. The DISC breaks down personality into four categories. They are:

I’s Style: The people’s people, they are outgoing and the life of the party. They’re also expressive, impulsive and persuasive and can lose focus easily. Why We Like Them: They’re creative and fun to be around.

Stabilizing S’s Style: The ultimate team player, they’re unbelievably loyal, steady and concerned about how everyone feels. They’ll run from conflict and can sometimes be slow to make a decision. Why We Like Them: They’re patient, make great teachers or coaches and are devoted to the team and the company.

You can build a winning team who like, respect and communicate with each other and their leaders by learning the four distinct behavioral styles.

DISC is not a magical test that will guarantee success, and your team members never fit into just one personality category. Cautious C’s Style: The perfect job for a C? Anything with more rules than you can shake a bureaucrat at. They love them, as well as details and procedures. Why We Like Them: They have some of the highest quality-control interests of any of the styles. Keep in mind that DISC is not a magical test that will guarantee success, and your team members never fit into just one personality category. It is, however, a great indicator of a good fit for hiring or how to communicate with your team. If you are a high D, for example, don’t hire a high S as your assistant. She’ll freak out every day. Give a high C a system to set up, and that team member will be over the moon. Simply remember to treat the personalities accordingly, set up processes to reflect them, and you are on your way to creating a culture of communication and teamwork that breeds success.

Join Dave in Orlando for EntreLeadership Master Series on October 14–20. Learn more

13


Everything you ever wanted to know about

BUILDING AND GROWING A BUSINESS … but didn’t know to ask.

Join us in Orlando for

Walt Disney World Swan and Dolphin October 14–20, 2012 Learn more at EntreLeadership.com

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